review policy: jurisdictions and availability in specific countries

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Michiel B. de Jong

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Mar 14, 2013, 10:50:05 PM3/14/13
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related to the second point of the 'liability and indemnification'
review policy, since we're on the topic of review policies, i would like
to add a review policies for jurisdictions:

- it is OK for a service to choose jurisdiction in their place of
business, even if this means that the service will not be available to
certain users.

- it is also OK if a service is only available in certain countries
because of licensing restrictions (example: spotify), or where the
service is clearly marketed geographically. having said that, we want
services to be available to users as universally and equally as
possible.

- it is a plus point if a service has multiple jurisdictions to make it
more accessible to more people. example: facebook is available in Cuba
thanks to their second jurisdiction option in Ireland.

- also, it is a pluspoint if a service actively tries to be globally
available, even if this implies complying with government censorship
where strictly necessary, for instance Google (regrettably failed)
attempts to be available in China.

Ian McGowan

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Mar 15, 2013, 8:25:16 AM3/15/13
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All of these points seem reasonable to me. It seems logical that a business would choose a jurisdiction where the business is based. It would also be unfair to expect a business to be available worldwide knowing that there are tons of laws that they would have to be aware of and follow in order to exist in some places. This and multiple jurisdictions go hand-in-hand, I think. The good-faith attempt to be globally available by Google is also a good thing, and should be regarded as such with other services.

Hugo Roy

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Apr 30, 2013, 11:03:08 AM4/30/13
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Place of jurisdiction and availability in other countries are
completely different subjects. Some jurisdiction can be
problematic, in such cases, maybe we should single them out as
negatives. Otherwise just providing the information, neutrally,
about the place of jurisdiction seems enough to me.

Let's recall we're reviewing terms to give information to users
who need it. We're not writing a tourist guide to what we think
are the best and most nice services out there.

Best,

--
Hugo Roy, Project Lead
Terms of Service; Didn't Read | www.tosdr.org
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