Texas Cowboy term help needed

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Greg Parkinson

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Oct 8, 1993, 9:48:31 AM10/8/93
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As the texification of Citibank's technology continues,
we here in NYC are attempting to learn as much as we
can about the natives, their culture, and the festive
and colorful vocabulary they sport.

What's a "dogie", as in "Git along, lit'l dogie"?

--
Greg Parkinson Phone: 212-657-7814 Fax: 212-657-4599
Citibank,111 Wall Street E-Mail: g...@fig.citib.com
New York, New York 10043
The opinions expressed are my own and not those of the big 'ol bank.

Steven Levine

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Oct 8, 1993, 10:49:30 AM10/8/93
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In article <CEKzo...@fig.citib.com> g...@fig.citib.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:

>What's a "dogie", as in "Git along, lit'l dogie"?

A stray calf, like we sometimes get a glimpse of when folks
where bathrobes on our favorite tv shows.

-Steven


Chuk Craig

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Oct 8, 1993, 12:27:56 PM10/8/93
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Greg Parkinson writes

>
> As the texification of Citibank's technology continues,
> we here in NYC are attempting to learn as much as we
> can about the natives, their culture, and the festive
> and colorful vocabulary they sport.
>
> What's a "dogie", as in "Git along, lit'l dogie"?
>

It's like a heifer. Only more Texan.

chuk

--

Charles E. Craig
University Computer Center Internet: ch...@nwu.edu
Northwestern University NeXTmail: ch...@giskard.acns.nwu.edu

Chip Graham

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Oct 8, 1993, 3:21:12 PM10/8/93
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In article <CEKzo...@fig.citib.com>,

Greg Parkinson <g...@fig.citib.com> wrote:
>
>What's a "dogie", as in "Git along, lit'l dogie"?
>
That is a nickname for cattle. As them ol' pokes were herding
those dogie's out across the prairies, they often sang songs
to them, much the way some city folk talk to their poodles.

>--
>Greg Parkinson Phone: 212-657-7814 Fax: 212-657-4599
>Citibank,111 Wall Street E-Mail: g...@fig.citib.com
>New York, New York 10043
>The opinions expressed are my own and not those of the big 'ol bank.


--
Chip Graham cgr...@convex.com +1 214 497 4642
Convex Computer Corporation
3000 Waterview Parkway
Box 833851, Richardson,Tx,75083

Stuart McDow

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Oct 10, 1993, 12:16:27 PM10/10/93
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g...@fig.citib.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>
> As the texification of Citibank's technology continues,
> we here in NYC are attempting to learn as much as we
> can about the natives, their culture, and the festive
> and colorful vocabulary they sport.


Ummmmm.......

Could you please explain more about "the texification
of Citibank's technology" ?

I really, really, hate to be anal about this, but I hope we don't veer
off into Texas-bashing. The simple fact is Texas is no more. It has
seen such an influx of people over the last thirty years, that to me,
Texas is nothing like it was. I'm not trying to say that new people is
bad, but the new people that came to Texas didn't take the time to
figure out the native (ie "when in Rome...."). I'm a seventh
generation Texan, which doesn't make me better that anyone else, but I
really have been having this sense of 'there goes the neighborhood'.

I'm not really sure what I'm trying to say here (that should be
obvious). I guess I'm one of those idiot Texans that really do love
this place, and can't bear to see the changes that have happened.

We've all read about how Seattle has been changed irrevocably because
of all the influx of Californians. The same thing is happening in
Texas, and especially in my beloved Austin. It makes me sad.

Please don't get me wrong, I love people coming here. I just wish that
when they move here, they take the time to learn what it's about. It
takes time.....

Sorry about the rant (or whatever this was), but Texas bashing is the
*one thing* that gets my hackles up.

Thanks for letting me vent.


--
| Stuart McDow, System Administrator | smc...@mamba.asg.arlut.utexas.edu |
| Applied Research Laboratories | +1 512 835 3672 w |
| The University of Texas at Austin | |
| 10000 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 | |

cann...@omrf.uokhsc.edu

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Oct 11, 1993, 2:19:02 PM10/11/93
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Greg,

A dogie is a calf. Suggest you check your local library for a copy of
anything written by J. Frank Dobie, especially a book called Cow People.
It's a collection of stories and tall tales from ranching folks and is
really great. You might see if you could find a copy of the Texas
Dictionary of the English Language. Example: *harkut* - what yyew
git when yew go to the barbershop = "I need a harkut".

If you visited Dallas before, you might have noticed traffic signs
that said Drive Friendly. Well, when I was passing through there last
week for a job interview in San Antonio, the back of the yellow triangle
signs was changed to read Drive Gently. Is that some kind of a sexual
thang??

M.
Native Texan

cann...@omrf.uokhsc.edu

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Oct 11, 1993, 2:26:17 PM10/11/93
to

Correct me if I'm wrong, Steven, but I believe a *stray* calf is called
a maverick and that a dogie is just a plain, ol' in the herd calf.

M.

Greg Parkinson

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Oct 11, 1993, 4:09:39 PM10/11/93
to

>g...@fig.citib.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>>
>> As the texification of Citibank's technology continues,
>> we here in NYC are attempting to learn as much as we
>> can about the natives, their culture, and the festive
>> and colorful vocabulary they sport.


>Ummmmm.......

>Could you please explain more about "the texification
>of Citibank's technology" ?

Citibank, a New York-based bank, is opening a
development center in Dallas.

>Sorry about the rant (or whatever this was), but Texas bashing is the
>*one thing* that gets my hackles up.

There is lots about Texas that inspires awe.

--
---------------------------------------------------------
Greg Parkinson New York, New York g...@panix.com
...beauty is convulsive or not at all...

Leith Chu

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Oct 11, 1993, 5:09:08 PM10/11/93
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In article <299cgr$3...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu> smc...@mamba.asg.arlut.utexas.edu

(Stuart McDow) writes:
>
>I really, really, hate to be anal about this, but I hope we don't veer
>off into Texas-bashing.
I believe most of us agree.

>The simple fact is Texas is no more. It has
>seen such an influx of people over the last thirty years, that to me,
>Texas is nothing like it was. I'm not trying to say that new people is
>bad, but the new people that came to Texas didn't take the time to
>figure out the native (ie "when in Rome...."). I'm a seventh
>generation Texan, which doesn't make me better that anyone else, but I
>really have been having this sense of 'there goes the neighborhood'.

Maybe, but all things have to change somehow. The goal is to preserve
whatever is integral to your state, without locking yourselves into what
would eventually become anachronistic.

>I'm not really sure what I'm trying to say here (that should be
>obvious). I guess I'm one of those idiot Texans that really do love
>this place, and can't bear to see the changes that have happened.

Trust me. You love your home, you're no idiot.

>Please don't get me wrong, I love people coming here. I just wish that
>when they move here, they take the time to learn what it's about. It
>takes time.....

Yep. And it's your job as a Texan to teach them. But be warned. It won't
be one-way. As they learn more about you, you'll learn more about them.
When my parents moved here, they had a lot to learn about Canada. But
Canada also had a lot to learn about them. Where does this leave me? I
secretly put butter on my rice (don't tell Mom) and put Hoisin sauce on my
burgers. The Multicultural Society would be so proud!

>Thanks for letting me vent.

No problem. You were a gentleman about it (by the way, maybe I've been
fortunate, but I've never met a Texan, straight or gay, I didn't like. Do
you send these men and women out as samples, or what?)

panda cub (Leith Chu) | No, I don't touch-type. I do a lot more than just
val...@atlas.cs.upei.ca | *touch* my types. Daddies! Cowboys! Bears! Denim!
Charlottetown, PEI | Uniforms! Rope! Leather! Hankies! Yeah! Fun! Yeah!

Steven Levine

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Oct 11, 1993, 5:31:56 PM10/11/93
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>In article <1993Oct8.0...@hemlock.cray.com>,
ste...@cray.com (Steven Levine) writes:

...An article I cancelled within minutes of sending because
my recent tendency to type homophones got the better of
me, and yet it seems to have gotten out anyway...

>> A stray calf, like we sometimes get a glimpse of when folks
>> where bathrobes on our favorite tv shows.

^^^^
wear

>Correct me if I'm wrong, Steven, but I believe a *stray* calf is called
>a maverick and that a dogie is just a plain, ol' in the herd calf.

I double-checked my American Heritage, which claims that a dogie
is motherless or stray. I don't have enough cowboy experience
myself to vouch for the accuracy of this.

I do know a cowpunching song, though, written by Genny
Haley:

I am an old cowpuncher, I punch those cows so hard
I have me a cowpunching bag, set up in my backyard
This bag is made of leather, and so are cows, of course
And when I'm finished punching cows, I go and punch my horse.


It's been lonesome in the saddle, ever since the old horse died
...and so forth...

--

My favorite cowpoke song, though, is from an old Bing Crosby
recording: You don't know what lonesome is `til you get
to herding cows. This is worth repeating in its entirety:

When the hoot-owl toots his too-loo to the wail of the nick-wick hen
And the ching-pung chirps in the chilly night, it's mighty lonesome then
It's mightly lonesome when the breese howls through the jackpine bows
Man, you don't know what lonesome is, 'til you get to herding cows.

Now the ordinary fella, he gets off on a Saturday night
And he gets a chance to see his friends, which ain't no more than right
But when the saddle is your home, there's no time to carouse
Man, you don't know what lonesome is, 'til you get to herding cows.

Now you may often wonder, why a cowboy sings so sad
He's thinking of the many things in life he never had
No pal, no gal for company, just the cattle as they browse
Man, you don't know what lonesome is, 'til you get to herding cows.

Now the keeper of the lighthouse, and the sailor man at sea
And the lookout on the mountaintop, ain't got a thing on me
'Cause I got all the lonesomeness the common law allows
Man,you don't know what loneseme is 'til you get to herding cows.

----

I also know "The Cowpuncher's Waltz," also by Genny Haley, whom
I haven't seen for 15 years -- Punch, punch, punch
all those cattle; punch, punch, punch them to schmaltz -- but
we'll leave that for another time.

--
Steven Levine
ste...@cray.com

Lou Ceci

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Oct 12, 1993, 2:59:13 PM10/12/93
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"Dogie" (pronounced "dough-ghee") is a motherless calf. Calves that
lose their mothers often eat large quantities of grass because they
cannot nurse. This causes their bellies to swell, making them "dough-
bellies." "Dogie" is a contraction of "dough-belly."

--Lou

Clay Colwell

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Oct 12, 1993, 5:31:08 PM10/12/93
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In article <29cei3$7...@panix.com>, g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>
> There is lots about Texas that inspires awe.

Why, *thank* you! Shucks dern it, Ah didn't realahz that Ah wuz
so purshiated lak that!

Oh, you *weren't* talking about me?

Phooey. <pout>

(Sorry, I couldn't help it: it's Tuesday.)

--
Clay Colwell "If homosexuality is a disease, then let's all call
aka PlainsSmurf in queer to work." - Robin Tyler
arch...@vnet.ibm.com Disclaimer: This is *Clay* talkin', not IBM.
S2/5 b+ g- l-/+ y- z- n o- x- a++ u/- v-/+ j-/++ (mutating)

John Dorrance

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Oct 12, 1993, 5:10:18 PM10/12/93
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In article <CEssq...@gain.com> ceci@santiago (Lou Ceci ) writes:
>"Dogie" (pronounced "dough-ghee") is a motherless calf.

No, no, no. A dough-ghee is a little hut for practicing a martial art.
A Dogie is a child doctor.

John, clarifying

--
tha...@spdcc.com: John Dorrance, Floozy Smurf, Disco Diva y Flamenco Chico
Yesterday was plain *awful*.
But that's... not now... THAT'S THEN!
-_Annie_

cann...@omrf.uokhsc.edu

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Oct 13, 1993, 1:21:55 PM10/13/93
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In article <299cgr$3...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu>, smc...@mamba.asg.arlut.utexas.edu (Stuart McDow) writes:
> g...@fig.citib.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>>
>> As the texification of Citibank's technology continues,
>> we here in NYC are attempting to learn as much as we
>> can about the natives, their culture, and the festive
>> and colorful vocabulary they sport.
>
>
> Ummmmm.......
>
> Could you please explain more about "the texification
> of Citibank's technology" ?
>
> I really, really, hate to be anal about this, but I hope we don't veer
> off into Texas-bashing. The simple fact is Texas is no more. It has
> seen such an influx of people over the last thirty years, that to me,
> Texas is nothing like it was. I'm not trying to say that new people is
> bad, but the new people that came to Texas didn't take the time to
> figure out the native (ie "when in Rome...."). I'm a seventh
> generation Texan, which doesn't make me better that anyone else, but I
> really have been having this sense of 'there goes the neighborhood'.
>

From one Native Texan to another, I agree with what you're saying.
I've lived all of my life in Texas (except for this time I've spent
stuck in ...gasp, Okladamnhoma). I grew up in Ft. Worth/Arlington, and
we were always amazed at the influx of "northerners" into Dallas. That
truly did change the social and political demographics. I can *almost*
remember when Dallas wasn't such a right-wing, ultraconservative armpit.
(note this is spoken like a true Ft. Worthian).



> I'm not really sure what I'm trying to say here (that should be
> obvious). I guess I'm one of those idiot Texans that really do love
> this place, and can't bear to see the changes that have happened.

I didn't really appreciate Texas until I moved away. I'm
bustin' my ass trying to get back as soon as I can. I left San Antonio
in 1987, and have regretted it ever since. See me beat a hasty retreat
back to the Alamo City.



> We've all read about how Seattle has been changed irrevocably because
> of all the influx of Californians. The same thing is happening in
> Texas, and especially in my beloved Austin. It makes me sad.

Do you remember the Austinites a few years back who staked out
the city limits line and held up signs urging people to go back home,
that Austin was closed or words to that effect? It *is* sad to see
what's happened to Austin -- San Antonio too. But both places have
been able to retain their uniqueness, and I doubt that will ever be
spoiled.



> Please don't get me wrong, I love people coming here. I just wish that
> when they move here, they take the time to learn what it's about. It
> takes time.....

Me too.



> Sorry about the rant (or whatever this was), but Texas bashing is the
> *one thing* that gets my hackles up.
>
> Thanks for letting me vent.
>

Me, too. And your welcome.

Marilyn
Bragging rights intact

Steve Giammarco

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Oct 13, 1993, 7:22:47 AM10/13/93
to
In article <29cei3$7...@panix.com> g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>
>There is lots about Texas that inspires awe.


Gee. Thanx, Greg.... :)

--
Steve Giammarco/5616 Preston Oaks Rd #1706/Dallas TX 75240
Best Path: seas.smu.edu!letni!sdf!marco
loveyameanit. *** Please Note New Address *** I _OWN_ It!

Greg Parkinson

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Oct 13, 1993, 5:11:30 PM10/13/93
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In <CEu2A...@sdf.lonestar.org> ma...@sdf.lonestar.org (Steve Giammarco) writes:

>In article <29cei3$7...@panix.com> g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>>
>>There is lots about Texas that inspires awe.

>Gee. Thanx, Greg.... :)

I work in a bank. You learn to talk this
way when you have to.

Someone at lunch today told me that all
Texan males are tall and broadshouldered
and have big, long, fat dicks.

Is this true?

Jess Anderson

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Oct 13, 1993, 6:19:24 PM10/13/93
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In article <29hqu2$i...@panix.com>, Greg Parkinson
<g...@panix.com> wrote:

>Someone at lunch today told me that all
>Texan males are tall and broadshouldered
>and have big, long, fat dicks.

>Is this true?

No, it's not true. They are not all tall,
nor are they all broad-shouldered.

--
[Jess Anderson <> Division of Information Technology, University of Wisconsin]
[Internet: ande...@macc.wisc.edu {o"o} UUCP:{}!uwvax!macc.wisc.edu!anderson]
[Room 3130 <> 1210 West Dayton Street / Madison WI 53706 <> Phone 608/262-5888]
[-------------> It's never too late to have a happy childhood. <--------------]

J. N. Shaumeyer

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Oct 13, 1993, 6:32:54 PM10/13/93
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Greg Parkinson (g...@panix.com) wrote:

> Someone at lunch today told me that all
> Texan males are tall and broadshouldered
> and have big, long, fat dicks.

Is there something special about power
lunches among bankers that leads to
conversational opportunities of this
sort, or could you teach any of us how
to do lunches like this?

--jns

Leith Chu

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Oct 13, 1993, 8:28:33 PM10/13/93
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In article <29hutc$l...@news.doit.wisc.edu> ande...@macc.wisc.edu

(Jess Anderson) writes:
>In article <29hqu2$i...@panix.com>, Greg Parkinson
><g...@panix.com> wrote:
>
>>Someone at lunch today told me that all
>>Texan males are tall and broadshouldered
>>and have big, long, fat dicks.
>
>>Is this true?
>
>No, it's not true. They are not all tall,
>nor are they all broad-shouldered.

Damn.

panda cub (Leith Chu) | No, I don't touch-type. I do a lot more than just
val...@atlas.cs.upei.ca | *touch* my types. Daddies! Cowboys! Bears! Denim!

Charlottetown, PEI | Uniforms! Rope! Leather! Hankies! Yeah! ooh! Yeah!
Canada | Bear Code: h (B0) f- t rv c++!d g++ k+ sv pv (!!)

Greg Parkinson

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Oct 15, 1993, 11:33:29 AM10/15/93
to

My ex-boyfriend Gene, who works around the corner from
me, told me this. His friend Kevin (aka "Cockroach")
concurred.

Stuart McDow

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Oct 16, 1993, 4:41:05 PM10/16/93
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cann...@omrf.uokhsc.edu writes:
> In article <299cgr$3...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu>, smc...@mamba.asg.arlut.utexas.edu (Stuart McDow) writes:
>
> I didn't really appreciate Texas until I moved away. I'm
> bustin' my ass trying to get back as soon as I can. I left San Antonio
> in 1987, and have regretted it ever since. See me beat a hasty retreat
> back to the Alamo City.

I have always liked SanAntonio; I think is it (was) more laid-back
than Austin. Have you ever been to the Liberty Bar? And what about
that *hideous* Alamo Dome? *SIGH* more changes....

> Do you remember the Austinites a few years back who staked out
> the city limits line and held up signs urging people to go back home,
> that Austin was closed or words to that effect? It *is* sad to see
> what's happened to Austin -- San Antonio too. But both places have
> been able to retain their uniqueness, and I doubt that will ever be
> spoiled.

I was there :-). But, I'm not so sure whether they've retained their
respective uniquenesses. It seems like Austin is on its way to
becoming just another AnyTown. This used to be such a open, smart,
somewhat unpretentious, and _small_ town. I used to know everyone in
this city. Now, it's grown so much that I feel like a stranger in my
own city. There's been a high-tech boom here during the 80s, and it's
continuing. Many people are moving here soley for the jobs, and they
could care less about which city they live in, as long as there are
jobs. Contrast this to the time when people moved here because they
fell in love with Austin/San Antonio/Hill Country in general. Ooops,
I'm ranting again.

> > Please don't get me wrong, I love people coming here. I just wish that
> > when they move here, they take the time to learn what it's about. It
> > takes time.....
>
> Me too.
>
> > Sorry about the rant (or whatever this was), but Texas bashing is the
> > *one thing* that gets my hackles up.
> >
> > Thanks for letting me vent.
> >
> Me, too. And your welcome.
>
> Marilyn
> Bragging rights intact


ObMotts: I introduced 5th generation (West)Texan Shane to 6th
generation (Central)Texan John, and they hit it off immediately.
Unfortunatly, it only lasted for a week. Something about them both
being raised in the Church of Christ......

Cheers.

Clay Colwell

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Oct 18, 1993, 12:38:33 PM10/18/93
to

In article <29pm91$s...@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu>, smc...@mamba.asg.arlut.utexas.edu (Stuart McDow) writes:
> somewhat unpretentious, and _small_ town. I used to know everyone in
> this city. Now, it's grown so much that I feel like a stranger in my
> own city. There's been a high-tech boom here during the 80s, and it's
> continuing. Many people are moving here soley for the jobs, and they
> could care less about which city they live in, as long as there are
> jobs. Contrast this to the time when people moved here because they
> fell in love with Austin/San Antonio/Hill Country in general. Ooops,
> I'm ranting again.

A*hem*. Just to provide a counterexample (or to restore your faith
in Austinites): I moved to Austin with my family in 1977 (in the first
major influx to Austin). I've grown to *love* this town (in spite of
my gripes with the way the city council runs the place). When I got
my MSEE from UTexas, the hi-tech job market in Dallas and Houston was
very healthy, and the market in Austin much less so. (The companies
I applied at were generally pessimistic in their hiring possibilities.)
Still, I kept my resumes and interviews limited to Austin because, dad
gum it, I wanted to *stay* here.
I have many out-of-town friends who lament having moved from Austin
and would love the opportunity to come back and live here again. Still,
I *do* understand your concerns about Austin maintaining its small-city
status. I wouldn't want to see it become the sprawl of Dallas or
Houston (as nice as they may be, they just don't have the *feel* of
Austin).

Just my $.02.

(BTW, Applied Research Labs was one of the places I applied with and
interviewed at. I found it unusual that they would send me a rejection
letter *16 months* after the interview [I had worked for IBM fulltime
for over a year by then].)

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