more terms from carleton freenet lesbigay

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Hillary Russak

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Jan 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/5/96
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In article <4cjkpr$4...@acy1.digex.net>, ae...@freenet.carleton.ca
(Victoria Edwards) wrote:

> Pink Triangle Services, a local social services charity I volunteer
> with, came up with the following terms & working definitions. They
> aren`t copywritten, or written in stone but can come in handy.
> Comments.
>
<snip>
>
> Pink Triangle: originally, the identifying insignia worn by
> lesbians and gays in the Nazi death camps, similar to the yellow
> star of David worn by Jews.

hmm... I thought lesbians wore a black triangle and gay men wore a pink
one. I'd also add that the pink triangle was accepted as a reclaimed
symbol of gay and lesbian freedom, reminding us that our freedom is/was
hard-won.

If we're talking about symbols, I'd add the rainbow flag to the list for
those who may not be familiar with it as symbol gay men and lesbians use
to communicate our acceptance of diversity (which includes the diversity
of sexual orientation). This is the most widely-used symbol of gay
freedom and community.

-Hillary

Victoria Edwards

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Jan 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/5/96
to
Pink Triangle Services, a local social services charity I volunteer
with, came up with the following terms & working definitions. They
aren`t copywritten, or written in stone but can come in handy.
Comments.

bisexual: literally. both-sexual, someone who is equally
attracted to members of both sexes. True bisexuals often face
rejection by straight society and by gays and lesbians. (many
gays & lesbians have come to distrust the word since it is so
frequently claimed by people who want to experiment while keeping
one foot in socially respectable territory, and often retreat
there)

coming out: the act of disclosing one's lesbian or gay sexual
orientation. Can refer to a heady transition period of coming
out to many people. Even after such a period, it is a process
which continues throughout our lives as we come out selectively
to the people with whom we wish to share our lives.

dyke: often used broadly as a derogatory reference to a woman`s
non-conformity, regardless of her sexual orientation. This term
is sometimes reclaimed by lesbians, and de-intensified through
warm and humorous `internal` use.

gay/lesbian family: the network of important relationships that
provide familial support for lesbians and gays. These could
include lovers, close friends, past lovers, mentors and household
members. In times of crisis or serious decision, these
relationships are frequently more significant that those with
one`s family of origin (legal and blood relatives).

faggot (fag): dates from medieval witch burnings, when gay men
were thrown on the pyre as faggots (literally bundles of
kindling-sticks), Non-Christian spirituality and gender non-
conformity were treated as equal heresies. The term has survived
as a hateful put-down of gay men, or non-gender conforming men
regardless of sexual orientation. The hate word is sometimes
reclaimed by gay men, and de-intensified through
warm and humorous `internal` use.

gay: historically an internal code word to denote the underworld
of artists, intellectuals and street people who lived their
sexuality on the fringes of society, `in the gay life`. Because
it describes more than our sexual acts, and because it evolved
from our history and culture, it is the preferred descriptive
term. It has been used for men and women equally. More recently
it is used more often with reference to men, and lesbian with
reference to women.

gay/lesbian: differ from homosexual in that they denote self-
identification and identification with a minority culture that
provides reference points, a pool of common experience, support
and self-affirmation.

homophobia: irrational fear/hatred of gays and lesbians.
Like all prejudices, it is based on a set of myths and
stereotypes which it then offers to justify itself. Because
it is so rarely challenged structurally, it is destructive to
our lives both in term of societal and legal limitations and in
terms of violence against us. It is so pervasive that many gays &
lesbians internalize its message and de-value their ability to
contribute to the world.

homosexual: a term coined in the late 19th century (literally
same sexual). Its main use has been in psychiatry as a clinical
label for patients(male or female) with sexual attraction to
members of their own gender. See gay and lesbian

In the closet: a way of life that accompanies one's sexual
orientation. The complexity of this requires accepting and
managing a network of restrictions to avoid the sanctions imposed
against those identified as lesbian or gay. Sometimes used
derogatorily, with reference to the falsification and paranoia
associated with life in the closet. Can be used to describe parts
of one`s life, eg I`m out with friends and family but I`m still
in the closet at work.

Lesbian: historically, residents of the island of Lesbos, a
community of women in the 7th century BC. Preferred because it is
self-ascribed & describes more than our sex acts, but also
because it acknowledges our distinct history and draws on the
affirming imagery of a community of women.

Lesbian/gay positive: used to describe a person (often a helping
professional_ without reference to their sexual orientation,
whose framework affirms lesbian and gay identities and who
acknowledges that homophobia presents a structural obstacle to
the well-being of lesbian and gay people.

Lesbian/gay community: the shared set of values and institutions
that arise from the common experience of a group of lesbians and
gay men. Lesbian & gay communities may evolve distinctly or with
large degrees of overlap. Experiences differ with the setting and
thus the institutions may take different forms. For example, an
urban community may comprise a sophisticated complex of interest
groups, bars, bookstores, restaurants, theatres, sports clubs and
even churches whereas a rural community may be as rudimentary as
three isolated people in one county who meet once a month to
talk. What both these communities have in common is the shared
experience of the adversity of homophobia and the provision of
safe social space in which to grow.

lover: the most common term used by lesbians /gays to describe
their primary intimate partner. Without access to society`s rites
of passage which formalize straight relationships, this word
usually denotes to us a relationship of significant commitment or
duration. This contrasts with the word`s common meaning in
straight society where it refers to a secret sexual liaison
outside the primary relationship. Some variations are: partner,
significant other. Gay men sometimes use `husband`
euphamistically.



Pink Triangle: originally, the identifying insignia worn by
lesbians and gays in the Nazi death camps, similar to the yellow
star of David worn by Jews.

AIDS-Ralated Terms

PWA: person with AIDS PLWA person living with AIDS. Preferred
over `AIDS victim` which portrays the person as a passive object
in a process

HIV: Human Immunodeficiency Virus. The virus that is currently
presumed to be the cause of AIDS

HIV +: also referred to as seropositive, indicated that the
person`s blood shows evidence of the presence of antibodies to
HIV. It is assumed that the presence of antibodies indicated
infection with the virus. These people may not be sick with AIDS
but are awknowledged to be vulnerable to it, and can pass the
virus on.

ARC: AIDS Related Complex. Refers to the early stages of AIDS.
Commonly used in US journals and occasionally in Canadian ones.

AIDS Test: contrary to common usage, no such test exists. The
only test in common use is the HIV antibody test. Since the ratio
of people with AIDS to people with HIV in North America is about
5:100, confusing them has serious consequences, both for HIV
positives who are not sick with AIDS, and for public awareness.
At present, positive results are reportable in all provinces, and
so the descision to take the test must be carefully weighed
against considerations such as possible loss of insurance, job,
home, child custody and privacy.

High risk groups: it is preferable to speak of high risk
behaviours both because it is more accurate and because it makes
it clear that it is actions (which can be changed) and not
demographic traits (which cannot) that determines the risk. It is
how we have sex, not with whom we have it.


--
Daughter not of my labour, but of my labours
You are who we dreamed Vilik Raphaelle
WebPage: http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/freeport/sigs/life/gay/menu
HomePage: http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/freeport/sigs/life/gay/me/menu

Hillary Russak

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Jan 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/5/96
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In article <4ckbpt$o...@acy1.digex.net>, Caila <ma...@bronze.lcs.mit.edu> wrote:
<snip>
> I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
> a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a
> homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and
> what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?
> Where did they originate?
<snip>

Wow, I've been a lesbian in 3 major U.S. metropolitan areas for the past
14 years and I've never heard of this. My understanding was that the
freedom rings held the same significance as the rainbow flag.

> --Michelle (scared to venture too far into the lesbigay community to find
> this stuff out for herself, since she's engaged to a man and pregnant and
> afraid of rejection :( )

Curious closure, Michelle... you're afraid of rejection from the guy
you're marrying or from the "lesbigay community"?
-Hillary (who wishes you the courage to eventually feel safe enough to
venture into anything you want, despite the risk)

Caila

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Jan 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/5/96
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On 5 Jan 1996, Hillary Russak wrote:

[with regard to Victoria's list of definitions]


> If we're talking about symbols, I'd add the rainbow flag to the list for
> those who may not be familiar with it as symbol gay men and lesbians use
> to communicate our acceptance of diversity (which includes the diversity
> of sexual orientation). This is the most widely-used symbol of gay
> freedom and community.

Oh, goodie! Someone else brought it up, and now I can ask while feeling
I'm remaining relatively close to the topic :)

I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a
homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and
what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?
Where did they originate?

**DISCLAIMER: The following is NOT intended to spark religious
discussion. Attempts to read any significant meaning intended by the
author will result in prosecution. >:} **

An interesting coincidence: when I was in high school, my church promoted
something similar called 'power bands', beaded bracelets where each color
symbolized a significant part of a Christian's life. (For example, black
stood for sin, red stood for the blood of Christ, white for redemption...
I can't remember specifics.) The beads were held in place on a leather
cord that was knotted on either side, and the knots symbolized birth and
death. These bracelets were intended as a conversation piece, a way for
Christians to bring up the subject of salvation with others. They also
looked really cool. *grin* Were freedom rings intended to be used this
way, and if so, has it worked?

--Michelle (scared to venture too far into the lesbigay community to find
this stuff out for herself, since she's engaged to a man and pregnant and
afraid of rejection :( )

/ =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- \
| "I've been with thousands of men, | Redhead by birth... |
| Again and again - they sing the same tune: | Texan by the grace of God |
| They're always coming and going, and going | =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= |
| And coming... and always too soon!" | Michelle Chambers |
| | (Caila) |
| -- Madeline Kahn, _Blazing_Saddles_ | ma...@bronze.lcs.mit.edu |
\ -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= /

Cappy Harrison

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Jan 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/5/96
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In article <4cjkpr$4...@acy1.digex.net>, ae...@freenet.carleton.ca
(Victoria Edwards) wrote:

> Pink Triangle Services, a local social services charity I volunteer
> with, came up with the following terms & working definitions. They
> aren`t copywritten, or written in stone but can come in handy.
> Comments.
>
> bisexual: literally. both-sexual, someone who is equally
> attracted to members of both sexes.

ARRGH!! *rant* *rage*

*sigh*

Could you ask them to take the "equally" out of that sentence, please?

(I have no idea how I could measure my attractions to men and women, so
have no idea whether or not I am "equally" attracted to them. I am a
bisexual, nonetheless.)

> True bisexuals often face
> rejection by straight society and by gays and lesbians.

And the "True" out of THAT sentence?
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Cappy Harrison
khar...@sas.upenn.edu
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~kharriso/


just julia

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Jan 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/6/96
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Victoria Edwards (ae...@freenet.carleton.ca) wrote:
: Pink Triangle Services, a local social services charity I volunteer
: with, came up with the following terms & working definitions.

Good work, but...(always that darned but)

: bisexual: literally. both-sexual,

Pet Peeve alert: I hate it when people say "well, literally <blah> means
this so any other definition is wrong." Argh. Lots of things don't
make sense literally and meanings of words have changed. I mean,
homophobes do not literally have a phobia (in the full psychological
sense of the word) but that isn't relevant. Just because lesbians
don't live on the island of Lesbos doesn't mean they aren't lesbians.
Argh. I'm sorry, this happens to be a major peeve of mine.

: attracted to members of both sexes. True bisexuals often face


: rejection by straight society and by gays and lesbians.

So, you're only bi if you're rejected by everyone? <sob>

: (many


: gays & lesbians have come to distrust the word since it is so
: frequently claimed by people who want to experiment while keeping
: one foot in socially respectable territory, and often retreat
: there)

A little comment that bis hate biphobia et al would be nice.


My grumbling (and others grumbling) aside, a fine piece of work.

julia
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
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away." --Sarah Caudwell, _The Shortest Way to Hades_

just julia

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Jan 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/6/96
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More on freedom rings

I bought a pair 6 years ago and at that time they were marketed as
a rainbow flag (as in Jesse Jackson's rainbow coalition) with an
added bonus of including gays. They were not marketed as "I am gay,
see me roar."

Branwyan

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Jan 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/6/96
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On 5 Jan 1996, Caila wrote:
> I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
> a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a
> homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and
> what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?
> Where did they originate?
I've never heard the obstacle bit... but I heard some vague reference
once to them each symbolizing a different aspect of freedom (sexual,
political, speech etc...) I'm not sure if they symbolize anything
individually, but I take them to represent diversity. Under that
definition, I wear them, and am bi. Anyone know why there is only 6
colours (no indigo) and therefore not a complete rainbow?

> These bracelets were intended as a conversation piece, a way for
> Christians to bring up the subject of salvation with others. They also
> looked really cool. *grin*
> Were freedom rings intended to be used this
> way, and if so, has it worked?
>

I've heard them more prominantly called "pride rings" and worn to
symbolize being proud of being queer. (And to reinforce "outness") I
think that on some level, at least among my aquaintences, they help us to
recognize another queer and strengthen the community (however one may
define it). On another level, I think that they are a complete consumer
propagating device like the t-shirts, and the coffee mugs... and the key
chains... and the hats.... and the refrigerator magnets etc... and etc...
But I guess there's a consumer demographic for everyone right?

Branwyan,
who hopes she's helped without pissing anyone else off.


Caila

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Jan 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/6/96
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I wrote:
[...]
: I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
: a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a
: homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and
: what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?
: Where did they originate?
[...]

Hillary responded:


> Wow, I've been a lesbian in 3 major U.S. metropolitan areas for the past
> 14 years and I've never heard of this. My understanding was that the
> freedom rings held the same significance as the rainbow flag.

Forgive my naivete *blush* but what _does_ the rainbow flag mean,
exactly? (I saw a documentary on it a long time ago, but I didn't really
pay attention as at the time I still thought I was straight :) And of
course, my gay friend could just be _wrong_... stranger things have
happened :)

: --Michelle (scared to venture too far into the lesbigay community to find

: this stuff out for herself, since she's engaged to a man and pregnant and
: afraid of rejection :( )

> Curious closure, Michelle... you're afraid of rejection from the guy


> you're marrying or from the "lesbigay community"?

Whoops, thought I was clear -- my fiance is quite accepting of my
attraction to women, and has no problems with it. I just feel silly going
anywhere that is lesbigay oriented and expecting to be welcomed, since
I'm 7 months pregnant. (That's part of pregnancy too, though, I feel like
I should be doing motherly things and swear off things like masturbation
or visiting toy shops in the city.)

> -Hillary (who wishes you the courage to eventually feel safe enough to
> venture into anything you want, despite the risk)

*blush* Thanks, hopefully someday I will... I guess my whole problem is
people don't seem to understand that just because I'm planning a life
with a man does NOT mean I'm not attracted to women as well. (In fact,
I'm _more_ attracted to women, physically, it's just this one man that
I'm so attached to.) The other day, when I told a friend I was engaged,
he got perplexed and said he thought I was bisexual. I told him I am, and
he then misunderstood my fiance accepting my sexuality as my fiance and I
being 'swingers'(which we're not), and launched into a tirade about how
marriage should be monogamous and sacred... I didn't know how to make him
understand, and at the same time, I felt like a little girl who'd brought
home a bad report card. *sigh* It's been two years now, how long does
learning to live with your sexuality take??

Thanks for the encouragement (and for listening)...
--Michelle

Dark Phoenix

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Jan 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/7/96
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In article <4clidc$k...@acy1.digex.net>, Branwyan <en...@trentu.ca> wrote:

> On 5 Jan 1996, Caila wrote:

> > I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
> > a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a
> > homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and
> > what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?
> > Where did they originate?

> I've never heard the obstacle bit... but I heard some vague reference
> once to them each symbolizing a different aspect of freedom (sexual,
> political, speech etc...) I'm not sure if they symbolize anything
> individually, but I take them to represent diversity. Under that
> definition, I wear them, and am bi. Anyone know why there is only 6
> colours (no indigo) and therefore not a complete rainbow?
>

I read that the stripes in both the freedom rings and the rainbow flag
each stood for a different member of the GLBT community. I remember that
bisexuals were purple (one of my favourite colours, hurrah!), and the
other five were split up between gay men, lesbians, the trans- community,
and friends of the community and one other (or perhaps there was one for
transsexual and one for transgendered or something like that).

I remember seeing this in a store in the West Village, but I can't
remember the exact details. Does anyone else know about this?


-- Ali.

--
-=- Ali Lemer -=-=- a...@panix.com -=-=- http://www.panix.com/~ali -=-
"The Internet is not a toy." -- Gary Farber
boB Allisat, Usenet Kook: Coming to a Newsgroup Near You! Read on:
http://www.interlog.com/eye/Misc/Kooks/Allisat/allisat.htm


Sarah13389

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Jan 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/7/96
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In article <4cju1j$c...@acy1.digex.net>, khar...@sas.upenn.edu (Cappy
Harrison) writes:

>In article <4cjkpr$4...@acy1.digex.net>, ae...@freenet.carleton.ca
>(Victoria Edwards) wrote:
>
>> bisexual: literally. both-sexual, someone who is equally

>> attracted to members of both sexes.
>

>ARRGH!! *rant* *rage*
>
>*sigh*
>
>Could you ask them to take the "equally" out of that sentence, please?
>
>(I have no idea how I could measure my attractions to men and women, so
>have no idea whether or not I am "equally" attracted to them. I am a
>bisexual, nonetheless.)

I agree. Based on my personal experiences, I think a better definition
would be one who does not make gender a dominating issue in who they are
attracted to.

>> True bisexuals often face
>> rejection by straight society and by gays and lesbians.
>

>And the "True" out of THAT sentence?

If there are true bisexuals, what are false bisexuals.

Just my two cents. I still liked your post Victoria.

Sarah
sarah...@aol.com

January 6, 1996

Branwyan

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Jan 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/7/96
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On 7 Jan 1996, Dark Phoenix wrote:

> In article <4clidc$k...@acy1.digex.net>, Branwyan <en...@trentu.ca> wrote:
> > Anyone know why there is only 6
> > colours (no indigo) and therefore not a complete rainbow?
> >
>
>
>
> I read that the stripes in both the freedom rings and the rainbow flag
> each stood for a different member of the GLBT community. I remember that
> bisexuals were purple (one of my favourite colours, hurrah!),

> -- Ali.

/me woohoo!s cause she's found yet another reason to justify her purple use.

Branwyan,
the one pride, two spirited, flying purple people eater *grin*


Mrsmnch

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Jan 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/8/96
to

Anyone know the colors, and
: what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?

A group of us were just discussing this last night. Let me see...

Red=Lesbians
Orange=Trans
Yellow=AIDS
Green=Straight alies
Blue=Gay Men
Purple=Bisexuals

This was all explained to me by a BabyDyke friend at an impromptu coming
out gathering we had for her. Cant vouch for the source or the validity
of what she told me, but there it it!

--Ang

Laurel Halbany

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Jan 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/9/96
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Caila <ma...@bronze.lcs.mit.edu> wrote:

>Whoops, thought I was clear -- my fiance is quite accepting of my
>attraction to women, and has no problems with it. I just feel silly going
>anywhere that is lesbigay oriented and expecting to be welcomed, since
>I'm 7 months pregnant. (That's part of pregnancy too, though, I feel like
>I should be doing motherly things and swear off things like masturbation
>or visiting toy shops in the city.)

If you run into les/bi/gays who flip at the sight of a pregnant woman,
spurn them and go on. Lots of lesbians and bisexual women have kids!
You may have people asking you "fresh or frozen"? though. :*

When my daughter was born, you should have seen all my tough
leatherdyke friends go to pieces..... "She's soooo CUUUUTE!"

>*blush* Thanks, hopefully someday I will... I guess my whole problem is
>people don't seem to understand that just because I'm planning a life
>with a man does NOT mean I'm not attracted to women as well. (In fact,
>I'm _more_ attracted to women, physically, it's just this one man that
>I'm so attached to.) The other day, when I told a friend I was engaged,
>he got perplexed and said he thought I was bisexual. I told him I am, and
>he then misunderstood my fiance accepting my sexuality as my fiance and I
>being 'swingers'(which we're not), and launched into a tirade about how
>marriage should be monogamous and sacred... I didn't know how to make him
>understand, and at the same time, I felt like a little girl who'd brought
>home a bad report card. *sigh* It's been two years now, how long does
>learning to live with your sexuality take??

Don't tolerate this kind of crap from your "friends." First of all,
your marriage terms are none of his business, and feel free to tell
him so. (You don't tell HIM who he can and can't fuck, right?) Second,
he seems to misunderstand what 'bisexual' means. I find that the
eye-color metaphor is useful. i.e., if a person is attracted to folks
iwth blue eyes as well as folks with brown eyes, and she marries a
blue-eyed person, does that mean she never really found brown eyes
attractive? Of course not.

>Thanks for the encouragement (and for listening)...

Never apologize for the way you have chosen to live your life. Your
real friends will accept you, even if they don't agree with you.


Dark Phoenix

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Jan 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/10/96
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In article <4d0is2$1...@acy1.digex.net>, Caila <ma...@bronze.lcs.mit.edu> wrote:

> Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. Ali, you live in New York, maybe you can help me. I just
> moved here in the fall from Texas, and went to the Village (I thought)
> with a friend. It did seem a bit more queer, but I didn't notice any
> stores that were *specifically* glbt. Maybe you (or someone else who
> lives here) can recommend some? :)

I have a wonderful little reference pamphlet called GAY & LESBIAN NEW YORK
(A Map and Guide). It's printed by City & Company, 79 Fifth Avenue, NYC
10003 and retails for $5.95, although I picked it up for free at A
Different Light.

Reprinted here is a selection of stores and clubs/bars (mostly in the West
Village and Chelsea) that I thought might be of interest to people, as
well as a section of helpful phone numbers. My own comments are in
[brackets].

I looked for things that were specifically gay/lesbian (as opposed to
simply "alternative") and that were specifically women-oriented, as well
(e.g. no men's dance clubs).

Unfortunately, they don't have a terrific selection of lesbian bars and
clubs, but I don't have the addresses or numbers for the other places I
know. A very good reference to pick up is LGNY (Lesbian Gay New York), a
weekly paper sold at some newsstands and bookstores for $1.25. TIME OUT
NEW YORK also has a "gay/lesbian" section, so you can try looking there,
as well. If interest warrants it (i.e. people tell me they'd like me to),
I'll update it and re-post it periodically.

If you need more information on a specific place in NYC that you've heard
about, feel free to drop me a line at a...@panix.com and I'll see what I
can dig up.

-----------
SHOPS & BOOKS:

AMALGAMATED
19 & 20 Christopher Street (bet. Greenwich Ave. & Waverly Pl.)
691-8695 & 243-9270
Funky clothes and jewelry for both sexes.

DON'T PANIC
98 Christopher Street (Bleecker St.); 989-7888
T-shirts plus with a gay (GLBT) message. [This is a great store! You can
also reach them at (800) 45-PANIC and http://dont-panic.com for ordering.
They also have stores in San Francisco, London, and West Hollywood.]

GAY PLEASURES
546 Hudson St. (bet. Charles & Perry Sts.); 255-5756/645-0395
Video and art.

GREETINGS
45 Christopher St (bet. 6th and 7th Aves.); 242-0424
Gay card shop.

PLEASURE CHEST
156 7th Ave. South (bet. Charles & Perry Sts.); 242-2158
Sexy cards and erotic toys.

TRIANGLES & RAINBOWS
192 8th Ave. (bet. 19th and 20th Sts.); 627-2166
New, hot, gay card shop.

THE EROTIC BAKER
(phone orders only) 721-3217
Naughty shaped baked goods and chocolates.

EVE'S GARDEN
119 West 57th St., Suite 420 (bet. 6th and 7th Aves.); 757-8651
Erotic women's boutique.

JUDITH'S ROOM
681 Washington St. (bet. Charles & West 10th Sts.); 727-7330
Books by and about women.

OSCAR WILDE MEMORIAL BOOKSHOP
15 Christopher St. (Gay St.); 255-8097
Gay bookshop in the heart of the Village.

THREE LIVES & CO.
154 West 10th St. (bet. 7th Ave. & Waverly Pl.); 741-2069
Great bookstore with an accent on women.

A DIFFERENT LIGHT BOOKSTORE
151 West 19th St. (bet. 6th and 7th Aves.); 989-4850
Gay books with readings and signing by all the top gay writers.
[Open 7 days 10 am to midnight; mail order catalog (800) 343-4002. They
also have events every week -- free movies, music performancs, book
signings, lectures, etc. A great store.]

VERSO BOOKS
128 Eighth Ave. (bet. 16th and 17th Sts.); 620-3141
New gay bookstore.

---------------

LESBIAN BARS & CLUBS:

CRAZY NANNY'S
21 Seventh Ave. (Leroy St.); 366-6312
Glamour dyke video bar with dancing on two floors.

D.T. FAT CAT
281 West 12th St. (West 4th St.); 243-9041
Comfy spot popular with the locals.

HENRIETTA HUDSON
438 Hudson St. (Morton St.); 924-3347
Happening cruise bar with great jukebox [and pooltable].

CLIT CLUB
432 West 14th St. (bet. 9th and 10th Aves.); 366-5680
Hot music, hot dykes, and go-go girls dancing the night away.

---------------

Gay and Lesbian Network -- Helpful Telephone Numbers
(all numbers 212 unless noted otherwise)

ACT UP/NY: 564-2437
AIDS HOTLINE: (800) 342-AIDS
ALTERNATIVE T.V.: 677-8494
ANTI-VIOLENCE PROJECT (AVP): 807-0197
COMMUNITY HEALTH PROJECT (CHP): 675-3559
EMPIRE STATE PRIDE AGENDA: 673-5417 (New York State gay and lesbian lobby group)
GAY CABLE NETWORK (GCN): 727-8850
GAY ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION (GET): 255-8824
GAY AND LESBIAN ALLIANCE AGAINST DEFAMATION (GLAAD): 807-1700
GAY & LESBIAN SWITCHBOARD OF NY: 777-1800 (Call for everything and anything.)
GAY & LESBIAN VISITORS CENTER OF NY: 463-9030
GAY MEN'S HEALTH CRISIS (GMHC): 807-6664
HERITAGE OF PRIDE (HOP): 807-7433 (Organizers of annual Gay Pride Parade and
Gay Street Festival)
HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN FUND: (202) 628-4160 (National gay/lesbian lobby group)
HX HAPPENING LINE: 593-HXHX/4949 (The latest info on gay and lesbian parties
and events)
INTERNATIONAL LESBIAN AND GAY ASSOCIATION (ILGA): 620-7310
LAMBDA LEGAL DEFENSE AND EDUCATION FUND: 995-8585
LESBIAN AIDS PROJECT: 337-3532
LESBIAN & GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES CENTER (THE COMMUNITY CENTER): 620-7310
(Resource center; a wealth of information)
NATIONAL GAY AND LESBIAN TASK FORCE (NGLTF): (202) 332-6483
QUEER NATION/NY: 260-6156
SAINT-AT-LARGE: 674-8541 (Gay men's dance party promoters)
SAGE: 741-2247
SHESCAPE: 645-6479 (Women's dance party promoters)
STONEWALL 25 NYC COMMITTEE: 439-1031 (March and rally organizers)

Anne Kaelber

unread,
Jan 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/10/96
to

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Branwyan <en...@trentu.ca> wrote:
>On 5 Jan 1996, Caila wrote:
>> I've wondered for a while about the meaning of freedom rings. I'm told by
>> a gay friend that each color symbolizes an obstacle in the life of a

>> homosexual, but he wasn't sure of specifics. Anyone know the colors, and

>> what each means? Do they apply to lesbians, bis, and tg folk as well?

>> Where did they originate?
>I've never heard the obstacle bit... but I heard some vague reference
>once to them each symbolizing a different aspect of freedom (sexual,
>political, speech etc...) I'm not sure if they symbolize anything
>individually, but I take them to represent diversity. Under that

>definition, I wear them, and am bi. Anyone know why there is only 6

>colours (no indigo) and therefore not a complete rainbow?

Let me try to post again. (The first time didn't work.):
Check out the Rainbow Icon Archive at http://users.aimnet.com/~jase/ria/

It gets a lot of traffice and the server is usually too busy, so I'll
summarize:

The flag originally had 8 stripes. When they went to produce it, they
were unable to get the pink and turquoise colors. So they dropped them
and changed the indigo to blue.

There is an alternate pride flag that has a black stripe added on the
bottom, according to Jase at the Rainbow Icon Archive. The black stripe
represents all the people that have died from AIDS. The idea has been
presented that the black stripes should be removed and sent to
Washington to be burned when a cure for HIV/AIDs (not sure which) has
been found.

Anne.

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--
Anne Kaelber | My family coat of arms
625 McGuffey Ave. #290 |
Oxford, Ohio 45056 | ties at the back...
kael...@muohio.edu |
http://miavx1.muohio.edu/~sakaelber | ...is that normal?








---------------------------------194272374318884--

a.k.a. witzz

unread,
Jan 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/10/96
to
Caila <ma...@bronze.lcs.mit.edu> wrote:

>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. Ali, you live in New York, maybe you can help me. I just
>moved here in the fall from Texas, and went to the Village (I thought)
>with a friend. It did seem a bit more queer, but I didn't notice any
>stores that were *specifically* glbt. Maybe you (or someone else who
>lives here) can recommend some? :)

Gotta know where you're going, I guess. If you're looking for the
sex/SM variety, try the Pleasure Chest on 7th ave. between, I think,
Charles and Waverly (just north of Christopher St.) or the Leatherman
(a bit scary IMHO but has good stuff) on Christopher west of 7th Ave.
They're more gay-male seeming on the surface but they've got girls'
toys, too.

For books, check out A Different Light on 19th St. between 7th and
8th. For cards, magnets, etc. go to Dave's card shop on 7th Ave.
between 17th and 18th. There used to be a wimmin's bookstore but it
closed due to lack of funds (sniff).

And for cool and wacky t-shirts, go to Don't Panic! on, I think it's
on Christopher west of 7th.

That should give you a start anyway. Then there are all the pottery,
craft, etc. shops that aren't specifically gay but have lots of gay
clientele...

I find that lesbians are harder to find in large numbers than gay men,
who are everywhere in the Village and Chelsea. As in other places,
we're everywhere and nowhere. For dykes galore, head for Park Slope in
Brooklyn, where there also should be some more stores. At least, a pet
shop!

-Carol

Caila

unread,
Jan 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/10/96
to
On 7 Jan 1996, Dark Phoenix wrote:

[snipped lots of stuff about meaning of freedom rings]


> I remember seeing this in a store in the West Village, but I can't
> remember the exact details. Does anyone else know about this?
>
>
> -- Ali.

Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. Ali, you live in New York, maybe you can help me. I just

moved here in the fall from Texas, and went to the Village (I thought)
with a friend. It did seem a bit more queer, but I didn't notice any
stores that were *specifically* glbt. Maybe you (or someone else who
lives here) can recommend some? :)

Not that I'll be going into the city for some time _anyway_, between four
feet of snow and my seven-month belly (walking? *blech!*), but a list
would be handy to have around for when I _am_ up and about :)

--Michelle (just a southerner lost in the Big Apple :)

a.k.a. witzz

unread,
Jan 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/11/96
to

>JUDITH'S ROOM
>681 Washington St. (bet. Charles & West 10th Sts.); 727-7330
>Books by and about women.

Unfortunately, Judith's Room closed.

-Carol


YYosh

unread,
Jan 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/11/96
to
Looks like Dark Phoenix & CarolM came up with a lot of stores/bars/etc.,
but here are a few more ideas:

Ruby Fruit Bar & Grill (531 Hudson) is a relatively new bar/restaurant in
the West Village.

Orbit (46 Bedford) - used to be a gay bar - currently a restaurant with
mainly gay/lesbian customers.

Manatu's (340 Bleeker) - Diner - Great weekend brunches!

You should try the Gay & Lesbian Community Center on 13th St. (Just west
of 7th avenue). They have a lot of events daily including dances, support
groups, movies, etc. Pick up a calendar the next time you're in town.
They also have periodic orientations featuring many gay, lesbian & bi
organizations in the NY City area.

Note: DT's Fat Cat is currently the Cubby Hole (The old Cubby Hole is
currently Henrietta Hudson) - pretty confusing, eh?
Also, the Clit Club is open on Friday nights only.

zoe

unread,
Jan 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/12/96
to
..just lurking occasionally here, and decided to comment on what the
colors mean (at least from a different souce) re: Chakras (aka spinning
wheels of energy that are part of the "subtle" body)..forgive me in
advance if I'm being redundant to what has already been said, or if I am
not following proper nettiquette.....as I said I just mosey along and
visit here once in a while...thanks.

[snip]
>: Red=Lesbians


>: Orange=Trans
>: Yellow=AIDS
>: Green=Straight alies
>: Blue=Gay Men
>: Purple=Bisexuals

[snip]
>I've seen a list about various qualities and strengths which each color
>is suppoed to embody -

[snip some more]

Red is the "base" Chakra
Orange is the pelvic region
Yellow is the solar plexus
Green is the heart
Blue is the throat
Indigo is the "third eye"
..and
Violet is the "crown" Chakra

(and also the "crown chakra is considered "spirit" etc. and
it is often represented by a clear quartz crystal...so, when
you mix all the colors (in light form vs. another medium) you get
the "enlightened" crown chakra)


peace, ..zoe

LA Meisel

unread,
Jan 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/12/96
to
In article <4d0ttq$b...@acy1.digex.net>, car...@delphi.com (a.k.a. witzz)
writes:

>
>>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm. Ali, you live in New York, maybe you can help me. I just
>>moved here in the fall from Texas, and went to the Village (I thought)
>>with a friend. It did seem a bit more queer, but I didn't notice any
>>stores that were *specifically* glbt. Maybe you (or someone else who
>>lives here) can recommend some? :)
>

>


>I find that lesbians are harder to find in large numbers than gay men,
>who are everywhere in the Village and Chelsea. As in other places,
>we're everywhere and nowhere. For dykes galore, head for Park Slope in
>Brooklyn, where there also should be some more stores. At least, a pet
>shop!
>

As a Dyke living in "Dyke Slope", I felt the need to add my two bits...

Womyn here are everywhere and yet no where. We are visible at the fruit
markets, the D'agostinos, the Japanese restaurant, and everywhere else.
However, as far as a meeting place for us womyn there really isn't one in
the Slope. Unfortunately, we just lost out gay owned book store, " A Room
of Our Own" at the corner of 7th Avenue and 9th Street. As you stroll
along 7th Avenue there are many gay and lesbian owned businesses.

There is a popular social group based in Brooklyn, but far from exclusive,
known as "SAL" or "Social Activiities for Lesbians." The phone number is
(718) 630-9505. You may call that number and request a complimentary
calendar of events.

LA

SDMcNeal

unread,
Jan 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/12/96
to
In article <4d44of$8...@acy1.digex.net>, yy...@aol.com (YYosh) writes:

>Subject:Re: The Village? (was Re: more terms from carleton freenet
lesbigay)
>From: yy...@aol.com (YYosh)
>Date: 11 Jan 1996 17:59:27 -0500

When I was in New York for a summer my favorite restaurant was Cowgirls'
Hall of Fame on Hudson about 2 or 3 blocks off of Christopher Street.
They have the best margaritas in the Village and a great atmosphere. A
great place for a date.

Dark Phoenix

unread,
Jan 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/13/96
to
In article <4d3q0j$r...@acy1.digex.net>, car...@delphi.com (a.k.a. witzz) wrote:

> >JUDITH'S ROOM
> >681 Washington St. (bet. Charles & West 10th Sts.); 727-7330
> >Books by and about women.
>

> Unfortunately, Judith's Room closed.
>


As did VERSO BOOKS, just last week, I was shocked to discover tonight.

Thanks for the info.


-- Ali.

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