A Chocolate Malt

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John K. Taber

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Jul 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/12/99
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I went to the closest hamburger place today where the
hamburgers are too big and you get fries whether you
want them or not, both of which to charge you all the
more.

"Hamburger, oldtimer, hold the mustard, but give me
mayonnaise, please."

I was raised on the East Coast and cannot get used to
mustard on hamburgers. It should be ketchup on hamburgers,
and mustard on hot dogs. But in Texas, it's both.

"And a chocolate milkshake." I said. Chili's is one of the
few places that serves something called chocolate milkshake.
The waiter nodded. "No, make that a chocolate malt" said I.

A blank look. "You don't have chocolate malts?" Still a blank
look. "Uhh, do you know what I mean?"

He says hopefully "That's a handmade chocolate milkshake?"

"No, no. It's a chocolate milkshake with malt added to it."
He had never heard of malt.

"A chocolate milkshake is fine" I said. So, he brought me
something that was made of pre-packaged materials and extruded
from a machine.

Once upon a time, a chocolate malt and a hamburger was lunch
for lots of people. Lunch counters used to have milkshake
mixers. I remember them at the counter. Long skinny mixing
blades, usually two of them for making two shakes at once.
They used stainless steel containers, added milk and ice
cream and slipped the container under the mixing blades.
Whir, for a suitable time, pull out the container, and
pour shake into long fluted glass.

Do you guys remember that, or am I imagining things?

By adding malt powder, one had a malt.

It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
was talking about.

Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some
sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
at all.

Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?


Nixon

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Jul 12, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/12/99
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"John K. Taber" wrote:
(shortened)

> Do you guys remember that, or am I imagining things?
> By adding malt powder, one had a malt.

Oh yes. I remember. A Chocolate Malted was the
favorite. I don't remember using any "fluted"
glass; we just used a large plain glass of about
a pint and a half.

>
> Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
> that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
> have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
> I remember banana splits with whipped cream.

No they have not disappeared. I always have on hand the makings

for a giant Banana Split, a Sunday, or a Coke Float!(some called
them a Vanilla Float; a big scoop of vanilla ice cream in most
any sort of soft drink, usuall coke or root beer). In fact,
just writing about it makes me want to go up and make a big
banana split.

> Now it's some
> sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
> at all.
>
> Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?

I remember the REXALL Drug Stores and their usually
great soda fountains.

Off to the Kitchen !!

Dave
--
/s/David Nixon n...@att.net
Optimism; the only attitude that makes any sense in this world-
(guarded optimism).

Peter Rathmann

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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John K. Taber <jkt...@dhc.net> wrote in message
news:C345895670A2BA29.0DE9605E...@lp.airnews.net...
...

> Once upon a time, a chocolate malt and a hamburger was lunch
> for lots of people. Lunch counters used to have milkshake
> mixers. I remember them at the counter. Long skinny mixing
> blades, usually two of them for making two shakes at once.
> They used stainless steel containers, added milk and ice
> cream and slipped the container under the mixing blades.
> Whir, for a suitable time, pull out the container, and
> pour shake into long fluted glass.
>
> Do you guys remember that, or am I imagining things?

There's a restaurant called "Taxi's" near us (Walnut Creek, CA) that still
makes them that way. It doesn't all fit in the glass, so they serve it with
the stainless mixing container on the side. Both malts and shakes are
offered. Of course this place also has a real juke box with 45 rpm records
and individual quarter-fed music selector boxes at each booth.
Peter


Bob

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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John,

No, we "pure bred" Texans couldn't eat a hamburger without mustard. No
ketchup either unless you're at McDonalds. Mayo makes what we call a
"sissy burger."

But, I can help you with the malt.

Sonic Drive In has real malt and they use real stainless steel cups and
mixers to make them. You do get them in a styro cup since it's a drive
in but it is real. One thing about Sonic is that the company forbids
(and checks, too) the use of anything artificial in any of its sundaes,
shakes, malts or anything else on the menu. That's one of the reasons
they have the best onion rings in the world. Made by hand every morning
from whole onions, just waiting for that order to come over the speaker
before they're gently placed in the fryer.

The reason I know this is because I used to own one. Never even used
off-brand cheese, mayo or anything else. It was Kraft on almost all of
that stuff and Vlasic on the pickles. I like their burgers because they
are only 1/5 of a pound instead of 1/4 to 1/2 pound like those monsters
at Chilis, Cheddars, Bennigans and those theme places. Sure, Sonic is
like that too but we did listen to and respond to the customer. I used
to have 2 customers a day who would come in for a grilled cheese on
wheat. I'd get a whole loaf of wheat every day even though only 4
slices of it would be used. I'd eat it too if I had a sandwich. Can't
stand that white fluffy stuff that Mrs. Bairds and all the other
bakeries call bread.

There is one good use for white bread. Take a little of it and some
water from a lake and make a little ball as you squeeze the air out of
the "bread." Take just a pinch and put it on the end of a bream hook
and you can catch fish all day with the stuff. We call that "dough
bait." That's the only good use I can think of right now.

Oh yes, if you like strawberry malts Sonic doesn't use strawberry
flavoring. It's real strawberries and you can sure taste the
difference. Even though their ice cream comes out of a machine it is
real milk ice cream mix bought from a local dairy, like Oak Farms or
Borden's here. Some of the biggie fast food places (which shall go
unnamed) use a powder they mix with water. Ugghh!

Bob

"John K. Taber" wrote:
>
> I went to the closest hamburger place today where the
> hamburgers are too big and you get fries whether you
> want them or not, both of which to charge you all the
> more.
>
> "Hamburger, oldtimer, hold the mustard, but give me
> mayonnaise, please."
>
> I was raised on the East Coast and cannot get used to
> mustard on hamburgers. It should be ketchup on hamburgers,
> and mustard on hot dogs. But in Texas, it's both.
>
> "And a chocolate milkshake." I said. Chili's is one of the
> few places that serves something called chocolate milkshake.
> The waiter nodded. "No, make that a chocolate malt" said I.
>
> A blank look. "You don't have chocolate malts?" Still a blank
> look. "Uhh, do you know what I mean?"
>
> He says hopefully "That's a handmade chocolate milkshake?"
>
> "No, no. It's a chocolate milkshake with malt added to it."
> He had never heard of malt.
>
> "A chocolate milkshake is fine" I said. So, he brought me
> something that was made of pre-packaged materials and extruded
> from a machine.
>

> Once upon a time, a chocolate malt and a hamburger was lunch
> for lots of people. Lunch counters used to have milkshake
> mixers. I remember them at the counter. Long skinny mixing
> blades, usually two of them for making two shakes at once.
> They used stainless steel containers, added milk and ice
> cream and slipped the container under the mixing blades.
> Whir, for a suitable time, pull out the container, and
> pour shake into long fluted glass.
>
> Do you guys remember that, or am I imagining things?
>

> By adding malt powder, one had a malt.
>

> It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
> and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
> from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
> malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
> was talking about.
>

> Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
> that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
> have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.

> I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some


> sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
> at all.
>
> Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?

--
The IQ of the world is static. Only the
population keeps increasing.

lang...@my-deja.com

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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In article
<C345895670A2BA29.0DE9605E...@lp.airnews.net>,
"John K. Taber" <jkt...@dhc.net> wrote:
> Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember ...

While you're back in the drugstores, don't forget the cherry phosphates.
-----
Spoons don't fatten people.


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.

James A. Chamblee

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
to
John K. Taber wrote:

> It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
> and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
> from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
> malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
> was talking about.

Here's more bad news for you. Most of the fast food milkshakes have
little or no milk in them. They don't even have enough milk to call
them milkshakes, just "shakes"

The biggest ingredient is soy.

Jim
Md.

Ewm ema

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
to
>Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?

Do you mean Schrafft's?


The Michael

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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James A. Chamblee wrote in message <378B14...@erols.com>...

>Here's more bad news for you. Most of the fast food milkshakes have
>little or no milk in them. They don't even have enough milk to call
>them milkshakes, just "shakes"
>
>The biggest ingredient is soy.
>
>Jim
>Md.

Probably where the saying "thems the shakes" comes from.

Mo Drew

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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You can still get real malts in Yuma AZ !


--
For Free BC & Western Canada Information,
Car Rentals, Accommodation, Tour Packages,
some info on the US Southwest,
plus informative netsite links, visit
http://www.cow-net.com/modrew/
John K. Taber wrote in message ...

>It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
>and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
>from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
>malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
>was talking about.
>

>Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
>that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
>have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
>I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some
>sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
>at all.
>

John K. Taber

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
to

Ewm ema wrote in message
<19990713083849...@ng-fm1.aol.com>...

>>Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?
>
>Do you mean Schrafft's?
>

That's it, Schrafft's. Thanks.


arthur wouk

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
to
...

>The waiter nodded. "No, make that a chocolate malt" said I.
>
>A blank look. "You don't have chocolate malts?" Still a blank
>look. "Uhh, do you know what I mean?"
>
>He says hopefully "That's a handmade chocolate milkshake?"
>
>"No, no. It's a chocolate milkshake with malt added to it."
>He had never heard of malt.
>
>"A chocolate milkshake is fine" I said. So, he brought me
>something that was made of pre-packaged materials and extruded
>from a machine.
>
>Once upon a time, a chocolate malt and a hamburger was lunch

i thought the chocolate malt was regional eastern, maybe only new york.
had them all the time as a kid in ny.

>for lots of people. Lunch counters used to have milkshake
>mixers. I remember them at the counter. Long skinny mixing
>blades, usually two of them for making two shakes at once.
>They used stainless steel containers, added milk and ice
>cream and slipped the container under the mixing blades.
>Whir, for a suitable time, pull out the container, and
>pour shake into long fluted glass.
>
>Do you guys remember that, or am I imagining things?
>
>By adding malt powder, one had a malt.

in fact, the milkshake was considered the cheap version of the malted
milk (new york for a malt drink). then there was the float (scoop of
icecream in the malted milk). later reduced to 'in the milkshake'.
but they poured real chocolate syrup into a glass of milk poured from
a bottle.

>It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
>and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
>from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
>malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
>was talking about.
>
>Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
>that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
>have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
>I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some
>sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
>at all.

what destoryes all the above was the onset of fast food places with
synthetic everything, including sundaes and banana splits. the kids
never learned what a real one was, and didn't like then when they
encountered them.

examples: my wife's nephews and nieces all dislike real maple syrup
and prefer the synthetic goo which is in all the bottles of cheap
syrups which appear in the supermarket. also, no one after my
generation seems to know what cream cheese is. they think the
adulterated gummed stuff which kraft sells as philadelphia brand
and others imitate is cream cheese. the french are right to despise
americans. france is a country with, is it 247?, real cheeses.

>
>Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?
>

not in the bronx. in the bronx it was addie vallins. i don't know what
it was in all the boroughs, but in manhattan it was Schrafts.


--
"Heaven always bears some proportion to earth. The god of the cannibal
will be a cannibal, of the crusades a crusader, and of the merchants a
merchant." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson, 'The Conduct of Life'
to send me email, remove 'syzygy.' from my address

maureen

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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On Mon, 12 Jul 1999 20:22:01 -0500, "John K. Taber" <jkt...@dhc.net>
wrote:

>Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places


>that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
>have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
>I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some
>sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
>at all.

Time to move to Canada, John! We have a chain of Dairy Queens that do
great banana splits and sundaes, with real cream.

This is what you get:

- Ice cream from cows who have not been injected with the bovine
growth hormone.

- lots of strawberries and pineapples

- one whole banana

- a covering of chocolate syrup

- a big dollop of real cream on top with a sprinkling of chocolate

So not only are we Number one according to the UN. We also have great
banana splits. And our dollar is low! What are you waiting for??

Maureen

maureen

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
to
On Tue, 13 Jul 1999 06:25:54 -0400, "James A. Chamblee"
<cham...@erols.com> wrote:

>John K. Taber wrote:
>
>> It's gone, all gone. There are no milkshake mixers anymore,
>> and the few places that still serve milkshakes extrude them
>> from a machine like a yogurt dispenser. And there's no
>> malt. The kid didn't have the foggiest notion of what I
>> was talking about.
>

>Here's more bad news for you. Most of the fast food milkshakes have
>little or no milk in them. They don't even have enough milk to call
>them milkshakes, just "shakes"
>
>The biggest ingredient is soy.
>>Jim
>Md

And the soy is genetically engineered while most of the milk in the US
comes from sickly cows on the bovine growth hormone. Just adding to
the bad news.

Maureen

Richard Cline

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Jul 13, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/13/99
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In article <378bc07...@news.sentex.net>, mau...@sentex.net (maureen)
wrote:

_________________

Careful Maureen

Arthur will be after you for advertising Canada the way he is after the
people from Reno.

Dick

Doris Carter Ford

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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arthur wouk (aw...@blackhole.nyx.net) wrote:
: In article <7me9d1$cuu$1...@nntp6.atl.mindspring.net>,
: Rita <mkin...@mindspring.com> wrote:
: >>
: >In my youth in the Midwest there were specialty ice cream
: >shops where one went in, sat down, and ordered luscious ice
: >cream sundaes.
: >ice cream inflated with air and heaven knows what chemicals.
: >Haagen Daz and some other "good" ice cream makers do have
: >little stores and they do sell sundaes as well as cones, but the
: >ambience is not the same. Ice cream used to be a big deal.
:
: when we first got to evanston, illinois in summer of 1961 (i was
: teaching at northwestern that summer) there was one of the last few
: samples of the specialty ice cream store a block from where we lived,
: and they served 'phosphates'. this was strictly a midwestern thing,
: and they went under in the next few years.

This is the answer to the whole thing. We put those wonderful
places out of business by not shopping there. With our wonderful
freezers we could have all that ice cream at home.

If you want them do them yourself.

You can even make your own simple syrup. A heat -proof quart
container of sugar bring a quart of water to fast boil, slowly pour into
the sugar.

In a tall mixer bowl put ice cream, milk, simple syrup..the
flavor you want/fruit . Mix on high for 20 -30 seconds to suit youeself.

Doris F.

:
: any other midwesterners remember phosphates?
: --

Nixon

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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Doris Carter Ford wrote:

> : any other midwesterners remember phosphates?

Oh yes. Seems to me the "cherry phosphate" was
very popular in Oklahoma in the 40's. Don't remember
any other flavors.

CLScott101

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
Arthur wrote:

>any other midwesterners remember phosphates?
>

I do. There was a traditional drugstore where my friends and I hung out that
still had them. That drugstore has now been moved and preserved and is part of
a historical monument now in Topeka.

That drugstore had high wooden booths, and we would drink phospates and hang
around forever. Mr. Edelblute, the owner got sick and tired of us, and
periodically would kick out one of the boys who was showing off for the girls.

-Connie


CLScott101

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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Peter wrote:

>There's a restaurant called "Taxi's" near us (Walnut Creek, CA) that still
>makes them that way. It doesn't all fit in the glass, so they serve it with
>the stainless mixing container on the side. Both malts and shakes are
>offered. Of course this place also has a real juke box with 45 rpm records
>and individual quarter-fed music selector boxes at each booth.

I would be curious to know where this is since I now live in Walnut Creek.
Sounds like my kinda place.
-Connie


CLScott101

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
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Jim wrote:

>Here's more bad news for you. Most of the fast food milkshakes have
>little or no milk in them. They don't even have enough milk to call
>them milkshakes, just "shakes"
>
>The biggest ingredient is soy.
>

Don't knock the soy bean. It is a blessing to those of us who are lactose
intolerant. I use soy milk, soy ice cream, soy whipped topping etc. It is
nutritious and tastes perfectly fine to me.

-Connie


Elaine Jackson

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
Maureen wrote:
>Time to move to Canada, John! We have a chain of Dairy Queens >that do great
banana splits and sundaes, with real cream.
>
>This is what you get:
>
>- Ice cream from cows who have not been injected with the bovine
>growth hormone.
>
>- lots of strawberries and pineapples
>
>- one whole banana
>
>- a covering of chocolate syrup
>
>- a big dollop of real cream on top with a sprinkling of chocolate
>
>So not only are we Number one according to the UN. We also have
>great banana splits. And our dollar is low! What are you waiting >for??

Oh, fine. Just when I've got the Old Dude pretty much reconciled to not
retiring to France, you come up with a reasonable alternative.

Maureen, I don't *like* flannel underwear all year round...
otoh, I *do* like real banana splits - what I remember of them, had the last
one in country NY in '59 - so maybe we'll spend the summers in Our Neighbor To
The North, at least until we get too big to fit in the car any more.

Salivating a bit, as my internal memory chip kicks in and the flavor of
locally-made *good* ice cream appears in the sensory memory.

Elaine


James A. Chamblee

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
CLScott101 wrote:

> Don't knock the soy bean. It is a blessing to those of us who are lactose
> intolerant. I use soy milk, soy ice cream, soy whipped topping etc. It is
> nutritious and tastes perfectly fine to me.

Didn't knock it at all.

Trouble is, there are a bunch of people who are allergic to soy also.

My neighbor's kid had an IQ of plenty, but was allergic to soy. Soy
sent him into shock. Every time we took the kids to a hamburger place
that offered "100 percent beef", for example, when pressed, the manager
would admit that soy was also used in the meat.

Everything should be truthfully labelled, that's all.

Jim
Md.

John Harrison

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to

Maureen wrote :-

We have a chain of Dairy Queens that do
great banana splits and sundaes, with real cream.

This is what you get:

- Ice cream from cows who have not been injected with the bovine
growth hormone.

- lots of strawberries and pineapples

- one whole banana

- a covering of chocolate syrup

- a big dollop of real cream on top with a sprinkling of chocolate

So not only are we Number one according to the UN. We also have great
banana splits. And our dollar is low! What are you waiting for??

Maureen

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------


Maureen -
NOBODY could eat one of those.

You could feed India with a coupla dozen!

John


maureen

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
On Wed, 14 Jul 1999 20:28:33 +0100, "John Harrison"
<John.H...@bildad.com> wrote:

>Maureen wrote :-
>
>We have a chain of Dairy Queens that do
> great banana splits and sundaes, with real cream.
>
> This is what you get:
>
> - Ice cream from cows who have not been injected with the bovine
> growth hormone.
>
> - lots of strawberries and pineapples
>
> - one whole banana
>
> - a covering of chocolate syrup
>
> - a big dollop of real cream on top with a sprinkling of chocolate
>
> So not only are we Number one according to the UN. We also have great
> banana splits. And our dollar is low! What are you waiting for??
>
> Maureen
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

>Maureen -
> NOBODY could eat one of those.
>
> You could feed India with a coupla dozen!
>John

Isn't that the truth!?! We are so decadent in the West that we
often forget the appalling poverty in the world as we eat our banana
splits.

All it would take to eliminate poverty throughout the entire world is
for the whole world to go vegetarian. If we did that , not only would
we eliminate hunger and starvation, but would also slow down global
warming.

Seems so easy, but too many people would find it too hard to give up
their daily animal intake.

Me, in meditative mode again! :-)

Maureen


>
>


maureen

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Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
On Tue, 13 Jul 1999 17:13:55 -0700, dcl...@silcom.com (Richard Cline)
wrote:
>In article mau...@sentex.net (maureen)wrote:

>> > On Mon, 12 Jul 1999 20:22:01 -0500, "John K. Taber" wrote:
>>
>> >Back in the cobwebs of my mind, I seem to remember places
>> >that were famed for their milkshakes and sundaes. Sundaes too
>> >have disappeared. Even banana splits have all but disappeared.
>> >I remember banana splits with whipped cream. Now it's some
>> >sort of texturized corn starch, if you can find banana splits
>> >at all.
>>
>> Time to move to Canada, John! We have a chain of Dairy Queens that do

>> great banana splits and sundaes, with real cream.
>>
>> This is what you get:
>>
>> - Ice cream from cows who have not been injected with the bovine
>> growth hormone.
>>
>> - lots of strawberries and pineapples
>>
>> - one whole banana
>>
>> - a covering of chocolate syrup
>>
>> - a big dollop of real cream on top with a sprinkling of chocolate
>>
>> So not only are we Number one according to the UN. We also have great
>> banana splits. And our dollar is low! What are you waiting for??
>>
>> Maureen
>
>_________________
>
>Careful Maureen
>
>Arthur will be after you for advertising Canada the way he is after the
>people from Reno.
>
>Dick

Not to worry about Arthur, Richard. He has a soft spot for Canada.He
once lived in redneck Alberta.

Go tidy up your orchard! That'll keep you out of mischief.

Maureen


Richard Cline

unread,
Jul 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/14/99
to
In article <19990714114717...@ng-da1.aol.com>,
clsco...@aol.com (CLScott101) wrote:

> Jim wrote:
>
> >Here's more bad news for you. Most of the fast food milkshakes have
> >little or no milk in them. They don't even have enough milk to call
> >them milkshakes, just "shakes"
> >
> >The biggest ingredient is soy.
> >
>

> Don't knock the soy bean. It is a blessing to those of us who are lactose
> intolerant. I use soy milk, soy ice cream, soy whipped topping etc. It is
> nutritious and tastes perfectly fine to me.
>

> -Connie

Not only that, the soy is good for the blood. It reduces the
cholesterol. It reduces the LDL more than the HDL so that you cholesterol
ratio is more favorable. I have occasionally used a vanilla flavored soy
product on my breakfast cereal and found it very tasty.

Still, tofu is not high on my list of favorites.

Dick

Ron Kelley

unread,
Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
to
On 14 Jul 1999 16:09:20 GMT, cornu...@aol.comjunkblok (Elaine
Jackson) wrote:

> Maureen, I don't *like* flannel underwear all year round...
>otoh, I *do* like real banana splits - what I remember of them, had the last
>one in country NY in '59 - so maybe we'll spend the summers in Our Neighbor To
>The North, at least until we get too big to fit in the car any more.
>
> Salivating a bit, as my internal memory chip kicks in and the flavor of
>locally-made *good* ice cream appears in the sensory memory.
>
>Elaine

Or, you could move to Southern California, go to "Johnny Rockets" 60's
diner, and get real milk shakes, ice cream sundaes and banana splits.
Not to mention *great* hamburgers, cheeseburgers, reubens and patty
melts.

Ron Kelley

John K. Taber

unread,
Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
to

Richard Cline wrote in message ...

>
>Not only that, the soy is good for the blood. It reduces the
>cholesterol. It reduces the LDL more than the HDL so that you
cholesterol
>ratio is more favorable. I have occasionally used a vanilla flavored
soy
>product on my breakfast cereal and found it very tasty.
>
>Still, tofu is not high on my list of favorites.


It helps to know how to cook tofu.

Tofu has natural estrogen which is good for hot flashes, and other
annoyances. There is an increased chance of breast cancer for
prescription estrogen, but the evidence isn't in yet on natural
estrogen in soy products.

My wife cooks tofu Chinese style. She gets the firm tofu in the
Chinese store. She drains it, then cubes it about 1/2 in squares.
Note: fresh tofu in oriental stores comes soft, medium, and firm
(or hard). Each has its uses. The firm is used for stir fry.

Mince fresh ginger. Note: ginger can be kept refrigerated for
a long time by preserving it in sherry. Cut the ginger in hunks,
place in small jar with lid, and fill with sherry. You can use
it for fresh ginger for months to come.

Smash garlic clove. Note: use the flat of a Chinese cleaver (or
chef's knife) and smash the garlic. This is the easiest way
to crush garlic. Whack it good with the flat.

Saute broccoli flowerets in *good* oil. I recommend safflower,
but peanut oil will do. Saute over the highest possible heat, in
a flat cast-iron skillet, stirring constantly with a serving spoon
to prevent burning. Note: Never use a wok because you cannot get enough
heat to the food with the wok resting on Western appliances.
Chinese restaurants use woks on gas ranges with oversized burners.
In China, woks are inserted into depressions in charcoal. In the
US, unless you have a specially fitted gas range, you simply
cannot get enough heat to the food in the wok for stir fry. Use
a flat cast-iron skillet.

Also, add the minced ginger and smushed garlic. It only takes a
couple of minutes.

Add the tofu, and stir fry as before, but only a minute.

Remove from heat (or lower heat if you use gas). Add in a
dollop of hoisin sauce and a dollop of plum sauce. You can
get hoisin and plum sauce prepared in glass jars in any
Chinese market.

Add soy sauce (I like Kikkoman's) to taste.

This is quite good over steamed rice. The tofu absorbs the
flavors of all the other ingredients.


maureen

unread,
Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
to

Sounds great ,John, but it's easier to drop a chunk of soft tofu
in your orange juice in the morning and blend it with with a
spoonful of honey and some lecithin granules.

If you're in a rush to go out in the evening and you want a fast
evening meal and a cocktail, then just stick a chunk of soft tofu in a
strawberry daiquiri and blend. Have it with a veggie tray and rye
bread fingers, and you have an all-round delicious meal. Go easy on
the rum and heavy on the lime juice and strawberries.

Then, after the show, you can fill up on a banana split from the Dairy
Queen!

Mmm.....m! Life is good!

Maureen


Richard Cline

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Jul 15, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/15/99
to
In article <378e085...@news.sentex.net>, mau...@sentex.net (maureen)
wrote:

> On Thu, 15 Jul 1999 11:26:49 -0500, "John K. Taber" wrote:
>
> >>It helps to know how to cook tofu.
> >

----snip


> >
> >Add soy sauce (I like Kikkoman's) to taste.
> >
> >This is quite good over steamed rice. The tofu absorbs the
> >flavors of all the other ingredients.
> >
> Sounds great ,John, but it's easier to drop a chunk of soft tofu
> in your orange juice in the morning and blend it with with a
> spoonful of honey and some lecithin granules.
>
> If you're in a rush to go out in the evening and you want a fast
> evening meal and a cocktail, then just stick a chunk of soft tofu in a
> strawberry daiquiri and blend. Have it with a veggie tray and rye
> bread fingers, and you have an all-round delicious meal. Go easy on
> the rum and heavy on the lime juice and strawberries.
>
> Then, after the show, you can fill up on a banana split from the Dairy
> Queen!
>
> Mmm.....m! Life is good!
>
> Maureen

I'll settle for a bowl of fresh tree-ripened peaches topped with a little
yogurt. It is even a little more interesting to mix in some additional
fruits like sapote. I don't suppose you northerners have ever eaten
sapote.

Dick

B. Burkart

unread,
Jul 16, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/16/99
to
On Tue, 13 Jul 1999 22:36:57 GMT, aw...@blackhole.nyx.net
(arthur wouk) wrote:

>In article <7me9d1$cuu$1...@nntp6.atl.mindspring.net>,
>Rita <mkin...@mindspring.com> wrote:
>>>

>>In my youth in the Midwest there were specialty ice cream
>>shops where one went in, sat down, and ordered luscious ice
>>cream sundaes.
>>ice cream inflated with air and heaven knows what chemicals.
>>Haagen Daz and some other "good" ice cream makers do have
>>little stores and they do sell sundaes as well as cones, but the
>>ambience is not the same. Ice cream used to be a big deal.
>

There are still lots places like that in California.


Can still get chocolate "malts" etc. Sometimes the
waiter thinks the order was for "Chocolate milk" when you
say "malt" , so need to be sure it is explained correctly
in some places. Also many places do not have the malt and
then it is just a chocolate shake..


>when we first got to evanston, illinois in summer of 1961 (i was
>teaching at northwestern that summer) there was one of the last few
>samples of the specialty ice cream store a block from where we lived,
>and they served 'phosphates'. this was strictly a midwestern thing,
>and they went under in the next few years.
>

Possible that the ice cream specialty store could
have been the one a few blocks from campus to the West which
I would visit in the early 50s. . Recall that students got
a free ticket as part of the "welcome" package, but that
was long ago so not easy to remember that sort of thing.

Recently went back and tried to find that same ice
cream place, but was unable to find it. Sad that such a
place might disappear after 50 years or so.

Of course Robin Hood's barn was long gone even on
a prior visit.

But the biggest disappointment when I was unable
to eat a remembrance type lunch at Scott hall. Now they
are all University offices.

So decided to walk up to Sargent hall for my
lunch. It was still there, but after waiting in line for a
while, found out that they would only let "students" in.
Another big disappointment.

Eventually ended up way out on golf road (route
58 ) before finding a place to eat lunch.

The university no longer has the "charm" of the
50s. The beautiful Deering library views are blocked off
now from both the North and the South. And all those new
buildings built out into the Lake both South and North have
no uniqueness, or charm, etc as the old ones.


>any other midwesterners remember phosphates?

Yes

In the 1930s and early 1940s, we were drinkers of
phosphates. Remember mostly cherry and chocolate phosphates
Also could buy a coke or a cherry coke, or a chocolate coke
etc. Any of them for 5 cents.

In 40s was a Soda jerk etc. Made 25 Cents per
hour. .

B. Burkart

Irwin Sabath

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Jul 17, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/17/99
to
aw...@blackhole.nyx.net (arthur wouk) wrote:

>
>>
>>Schaeffer's. Wasn't there a place called Schaeffer's?
>>
>
>not in the bronx. in the bronx it was addie vallins.<

161st St. location?
Fordham Rd.?

Arthur: were we neighbors?

> i don't know what
>it was in all the boroughs, but in manhattan it was Schrafts.

--
Irwin

t.i.n.s.t.a.a.f.l.
(Helping victims of conventional wisdom)

Elaine Jackson

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Jul 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/18/99
to
Ron Kelley writes:

>Or, you could move to Southern California, go to "Johnny Rockets" 60's
>diner, and get real milk shakes, ice cream sundaes and banana splits.
>Not to mention *great* hamburgers, cheeseburgers, reubens and patty
>melts.

I haven't had breakfast yet (yes, I'm a real (elderly) geek, sat down at the
'puter at 5:30a.m.) and that menu made my eyes water with nostalgia and my
mouth water with pure simple greed. oh, for the days I could eat a great big
old cheeseburger, drink a quart of milk shake, then go back to work! :^)

Elaine
delicately dabbing the saliva off my chin with the lacy edge of my nightgown
because elegance is everything...

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