Uranium News: July 9, 2009

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Steev Morgan

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Jul 10, 2009, 9:46:56 AM7/10/09
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URANIUM NEWS

JULY 9, 2009

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR THE ART OF BEING GREEN FESTIVAL

IN THIS ISSUE:

1) CCAMU LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS FOR THE ART OF BEING GREEN FESTIVAL
2) COMMUNITY URANIUM MEETING JULY 26TH
3) VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR CCAMU'S SUMMER 2009 WATERSHED AWARENESS PROJECT
4) THE ARDOCH 'PRAY FOR THE LAND EVENT' REPORT
5) LETTER WRITERS NEEDED!
6) OPEN LETTER TO ENERGY MINISTER GEORGE SMITHERMAN, MPP
7) DONNA DILLMAN IS RUNNER UP IN HOMETOWN HERO AWARD
8) EDITORIAL: NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH
9) WOLFE ERLICHMAN RESPONDS TO THE NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH
10) DONNA DILLMAN RESPONDS TO THE NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH
11) ARTICLE: UN FORM SEES CONSENSUS ON URANIUM TAILINGS
12) LETTER: DR. GORDON EDWARDS: CNSC PROTECTS INDUSTRY, MISINFORMS CANADIANS
13) ARTICLE: NUCLEAR POWER COULD COST TRILLIONS OVER RENEWABLES



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1) CCAMU LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS FOR THE ART OF BEING GREEN FESTIVAL

Volunteers Needed this weekend at the Art of Being Green,
in Middleville to help, please come to the booth
at the festival on Sat 10 a.m. - 5 pm. Or  Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

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2) COMMUNITY URANIUM MEETING JULY 26TH

Suzanne Lauten will be our guest speaker at this event. Susanne Lauten is a professional photographer and writer, recently retired.  For six months of the year, she calls her rustic island retreat in Haliburton County, her home.  Recently, she founded the network Cottagers against Uranium Mining and Exploration, CUME, and is working full time to protect all Ontarians from the dangers of uranium mining and exploration. She is spear heading the community-wide, anti-uranium protest rally to be held at Queen's Park, Sunday Sept. 27, 2009, 2:00-4:00pm.

To find out more about CUME check out the article "Don't sneer at local fears - the cause can be just" on The Star website this week.

July 08, 2009

By Jim Coyle

"It's been at the very least a little cheeky for Premier Dalton McGuinty and his deputy, over recent months, to dismiss those who would thwart their will as NIMBYists."

To read the rest of this article go to,

http://www.thestar.com/article/662520

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3) VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR CCAMU'S SUMMER 2009 WATERSHED AWARENESS PROJECT

The purpose of our proposed project is:

  1. to contact all the people living in the area that will be affected by the ongoing exploration and proposed mine and

  2. to involve them in the protection of their local environment.


The proposed mine will be located along the shoreline of Crotch Lake and near other waterways that feed the Mississippi River.  With WMAN/IEN funding, CCAMU’s Summer 2009 Watershed Awareness campaign will enable key volunteers, to create watershed communities along the Mississippi River by educating residents and provided them with printed material such as maps and other background information on proposed uranium mining in the watershed.  The printed material will describe the area that will be affected and how it will be impacted.  This being the first phase, we plan to focus on the community along one tributary of the Mississippi (Bolton Creek), developing and refining our approach in the process, with the goal of eventually encompassing the entire watershed.  Our volunteers will set up an association of shoreline neighbours along Bolton Creek who will be informed on the mining issue and will be able to respond to each issue as the process evolves.  We will also set up information booths and distribute printed materials at local fairs, farmers’ markets, and festivals (such as The Art of Being Green Festival) to inform residents along other Mississippi River tributaries of this initiative.

To get involved contact CCAMU at urani...@mail.ccamu.ca


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4) THE ARDOCH 'PRAY FOR THE LAND EVENT' REPORT

The Pray for the Land event was blessed with wonderful weather, and an abundant feeling of community and resilience. There were about 60-70 people, with an ebb and flow throughout the day, some coming earlier, some later, but the most at mid-day through the afternoon.  The day began with a sunrise ceremony and proceeded to deal with meeting with Ray Westgarth (very friendly and businesslike) and placing ourselves across the road from the sweat lodge which was set up on the road allowance to the left of the gate. People trickled in and very soon a considerable group of people were discussing, reminiscing and praying. There were two sweats throughout the course of the day, a group of Buddhists who sat and meditated, and a Muslim extended family who had their own prayer ceremony. Cathy Wills brought her teepee which was spread out for anyone interested to decorate in their own way with the fabric paints provided.  We also made tobacco ties and each person was invited to take one, to offer their prayers and well wishes, and to tie this offering on the fence or gate.  As we packed up and departed, the offerings remained.  The day was filled with the sharing of food donated by many generous hands, and the warm joys of community, the sharing of stories, and a strong sense of common purpose.  It was wonderful to see so many familiar faces, and many new ones. It was a wonderful day.

In solidarity,

Susan DeLisle

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5) LETTER WRITERS NEEDED!

Hey all you writers out there – we need you!

You’ve likely read by now that the province has put the new Darlington nuclear contracts on hold pending a bail out from the feds. Now the pressure is on Harper to save AECL.

We need to flood the papers with letters, comments and even op-eds congratulating the provincial gov’t for suspending new nuclear procurement, and describing the incredibly wide range of more attractive alternatives available to Ontario .

The province’s strategy of asking the federal government to pay for Ontario ’s nukes is no solution to nuclear’s prohibitive costs. Green energy is the answer, and the solution is to put our Green Energy Act to work by rolling out the green power and jobs.

Timing is of the essence. Usually, they print what people send same day, sometimes a day later, rarely 3 – 4 days later, so don’t delay! Also keep in mind, being concise is key. Focus your message. Just try for one clear idea per letter rather than trying to squeeze in several. Write for the masses. 100 words is best, 200 max.

At the same time, our message is a positive one – this is Ontario ’s golden opportunity to aggressively pursue a 100% renewable energy grid, as the nukes come to the end of their lives in the next 10-15 years. We congratulate Smitherman on his bold initiative to suspend procurement of new nukes based on cost – after all, what his constituents really want is lowest cost, reliable, truly green energy.

lette...@thestar.ca

let...@globeandmail.ca

http://www.nationalpost.com/contact/letters.html?name=Letters&subject=Letter+to+the+editor

torsun...@sunmedia.ca


Here are some articles that have been rolling off the press yesterday and today. They need to be responded to, both through comments online as well as letters to the editor. Go for it! And thank you!

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/energy-ontario-feels-the-price-isnt-right/article1201990/

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/ontario-suspends-nuclear-power-plans/article1200469/

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/aecls-future-in-doubt-as-ontario-suspends-nuclear-power-plans/article1200469/

http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/658223

http://www.thestar.com/News/Ontario/article/658118

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/reactor-design-puts-safety-into-question/article1200130/

http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/658528

http://www.thestar.com/Business/article/658573

http://www.northumberlandtoday.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=1635331

http://blogs.greenpeace.ca/2009/06/29/nuclear-bids-too-expensive-says-ontario/

http://www.torontosun.com/comment/editorial/2009/06/30/9977901-sun.html

http://www.nationalpost.com/news/canada/story.html?id=1745198

http://www.thestar.com/unassigned/article/658622

http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5i54H-bFYi2pUEA94ME0LrmqQlFsw

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2009/06/29/onatario-nuclear.html


Angela Bischoff
Campaign Manager
Ontario Clean Air Alliance
Tel: 416 926 1907 x 246
625 Church Street, #402
Toronto , ON M4Y 2G1
ang...@cleanairalliance.org
www.ontariosgreenfuture.ca
www.cleanairalliance.org


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6) OPEN LETTER TO ENERGY MINISTER GEORGE SMITHERMAN, MPP

June 30, 2009

Thank you Mr. Smitherman for your informed decision to put on hold, indefinitely, the building of new reactors in Ontario.  There are lots of reasons that this makes sense and I appreciate that you are taking that sober second look, especially in light of the recent spat of accidents, here and around the world.

A recent 15-country, 12-year, 407,391-person study of nuclear-power workers has found "the employees are twice as likely to die from all causes of cancer than the general public because of the extra radiation exposure." (30-page Exposure to Radiation and Health Outcomes, commissioned by the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, written by Saskatchewan-based health researcher, Mark Lemstra.)  Of particular note, the writers found that in Canada, reactor workers are, not twice, but 7.65 times "more likely to die from all causes of cancer compared to non-employees."  This is cause for major concern.

Further, and as you know, Canada's CANDU reactors release tritium - a radioactive form of hydrogen - into our drinking water.  Studies show that high levels of tritium exposure can cause health problems, including miscarriages, birth defects, permanent genetic damage and cancer.  In one of many such incidences over the decades, 28 trillion becquerels of radioactive tritium was recently released at the Chalk River nuclear facility into the Ottawa River, the source of Ottawa's drinking water.  Tritium contamination cannot be filtered out of the system.

In this regard, I suspect you would concur that my granddaughter's body is no different than that of a three-year-old in California or the European Union, yet she is expected to be able to absorb, "safely," the Canadian allowable limit of 7,000 becquerels per litre of tritium in her drinking water, compared to someone living in either CA or the EU, where the limits are 15 and 100, respectively.  Interestingly, nuclear technology used in CA and in the EU, does not require tritium, or it's release and therein lies the difference in allowable limits.

I'm sure that you would agree, too, that something is sadly wrong with a picture that exposes our babies and our nuclear workers to these increased risks and I implore you to go further and use your influence to bring our Canadian limits in line with other countries and to begin the process of nuclear phase out.

It is becoming more widely accepted that a mixed hydro and wind system could provide all the baseload power needed at much less cost with much more efficiency, and without the risks inherent to the uranium cycle, including where to store the accumulating spent fuel coming out of the nuclear option. Add major conservation efforts, and growing all around efficiency, solar and other (truly) green possibilities to the mix and we should be laying nuclear to rest for eternity, then figuring out what to do with the radioactive damage we have already wrought and will have to constrain well, well beyond our grandchildrens' lifetimes.

Blessings on your work to make their future liveable on this finite planet,

Donna Dillman

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7) DONNA DILLMAN IS RUNNER UP IN HOMETOWN HERO AWARD

The Earth Day Canada's Hometown Heroes Program recognizes environmental leaders who have fostered meaningful, long-term community awareness and action. For more information on the 2009 Hometown Heroes Award Program please visit www.earthday.ca/hometown.

“There are so many unsung environmental heroes working in their towns and cities across Canada every day to make their communities more resilient and hopeful,” says Benneian. “Earth Day Canada is performing an important service by acknowledging their contributions and providing a platform for their stories. Hopefully, they will inspire others to make a difference.”

Winner: Liz Benneian was been chosen as Canada’s 2009 Environmental Hometown Heroes Award winner. Liz, recognized at the 6th Annual Earth Day Canada Gala, received a cash-prize of $10 000; $5 000 to keep and $5 000 to donate to the environmental cause of their choice. Liz chose to give $5 000 of the cash award to the Oakvillegreen Conservation Association.

Runner Up: Donna Dillman: On October 8, 2007 Donna began what would become a 68 day hunger strike in support of a moratorium on the exploration and mining of uranium as well as a public inquiry. The community rallied in support.

To read more go to,  http://www.earthday.ca/hometown/winners.php

About Earth Day Canada

Earth Day Canada (EDC), a national environmental charity founded in 1990, provides Canadians with the practical knowledge and tools they need to lessen their impact on the environment. In 2004 it was recognized as the top environmental education organization in North America by the Washington-based North American Association for Environmental Education, the world’s largest association of environmental educators. In 2008 it was chosen as Canada’s “Outstanding Non-profit Organization” by the Canadian Network for Environmental Education and Communication. EDC regularly partners with thousands of organizations in all parts of Canada. www.earthday.ca


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8) EDITORIAL: NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH

TheStar.com

Jun 30, 2009 04:30 AM

"Nuclear power is not dead in Ontario. Rather, it has become a political tennis ball volleyed between two governments, Conservative Ottawa and Liberal Queen's Park.

Provincial Energy Minister George Smitherman made that clear yesterday in announcing the suspension of Ontario's pursuit of new reactors to replace its aging nuclear fleet. "The ball, in a certain sense, is in the court of the government of Canada," he said."

To read the rest of this editorial go to,

http://www.thestar.com/article/658528


------------------------


9) WOLFE ERLICHMAN RESPONDS TO THE NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH


I was very disappointed that a major newspaper like the Toronto Star would have such a shallow understanding of an issue which is central to our very existence on the planet. Your editorial made no mention of the evidence which is starting to come out about the possibility of genetic damage caused by the world-wide emission of radioactive materials into our air and water. No reference was made to the increased rates of cancer around nuclear power stations. Recently, it has come out that The International Atomic Energy Agency had to approve any announcements by the World Health Organization about the health effects of nuclear power and this hhas prevented the WHO from telling the truth about the health risks of radiation.

       It was disappointing that your writer parroted the simplistic propaganda put out by the nuclear lobby about the wind not blowing and the sun not shining. Even though the nuclear lobby and your writer is wrong about the viability of conservation and clean alternative energy, the more important fact is that we have to change the way we live if the human race is going to survive. Keeping nuclear power is an indication that we are going to maintain the status quo and keep on using up our mineral resources and our forests as if they are endless and not finite. The obscene amounts of money spent on nuclear power means that there is no money left over to implement conservation and clean energy alternatives. It is clear that whoever wrote the editorial has no idea how much nuclear power really costs all Canadians when he mentions the volatility of the price of natural gas. The most expensive natural gas would still be a lot cheaper than nuclear power when you consider that we subsidize AECL to the tune of $100's of millions of dollars and all the other ways that tax dollars subsidize nuclear energy.

       The loss of jobs if the nuclear industry is shut down is definitely a major concern. However, as shown with cigarettes and asbestos, jobs by themselves are not a good enough reason to maintain a deadly industry. Fortunately, in Ontario, we have at least $26 billion which we can switch from building nuclear to transitioning to a green economy and in particular to helping nuclear workers move to green jobs.

       Newspapers, like politicians, should have a vision and show intelligent leadership. As the editorial so clearly shows, the Star has neither a truly clean vision of the future or intelligent leadership when it comes to Ontario's energy future. Lets hope Energy Minister George Smitherman has that vision and will start us on a sustainable energy future today.

-Wolfe Erlichman


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10) DONNA DILLMAN RESPONDS TO THE NUCLEAR TENNIS MATCH


I'd have thought that the Toronto Star would have a more intelligent grasp of the nuclear issue.  Where was the info on recent studies showing genetic damage caused by radioactive materials in our air and water and increased cancer rates - nuclear employees are 7.65 times more likely to die from all causes of cancer compared to non-employees; information on a mixed hydro-wind system that could provide a baseload power 24/7 at much less cost with much more efficiency, and without the risks inherent to the uranium cycle, including where to store the accumulating spent fuel coming out of the nuclear option, and on the need to leave our children's children a legacy we can be proud of.

New jobs can be found, but an environment laid waste to material demand for ever increasing consumption needs to be reviewed, and soon.  Phasing out cost prohibitive, unsafe and unclean nuclear would be a very good beginning.

-Donna Dillman

---------------------------

11) ARTICLE: UN FORM SEES CONSENSUS ON URANIUM TAILINGS

June 30, 2009
World Nuclear News

"Delegates and representatives from Central Asian countries have agreed to work together to solve problems relating to radioactive and toxic waste left over from historic uranium mining at a United Nations-led forum."

To read the rest of this article go to,

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/WR-UN_forum_sees_consensus_on_uranium_mine_waste-3006098.html?jmid=17466&j=235772059&utm_source=JangoMail&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=WNN+Daily+30+June+2009+(235772059)&utm_content=uraniumnews%40mail.ccamu.ca

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12) LETTER: DR. GORDON EDWARDS: CNSC PROTECTS INDUSTRY, MISINFORMS CANADIANS

Submitted for publication in the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix

Letter to the Editor

July 2, 2009

CNSC Protects Industry, Misinforms Canadians

Judging by his letter [Saturday, June 27] the president of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) thinks that shielding the nuclear industry is more important than providing accurate information to the public and to Canada’s atomic workers.


The CNSC has a responsibility to protect the health and safety of Canadians.  It also has a specific legal obligation to “disseminate objective scientific information” about the nature of the risks associated with nuclear facilities.


Yet Mr. Binder grossly misrepresents the scientific findings of a 15-nation study of atomic workers by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), affiliated with the World Health Organization.


The IARC study found that chronic exposure of atomic workers to low-level radiation does cause a statistically significant increase in cancers.  Moreover, the results indicate that the risk factor is about 6 times higher than previously estimated, based on the survivors of the world war 2 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.


Even more important is the fact that Canadian atomic workers are at much higher risk (about three times higher) than the atomic workers from other countries.


Instead of communicating this important information, Mr. Binder denies that there is any increased risk at all due to radiation exposure.


He says that atomic workers are healthier than the average Canadian.  True,  but every health scientist knows about the fallacy of “the healthy worker effect”. Just because workers are healthier than average, that doesn’t mean that some of them may not be suffering from industrially-induced diseases, as the IARC study convincingly documents.


Mr. Binder also implies that there is no evidence of extra risk among the general population from living in the vicinity of nuclear facilities.  Yet a recent study commissioned by the German Government shows a statistically significant increase in leukemia among children under five years of age living within five kilometres of a nuclear reactor.  Contrary to Mr. Binder's remarks, the authors of the study did not "rule out" radiation as a cause; they simply said that current radiation risk estimates could not account for the large amount of excess leukemia.


Perhaps if it had some health professionals on staff and were not reporting to the Minister of Natural Resources, who champions nuclear power, the CNSC might evolve into a more responsible organization -- educating the public instead of keeping them in the dark.


Gordon Edwards, Ph.D., President,
Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility.

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13) ARTICLE: NUCLEAR POWER COULD COST TRILLIONS OVER RENEWABLES

By Brendan Borrell
Scientific American

June 19, 2009

"Nuclear power plants may not emit greenhouse gases, but they sure could suck in the tax dollars.

An analysis by economist Mark Cooper at the Vermont Law School claims that adding 100 new reactors to the U.S. power grid would cost taxpayers and customers between $1.9 and $4.1 trillion over the reactors' lifetimes compared with renewable power sources and conservation measures."

To read the rest of this article go to,

http://www.scientificamerican.com/blog/60-second-science/post.cfm?id=nuclear-power-could-cost-trillions-2009-06-19

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