Investigating Virtue and Desire

10 views
Skip to first unread message

matthew.p...@gmail.com

unread,
Mar 9, 2008, 11:29:13 PM3/9/08
to
Hello, everyone.

I am interested in the ideas of virtue and desire, and am curious to
hear what you think your faith tradition has to say about these ideas.

I'm trying to get the bird's-eye view, so it would be helpful to me if
you could summarize, limiting yourself to three paragraphs: a
paragraph about virtue, a paragraph about desire, and perhaps another
paragraph on how these ideas fit into the larger framework of your
tradition. I know you won't be able to say everything in three
paragraphs, but if you mention something in your summary that I find
intriguing, I promise I'll ask for details. =)

Thanks,
Matthew Lowe

Baird Stafford

unread,
Mar 10, 2008, 5:15:16 AM3/10/08
to
In article
<a353eabd-3c8b-4797...@h25g2000hsf.googlegroups.com>,
matthew.p...@gmail.com wrote:

Paragraph 1: "An ye harm none, do as ye will."

Paragraph 2: "All acts of love and pleasure are my acts, says the
Goddess."

Paragraph 3: Those are pretty much the entire basis of the Tradition of
which I am an initiate.

Blessed be,
Baird

Yowie

unread,
Mar 10, 2008, 7:22:29 PM3/10/08
to

Hi Baird, good to see you when reading SRQ (although I know you crossposted
from SRP).

Virtue: Love your Godde with the whole of your self, and love others as you
love yourself.
Desire: Is this (action, thing) in accord with the principle above?
Summary: Love.

BTW, I don't have a named tradition. I'm somewhere in the
Christo-Pagan-Quaker triangle, probably leaning more to the Christian/Quaker
corner, but there's still a heavy amount of Wiccan philosophy in there.

Yowie

Matthew Lowe

unread,
Mar 11, 2008, 5:11:41 AM3/11/08
to
> Paragraph 3: Those are pretty much the entire basis of the Tradition of
> which I am an initiate.
>
> Blessed be,
> Baird

Thanks, Baird. =)

Joseph Littleshoes

unread,
Mar 12, 2008, 4:25:51 PM3/12/08
to
matthew.p...@gmail.com wrote:

Define "virtue"?

Traditional Christian angelology - the seventh highest order of the
ninefold celestial hierarchy.

ORIGIN Middle English : from Old French vertu, from Latin virtus ‘valor,
merit, moral perfection,’ from vir ‘man.’

Given the subjective nature to say nothing of the relativity of morality
and ethics, whenever i see the world "virtue" i think of the male animal
and its breeder warrior aspects.
--
JL

.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages