[marines] Digest (09/16 13:27) Special Issue (#1998-10)

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Special Issue (#1998-10) - Topics This Issue:

1) BONNIE BRINGS BREEZE TO BEACHES
2) MARINES GIVE AID TO LOCAL RESIDENTS
3) BUILD IT THEY WILL COME
4) AIRFRAMES KEEP THINGS RUNNING SMOOTHLY
5) FLEEING FROM HARM'S WAY
6) BLOODTHRISTY INSECTS ARE NO JOKE
7) NATURE'S CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
8) AIR STATION MARINES MAKE HYDRATION PROCESS EASY

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==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 11:42:18 -0700
Subject: BONNIE BRINGS BREEZE TO BEACHES

BONNIE BRINGS BREEZE TO BEACHES


By LCpl. John J. Watts Jr.

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 31) --
Thank goodness it's over. Hurricane Bonnie slowly strolled over the
Air Station and the rest of the East Coast last week leaving behind
a few unlucky trees and minimal water damage but proved to be
more merciful than Hurricane Fran, two years ago.
Joseph Jackson, Air Station resident, said his power went down for
nearly 30 hours in the staff housing area. "I lost most the food in the
refridgerator, but my house was not damaged," said Jackson. The hurricane
made landfall at Cape Fear Wednesday south of Wilmington. Bonnie drifted
north-northeast at about 5 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center
in Miami. The drifting continued on the same track for another 24 hours,
amplifying the flood threat. Hurricane Bonnie?s winds slowed to 85 miles
an hour as the storm drifted slowly here Thursday while rains continued to
soak and flood a wide area. Floods cut new inlets in at least two barrier
islands and tornadoes were spawned inland, officials said. Damage reports
were sketchy, but appeared to be less than from Hurricane Fran. The
storm's rain and high winds flooded roads and toppled trees and power
lines across North Carolina, sending utility crews scrambling to make
repairs. Power company officials estimated it would take days to
completely restore service for all. The Air Station marina was not damaged
even though the water rose well above normal. "We lost a few trees, but
the boat owners anchored their boats in the river and had no losses," said
Ron Harris, marina manager. Most hangers at the Air Station suffered
minimal water damage, with the normal leaks that occur during periods of
heavy rain, but hanger 4106, home of Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron-29
(MALS-29) suffered heavy water damage. "Contractors just completed repairs
earlier this year to our roof which was severly damaged by Hurricane Fran.
Bonnie took us back to the beginning," said Gunnery Sgt. Jerry Widner,
MALS-29 S-4 chief. "We had four inches of standing water in office spaces
and all most every picture on the wall was destroyed. Bonnie dislodged one
of our ventilation units from the roof and destroyed nearly every one of
our ceiling tiles," said Widner. Bonnie was downgraded from a hurricane to
a tropical storm Thursday morning as it spent much of its fury over North
Carolina. But as it fed on the warm waters of the Atlantic, its sustained
winds increased to 75 mph, and the National Weather Service redesignated
it as a hurricane at 11 p.m. Thursday. Sgt. Stephen T. Lewis, weather
forecaster for the Air Station weather service, said the storm was
unpredictable. "Meteorology is an evolving science. We take all the
information we receive from the National Weather Service, radar,
satellites, charts, graphs and add that to our own experiences and what
we've learned and come up with a somewhat accurate picture of what's going
on out there. Any number of small variables could cause a change though,"
Lewis said. Air Station Weather works 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
During Hurricane Bonnie, they had two forecasters, four observers and one
weather officer on deck to monitor the storm and the phones. "The phones
ring off the hook during a storm," Lewis said. "We don't offer a recorded
message anymore but in its place is our web site
(http://www.weather.clb.usmc.mil) which offers the same amount of
information we can over the phone anyway." Lewis also encourages people
interested in obtaining current weather conditions to call 451-1717 Camp
Lejeune's information line which offers the equivalent of what the Air
Station weather service can provide for callers. According to Lewis, the
highest recorded gust of wind on the Air Station was 71 mph. The Air
Station received 11.55 inches of rain from Hurricane Bonnie. The Air
Station weather service's main mission is to brief pilots and squadron
commanding officers on current weather conditions for flying and is not
available for civilian consultation. "Most of the time the weather you see
on the television is as good as the information we have here," Lewis said.
"We take all of the information in to account and simply let everyone
concerned know if it's good enough to go up there."
-30-


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 11:44:26 -0700
Subject: MARINES GIVE AID TO LOCAL RESIDENTS

MARINES GIVE AID TO LOCAL RESIDENTS


By Cpl. Brandon Rizzo

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 31) --
Amidst the chaos that mother nature thrust upon the residents of the
area with hurricane Bonnie late Wednesday night and Thursday lied
the helping hand of Marine Wing Support Squadron-272
(MWSS-272).
Marines from the squadron's bulk fuel and motor transport units
volunteered their time and efforts to help the residents and families
aboard the Air Station by working in the Station chow hall and refueling
generators aboard New River, Camp Geiger and Stone Bay, in order to
maintain the proper power supplies necessary to facilitate the shelters
and medical units. MWSS-272's bulk fuel unit dispatched two teams, each
comprised of a driver and a mobile refueler, to service over 40 generator
sites. The teams braved the wrath of Bonnie and headed into the brunt of
the storm to complete their tasks. In order to prepare for the storm, the
teams surveyed the sites the day base housing areas were evacuated in
order to locate the generators and make sure that any maintenance needed
was immediately attended to. The main generators were located at the
firehouses aboard Camp Geiger, the Medical and Dental Clinics aboard New
River and Camp Geiger, and of course the shelters which were located at
the New River Enlisted Club, the old gym here, and at the Stone Bay gym.
"This was a good opportunity to use our training and help out the families
and residents who were in the shelters," said Sgt. Steven R. McNeill,
assistant refuelers chief for '272. "It's good to know that what you're
doing is helping out the people here," said LCpl. Danny D. Fields. "It was
also a chance for us to put to use what we've learned during our
training." The fuelers weren't the only heroes of the hurricane reliefs
teams, though. Eight Marines from MWSS-272's motor transport section
admirably volunteered their time and efforts as well, the day after the
storm , to relieve residents and Marines from the bland nourishment of the
Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) that were being served at the shelters. With
only one hour's notice, the volunteers cleaned the Station chow hall,
prepped the food, and served the hungry residents and devil dogs meals of
hamburgers, hot dogs, pinto beans, cold-cut sandwiches and chili. "We had
a short time to prepare for it, but over all the relief effort went well,"
said LCpl. Michael S. Wolfe, motor transport mechanic, MWSS-272. "We did
it to help people out, and that?s what we accomplished."
-30-


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 11:44:26 -0700
Subject: BUILD IT THEY WILL COME

BUILD IT THEY WILL COME


By Sgt. Jeremy Heltsley

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 5) --
Marine Wing Support Squadrons (MWSS) are renowned for their
ability to go anywhere at a moment's notice to provide support for
their aviation counterparts. The "Untouchables" of MWSS-272
recently demonstrated how vital, self-sufficient and expedient
support squadrons are when the squadron set up temporary
residence at Tactical Landing Zone (TLZ) Blue Bird aboard Camp
Lejeune earlier this month to reconstruct an aging expeditionary
airfield (EAF).
According to Gunnery Sgt. John C. Jefferson, MWSS-272 EAF
officer-in-charge, given the nature of the operation and the work that had
to be done, this was one of the quickest and most successful airfield
construction operations he has witnessed. "We had to take up the existing
EAF because the shoulders surrounding it have eroded in the past few
years, causing a hazard to landing aircraft," Jefferson said. "Once all
the mats were taken up, our engineers and heavy equipment (HE) sections
built new dirt shoulders, and then a new airfield was constructed." TLZ
Blue Bird is a vertical/short takeoff and landing (VSTOL) site used by
helicopter and AV-8 pilots for combat mission training, but larger EAFs
can be built to support other fixed-wing aircraft. Blue Bird is composed
of hundreds of interlocking aluminum mats found in two sizes. Twelve foot
mats weigh 144 pounds and the six foot mats weigh 72 pounds. All are
either placed or removed from their position manually. After the old mats
were removed they were sent to Chetham Annex in Virginia, where they will
be repaired and resurfaced for future use. The new mats were sent from
Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort in South Carolina. Blue Bird's runway is
more than 1,500 feet long and 72 feet wide. It has two taxiways, one 350
feet in length and the other 235 feet. A 96 by 96 foot vertical takeoff
and landing pad is also a part of the landing zone's total surface area of
161,568 square feet. "The entire surface area was reworked about five
years ago and is still in relatively good shape," Jefferson said. "Only
certain spots that laid under the old mats needed to be repaired for
certification." Stationary EAFs undergo an annual certification to deem
them safe for aircraft operations. Every Marine Aircraft Wing (MAW) has
contracted civilian employees who conduct the certifications, however,
during times of war their presence is not required. During times of war
and conflict, EAFs are only constructed if there are no existing airfields
or unobstructed roads to land on in the area. Then, once the battle field
advances, an EAF will be moved along with it. Jefferson said EAFs can be
constructed in a combat zone in as little as two to three days. The
Untouchables constructed their entire base camp, relocated necessary
equipment from New River to the TLZ, assessed work requirements, and
started disassembling the runway on the first day at the site. The
squadron's base camp was spread throughout a wooded area adjacent to the
TLZ and consisted of a small number of the all-to-familiar general purpose
tents covered with camouflage netting which made it virtually invisible to
an untrained eye. A valuable asset for allowing the squadron to be
self-sufficient is MWSS-272's utilities section. Using specialized
equipment, the section has the ability to produce potable water from sea
water. During this recent operation, utilities Marines pumped out 600
gallons of potable water per hour. The water was used for drinking,
cooking and showers. All water was tested before use. By constructing a
field mess, three days after the camp was set up the squadron?s food
service Marines were serving cooked meals for breakfast and dinner. The
weather played a big part in the timeliness of the operation, according to
Capt. Patrick McGee, MWSS-272 operations officer. "The rain held off
during the most crucial periods of work, being the ground work and
airfield construction. A little rain would have been nice at certain times
to cool things off and to keep the dust down," he said. No major injuries
occurred during the operation, according to HM1 Alphonso Whitt, squadron
corpsman. Victims of mosquitoe and chigger bites received most of the
medical attention, outside the normal nicks, cuts and bruises. The
estimated time taken to complete the operation was four weeks. The
Untouchables completed the task in a mere two weeks. "The troops deserve
every bit of the credit for another successful operation," said Lt. Col.
Danny Brush, MWSS-272 commanding officer. "They came out here and broke
their backs to meet the needs of the Corps."
-30-


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 11:44:26 -0700
Subject: AIRFRAMES KEEP THINGS RUNNING SMOOTHLY

AIRFRAMES KEEP THINGS RUNNING SMOOTHLY


By LCpl. John J. Watts Jr.

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 31) --
Thank goodness it's over. Hurricane Bonnie slowly strolled over the
Air Station and the rest of the East Coast last week leaving behind
a few unlucky trees and minimal water damage but proved to be
more merciful than Hurricane Fran, two years ago.
Joseph Jackson, Air Station resident, said his power went down for
nearly 30 hours in the staff housing area. "I lost most the food in the
refridgerator, but my house was not damaged," said Jackson. The hurricane
made landfall at Cape Fear Wednesday south of Wilmington. Bonnie drifted
north-northeast at about 5 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center
in Miami. The drifting continued on the same track for another 24 hours,
amplifying the flood threat. Hurricane Bonnie?s winds slowed to 85 miles
an hour as the storm drifted slowly here Thursday while rains continued to
soak and flood a wide area. Floods cut new inlets in at least two barrier
islands and tornadoes were spawned inland, officials said. Damage reports
were sketchy, but appeared to be less than from Hurricane Fran. The
storm's rain and high winds flooded roads and toppled trees and power
lines across North Carolina, sending utility crews scrambling to make
repairs. Power company officials estimated it would take days to
completely restore service for all. The Air Station marina was not damaged
even though the water rose well above normal. "We lost a few trees, but
the boat owners anchored their boats in the river and had no losses," said
Ron Harris, marina manager. Most hangers at the Air Station suffered
minimal water damage, with the normal leaks that occur during periods of
heavy rain, but hanger 4106, home of Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron-29
(MALS-29) suffered heavy water damage. "Contractors just completed repairs
earlier this year to our roof which was severly damaged by Hurricane Fran.
Bonnie took us back to the beginning," said Gunnery Sgt. Jerry Widner,
MALS-29 S-4 chief. "We had four inches of standing water in office spaces
and all most every picture on the wall was destroyed. Bonnie dislodged one
of our ventilation units from the roof and destroyed nearly every one of
our ceiling tiles," said Widner. Bonnie was downgraded from a hurricane to
a tropical storm Thursday morning as it spent much of its fury over North
Carolina. But as it fed on the warm waters of the Atlantic, its sustained
winds increased to 75 mph, and the National Weather Service redesignated
it as a hurricane at 11 p.m. Thursday. Sgt. Stephen T. Lewis, weather
forecaster for the Air Station weather service, said the storm was
unpredictable. "Meteorology is an evolving science. We take all the
information we receive from the National Weather Service, radar,
satellites, charts, graphs and add that to our own experiences and what
we've learned and come up with a somewhat accurate picture of what's going
on out there. Any number of small variables could cause a change though,"
Lewis said. Air Station Weather works 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
During Hurricane Bonnie, they had two forecasters, four observers and one
weather officer on deck to monitor the storm and the phones. "The phones
ring off the hook during a storm," Lewis said. "We don't offer a recorded
message anymore but in its place is our web site
(http://www.weather.clb.usmc.mil) which offers the same amount of
information we can over the phone anyway." Lewis also encourages people
interested in obtaining current weather conditions to call 451-1717 Camp
Lejeune's information line which offers the equivalent of what the Air
Station weather service can provide for callers. According to Lewis, the
highest recorded gust of wind on the Air Station was 71 mph. The Air
Station received 11.55 inches of rain from Hurricane Bonnie. The Air
Station weather service's main mission is to brief pilots and squadron
commanding officers on current weather conditions for flying and is not
available for civilian consultation. "Most of the time the weather you see
on the television is as good as the information we have here," Lewis said.
"We take all of the information in to account and simply let everyone
concerned know if it's good enough to go up there."
-30-


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 13:27:00 -0700
Subject: FLEEING FROM HARM'S WAY

FLEEING FROM HARM'S WAY


By Sgt. Jeremy Heltsley

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 31) --
Everyone is aware of a hurricane's destructive power, and with that
in mind, New River flight squadron's make the necessary
preparations to protect their most valuable assets: their aircraft.
Personnel can fold and squeeze all of a squadron's aircraft into
hangars to protect them from destructive winds, however, hurricane
Fran in 1996 proved that hangers aren't always guaranteed
protection. So the best protection offered to aircraft is to leave the
endangered area. Several New River squadrons flew their helicopters to
prearranged locations in nearby states to take them out of harm's way, and
according to Lt. Col. Terry Moore, Marine Aircraft Group-29 (MAG-29)
executive officer, it is a tactic that pays off. "We have to take the
aircraft and put them somewhere safe. We don't have that many, so we have
to protect them any way possible," Moore said. "So, even if the hangers do
so happen to get damaged, the helicopters won't." When the Air Station
reaches destructive weather condition two status, meaning destructive
weather is likely within 24 hours, New River squadrons are directed by the
Second Marine Aircraft Wing (2nd MAW) to either evacuate or hangar all
aircraft, dictated by the size of the storm. A category three hurricane,
like Bonnie, calls for evacuating the aircraft to safe locations. "The
hangars can only sustain so much wind, and because they have such high
walls, they are prone to catch wind easily," said Moore. "When they are
damaged the contents can easily be damaged as well. This is why everyone
needs to understand that when their family members are asked to evacuate
the aircraft, their sacrifice is of absolute importance." Approximately
200 New River servicemembers evacuated the afternoon of August 25 to avoid
hurricane Bonnie, leaving behind their families and friends to wait out
the storm. "Although inconvenient, it wasn't a total surprise for the
pilots and aircrew who were selected to evacuate the aircraft," said Lt.
Col. Ed Walsh, MAG-26 executive officer. "The Marines were notified at
least 24 hours before the evacuation, and in addition, most squadrons made
an extra effort to select single squadron members to perform the task."
According to Walsh, married Marines with families and property to secure
off base were taken into consideration when the crews were selected.
"Obviously if we have a single Marine living in the barracks, vice a
married Marine with children, we will send the single one, nevertheless,
we are all Marines with a job to do," he said. "The command is really good
about who is selected for certain tasks, but that doesn't mean anyone is
getting special treatment," said Maj. David Burchinal, Marine Heavy
Helicopter Squadron-461 (HMH-461) director of safety and standardization.
"My wife and I have been in the Marine Corps family for 17 years, are
settled and have a brick home away from the beach, so I volunteered to go,
so that someone else could stay back. This isn't really a sacrifice, just
something that every Marine has to do and their family has to understand
why." Although personnel who evacuated the aircraft from Bonnie will be
rotated for the next hurricane between ones who stayed behind, many
enjoyed the experience and will volunteer again. "It was a very smooth
evolution, almost like clockwork," said Cpl. Carlos Monge, HMH-461
aircrewman. "You just have to trust that who you leave behind will do what
they know how to make it through whatever is going on. In the meantime,
you have a chance to visit a new place and see the sites. I enjoyed myself
and will volunteer to go the next time." New River's aircraft made the
trip to and from their destinations safe and sound, and are prepared at a
moments notice to do it all again.


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 13:27:01 -0700
Subject: BLOODTHRISTY INSECTS ARE NO JOKE

BLOODTHRISTY INSECTS ARE NO JOKE


By Cpl. Brandon Rizzo

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Jul 16) --
The muggy summer season is at its prime, and so are the swarms
of deer and horse flies that are eating joggers alive aboard the Air
Station.
Female horse and deer flies are probably the greatest nuisances to
warm-blooded animals during the warm seasons.
Piercing the skin with their knifelike mouth parts, these vicious,
persistent, insects feed on the blood of cattle, horses, mules, deer,
hogs, dogs and especially Marines, to name just a few. A single fly will
suck an animal's blood for several minutes. Once finished, slightly
bleeding wounds are usually the result, permitting secondary feeding sites
for other annoying insects. Horse and deer flies can be more than just a
painful nuisance. They are also known to transmit anthrax, tularemia,
anaplasmosis, hog cholera, equine infectious anemia and filariasis,
according to an Ohio State University (OSU) Extension fact sheet on
entomology. In addition, they are suspected of transmitting Lyme disease,
according to the New England Journal of Medicine. Deer flies, known as
chrysops flavidus to entomologists, usually launch their attacks against
humans along beaches, near streams and especially near moist, wooded
areas. The largest number of attacks occur on warm, sunny days with little
wind. Dark shapes and moving objects also seem to be a great attraction to
deer flies, however, a drop in temperature or a breeze usually reduces
their vicious attacks. "I've noticed that the deerflies usually attack
more on the hotter, muggier days," said Lance Cpl. Juan M. Espinoza,
jogger. "And it's not just one at a time. Usually you'll have a whole
group of them after you." Espinoza is right, humans are usually attacked
around the face, neck and head areas, often by four or five flies at one
time, sometimes even more. "The problem seems to be worse at the Marina
and those areas near the water," said Cpl. Denis Lebreton, jogger. "I
can't run on the trails as often down there because the flies are such a
nuisance." Horse flies seem to be attracted to shiny surfaces, motion,
carbon dioxide and warmth, according to the OSU Extension fact sheet. Many
attacks occur while the victim is in water. The horsefly lands on the
skin, in no particular area of the body, and bites the skin, often causing
a searing pain. Once these flies begin sucking the blood, they are usually
difficult to remove until they are finished. Horseflies are larger than
deer flies, with heavy, brown or black, and sometimes striped bodies along
with huge heads. Their size varies from three-fourths to more than one
inch long. Some smaller species of horseflies may have gray or brown
bodies, as well as black, sometimes with green eyes. These eyes may also
have reddish-gold, crisscrossed bands on them that disappear after the fly
is dead. The most common type of horsefly native to the eastern United
States is known as tabanus americanus, or greenhead. These flies have
reddish-brown bodies and their wings lack markings except along the front
edge. Not only do these tabanids cause loss of blood, but sometimes cause
animals to run so wild that they lose weight and or even break their legs,
according to the Simon and Schuester Guide to Insects. Greenhead flies
also attack fowl. Even more terrible than these effects is their ability
to transmit deadly diseases. Deer flies are barely, if at all larger than
the common housefly, and have yellow or black markings with dark stripes
on the body and dark patterns on the wings. Some look similar to a
camouflage pattern. These flies have green or golden eyes with zigzag
stripes, according to the OSU Extension fact sheet. Deer flies commonly
attack humans, while most species of horseflies usually attack livestock.
As far as prevention goes, there are no repellents or insecticides on the
market that are 100 percent effective on these monster flies. However,
some repellents such as Off!, or others containing methomyl, found in
Apache or Fly-tech products, diazinon, found in Knox-out or Spectricide
products, dursban, which is a household surface spray, malathion or
dimethoate are found to greatly aid in the prevention of attacks,
according to David V. Barkley, urban horticultural agent for the North
Carolina Cooperative extension service. "Bndiocarb, which is commonly
known as Ficam, is one possible chemical control of these flies, however,
it is a license-only product," Barkley said. "Diazinon, however, is
something most people have on hand." Area repellents with citronella or
naphthalene are a good way to repel deer flies and mosquitoes in or near a
patio, yard, tent or cabin, according to the OSU Extension fact sheet.
Probably the best form of protection for campers, hikers, picnickers or
anyone else who is spending prolonged time outside, is a nylon head net.
There are head nets that keep all pests away from the head-to-shoulder
area, are suitable for clear vision, and are also reinforced for cigarette
and pipe smoking. Also available is a mesh jacket that slips over
clothing, and is effective when used in conjunction with a strong
repellent. Gloves and tightly-woven, long-sleeved clothing are a common
aid in prevention of attacks to the body. It is important to keep shirt
cuffs buttoned tightly. Lighter-colored clothing is less attractive to
horse and especially deer flies as opposed to dark blue jeans and shirts.
Providing shelter for humans and animals during the day is important,
since horse and deer flies don?t bite as much at night. There are three
repellents available at the New River exchange "C" store that contain the
active ingredient n-diethyl-meta-toluamaide, as well as a surface spray
called Permanon, which contains an active chemical called permethrin.
These chemical repellents aid in the control of fly attacks. The Camp
Lejeune exchange's sporting goods section carries a number of head nets,
mesh clothing, gilly suits, repellents and insecticides, and countless
other bug-control products, and the convenience store carries a number of
chemical repellents as well.


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 13:27:01 -0700
Subject: NATURE'S CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

NATURE'S CAPITAL PUNISHMENT


By Cpl. Christopher Lowe

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Jul 16) --
Lightning, the great thunderbolt from mythology, has long been
feared as an atmospheric flash of supernatural origins: the great
weapon of the gods. The Greeks both marveled and feared
lightning as it was hurled by Zeus. For the Vikings, lightning was
produced by Thor as his hammer struck an anvil. In the Far East,
early statues of Buddha show him carrying a thunderbolt with
arrows at each end. Native American tribes believed lightning was
due to the flashing feathers of a mystical thunderbird whose
flapping wings produced the sound of thunder.
Today, scientific and experimental procedures replace intuitive
concepts and mystical beliefs. Yet, we remain in awe of lightning
which still shines with its mystery, and rightly so. Each year lightning
is responsible for the deaths of a hundred or so people, injuries to
several hundred more, and millions of dollars in property damage in the
United States alone. In order to better understand such a devastating
force, we must first look at what lightning is made up of. As particles
within a cloud (hydrometeors) grow and interact, collisions cause these
particles to become charged. Some tend to acquire a positive charge and
move to the upper portion of a cloud while others become negatively
charged and shift to the lower portion of the cloud. This separation of
charges produces enormous electrical potential both within the cloud and
between the cloud and ground. This can amount to millions of volts, and
eventually the electrical resistance in the air breaks down and a flash
begins. Lightning, then, is an electrical discharge between positive and
negative regions of a thunderstorm. "Most people don't take lightning
seriously, and they should," said chief meteorologist Marvin Daugherty,
WITN-TV Channel 7. "It's one of the most dangerous killers out there, and
North Carolina has one of the largest lightning strike fatality rates in
the country. We use Doppler radar to track and see inside severe
thunderstorms, if harsh enough, we issue warnings about their current
location and what direction their heading." Even though a storm follows a
path, wind can cause it to change direction rapidly and can send lightning
bolts to clear skies many miles away. That's what happened to Steve
Marshburn Sr. in Nov. of 1969. "It was a nice, clear day out, and I was
assisting customers at the local bank where I worked when all of a sudden
a bolt traveled through the teller speaker, jumped three feet, and struck
me in the spine. As soon as it happened, I would forever be a different
person." When Marshburn awoke that following morning after being struck,
he said he felt like his body had been overloaded with electricity. "You
know what lightning does to your television set when it's struck," he
said. "Now take that thought and imagine what it does to the wiring in
your mind and body." Since the incident, Marshburn has battled with cancer
and undergone 21 surgeries. He said all of this suffering has made him the
strong person he is today, and as the founder of a worldwide support
group, he talks with victims who experience the same problems he
encounters on a daily basis. Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors
International Incorporated is a support group for individuals that have
been injured by electricity. It's also there for friends and family
members of victims during their time of need. It currently has 710 members
worldwide, has published books on the subject and is steadily busy
studying the after effects of lightning strikes. Some of these effects
include severe headaches, fatigue, depression, seizures and memory loss.
"To treat a lightning strike victim, you first have to look at the
severity of the incident," said Dr. James Garrett, medical director for
the emergency department at Onslow Memorial Hospital. "Lightning strikes
are different than any other electrical shock. When you're struck with
lightning, it's more like a burn that affects the brain and heart whereas
electrical burns tend to cook the internal organs," he added. Garrett
summed it up by saying lightning strikes are like motor vehicle accidents,
you have your major ones and at the same time, you?ll have your minor
accidents. As dangerous as this quick and deadly enemy is, there are
precautions you can take to lessen your chances of possibly being struck.
While outdoors during inclement weather, stay away from lakes, streams and
swimming pools, and avoid metal objects such as electric wires, fences,
golf clubs, machinery, motors, power tools and railroad tracks. Other
unsafe places include tents, golf carts, hilltops and open spaces. If
you're standing under a tree, you're at a much greater risk of being
struck. Electricity will take the path of least resistance, and water
provides that path. Trees are about 20 percent water. Humans are about 65
percent water. If lightning strikes near a person and a tree, the one that
contains the most water is the one most likely to be struck. If at all
possible stay indoors during electrical storms. However, keep in mind that
though indoors there are still dangers. Stay away from any electrical
appliances, plumbing fixtures, water, open doors and windows. Lightning
may strike telephone and electrical wiring outside the home, then travel
inside via the phone cord, into your telephone and out of the handset
causing you to get shocked. Cordless phones however, are safe to use, but
don't call someone who doesn't have a cordless phone during a storm. To
avoid becoming a victim of a lightning strike, apply risk-management
techniques. Know what the weather conditions are before you go outside. If
a storm is approaching or in progress, avoid outdoor activities. Even
though your chances of being struck by lightning are one in 600,000 it's
not worth the risk of getting struck especially if you'll have time to
continue your activity after the storm passes. Anyone interested in
Lightning Strike and Electric Shock Survivors Int. Inc. can call (910)
346-4708 for more information.


------------------------------


==============================
Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 13:27:00 -0700
Subject: AIR STATION MARINES MAKE HYDRATION PROCESS EASY

AIR STATION MARINES MAKE HYDRATION PROCESS EASY


By Sgt. Jeremy Heltsley

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION NEW RIVER N.C. (Aug 31) --
Staying hydrated during the hot summer months is a number one
priority for Marines. However, this may not be as simple as it
sounds.
Marines are issued canteens, but they can be awkward to carry
around, even when attached to a web belt. The hassle associated
with adjusting a web belt to fit properly, especially with gear
attached, is indisputable. Moreover, many Marines working with
advanced tools and equipment are not able to wear web belts with
canteens because of the safety hazard associated with getting
hung or snagged on the equipment.
Another common complaint with canteens is that they require the
use of both hands whenever you want to take a drink. Individuals
with pressing and high speed jobs can?t always stop what they are
doing to unsnap the canteen pouch, unscrew the cap, consume the
water, screw the cap back on and properly secure the canteen back
into the pouch without taking up more time than they can afford to
lose.
The canteen, because of its durability under field conditions, is in no
threat of being replaced anytime soon, but it the meantime, Marines
working in garrison are finding out more and more how to maintain their
hydration using a contemporary device which is growing in popularity. The
Body Mounted Hydration System (BMHS) was one man's answer to staying
highly mobile and hydrated at the same time. According to Stormy Storms,
administrator for Camel Bak military sales, the idea originated when
Michael Eddison, paramedic, cycle hobbyist and BMHS inventor, attached an
IV (intravenous) bag to his T-shirt and ran a tube from the bag so that it
could be placed in his mouth. This allowed Eddison to drink and ride his
bicycle at the same time without skipping a beat. The awkward appearance
did nothing to hinder the design and production of the new hydration
system, and thus, Camel Bak Hydration Systems was born. Camel Bak is just
one of many name brand hydration systems now on the market. The Camel
Bak's design consists of a liquid bladder housed in a insulated
polyurethane foam base pack. The liquid travels by suction through a
flexible tube running from the pack to the user's mouth, and can be tucked
away under one of the shoulder straps. The tube features a removable mouth
piece, ideal for promoting good hygiene if another person uses the same
Camel Bak. The pack is mounted on the wearer's back by nylon straps fitted
with heavy-duty buckles. Although the BMHS was originally designed for
cyclists, other athletes and people who have witnessed the device's
convenience through the years have invested in the product themselves. The
Marine Corps, as well as the other branches of the armed forces, has
joined the bandwagon. "We receive orders from every branch of the military
from all locations throughout the U.S.," Storms said. "This is especially
the case within the last three years. The number sold to the military is
approximately 100,000 a year, and that?s not including individual
purchases." The Camel Bak ranges in size from 50 to 100 ounces with prices
varying according to size. The most popular size ordered by the military,
according to Storms, is the 70 ounce. The 70 ounce costs approximately $25
and is capable of holding the same amount of fluid as two canteens. Marine
Aviation Logistics Squadron-29 (MALS-29) was one of the first units aboard
the Air Station to start issuing Camel Baks to its Marines, according to
LtCol. Mark Fracassa, MALS-29 commanding officer. "We started using the
Camel Bak early last summer after questions were raised about keeping
troops hydrated while working in high-heat environments," Fracassa said.
"Canteens are fine, but they tend to get in the way while climbing up,
down, in and out of aircraft." One of the most important aspects of the
Camel Bak for Marines who work on aircraft is its placement on the body.
Being centered on the wearer's back keeps the individual from being
off-balance and falling. "The Camel Bak is especially important to our
guys who travel out to Twentynine Palms, California for Combat Arms
Exercises (CAX)," Fracassa said. "Working out in the hot desert sun can
dehydrate someone quickly, and Camel Baks proved to be invaluable during
those conditions. Personnel from other units witnessed how effective they
were with us, and as a result, they started using them as well." Following
MALS-29?s lead, other squadrons and units throughout the area, including
both Marine Aircraft Groups-26 and 29, and Headquarters and Headquarters
Squadron here are now purchasing and issuing Camel Baks. "If one of our
helicopters goes down in a secluded area, the Camel Bak can prove to be a
lifesaver," said Capt. John Carrie, Marine Light/Attack Helicopter
Squadron-269 (HML/A-269) AH-1W "Cobra" pilot. "I fly with mine all the
time to stay hydrated, and I know flightline personnel are happy to have
them." "I go through two or three of these every day out on the
flightline," said LCpl. Wendy Reed, HML/A-269 plane captain. "The heat out
here is a constant, and without fluids we find easy to obtain using Camel
Baks, we would have a lot of heat casualties." Camel Baks and other
similar body mounted hydration systems are available at local Marine Corps
Exchange and retail stores in the area.


------------------------------

End marines Digest (09/16 13:27)
********************************


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