Beetle Bailey

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Andrew David Simchik

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In <4mm5tq$a...@acme.freenet.columbus.oh.us> ksut...@freenet.columbus.oh.us (Krysta Sutterfield) writes:

> Was anyone else offended by the recent Beetle cartoon showing
>Beetle being beat up [yet again] after telling Sarge, "I love you, man"?
>In the strip, Beetle says it was a ploy to get Sarge's beer.
> Anyone know an address [e-mail or s-mail] to reach Mort Walker or
>his distributor?

WHAT?

I'm reminded of a wonderful cartoon for our humor magazine,
drawn by the inimitable Dennis Tucker, wherein Beetle spoke
up about the ban on gays in the military to Sarge. Sarge
replied, "I'm actually glad you hold this enlightened and
progressive viewpoint, Beetle."

BEETLE: You are?

SARGE: Yes. It gives me another excuse to bash you!

I hate Beetle Bailey almost as much as I hate B.C. I despise,
loathe, and otherwise detest B.C. with a violent burning passion.

I'm supposed to be writing a French paper on HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR,
so I have to go now. I offer that information in the hopes that
saying it will make it real.

Drewcifer, who is two papers and a final away from his BA...
--
________________________________________________________________
\ Andrew D. Simchik: as0...@uhura.cc.rochester.edu /
\ a.k.a. Drewcifer, Royal Porcupine and Schno Pianist /
\__________________________________________________________/

Eric Bohlman

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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Krysta Sutterfield (ksut...@freenet.columbus.oh.us) wrote:

: Was anyone else offended by the recent Beetle cartoon showing


: Beetle being beat up [yet again] after telling Sarge, "I love you, man"?
: In the strip, Beetle says it was a ploy to get Sarge's beer.

There's a thread on this currently taking place in rec.arts.comics.strips.


Rayder

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In article <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:
>
>You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the stunningly
>beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper curry.

This is a truly wonderful sentence.

Rayder
--
Rayder is the [ Industrial Strength Irritant and Dance Dog ]
e-mail: hka...@panix.com, web: <http://www.panix.com/~hkaplan>

Ellen Evans

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In article <ebohlmanD...@netcom.com>,

Isn't this connected to that ad series in which a guy trying to get his
father's/his brother's/his friend's beer says this and when the first target
catches on to him he just moves on to the next guy?

--
Ellen Evans 17 Across: The "her" of "Leave Her to Heaven"
je...@netcom.com New York Times, 9/30/94

Michael Thomas

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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Rayder (hka...@panix.com) wrote:
> In article <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:
> >
> >You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the stunningly
> >beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper curry.

> This is a truly wonderful sentence.

Sigh.

I'll have to content myself with the memory of Jagu's
mortar and pestle while visiting Derik in Amherst. I
wish I knew how to make curries like that. The perfume
of coriander is something that was stolen from heaven,
I'm sure.


Mike, who is marinating some pork chops
in Madeira, coriander, white pepper,
garlic and shallots to be grilled over
mesquite for din-din tonight and served
with a Madeira/veal stock reduction. Oh,
and the grilled leeks too. A nice floral
Condrieu, you say? Of course you did.

--
Michael Thomas (mi...@mtcc.com http://www.mtcc.com/~mike/)
Pass the bottle and damn the expense
I've heard it said by a man of sense
That the labouring classes could scarce live a day
If people like us didn't eat, drink and pay
-- A. H. Clough

ke...@worldnet.att.net

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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hka...@panix.com (Rayder) wrote:
>In article <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:
>>
>>You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the stunningly
>>beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper curry.
>
>This is a truly wonderful sentence.

Along with Mike Thomas's observations on the odor of coriander as a gift
from heaven, this reminds me of the wonder of smells that cling to some
of our memories.

For many years I had a garden apt in Manhattan, and as the backyard had
been ripped up and left derelict in the process of renovating the
building I was able to make my own private Eden from scratch.

At one point I had trained a small patch of mint plants into small
bushes, cutting them back over and over again until they developed into
sturdy little shrubs. One day while I was cutting back the branches and
throwing them on the path I noticed my boyfriend sunning himself on a
chaise at the other end of the garden.

He was a big, country boy, a grad student at Columbia, with a sweet face,
a huge grin and lake-blue eyes. I stood there with a bunch of clippings
in my hand, and he looked so delicious sweating in the sunlight. I
walked over to him, strewed the mint on him from head to foot; then
rubbed it on him with my hands. The scent was overwhelming, and he woke
up laughing.

We went inside and made love in the bedroom, which looked out onto the
garden, and the aroma of mint -- on him, on me, on the sheets -- has
become the scent of that entire affair for me.

And then there was the man who smelled of almond, my very most favorite
sexy aroma. But that was later.

Jack


Arne Adolfsen

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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WARNING!: boring ol' food queen talk follows!

In article <Dr1rH...@mtcc.com>
mi...@mtcc.com (Michael Thomas) writes:

> Mike, who is marinating some pork chops
> in Madeira, coriander, white pepper,
> garlic and shallots to be grilled over
> mesquite for din-din tonight and served
> with a Madeira/veal stock reduction. Oh,
> and the grilled leeks too. A nice floral
> Condrieu, you say? Of course you did.

If it weren't for the fact they're p*rk chops, I'd hop on the
next flight to Oakland and invite myself to din-din.

Speaking of fixing food, I have to start on Saturday's dinner
for a well-known motsser who's clearing out of his town and
staying with Ken and me this weekend rather than face the locals
on his birthday (I think he wants to remain anonymous on this
point) -- uh, where was I?, oh yes, I have to start fixing
Saturday's dinner *tonight*. I've gone Spanish for the past
half dozen dinners, but -- despite the fact that I just bought
Penelope Casas' newest book, _!Delicioso!_, which is on
regional Spanish cuisine -- this time I'm going hot-weather
Italian. So tonight I'll be making the vegetables (baby
artichokes, mushrooms, pearl onions) marinated in oil and lemon.
It's one of the antipasti. I haven't fixed on what the other
antipasti will be, but I'm starting to think that in addition
to the marinated vegetables I'd like to make Marcella Hazan's
grilled vine leaves stuffed with goat cheese, a cannellini salad
with sage and thyme, focaccia with sauteed garlic, maybe some
asparagus or something drizzled with olive oil and lemon juice.
And a real salad, too, of course. All in very small portions.
The pasta course has me worried. I think I'll do either penne
all'arrabbiata or bucatini (if I can find any) all'amatriciana --
fast, easy, and tasty. Or maybe spaghetti alla disperata? The
main course is vitello tonnato, for which I'm following Bugialli's
recipe which calls for *roasting* the veal loin with the tuna
rather than boiling it and adding a tuna-mayonnaise sauce after.
The recipe certainly does look promising. (Yeah, dinner party suicide.
I haven't tested the recipe on my guinea pig roommate yet.) (Hi Ken!
Hi Season!) Then for dessert is that fabu lemon ice with Vodka-
marinated grapefruit slices I've made before. All of this to be
washed down with some good wine. And because so much of it is
made in advance, I may even be able to mingle with the guests.

Watch -- the temps are gonna drop to the 60F's this weekend, just
when I've gone to the trouble of making food meant to be eaten when
it's in the upper 80F's and 90F's.


--
-- Arne -------------------------------------------- adol...@mizar.usc.edu --
"Who's stoned? I am merely traveling incognito." -- Neely O'Hara

Andrew David Simchik

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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In <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:

>In article <1996May7.0...@galileo.cc.rochester.edu>,


>Andrew David Simchik <as0...@uhura.cc.rochester.edu> wrote:

>>I'm supposed to be writing a French paper on HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR,

>Ah, memories. You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the

>stunningly beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper
>curry.

>And solved my upcoming "what to serve at the dinner party this weekend"
>problem. Thank you for both.

You're welcome for both. I wish the paper were so easily solved.
It's not that I don't know what to write about; it's just that
I have to struggle against minimal francophonia (new word alert)
in order to write it in French...

Greg Havican

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May 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/7/96
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This gets graphic, and some of you may find it very disturbing, so if your
sqeemish about such things, hit "n" now.

In message <4mo8sk$l...@mtinsc01-mgt.ops.worldnet.att.net> -
ke...@worldnet.att.net7 May 1996 19:39:00 GMT writes a nice post about mint
and a man which started with:
:>
:>hka...@panix.com (Rayder) wrote:
:>>In article <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:
:>>>
:>>>You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the stunningly


:>>>beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper curry.

:>>
:>>This is a truly wonderful sentence.


:>
:>Along with Mike Thomas's observations on the odor of coriander as a gift
:>from heaven, this reminds me of the wonder of smells that cling to some
:>of our memories.

Houston. 1980 (I think). I had just been made a full member of the
American Leathermen without having to go through the usual pledge period.
After a roudy evening at The Drum and The Loading Dock, we headed back to
our club president's house which was just across the street from the bars.
Unbeknownst to me, the other club members had spent all evening planning an
initiation orgy for me and there were almost 70 men at his house when we
walked in the door.

I was drunk. I was speeding my tits off. I took one look at the crowd of
hot men of all shapes, sizes, and colors and proceeded to rip my clothes
off and jump into the middle of the sweating, writhing group of people and
spent literally hours doing anything and everything I could manage to do
with my body and the bodies of the men around me.

During the course of the early morning hours, I kept going back to one man
who caught my eye, and my heart, over and over again. He was a small
beauty of about 5'7" and 130 lbs. His body was lithe and defined, with a
light dusting of fine hair on his chest and legs. His beard was short and
blond and he had the most beautiful green eyes that sparkled with a
mischeviousness whenever we would look at each other. I was seriously in
lust and we couldn't get enough of each other.

Around 07:00, we found ourselves alone in the back bedroom of the house.
The franticness of the hours had begun to die down and we lay together
gently touching and caressing each other. We started kissing and continued
for what seemed like hours. Finally, he asked me to do the one thing that
we hadn't done that morning. He wanted me to fist him.

Since the orgy hadn't been planned in advance, we were limited on the types
of lubricants available to us. Our host was a food distributor, so his
kitchen was well stocked, including a couple of cans of butter flavored
Crisco (he didn't have any plain Crisco which was *the* lubricant of choice
back in those days).

I went out to the living room and liberated one of the cans from the
throbing mound still going at it out there. When I returned to the
bedroom, my friend (Chris) proceeded to lube up my right hand and arm. I
then lubed his ass and we began the intricate dance of fisting. I have
very large hands and I was concerned about hurting him until he loosened
up. I didn't have to be. He was so worked up by this time that I had to
restrain his enthuseasum.

What happened next is almost beyond words for me. As the fister, there is
the enormous responsibility of literally having someone's life in your
hands. If proper caution is not used, it is very easy to do internal
damage to your partner. It is this danger, and this responsibility, that
lends the edge to the entire experience.

Watching your partner respond to the sensations that are going on within
his body. Realizing that you have this power of such great pleasure over
someone. Feeling the pulse of his blood as it races through his body.
Placeing the back of your hand against the upper part of his rectum and
feeling the beat of his heart and the expansion of his lungs as he takes in
a breath. Simultaneously watching and feeling as his whole body is wracked
by waves of orgasm. Realizing that you've shot all over yourself and him
without ever touching yourself. All from the fear, excitement, and power
that has come over you both.

To this day, whenever I smell butter flavored Crisco, I'm transported back
to that morning and to that moment with Chris.

Greg

There's a P.S. to this story. Three days later, my friends who owned the
house had to replace all the carpet. As you may or may not know, butter
flavored Crisco has the most rancid smell after being exposed to the air
for a few days. It was the most expensive orgy they ever threw, but it was
priceless to me.

Greg Havican / "You! Out of the pool!" -- gene police
---------------------/------------------------------------------
topm...@io.com / http://www.io.com/~topman4u
Finger for PGP Key / Check out ModelTrek: The Reviews at
/ http://www.io.com/~topman4u/ModelTrek.html
----------------------------------------------------------------


Brian Kane

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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In article <4molct$j...@anarchy.io.com>,
Greg Havican (Greg.H...@io.com) wrote:

+To this day, whenever I smell butter flavored Crisco, I'm transported back
+to that morning and to that moment with Chris.

So, can I make some cookies for ya? My mother
taught me to always use Crisco in my cookies.
--
Brian Kane~~ka...@buast7.bu.edu~~http://buast7.bu.edu/~kane/
Please don't send e-mail to ka...@BUAST1.bu.edu---it'll bounce.
I charge $10.00 per line for reading unsolicited commercial e-mail.

Sim Aberson

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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In article <4mo8r1$f...@mizar.usc.edu>,

Arne Adolfsen <adol...@mizar.usc.edu> wrote:
>If it weren't for the fact they're p*rk chops, I'd hop on the
>next flight to Oakland and invite myself to din-din.

I'm sure if you ask him nicely, Mike'll make this out of the same type of
chicken from which comes chicken pancetta.

This weekend I decided to just do a dessert for a number of non-motss
friends. Well, mostly non-motss, but the one other motsser isn't exactly
a friend. I have planned a guanabana lime souffle with key lime butter, a
chocolate-rum flan, and an ice to be determined later, and maybe some
fresh tropical fruit if I can find a mamey, monstera, or cherimoya. All
washed down with copious amounts of Bonny Doon muscat cannelli and Cuban
coffee. I've never made any of these things before, except the Cuban
coffee, of course.


--
"Mi-yammi! The extraordinary city, with its Judeo-Cubano population, its
mix of surgical-appliance and sex-fetishist obsessions, takes the American
melting pot past the boil. It represents pretty much everything Patrick
J. Buchanan hates." David Denby, New York magazine film critic

Greg Havican

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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In message <4mqcg6$g...@news.bu.edu> - ka...@buast7.bu.edu (Brian Kane)8 May
1996 14:52:54 GMT writes:
:>
:>In article <4molct$j...@anarchy.io.com>,
:>Greg Havican (Greg.H...@io.com) wrote:
:>
:>+To this day, whenever I smell butter flavored Crisco, I'm transported back
:>+to that morning and to that moment with Chris.
:>
:>So, can I make some cookies for ya? My mother

:>taught me to always use Crisco in my cookies.

Anytime you want.

Greg

----------------------/----------------------------------------------------
Greg Havican / http://www.io.com/~topman4u
topm...@io.com / Finger for PGP key
----------------/----------------------------------------------------------
"Of all the dogs whom I have served, I've never known one who understood
so much of what I say, or held it in such deep contempt." -- E.B. White
(On the subject of Dachshunds)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------


a flying squirrel

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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Sim Aberson <cz...@freenet.carleton.ca> wrote:

>I'm sure if you ask him nicely, Mike'll make this out of the same type of
>chicken from which comes chicken pancetta.

I did and he did. When I read the post about pork chops, I freaked
and called him. It was immediately substituted for a chicken breast.
Pork just ain't my thing.

Oh, the menu? Glad you asked!

Roasted Garlic and Goat Cheese Souffles (David Bruce '91 Pinot Noir)

Roasted Red Pepper, Tomoato, and Garlic Soup with Creme Fraiche and
Garlic Crouton (Bonny Doon '92 Clos du Gilroy (Grenache))

Pork Chops (or Chicken Breast) in Madeira and Veal Stock Reduction
with Brasied Leeks in Creamy Mustard Sauce (some Viognier that I
have since lost the vinter and vintage for)

Warm Apple Tartlets with Creme Fraiche (Dow '77 Port)

Entertainment: why Charlie, of course.

This should only require 5,206 minutes on the StairMaster today to
neutralize. Nonetheless, a public thanks to Mike for his never-
ending generosity and limitless cooking talent. As I mentioned
at the dinner table last night, I'd love to drag Arne up for a
bake-off between the two.
--
a flying squirrel Richard W. Johnson skw...@mtcc.com

"I could never be a dancer. Were I to try even one split,
my intestines would fall out all over the place."
-- Michael Hennahane

Michael Thomas

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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a flying squirrel (skw...@mtcc.com) wrote:
> Sim Aberson <cz...@freenet.carleton.ca> wrote:

> >I'm sure if you ask him nicely, Mike'll make this out of the same type of
> >chicken from which comes chicken pancetta.

> I did and he did. When I read the post about pork chops, I freaked
> and called him. It was immediately substituted for a chicken breast.
> Pork just ain't my thing.

All these Kosher gentiles!

Feh.

> Oh, the menu? Glad you asked!

> Roasted Garlic and Goat Cheese Souffles (David Bruce '91 Pinot Noir)

Acshilly it was a Navarro Pinot Noir that Mr. Hennahane
provided. Quite yummy stuff.

> Roasted Red Pepper, Tomoato, and Garlic Soup with Creme Fraiche and
> Garlic Crouton (Bonny Doon '92 Clos du Gilroy (Grenache))

This is one of those recipes that I totally winged.
Aric had a roasted red pepper soup in Boston, but I
really didn't remember much about it except that the
texture looked intriguing. I used some of my beef stock
that I made a while back, and that really seemed to
do the trick of making for a very hardy soup.
I must say that the Grenache, to my pallet, tasted
a lot more like Beaujolais. Maybe I'm not familiar enough
with pure grenache based things (though they are the
bulk of most CNdP's and Gigondas, as well as most
everything from Provence), but I suspect that 'ol Randall
Graham has his terriors looking like something about
300 miles to the north.

> Pork Chops (or Chicken Breast) in Madeira and Veal Stock Reduction
> with Brasied Leeks in Creamy Mustard Sauce (some Viognier that I
> have since lost the vinter and vintage for)

The next time I BBQ, I swear that I'm going to appoint
a flame tender. There really is a trick to BBQ'ing
properly which I don't know/trust: you should be able
poke at meat to determine how done it is. There is a
certain amount of give which tells you where it is. I
guess that practice is the only thing you can hope for
as cooking times with a BBQ are totally useless. (a
medium fire: somewhere between absolute zero and melts
lead.)

> Warm Apple Tartlets with Creme Fraiche (Dow '77 Port)

> This should only require 5,206 minutes on the StairMaster today to


> neutralize. Nonetheless, a public thanks to Mike for his never-
> ending generosity and limitless cooking talent. As I mentioned
> at the dinner table last night, I'd love to drag Arne up for a
> bake-off between the two.

Oh, heavens. It should probably be taped. It would
probably be even more fun than those Graham Kerr shows
before he became a tee-totaling, isnt-this-great-there's-
only-1-gram-of-fat-in-this-horrible-approximation-of-food
fundamaniac boor.

Charlie Fulton

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May 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/8/96
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a flying squirrel (skw...@mtcc.com) wrote:

[re: Michael's dinner last night]

: Entertainment: why Charlie, of course.

Really? I recall sitting off in the corner much of the evening
quietly sparing people my shit-fuck-piss mood and not saying
terribly much otherwise. Except to do my Jessica impersonation,
but that was on request.

--
Charlie Fulton---foultone@mtcc.com---http://www.mtcc.com/~foultone/
"I want to find some nice girl at Pride that I can beat senseless."
Stephanie Smith

Todd Morman

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
to

In article <4molct$j...@anarchy.io.com>,

Greg Havican <Greg.H...@io.com> wrote:
>This gets graphic, and some of you may find it very disturbing, so if your
>sqeemish about such things, hit "n" now.

[...]

>What happened next is almost beyond words for me. As the fister, there is
>the enormous responsibility of literally having someone's life in your
>hands. If proper caution is not used, it is very easy to do internal
>damage to your partner. It is this danger, and this responsibility, that
>lends the edge to the entire experience.
>
>Watching your partner respond to the sensations that are going on within
>his body. Realizing that you have this power of such great pleasure over
>someone. Feeling the pulse of his blood as it races through his body.
>Placeing the back of your hand against the upper part of his rectum and
>feeling the beat of his heart and the expansion of his lungs as he takes in
>a breath. Simultaneously watching and feeling as his whole body is wracked
>by waves of orgasm. Realizing that you've shot all over yourself and him
>without ever touching yourself. All from the fear, excitement, and power
>that has come over you both.
>
>To this day, whenever I smell butter flavored Crisco, I'm transported back
>to that morning and to that moment with Chris.

*Jeeez-us!*

I have never seen anyone explain fisting like that before. That is some
scarily intense stuff.

todd trying to remember how to breathe morman

Charlie Fulton

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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Anthony J. Rzepela (rzep...@netaxs.com) wrote:
: Charlie Fulton (foul...@mtcc.com) wrote:

: : Really? I recall sitting off in the corner much of the evening


: : quietly sparing people my shit-fuck-piss mood and not saying
: : terribly much otherwise.

: "Smile! It's not so bad!"

But is it safe?

Chuck "Nobody wants to play with Szell-in-the-box" Fulton

ObNonMovieBuffs: MARATHON MAN

David T. Weinberg

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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In article <4mrouh$a...@newz.oit.unc.edu>
tmo...@email.unc.edu (Todd Morman) writes:

> I have never seen anyone explain fisting like that before. That is some
> scarily intense stuff.
>
> todd trying to remember how to breathe morman


mormon?

**************************************
David Weinberg '96 / D...@Dartmouth.EDU
Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA
Majors: Film Studies/Cognitive Science
**************************************

Greg Parkinson

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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In article <4mqaet$q...@freenet-news.carleton.ca>,
cz...@freenet.carleton.ca (Sim Aberson) wrote:

[....]

> This weekend I decided to just do a dessert for a number of non-motss
> friends. Well, mostly non-motss, but the one other motsser isn't exactly
> a friend. I have planned a guanabana lime souffle with key lime butter, a

I guess guanabana doesn't ship well. I wish I could find them
here. I <heart> guanabana.

> chocolate-rum flan, and an ice to be determined later, and maybe some
> fresh tropical fruit if I can find a mamey, monstera, or cherimoya. All

What does mamey taste like fresh? I've only ever had it in a
cuban-style milkshake.

> washed down with copious amounts of Bonny Doon muscat cannelli and Cuban
> coffee. I've never made any of these things before, except the Cuban
> coffee, of course.

I <heart> muscat cannelli.

-----------------------------------------------------
Greg Parkinson
g...@cinenet.net
-----------------------------------------------------

Andrew David Simchik

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
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In <4mnmg7$p...@panix.com> hka...@panix.com (Rayder) writes:

>In article <4mmqso$k...@xochi.tezcat.com> se...@tezcat.com (Ilona Koren-Deutsch) writes:
>>
>>You've just brought to mind my old friend Sayeeda, the stunningly
>>beautiful Bengali woman who taught me how to make a proper curry.

>This is a truly wonderful sentence.

And I keep reading it and getting Morrissey songs stuck in my head.
Damn! Damn! Damn!

Greg Havican

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May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
to

In message <4mrouh$a...@newz.oit.unc.edu> - tmo...@email.unc.edu (Todd
Morman)9 May 1996 03:31:29 GMT writes:
:>
:>In article <4molct$j...@anarchy.io.com>,
:>Greg Havican <Greg.H...@io.com> wrote:
:>>This gets graphic, and some of you may find it very disturbing, so if your

:>>sqeemish about such things, hit "n" now.
:>
[Fisting description snipped]

:>>To this day, whenever I smell butter flavored Crisco, I'm transported back


:>>to that morning and to that moment with Chris.

:>
:>*Jeeez-us!*
:>
:>I have never seen anyone explain fisting like that before. That is some
:>scarily intense stuff.

Although I didn't put it in the original post (because I didn't want to
detract from the description), I should say at this point that fisting is
*not* an activity to engage in with someone you don't trust.

It is one of the most dangerous of sexual activities you can engage in and
great care must be both taken and exercised so that you don't damage your
partner or, if you're the fistee, you aren't damaged.

No, I'm not going to say "do not try this at home".

ke...@worldnet.att.net

unread,
May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
to

In article <4mrouh$a...@newz.oit.unc.edu>
tmo...@email.unc.edu (Todd Morman) writes:
>

> I have never seen anyone explain fisting like that before. That is some
> scarily intense stuff.

Missed that article, but since it was about scents did it refer to
one of the biggest mistakes of 70's -- grape-scented lubricant.
The odor of that stuff was so incredibly powerful once it liquified
that it penetrated even outside your apt. And fuck in front of an open
window? Never! You'd be covered with more flies than a corpse.

This was right about the same time as those big Day-glo daisies with
stickum on the back came out.

Jack

Brian Kane

unread,
May 9, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/9/96
to

In article <4mqaet$q...@freenet-news.carleton.ca>,
Sim Aberson (cz...@freenet.carleton.ca) wrote:

+This weekend I decided to just do a dessert for a number of non-motss
+friends. Well, mostly non-motss, but the one other motsser isn't exactly
+a friend. I have planned a guanabana lime souffle with key lime butter

I love guanabana (where does the accent go?), but I have
a hard time finding it here, even in the large Hispanic
supermarkets. The best I can usually do is to buy
nectar (Goya, *gasp*) in bulk. Have you seen any
pastes being sold, like you see guava paste?

Sim Aberson

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

In article <glp-090596...@ppp69.cinenet.net>,

Greg Parkinson <g...@cinenet.net> wrote:
>I guess guanabana doesn't ship well. I wish I could find them
>here. I <heart> guanabana.

I think it mushes easily. I have trouble finding it in Miami, where a few
acres of it grow. It's amazing fresh. I think it's probably my favourite
fruit.

My recipe calls for using frozen mash because the fresh fruit is very
difficult to work with.

>What does mamey taste like fresh? I've only ever had it in a
>cuban-style milkshake.

It's definitely an acquired taste. I'd imagine you could find it out
there. A correspondent tells me that it's available in a supermarket in
Meadville, PA, a small town midway between Erie and Pittsburgh, PA, in one
of their local supermarkets.

It has an odd flavour. I think mainly because of the colour, people
compare it to sweet potatoes.

Sim Aberson

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

In article <4mtf08$8...@news.bu.edu>, Brian Kane <ka...@buast7.bu.edu> wrote:
>I love guanabana (where does the accent go?),

gua-na'-ba-na.

>but I have
>a hard time finding it here, even in the large Hispanic
>supermarkets. The best I can usually do is to buy
>nectar (Goya, *gasp*) in bulk. Have you seen any
>pastes being sold, like you see guava paste?

Guava lends itself to paste (pasta), but guanabana has a completely
different texture. Goya sells frozen guanabana pulp, which is what I
usually use.

Sim, who decided to make a passionfruit pie instead of an ice.

John Whiteside

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

Brian Kane <ka...@buast7.bu.edu> wrote:

> I love guanabana (where does the accent go?), but I have


> a hard time finding it here, even in the large Hispanic
> supermarkets. The best I can usually do is to buy
> nectar (Goya, *gasp*) in bulk. Have you seen any
> pastes being sold, like you see guava paste?

Have you tried Tropical Foods in Roxbury?

==================================================
John Whiteside | South End, Boston, Massachusetts
jo...@shore.net | http://www.shore.net/~johnw/
==================================================

Nelson Minar

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

cz...@freenet.carleton.ca (Sim Aberson) writes:
>Guava lends itself to paste (pasta), but guanabana has a completely
>different texture. Goya sells frozen guanabana pulp, which is what I
>usually use.

I've been working for a long time now on acquiring the materials
necessary to make mango lassi. Mango syrups (Torani) are nowhere near
correct - way too sweet, not nearly enough mango. I bought a can of
imported mango pulp and used it this week, same problem: not enough
mango taste. Is there no substitute for fresh? There has to be -
restaurants in the US can't count on fresh mango year round.

The other ingredients - good yogurt, purified water, cardamom and rose
water are easy to come by. A bit of honey, too, if you want it sweeter.

Nelson, who had the happy fortune of having friends drop by
unexpectedly for dinner and was prepared to serve them.
--
__
nel...@santafe.edu \/ http://www.santafe.edu/~nelson/
PGP key 9D719FAD Fingerprint 3B 9B 8E 58 1C 90 57 3E B7 99 ED 13 65 2E 0B 24

a flying squirrel

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

Nelson Minar <nel...@santafe.edu> wrote:

>Nelson, who had the happy fortune of having friends drop by
>unexpectedly for dinner and was prepared to serve them.

[choked up] Only a few more visits to the CotU and your training
will be complete. I guess we'll have to throw a Debutante Ball
for you for your "coming out" to Society.

[sniffle honk]


--
a flying squirrel Richard W. Johnson skw...@mtcc.com

"I got a new car in December and have already managed to destroy its
rear bumper. I think I am not gifted for driving." -- E McManus

Sim Aberson

unread,
May 10, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/10/96
to

In article <ozd94ce...@nelson.santafe.edu>,

Nelson Minar <nel...@santafe.edu> wrote:
>I've been working for a long time now on acquiring the materials
>necessary to make mango lassi. Mango syrups (Torani) are nowhere near
>correct - way too sweet, not nearly enough mango. I bought a can of
>imported mango pulp and used it this week, same problem: not enough
>mango taste. Is there no substitute for fresh? There has to be -
>restaurants in the US can't count on fresh mango year round.

Because of South America, mangoes are available all year 'round. For good
flavour, try either frozen mango pulp, which is available in Caribbean
markets near the frozen parcha (passionfruit), frozen guanabana, and
frozen tamarind. If that doesn't work, I've had great success with
syrups. I recommend Naturola Brand, from Puerto Rico (809) 781-5200, or
in your local Caribbean market. I'm making the passionfruit pie out of
their sirop de fruta parcha right this very moment.

Sim, who just realized he left his pie pan in Florida

Ken Rudolph

unread,
May 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/11/96
to

Nelson Minar (nel...@santafe.edu) wrote:
: cz...@freenet.carleton.ca (Sim Aberson) writes:

: I've been working for a long time now on acquiring the materials


: necessary to make mango lassi. Mango syrups (Torani) are nowhere near
: correct - way too sweet, not nearly enough mango. I bought a can of
: imported mango pulp and used it this week, same problem: not enough
: mango taste. Is there no substitute for fresh? There has to be -
: restaurants in the US can't count on fresh mango year round.

Price Club has these huge jars filled with mango slices in something
lighter than syrup. I imagine that pureed, these would be perfect for a
year-round fresh mango kind of thing.


--
--Ken Rudolph aka Lex (ke...@netcom.com *** k...@mtcc.com *** OR
ke...@worldnet.att.net)
---->See you in Chicago, May 30-June 3<-----

Jack Hamilton

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May 11, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/11/96
to

as0...@uhura.cc.rochester.edu (Andrew David Simchik) wrote:

>I'm reminded of a wonderful cartoon for our humor magazine,
>drawn by the inimitable Dennis Tucker, wherein Beetle spoke
>up about the ban on gays in the military to Sarge.

There *was* a Beetle Bailey strip about don't-ask-don't-tell,
which greatly surprised me.

>I hate Beetle Bailey almost as much as I hate B.C.

There is much to object to in Beetle Bailey, but it's far, far ahead of
B.C. in every category I can think of, including humor, intelligence, plot,
character development, and quality of drawing.

---------------------------
Jack Hamilton j...@acm.org

Todd Morman

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
to

David T. Weinberg <D...@Dartmouth.EDU> wrote:

>tmo...@email.unc.edu (Todd Morman) writes:
>
>> todd trying to remember how to breathe morman
>
>
>mormon?

Nope.

todd catching up again morman

Todd Morman

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May 12, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/12/96
to

After Greg's amazing story, and the caveat, I hesitate to post something
so, uh, mild, but the scents thing reminded me of how much I like the
smell of some of my friends. One in particular who I really love once left
his coat in my car; the next day was chilly so I ended up wearing it. It
was wonderful, as if he were following me around, watching over me, like
some kind of guardian ghost. I felt so *comforted* that day, just having
his smell (a bit of cologne, some Aveda stuff he uses, cigarette smoke--I
know, that may not sound great, but it was totally him) around me.

Then there was the day after the first sex I had with a real boyfriend;
we'd slept together, woke up together, showered together, and then gone
off to our respective classes. Even after the shower, his scent was all
over me; I remember sitting in the lecture room, smiling to myself and
smelling my arms and hands over and over and over again. It lasted all
day, too.

<sigh>

todd giving the inner cynic a rest morman

Kevin Michael Vail

unread,
May 13, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/13/96
to

In article <4mu33d$8...@freenet-news.carleton.ca>,
cz...@freenet.carleton.ca (Sim Aberson) wrote:

>In article <glp-090596...@ppp69.cinenet.net>,
>Greg Parkinson <g...@cinenet.net> wrote:
>>What does mamey taste like fresh? I've only ever had it in a
>>cuban-style milkshake.
>
>It's definitely an acquired taste. I'd imagine you could find it out
>there. A correspondent tells me that it's available in a supermarket in
>Meadville, PA, a small town midway between Erie and Pittsburgh, PA, in one
>of their local supermarkets.

That would be my lover David. Mind you, he definitely wasn't looking to
find one!

>It has an odd flavour. I think mainly because of the colour, people
>compare it to sweet potatoes.

"Odd" is a good way to describe the flavor, and "different" is a good way
to describe the texture. I think I would probably end up liking (as
opposed to "not minding") it if it were something I saw/ate frequently. I
don't think we'll ever get David within five feet of one again, though.
Even in Meadville. ;-)

Kevin "Oy vey! Mamey!" Vail
--
Kevin Michael Vail | Time gave both darkness and dreams to you...
ke...@vailbox.washington.dc.us | -- Roma Ryan

David A. Kaye

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May 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/14/96
to

Jack Hamilton wrote the quoted material below:

" There *was* a Beetle Bailey strip about don't-ask-don't-tell,
" which greatly surprised me.

I saw the strip and it blew me away. Also, Mort Walker, the man
responsible for the strip (I can't quite call him either the cartoonist
or the writer since he now has a team doing both functions), is the
leader of a group of cartoonists who set aside certain days to do strips
on important issues. If you remember, a few years ago about 3 dozen
comics did strips on hunger. Yes, it is surprising that Beetle Bailey is
one of the more progressive strips out there. BC and Wizard of Id failed
long ago to be anything but recycled vaudeville jokes.


--
(c) 1996 scul: An oar used at the stern
David Kaye of a boat to propel it.


david broudy

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May 14, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/14/96
to

In article <4najqu$i...@crl2.crl.com>, d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) wrote:

- Yes, it is surprising that Beetle Bailey is
- one of the more progressive strips out there.

It sure is, the way the ol General ogles Miss Buxley and how her plain
olive-drab co-worker has lil bumps instead of big knockers and how Sgt.
Lugg keeps throwing herself at Sarge and how Killer keeps slyly puttin the
moves on the babes.

Yes, Beetle Bailey is the *acme* of modern feminist/queer thought.

- BC and Wizard of Id failed
- long ago to be anything but recycled vaudeville jokes.

I guess Johnny Hart's born-again Christianity just flew right by you then...

* http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~broudy/ *

"Blue canary in the outlet by the lightswitch, who watches over you!"

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