Glory Holes

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Marc Talusan

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Jan 22, 1994, 1:07:05 PM1/22/94
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I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are
talking about when they say glory holes. I reckon this is a pre-AIDS
thang and it has something to do with anonymous sexual contact, but I
have not been fully informed.

Could somebody give me clue?

Marc Talusan
tal...@husc7.harvard.edu

David A. Kaye

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Jan 22, 1994, 4:28:44 PM1/22/94
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Marc Talusan (tal...@husc7.harvard.edu) wrote:

: I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are

: talking about when they say glory holes.

Glory holes are holes drilled in walls in places such as park restrooms so
that a person can stick his cock through and get sucked by someone on the
other side. Some are just crude holes, while others are finely smoothed
by artisans. (The College of San Mateo once had a library glory hole
which was cushioned by large rubber grommets on each side.)

Anyhow, the term comes from gold mining, where miners would dig lots of
holes to try to find a gold vein running through the ground. The one
which hit the vein was called the "glory hole."

Glory holes still exist, but with the advent of cinderblock construction
and armored plates the janitorial staffs are playing rough these days.

In the 1970s somebody took the glory hole concept and made a sex club out
of it -- putting in lots of booths with partitions between them with
holes. Why anyone would want to use such a device when they could meet
face to face is food for thought, but I'd guess that gay men have been
told by preachers that sex is bad that they don't feel they can look
other guys in the eye, so they just look their cock in the eye.

John Hein

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Jan 22, 1994, 9:24:35 PM1/22/94
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I recall a vicar being caught in Carlisle Citadel Station toilets with a
brace and bit ...

--

[ John Hein | ]
[ johnd...@drink.demon.co.uk | Phaggots do it on the phone! ]
[ johnd...@cix.compulink.co.uk| Sine Pretio Loquimine Omnibus ]
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Steve Dyer

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Jan 24, 1994, 4:02:02 AM1/24/94
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In article <2hrq09$c...@scunix2.harvard.edu>,

Marc Talusan <tal...@husc7.harvard.edu> wrote:
>I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are
>talking about when they say glory holes. I reckon this is a pre-AIDS
>thang and it has something to do with anonymous sexual contact, but I
>have not been fully informed.
>Could somebody give me clue?

Yeah, the men's room in the Science Center basement. Enjoy!

--
Steve Dyer
dy...@ursa-major.spdcc.com

cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu

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Jan 23, 1994, 5:15:00 PM1/23/94
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In article <2hrq09$c...@scunix2.harvard.edu>, tal...@husc7.harvard.edu (Marc Talusan) writes...

|I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are
|talking about when they say glory holes. I reckon this is a pre-AIDS
|thang and it has something to do with anonymous sexual contact, but I
|have not been fully informed.

Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in
a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
it. Pretty nasty, but it was a result of the society not fostering
single-partner relationships. Things are hopefully changing now.

Bud

Elf Sternberg

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Jan 24, 1994, 11:25:57 AM1/24/94
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cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu (Bud) writes:

> Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in
>a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
>it. Pretty nasty, but it was a result of the society not fostering
>single-partner relationships. Things are hopefully changing now.

*Sigh* Another mind lost to the heterosexual paradigm rather
than thinking for himself. Did it ever occur to him that even those of
us with strong, long-term, "primary" relationships still find the idea
of a glory hole hot and bothersome?

Elf !!!
--
PC Bulletin: Henceforth, sentient computers would like to be known as
"Silicon Intelligences." "Artificial Intelligence" is a pejorative term
invented by humans based on the mistaken belief that computers are some-
how not "natural." - e...@halcyon.com

David DeLaney

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Jan 24, 1994, 1:40:05 PM1/24/94
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e...@halcyon.com (Elf Sternberg) writes:
>cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu (Bud) writes:
>> Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in
>>a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
>>it. Pretty nasty, but it was a result of the society not fostering
>>single-partner relationships. Things are hopefully changing now.
> *Sigh* Another mind lost to the heterosexual paradigm rather
>than thinking for himself. Did it ever occur to him that even those of
>us with strong, long-term, "primary" relationships still find the idea
>of a glory hole hot and bothersome?

And some of us without them *depend* on them to get through the week...

ObMotss: The security guard seen showering in the local unused locker(tea)room.

Dave "it's either that or the <gasp> magazines..." DeLaney
--
David DeLaney: d...@utkux.utcc.utk.edu; ObQuote: `I suggest quoting 'J"K"P' and
'J"RR"P' both. --K' Disclaimer: Opinions? UTK?? Me??? BWAAAAHahahahaa <choke>
<snort> hee hee; Thinking about this disclaimer (or about theor. particle __
physics) may cause headaches. Vicki and Paul and Terry but not Joel. VR#: 0 \/

David A. Kaye

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Jan 24, 1994, 3:18:49 PM1/24/94
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cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu wrote:

: Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in


: a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
: it. Pretty nasty, but it was a result of the society not fostering
: single-partner relationships. Things are hopefully changing now.

Why do you assume this? San Francisco goes all out to help boost
male-male relationships, what with domestic partners registrations, the
recognition in society of same-sex couples, YET if you drilled a glory
hole in a restroom somewhere there'd still be a line of people waiting to
use it.

I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships
are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

Greg Parkinson

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Jan 24, 1994, 3:48:13 PM1/24/94
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In <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com> d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:

>I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
>rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
>couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
>security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
>coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships
>are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
>it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
>to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

1) Not all males like lots of rapid anonymous sex.
2) What are your qualifications for talking about
"biological drives" and how all males have the ones
you're talking about here?
3) Males are capable of looking for and enjoying
the security of having a home without being tricked
into it by women.
4) Male-male relationships are *not* by definition
over in a flash.
5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female
relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more
than a cultural myth that makes women into nest-oriented
homemakers and men into wandering sperm factories.

--
---------------------------------------------------------
Greg Parkinson New York, New York g...@panix.com
...beauty is convulsive or not at all...

Robert Hansen

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Jan 24, 1994, 3:57:50 PM1/24/94
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In article <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com> d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:

>I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
>rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive.

Excuse me...?

Watch your sweeping generalizations. "Some" males or "many" males may like
"lots of rapid anonymous sex", but *not all* males.


ROBERT HANSEN - Oregon Health Sciences University - Portland, Oregon USA
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
"If you don't vote, you don't have the right to complain. And, honey,
I surely do not want to give up my right to complain, no sir."
(Bessie Delany)
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Melinda Shore

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Jan 24, 1994, 4:28:03 PM1/24/94
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In article <2i1c6d$k...@panix.com> g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female
> relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more
> than a cultural myth that makes women into nest-oriented
> homemakers and men into wandering sperm factories.

It's absolutely just plain wrong. I believe recent surveys
have shown that male-male relationships actually last longer
than female-female, on average.
--
Melinda Shore - Cornell Theory Center - sh...@tc.cornell.edu

Sim Aberson

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Jan 24, 1994, 3:45:59 PM1/24/94
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In article <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com>, David A. Kaye <d...@crl.com> wrote:
>I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
>rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
>couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
>security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
>coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships
>are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
>it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
>to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

You forgot the smiley, right? Of course.

(I wonder what I am, neither fitting this description of male, nor being
really pink and soft and feminine. I always knew I was different.)
--
Sim Aberson AOML/Hurricane Research Division Miami, FL
I was not born to be forced. I will breathe after my own fashion.
If a plant cannot live according to its nature, it dies; and so a man.
Henry David Thoreau

Greg Parkinson

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Jan 24, 1994, 6:51:35 PM1/24/94
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In <2i1eh3$6...@fitz.TC.Cornell.EDU> sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu (Melinda Shore) writes:

>In article <2i1c6d$k...@panix.com> g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
>>5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female
>> relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more
>> than a cultural myth that makes women into nest-oriented
>> homemakers and men into wandering sperm factories.

>It's absolutely just plain wrong. I believe recent surveys
>have shown that male-male relationships actually last longer
>than female-female, on average.

I think that in terms of longevity, it was
male-male the longest followed by male-female
followed by female-female.

An associated detail (as if longevity wasn't
the *defining* characteristic of a relationship)
was that male-male tended to stay together but
become non-monogamous if sexual compatibility
became an issue, whereas female-female would
be based on a sexual relationship, and when and
if the sex moved elsewhere (women? sexual needs?
non-nest-bound?) then the members would re-form
relationships with the new partners.

I wonder, as women have more money and do the
joint-ownership thang when they get married,
if they will become more like gay men.

Kristin Bergen

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Jan 24, 1994, 6:56:11 PM1/24/94
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In article <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com>, David A. Kaye <d...@crl.com> wrote:
>cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu wrote:

>I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
>rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
>couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
>security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
>coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships
>are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
>it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
>to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.


<------evidently was frozen in a cryogenics lab before the advent of
poststructuralism, and only recently woke up...

Rise and Shine, Mr. Kaye! You've less than six years left in which to
join the 20th century!


Steve Dyer

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Jan 24, 1994, 7:59:45 PM1/24/94
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In article <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com>, David A. Kaye <d...@crl.com> wrote:
>This explains why male-male relationships
>are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
>it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
>to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

Davis, have you met Mike?

--
Steve Dyer
dy...@ursa-major.spdcc.com

Michael Bryan

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Jan 24, 1994, 12:50:46 PM1/24/94
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In article <23JAN199...@acvax.inre.asu.edu> cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu writes:
> Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in
>a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
>it.

That's pretty much it, although glory holes can exist in places other
than public restrooms. Such as in adult bookstores, sex clubs, etc.

>Pretty nasty, but it was a result of the society not fostering
>single-partner relationships. Things are hopefully changing now.

I beg your pardon? "Nasty" is in the eye of the beholder, my friend.
As for your "theory" as to why they exist, my two most immediate
objections are:

1) If I were in a long-term committed relationship, I would still
enjoy occassional glory-hole action. Provided my partner were
inclined to allow that in our relationship, and anyone likely
to be a partner of mine probably would.

2) Society *does* foster single-partner relationships among
heterosexuals. Yet I've certainly seen more than my fair
share of "straight" married men make use of a glory hole.

You might not like glory holes --- that's fine. Lots of people don't.
But there are a significant number of us who do. It's just another
in a *very* long list of menu selections one can choose from when
having sex. Your dislike of it does not make the activity "bad",
anymore than my dislike of beets makes *them* bad.

--
Michael Bryan mic...@resonex.com +1 510 249 9600 Ext 325
Resonex, Inc. ____ ____
47911 Westinghouse Dr. \ / \ /
Fremont, CA 94539 \/ Time and Tide Melt The Snowman \/

Michael Thomas

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Jan 25, 1994, 2:33:10 AM1/25/94
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Melinda Shore (sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu) wrote:
> In article <2i1c6d$k...@panix.com> g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) writes:
> >5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female
> > relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more
> > than a cultural myth that makes women into nest-oriented
> > homemakers and men into wandering sperm factories.

> It's absolutely just plain wrong. I believe recent surveys
> have shown that male-male relationships actually last longer
> than female-female, on average.


I was intrigued by that statistic as well, but as with
all things gay, one has to be a bit suspicious about any
statistics in this area.
That being said, and Mr. Kaye's wide brush over
generalizations aside, do you really think there
*isn't* something, on average, to the female
"nest building", male "sperm factory" generalization?
It seems to me to be fairly accurate, and has some
potential evolutionary roots. I, for one, don't think
this is all cultural since the same pattern seems
to emerge in disparate cultures.
I think it would be fair to say that the male/male
dynamic is different than the female/female dynamic
even if the exceptions make it pretty blurry, and
it is hard to quantify. Is it unreasonable to
ascribe this as being one difference?

Michael Thomas (mth...@netcom.com|mi...@gordian.com)
606 Sanchez, SF Ca. 94114

--
Michael Thomas (mth...@netcom.com|mi...@gordian.com)
606 Sanchez, SF Ca. 94114

David A. Kaye

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Jan 25, 1994, 3:20:27 AM1/25/94
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Greg Parkinson (g...@panix.com) wrote:

: 1) Not all males like lots of rapid anonymous sex.

DAMMIT! Of course, I'm not talking about ALL males. You know better
than to suggest that.

: 4) Male-male relationships are *not* by definition
: over in a flash.

Generally speaking, they are. I refer to Dr. Martin S. Weinberg's
groundbreaking research on the subject. (He also has a fascinating
bisexual study just out.) Also, I would direct you to "The Male Couple"
by McWhirter and Mattison.

: 5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female


: relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more

: than a cultural myth that makes women ....

I have read lesbian newspapers and literature for years. THEY say this.
I'm repeating it. Heck, even a close friend, a lesbian who has been
through 3 relationships has told me that (1) they never seem to break up,
and (2) that the nesting urge is very strong in her. Please remember
that I don't post idly. When I post something it's because thought has
gone into it. My opinions come from what I've read and observed;
they're not part of any agenda.

David A. Kaye

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Jan 25, 1994, 3:22:19 AM1/25/94
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Robert Hansen (han...@ohsu.edu) wrote:

: Watch your sweeping generalizations. "Some" males or "many" males may like


: "lots of rapid anonymous sex", but *not all* males.

Come on, Robert. You know better than to assume that absolutes exist.
Please give me the same benefit of intelligence. Of COURSE, I'm not
speaking of absolutes. There are exceptions to everything. Do I have to
state this every fucking time? People hit me over the head with this
time and time again. SURE there are exceptions. Are you happy now?

David A. Kaye

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Jan 25, 1994, 3:23:46 AM1/25/94
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Melinda Shore (sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu) wrote:

: It's absolutely just plain wrong. I believe recent surveys


: have shown that male-male relationships actually last longer
: than female-female, on average.

Coming from you everything I say is wrong anyhow.

Note that I DID NOT SAY that male-male relationship lasted a shorter time
than female-female. So, please READ what I've said. I said that getting
over the relationship is quicker in men than in women. God damnit you're
dense, Melinda.

David A. Kaye

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Jan 25, 1994, 3:24:59 AM1/25/94
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Kristin Bergen (kbe...@acpub.duke.edu) wrote:

: Rise and Shine, Mr. Kaye! You've less than six years left in which to
: join the 20th century!

I get my information from reading everything I can on a given subject
which interests me, plus in talking with people who I think know what
they're talking about. What's your excuse?


FJ!!

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Jan 25, 1994, 4:23:08 AM1/25/94
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d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:
>Do I have to state this every fucking time?

Yes. The words `some' or `most' are really not that hard to spell.
Even I can do it.
FJ!!

Melinda Shore

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Jan 25, 1994, 9:53:15 AM1/25/94
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Ummmm, she's had an education, and doesn't rely on parochial
hearsay??

Mike Reaser

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Jan 25, 1994, 10:33:28 AM1/25/94
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sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu (Melinda Shore) writes:
|> In article <2i2l0r$1...@crl.crl.com> d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:
|> >Kristin Bergen (kbe...@acpub.duke.edu) wrote:
|> >: Rise and Shine, Mr. Kaye! You've less than six years left in which to
|> >: join the 20th century!
|> >I get my information from reading everything I can on a given subject
|> >which interests me, plus in talking with people who I think know what
|> >they're talking about. What's your excuse?
|>
|> Ummmm, she's had an education, and doesn't rely on parochial
|> hearsay??

Or, just maybe, she talks to people who actually _DO_ know what they're
talking about rather than folks who she _thinks_ know what they're talking
about.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mike Reaser, Hewlett-Packard N. Amer. Response Center - Atlanta
#include <standard.disclaimer> |
NBCS: B4 f+ t w g+ k s+ l+ |My hometown makes _Deliverance_ look
Reply to: m...@hpuerca.atl.hp.com| like a love story -- JBear, et al

Greg Parkinson

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Jan 25, 1994, 11:37:49 AM1/25/94
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>Robert Hansen (han...@ohsu.edu) wrote:

The problem is that by using the term "exceptions"
you are implying that there is a "rule". What I
and Robert are saying is that "some males" or even
"many males" does not mean that there is rule that
makes this generally true.

Tom Barrett

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Jan 25, 1994, 11:34:25 AM1/25/94
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In article <1994Jan24.1...@resonex.com> mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:
>That's pretty much it, although glory holes can exist in places other
>than public restrooms. Such as in adult bookstores, sex clubs, etc.

One of the queer guides to SF lists a sex club which has a wall of
multi-level glory holes so accomodate all shapes and sizes. And, of
course, plenty of condoms on both sides of the wall. I also suppose
that they have kneeling pads :-)

Tom
--
Do the right thing...

Greg Parkinson

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Jan 25, 1994, 11:45:18 AM1/25/94
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In <2i2kob$g...@crl.crl.com> d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:

>Greg Parkinson (g...@panix.com) wrote:

>: 1) Not all males like lots of rapid anonymous sex.

>DAMMIT! Of course, I'm not talking about ALL males. You know better
>than to suggest that.

You should know better than to say "males...." when you
mean "some males....". If that's what you meant to say.

>: 4) Male-male relationships are *not* by definition
>: over in a flash.

>Generally speaking, they are. I refer to Dr. Martin S. Weinberg's
>groundbreaking research on the subject. (He also has a fascinating
>bisexual study just out.) Also, I would direct you to "The Male Couple"
>by McWhirter and Mattison.

How do they define "relationship"? Do they compare
male-male relationships with female-female and male-female

>: 5) Your characterization of male-male vs female-female
>: relationships is just plain *wrong* and is nothing more
>: than a cultural myth that makes women ....

>I have read lesbian newspapers and literature for years. THEY say this.
>I'm repeating it. Heck, even a close friend, a lesbian who has been
>through 3 relationships has told me that (1) they never seem to break up,
>and (2) that the nesting urge is very strong in her.

And you also think that your experience as a gay
man tells you everything you need to know about other
gay men. You might want to consider the possibility
that you could be unusual.

Please remember
>that I don't post idly. When I post something it's because thought has
>gone into it. My opinions come from what I've read and observed;
>they're not part of any agenda.

I don't care whether or not they are part of an
agenda. I care that you state things as fact that
are wrong.

Robert Hansen

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Jan 25, 1994, 12:17:31 PM1/25/94
to

>Robert Hansen (han...@ohsu.edu) wrote:


Of course I know better than to assume absolutes exist. Your statement,
though, seemed to indicate you didn't.

Do you have to state this every time? It would help. All you would have to
do is to insert a qualifier in your sentence. "Most" males. "Nearly all"
males. "Some" males.

Am I happy now? Sure. I would have been happier had you not lumped me in
with your sex-crazed relationship-impaired gender to begin with, but your
apology is accepted.

Ann Burlingham

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Jan 25, 1994, 12:59:34 PM1/25/94
to

In a previous article, d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) says:

>Heck, even a close friend, a lesbian who has been
>through 3 relationships has told me that (1) they never seem to break up,

So she's still with all three of the women?

>and (2) that the nesting urge is very strong in her. Please remember
>that I don't post idly. When I post something it's because thought has
>gone into it. My opinions come from what I've read and observed;
>they're not part of any agenda.


--
Ann Burlingham
Sears Library Case Western Reserve University toujours gai and
x5200 10900 Euclid Avenue always a lady
ax...@po.cwru.edu Cleveland, Ohio 44106 -don marquis

Kristin Bergen

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Jan 25, 1994, 10:58:51 AM1/25/94
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In article <2i3e48$d...@hpscit.sc.hp.com>,
Mike Reaser <m...@hpuerca.atl.hp.com> wrote:

[Mr. Kaye:]


>|> >I get my information from reading everything I can on a given subject
>|> >which interests me, plus in talking with people who I think know what
>|> >they're talking about. What's your excuse?

[Melinda:]


>|> Ummmm, she's had an education, and doesn't rely on parochial
>|> hearsay??

>Or, just maybe, she talks to people who actually _DO_ know what they're
>talking about rather than folks who she _thinks_ know what they're talking
>about.

Both, actually; the former consists in the latter, and the latter depends
on the former. That is, an education *is* talking to people who know
something, and education moreover helps one sort those who know
from...well, from everyone else.

I thank you both for diffusing the boredom of the response to Mr. Kaye I
would otherwise have had to make--I can barely keep from falling out of my
chair with boredom as it is.

Brian Kane

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Jan 25, 1994, 11:16:00 AM1/25/94
to
David A. Kaye (d...@crl.com) wrote:

:Greg Parkinson (g...@panix.com) wrote:

::4) Male-male relationships are *not* by definition
::over in a flash.

:Generally speaking, they are. I refer to Dr. Martin S. Weinberg's
:groundbreaking research on the subject. (He also has a fascinating
:bisexual study just out.) Also, I would direct you to "The Male Couple"
:by McWhirter and Mattison.

You must have a different "edition" of the McWhirter and Mattison
book than I have.

The average duration of coupling in their sample was around 10 years,
many of them still ongoing. I think one was even going on 50 years.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
In as much as the pursuit of the stars|Brian D. Kane
is our destiny, this pursuit will lead|kane@{buast7,astro,buast1}.bu.edu
to a radical redefinition of the basic| / ^ \ / ^ \ / ^ \ / ^ \
thing we call "family". Change awaits.|_| |_| |_| |_| |_

gsm...@uoft02.utoledo.edu

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 10:47:38 AM1/25/94
to

Right. Now give us your evidence on what is the exception and what
isn't. How many men like sticking their dick through a hole in
the wall in your opinion?
--
Gene Ward Smith/Brahms Gang/University of Toledo
gsm...@uoft02.utoledo.edu

Charles Squires

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 6:09:35 PM1/25/94
to
mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:

> [...] Your dislike of it does not make the activity "bad",


>anymore than my dislike of beets makes *them* bad.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Thank goodness SOMEONE around here has taste :-)

Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)

Charlie
--
______
---------------------------------------------------------------------\ /--
Charles S. Squires, Jr. (squ...@cs.wisc.edu) Madison, Wisconsin \ /
-----------------------------------------------------------------------\/----

Alan Stacey

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 6:27:13 PM1/25/94
to
In article <2hrq09$c...@scunix2.harvard.edu> tal...@husc7.harvard.edu (Marc Talusan) writes:
>I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are
>talking about when they say glory holes. I reckon this is a pre-AIDS
>thang and it has something to do with anonymous sexual contact, but I
>have not been fully informed.
>
>Could somebody give me clue?
>

I believe there is a substantial article about glory holes at Harvard
in issue 3 of "Steam" magazine.

If you want to do some first-hand research, and don't have access to
the article, I could Xerox it for you. 8-)

Cheers,
Alan.

Trinity College, Cambridge.
T* C1 L1b h++ d-(+) a-- w+ y+ e+ g t+ s++ m1+ m2(+)
B0 f-- t++ s++ e+ m+

David A. Kaye

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 8:17:21 PM1/25/94
to
Alan Stacey (am...@emu.pmms.cam.ac.uk) wrote:

: I believe there is a substantial article about glory holes at Harvard


: in issue 3 of "Steam" magazine.

Steam has made it all the way to the UK? Wow! What strikes me most
about Steam is that it's put together to look like a literary journal,
yet contains some of the best glory hole and bush cruising reports I have
ever seen!


gsm...@uoft02.utoledo.edu

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 9:35:27 PM1/25/94
to

>I guess I'm naive (or just 18). But I have no idea what people are
>talking about when they say glory holes. I reckon this is a pre-AIDS
>thang and it has something to do with anonymous sexual contact, but I
>have not been fully informed.

>>Could somebody give me clue?

A glory hole is where someone drills a small hole in the stalls in
the john. Then you can stick your head through the hole and
perform oral sex.

Mary Ballard

unread,
Jan 25, 1994, 11:13:48 PM1/25/94
to
Charlie Squires (squ...@zomma.cs.wisc.edu) writes:

> mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:
>
> > my dislike of beets ...


>
> Thank goodness SOMEONE around here has taste :-)
>
> Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)
>
> Charlie

Yes by all means, let's do. I hate beets *and* I hate scallops.

However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.

Mary, who needs a lighter thread than (dum da dum dum) the "Legal...."
thread (BTW, no more new developments - thankfully)

David DeLaney

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 12:51:55 AM1/26/94
to
squ...@zomma.cs.wisc.edu (Charles Squires) writes:
>mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:
>
>> [...] Your dislike of it does not make the activity "bad",
>>anymore than my dislike of beets makes *them* bad.
> ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>
>Thank goodness SOMEONE around here has taste :-)
>
>Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)
>
Only if we can add in broccoli and cauliflower...

Dave "will not eat some vegetables for food" DeLaney
--
David DeLaney: d...@utkux.utcc.utk.edu; ObQuote: `I suggest quoting 'J"K"P' and
'J"RR"P' both. --K' Disclaimer: Opinions? UTK?? Me??? BWAAAAHahahahaa <choke>
<snort> hee hee; Thinking about this disclaimer (or about theor. particle __
physics) may cause headaches. Vicki and Paul and Terry but not Joel. VR#: 0 \/

Clay Colwell

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 9:00:19 AM1/26/94
to

Actually, David, what you said was:

**********************************************************************************
From: d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye)
Newsgroups: soc.motss
Subject: Re: Glory Holes
Date: 24 Jan 1994 12:18:49 -0800
Organization: CRL Dialup Internet Access (415) 705-6060 [login: guest]
Lines: 22
Message-ID: <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com>
References: <2hrq09$c...@scunix2.harvard.edu> <23JAN199...@acvax.inre.asu.edu>
NNTP-Posting-Host: crl.crl.com
X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.2 PL2]

[...]
coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships


are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

***********************************************************************************

It's *not* at all clear that what you *claim* you said is in fact *what* you
said. You've now interpreted what you've said in your response to Melinda,
but her interpretation seems quite valid to me, given your original statement.
Hell, *hers* was the interpretation *I* came up with, as well as a great many
other people.

David, relax, take a deep breath, then try to explain in other words what
you tried to say in the first place. Your original words were obviously
not conveying what you meant.

--
Clay Colwell (aka PlainsSmurf) "Debate on USENET too often is like
cla...@austin.ibm.com shouting at graffiti." -- Me
arch...@vnet.ibm.com Disclaimer: This is *Clay* talkin', not IBM.
S2/6 b+ g/- l-/+ y- z- n o- x- a++ u/- v-/+ j-/++ (mutating)

Paco Ojeda

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 10:04:13 AM1/26/94
to
In article <2i4gb1$9...@crl.crl.com>

d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:

> : I believe there is a substantial article about glory holes at Harvard
> : in issue 3 of "Steam" magazine.
>
> Steam has made it all the way to the UK? Wow! What strikes me most
> about Steam is that it's put together to look like a literary journal,
> yet contains some of the best glory hole and bush cruising reports I have
> ever seen!

Where do you get this "Steam" magazine? Never heard of it...

Paco

Paco Ojeda

Marc Talusan

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 2:06:21 PM1/26/94
to
David A. Kaye (d...@crl.com) wrote:
: I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
: rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
: couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
: security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
: coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships

: are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
: it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
: to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.

Judging from my experiences, (o.k., they're not extensive but they'll do
for this situation) I think that gay men seem to have a tougher time
developing long-term relationships. But I don't attribute this to
people's biological tendencies. When society rears men to be sexual
aggressors and women to be sexually passive, two men trying to form a
long-term monogamous relationship may have a tougher time because they've
been made to think that sex should be one of their primary desires. In a
heterosexual relationship, the female is supposed to be the one to play
the stabilizing role in the relationship, the one who doesn't give in to
sex too easily. There's no such role in gay male relationships.

Marc
a.k.a.
The original poster who was just asking an innocent question

Matthew Melmon

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 5:03:19 PM1/26/94
to
In article <2i1mu7$n...@panix.com>, g...@panix.com (Greg Parkinson) wrote:

> I think that in terms of longevity, it was
> male-male the longest followed by male-female
> followed by female-female.

Splatasha fails to see how this is even a statistically viable
possibility. The number of male-female relationship so
overwhelmingly exceeds the number of same-sex relationships
that to get a representative subset of the mf group, which
is of the same scale as representative subsets of the mm and
ff groups, would represent quite a challenge. And there is,
of course, that pesky marriage thing, which gives mf couples
an added legal incentive to remain together.

All told, a meaningless statistic. I question the motivations
of anyone setting out to measure it.

*X*
(Who would guess that homosexual relationships break up much,
much quicker than heterosexual ones on average, but that men
who manage to remain together for a decade will be much less
likely to break up than a male-female couple. Splatasha shall
refrain from making guesses about female-female couples...)

Alan Stacey

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 5:40:34 PM1/26/94
to
In article <2i4gb1$9...@crl.crl.com> d...@crl.com (David A. Kaye) writes:
>Alan Stacey (am...@emu.pmms.cam.ac.uk) wrote:
>
>: I believe there is a substantial article about glory holes at Harvard
>: in issue 3 of "Steam" magazine.
>
>Steam has made it all the way to the UK? Wow! .......


Yes, it's made it all the way here. Specially imported by air by the
amazing ground-breaking me 8-).

(Although one of my issues was carried all the way by the delightful
Roger Phillips and given to me when I enquired about Steam once on
soc.motss)

Seriously, I don't know if one can buy it here, although I don't
recall seeing it and I certainly go to those stores in London that I
think would be most likely to stock it. I'm lucky enough to visit the
US enough for this not to be a problem.

>....... What strikes me most

>about Steam is that it's put together to look like a literary journal,
>yet contains some of the best glory hole and bush cruising reports I have
>ever seen!
>

Not only does it look like a literary journal, it is very
well-written. If most porn stars were as literate as Scott O'Hara
[the editor and a contributor], I suspect they'd refuse to utter the
ridiculous lines they're typically given.

Cheers,
Alan.

Trinity College, Cambridge

John Dorrance

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 8:25:47 PM1/26/94
to
I've tried them before and found them disappointing. Mainly because the
one that I've gone to (haven't actually *used* it) was frequented by ugly
(by my definition of the word - mousy, glasses, pale, looked like overworked
students (possibly because it was in the Humanities building on campus)
(immediate motss relevance: read about this tearoom in the STEAM article
about tearooms at UWM), came across as closety for some reason) guys. Is
it considered picky to judge tricks by their looks as opposed to their
dicks? What's the relationship between bathroom stalls and closets?

John, who paints himself as a slut but is more of a serial monogamite.
I *try* to trick, really I do, but I don't understand the logic behind
having *great* sex with someone and never seeing them again. If you're
attracted (maybe that's the problem. For one night stands, one must
choose ugly partners) and sexually compatible, why not see if something
comes of it? Of course, I'm beginning to realize that I'm one obsessive
motherfucker anyway (do I hear an amen from the Men of my Past?), so
perhaps my experiences are unique...
--
tha...@spdcc.com: John Dorrance, Floozy Smurf, Disco Diva y Flamenco Chico

Today's thought worthy of a British tabloid:
Kate Moss: waifer-thin model

John Dorrance

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 8:29:45 PM1/26/94
to
In article <2i1c27$5...@wave.aoml.erl.gov>,
Sim Aberson <abe...@ocean.aoml.erl.gov> wrote:

>In article <2i1af9$e...@crl.crl.com>, David A. Kaye <d...@crl.com> wrote:
>>I think this is a biological condition of male sex. Males like lots of
>>rapid anonymous sex. It's a biological drive. When you get a male-female
>>couple together the male often gives up his wanderlust in exchange for the
>>security of having a home. With male-male couplings both people are
>>coming from the same headspace. This explains why male-male relationships
>>are over in a flash, but in female-female relationships when they break up
>>it's something they're still doing 2 years later, and likely to continue
>>to be something they talk about 3 years after THAT.
>
>You forgot the smiley, right? Of course.
>
>(I wonder what I am, neither fitting this description of male, nor being
>really pink and soft and feminine. I always knew I was different.)

No, dear, you're codependent. Nothing unusual in that (and might I point
out to the crowd that Sim isn't all *that* monogamous, thankfully)!

Kisses,

John (dammit! I just remembered I still have that fucking KAte Moss pun
sig. Sorry, I'll go changee it posthaste. Forthwith.)

David Stevenson

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 7:03:59 PM1/27/94
to
BALL...@CONRAD.APPSTATE.EDU (Mary Ballard) writes:
>>
>> Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)
>
>Yes by all means, let's do. I hate beets *and* I hate scallops.
>
>However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.
>
But not enough to learn how to spell brusselS sprouts, apparently.

Steve Basile

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 7:27:20 PM1/27/94
to
In article <1994Jan24.1...@resonex.com> mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:
>In article <23JAN199...@acvax.inre.asu.edu> cc...@acvax.inre.asu.edu writes:
>> Yes, Marc, it's when one guys puts his weener through a hole in
>>a public restroom stall, so that the guy next row over can do things to
>>it.

>
>That's pretty much it, although glory holes can exist in places other
>than public restrooms. Such as in adult bookstores, sex clubs, etc.

[ Much sage philosophical discussions on holes of glory deleted for space]

I had to throw in two cents worth on this, and it's not even MY two cents...
Will the owners of this nifty exchange of pithy quotes please raise their hands?
I snarfed it off soc.motss for my quotes file a while back...Melinda maybe?....

#1>> as an old friend put it, "There are plenty of people with
#1>> whom I'd gladly spend an evening of bondage and water sports.
#1>> But *lunch*! Lunch is another matter entirely."
>
#2> Point taken. Or, put another way: "A gay man is somebody who'll suck the dick
#2> of a stranger through a hole in the wall, but scream if there are smudges
#2> on his champagne flute at brunch."

It is for moments like this that I read news.

OBGloryHoles: BlowBuddies SFO. That's it. Just BlowBuddies.

--
Stephen Basile |"Eagles may soar, but weasels aren't
A Cog In The Machine | sucked into jets." ____
Tivoli Systems Inc. | \ /
bas...@tivoli.COM | DISCLAIMER: _MY_ thoughts, OUR world. \/

Kristin Bergen

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 5:09:20 PM1/27/94
to
In article <16F4BE9...@uga.cc.uga.edu>,
STEVE LONG <LO...@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU> wrote:

>And Kristin, you must know where to get the *best* grits dishes in the
>Triangle - Crooks Corner. Get Bill's cookbook - wonderful recipes!

No, dear, Bill Neal makes the *second-* best cheese grits in the Triangle.
Mine are based on Bill's recipe, but are much tastier, I'm afraid. Also,
I make a better catfish than Crook's. Otherwise, I can't compete. I've
eaten out maybe a dozen times since moving here in the fall, and most of
those have been at Crook's. My theory is that the real genius there is
the saucier, also named Bill. BTW, it's a family restaurant, know what I
mean?

>>--report from North Carolina, where there's lots of grits and sadly little
>>boink.
>
>I wouldn't say that...being a Tarheel Born and Bred (UNC '90), I can
>*personally* attest to plenty of morning boinking (and afternoon, evening)

Sigh. The geography just hasn't worked so successfully for me; the only
one with whom I wish to boink lives in Montreal. Cheese grits are sorry
consolation. They don't, however, cut into my massive telephone and
airline budget, which is yet another of grits' many advantages.

Mary Ballard

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 7:30:18 PM1/27/94
to
Melinda (sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu) writes:

> In article <16F4BE...@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU> S...@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (Sammie L. Foss) writes:
> >don't you mean bawld okry?
>
> Uch. Okra is one of the few vegetables I really don't
> care for. I like beets, though.

I like the *taste* okra, but the texture leaves much to be desired!

Greg Parkinson

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 3:17:40 PM1/27/94
to
In <2i6c68$2...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu> wpa...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu (William A. Parsons) writes:

>But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!

Dave made me grits with cheese and tomatoes
the other morning.

I forgave him for not being a morning boinker.

David Stevenson

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 8:44:51 PM1/27/94
to
tal...@husc7.harvard.edu (Marc Talusan) writes:
>
>Judging from my experiences, (o.k., they're not extensive but they'll do
>for this situation) I think that gay men seem to have a tougher time
>developing long-term relationships. But I don't attribute this to
>people's biological tendencies. When society rears men to be sexual
>aggressors and women to be sexually passive, two men trying to form a
>long-term monogamous relationship may have a tougher time because they've
>been made to think that sex should be one of their primary desires. In a
>heterosexual relationship, the female is supposed to be the one to play
>the stabilizing role in the relationship, the one who doesn't give in to
>sex too easily. There's no such role in gay male relationships.
>
This is what's so charming about 19-year-olds.

Kristin Bergen

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 8:21:51 PM1/27/94
to
In article <stevensoC...@netcom.com>,
David Stevenson <stev...@netcom.com> wrote:

>BALL...@CONRAD.APPSTATE.EDU (Mary Ballard) writes:
>>
>>However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.
>>
>But not enough to learn how to spell brusselS sprouts, apparently.


(ahem)...shouldn't that be Brussels sprouts (with a capital B)?


Kristin Bergen

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 8:04:01 PM1/27/94
to
In article <2i9maq$r...@lester.appstate.edu>,
Mary Ballard <BALL...@CONRAD.APPSTATE.EDU> wrote:

>Melinda (sh...@dinah.tc.cornell.edu) writes:
>
>> Uch. Okra is one of the few vegetables I really don't
>> care for. I like beets, though.
>
>I like the *taste* okra, but the texture leaves much to be desired!

I felt much the same about okra until a Liberian man taught me how to make
some West African stews with okra and fufu which were truly delicious.
(Fufu is a grainy product of cassava, which became a staple in parts of
Africa where cash crops replaced the more nutritious grains; it's a lot
like Brazilian manioc.) Groundnut stew with okra is wonderful. Also,
I had pickled okra at Crook's Corner which I liked very much.

I have since taken okra off the list of things I won't eat, which
presently includes just liverwurst, beef-a-roni, and dick. (I have tried
liverwurst and beef-a-roni, but didn't like either one.)

Ann Burlingham

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 10:53:42 PM1/27/94
to

In a previous article, wpa...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu (William A. Parsons) says:

>But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!
>

>-Will (throwing a little southern spin on this sillyness.)

Silliness? Sillyness? (Only your spell-checker knows for sure.) This is
CLEARLY an attempt to get motssers to admit their food likes and dislikes,
for who-knows-what kind of dastardly plot! Will Mary find scalloped beets
on the menu? The okra growers will target our upscale market!
Life-sustaining carrots will dangled in front of our noses by the
prophet-crazed holy carrot growers! Cucumber lovers will be taunted in
classrooms! No more will we know our potatoes!
Motssers, arise! Tell no-one your vegetable preferences! If you value your
crudite, excercise your right to privacy! Eternal vigilance is the price
of freedom! Ask not the price of salt.

Steven Levine

unread,
Jan 28, 1994, 6:58:55 PM1/28/94
to
In article <2i6evd$o...@scunix2.harvard.edu>
tal...@husc7.harvard.edu (Marc Talusan) writes:

>Judging from my experiences, (o.k., they're not extensive but they'll do
>for this situation) I think that gay men seem to have a tougher time
>developing long-term relationships.

Eight years ago, a friend said, "It's nice to meet so many
long-term gay couples through the national gay band movement.
I don't see any of that in Boston." Well of course not -- he
was in graduate school (the same school Mr. Talusan attends,
coincidentally enough) and his friends were all students and he'd
only been out for two years. This particular
friend is still with the same partner he was with at the time,
who is, in fact, the first sexual partner he ever had. And
now, in the stage of life he has entered, he knows lots of
long-term gay couples, which only shows that limited experiences
lead to limited conclusions. (This is not an earth-shaking observation.)

What bothered me about my friend's comment, even eight years
ago, was its implication that there is something inherently
good about long-term relationships simply because of their
length. It reinforces the cultural myth that it is inherently
better to be in a long-term relationship. That the length of
a relationship indicates something about how good the relationship
is. I don't buy this, not as a generality. Not as the universal
truth it is touted as being.

Unless, under the rubric of the word "relationship," you include
more than I think Mr. Talusan includes -- that is, if you
include friendship as well as romantic encouplement (which is
a subset of friendship, anyway, in the instances I most
admire). In which case, it should become much clearer, even to
Mr. Talusan, that it is simply not true, by any standard or
statistic, that gay men have a tougher time developing long-term
relationships.

When "After the Ball" was first published, I picked it up
in a bookstore and randomly opened it. I fell on a page
that proclaimed that gay men do not develop real friendships
(I'm paraphrasing -- it was years ago). It seemed to me
that in one sentence, the authors of the book were dismissing
my life as invisible. And that of most of my friends.

I have close relationships with gay men that are as long term
as my adult life allows. It is my hope that the connections
I've made through soc.motss, some of which are unquestionably
friendships, will last well into the realm of long-term; some
are several years strong already. In contrast to Mr. Talusan's
experiences, it hasn't been tough at all.

I think it is a mistake to separate romantic encouplement from
friendship in discussing the existence of "long-term relationships."

--
Steven Levine
ste...@cray.com

Bob Koenig

unread,
Jan 28, 1994, 12:55:34 AM1/28/94
to
From article <2i6c68$2...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu>, by wpa...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu (William A. Parsons):
> : > Thank goodness SOMEONE around here has taste :-)
> : > Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)
> : > Charlie
>
> : Yes by all means, let's do. I hate beets *and* I hate scallops.
> : However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.

>
> But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!
>
I dunno about *fried* okra....but *pickled* okra is nummy. :)

BearCub

--
=======bea...@csd4.csd.uwm.edu=======B1/B2 c+(+!) s-(-) w f k? r m g========
Chubby-bear admirer, Phillie Phanatic, Rock N' Roll Guru, Queen/Freddie
Mercury fan, Disco-dancin', Well-spoken-for, Fun-loving, SnuggleBear,
Cuddler, Easy-goin, Mega-friendly, Bear-in-training. Nuff Said.

William A. Parsons

unread,
Jan 26, 1994, 1:18:48 PM1/26/94
to
Mary Ballard (BALL...@CONRAD.APPSTATE.EDU) wrote:

: Charlie Squires (squ...@zomma.cs.wisc.edu) writes:
: > mic...@resonex.com (Michael Bryan) writes:
: > > my dislike of beets ...
: > Thank goodness SOMEONE around here has taste :-)
: > Shall we have an "I hate beets" thread? :-)
: > Charlie

: Yes by all means, let's do. I hate beets *and* I hate scallops.
: However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.

But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!

-Will (throwing a little southern spin on this sillyness.)

Kristin Bergen

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 3:55:47 PM1/27/94
to
In article <2i97h4$q...@panix.com>, Greg Parkinson <g...@panix.com> wrote:

>Dave made me grits with cheese and tomatoes
>the other morning.

No, darling, it's not "grits with cheese," it's "cheese grits." In either
case, though, yum.

>I forgave him for not being a morning boinker.

Even cheese grits can't make up for this sin of omission, however. You're
too generous. I suggest you demand both cheese grits *and* morning boink.
Live it up!

STEVE LONG

unread,
Jan 27, 1994, 4:38:04 PM1/27/94
to
>>Dave made me grits with cheese and tomatoes
>>the other morning.
>
>No, darling, it's not "grits with cheese," it's "cheese grits." In either
>case, though, yum.

And Kristin, you must know where to get the *best* grits dishes in the
Triangle - Crooks Corner. Get Bill's cookbook - wonderful recipes!
>
>>I forgave him for not being a morning boinker.
>
>Even cheese grits can't make up for this sin of omission, however. You're
>too generous. I suggest you demand both cheese grits *and* morning boink.
> Live it up!
>
>--report from North Carolina, where there's lots of grits and sadly little
>boink.

Sammie L. Foss

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Jan 27, 1994, 4:45:07 PM1/27/94
to
Someone said:
>: Yes by all means, let's do. I hate beets *and* I hate scallops.
>: However, I do like both turnips and brussel sprouts.
>
>But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!
>
>-Will (throwing a little southern spin on this sillyness.)

don't you mean bawld okry?

Sammie

Melinda Shore

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Jan 27, 1994, 5:05:22 PM1/27/94
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In article <16F4BE...@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU> S...@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (Sammie L. Foss) writes:
>don't you mean bawld okry?

Uch. Okra is one of the few vegetables I really don't


care for. I like beets, though.

Emily's absence from the beet discussion is clear evidence
that she's continuing to have connectivity problems.
--
Melinda Shore - Cornell Theory Center - sh...@tc.cornell.edu

Greg Parkinson

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Jan 27, 1994, 5:09:44 PM1/27/94
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In <2i99oj$9...@news.duke.edu> kbe...@acpub.duke.edu (Kristin Bergen) writes:

>In article <2i97h4$q...@panix.com>, Greg Parkinson <g...@panix.com> wrote:

>>Dave made me grits with cheese and tomatoes
>>the other morning.

>No, darling, it's not "grits with cheese," it's "cheese grits." In either
>case, though, yum.

How embarassing. He says he translated it for
my yankee ears.

Mary Ballard

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Jan 28, 1994, 9:53:38 AM1/28/94
to
Ann (ax...@po.CWRU.Edu) writes:

>
> In a previous article, wpa...@emoryu1.cc.emory.edu (William A. Parsons) says:
>
> >But what about fried okra? Hmmm mmmm good!
> >
> >-Will (throwing a little southern spin on this sillyness.)
>
> Silliness? Sillyness? (Only your spell-checker knows for sure.) This is
> CLEARLY an attempt to get motssers to admit their food likes and dislikes,
> for who-knows-what kind of dastardly plot! Will Mary find scalloped beets

> on the menu? ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Bleah. Ack, ack. You're right Ann, this is clearly a conspriracy.
I say a call to arms is in order. So motssers, take up your plowshares,
asparagus spears, and carrot sticks and we shall beet them peas by
peas.

Mary

Sim Aberson

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Jan 28, 1994, 11:23:02 AM1/28/94