Libraries FAQ, v. 2.1, part 1/10

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Libraries FAQ 2.1
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/1107


Anthony Wilson
p...@iglou.com

Libraries FAQ
INDEX
1.0 Introduction
1.1 What is a FAQ?
1.2 Where can I find the latest version of the Libraries FAQ?
1.3 How can I contribute to the Libraries FAQ
1.4 What other FAQs might interest librarians and researchers?

2.0 General Information About Libraries
2.1 What is a library?
2.2 What is library science?
2.3 What types of libraries are there?
2.4 How long have libraries been around?
2.5 How old is librarianship
2.6 Where can I get the latest news regarding libraries and library
science?
3.0 Training & Education

3.1 Where can I earn a degree in librarianship?
3.2 Where can I earn a library technician diploma?
3.3 Can I take courses or earn an accredited library degree through
correspondence?
3.4 What conferences can I attend to keep my knowledge and skills up
to
date?

4.0 Work
4.1 What distinguishes the work of shelvers, library assistants,
library
technicians and librarians?
4.2 Who decides the attitudes, policies and actions of libraries?
4.3 What can I do about mouse ball theft?
4.4 What's the latest word on book banning attempts in public
libraries?
4.5 Where do librarians stand on the use of software filters to screen
content on library Internet workstations?
4.6 Where can I get information on job openings in library science?
4.7 What are information brokers?
4.8 What are some alternative careers for librarians?
4.9 Where can I find information on contracting out and outsourcing
library
services?

5.0 Classification
5.1 How does the Dewey decimal Classification (DDC) work?
5.2 What are the ten major classifications of the DDC?
5.3 What are the twenty major classes of Library of Congress?
5.4 What are the major Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) classes?
5.5 What are the ten major classes of Universal Decimal
Classification?
5.6 What other classification systems are there?
5.7 How do I cite information I find on the Internet?

6.0 Organizations
6.1 What organizations can I join to network with fellow
professionals?
6.2 What organizations are there for LIS students?

7.0 Culture
7.1 How did the "Marian the Librarian" stereotype start?
7.2 What happens when downtown New York's fiercest ruling party girl
finds
herself down and out working in a public library?
7.3 Can a werewolf be a librarian? Can she be happy?
7.4 Where can I find a list of sources of librarians in film?
7.5 Where can I find the lyrics for songs with libraries in them?
7.6 Who's the patron saint of librarians?
7.7 How many librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
7.8 Where can I get a list of sources of librarian images in comics?
7.9 Are there sci-fi novels where librarians have a prominent role?
7.10 Are there mystery novels where librarians have a prominent role?
7.11 What librarian is charged with helping Buffy the Vampire Slayer
fight
gouls, zombies, and other creatures of the night?"

8.0 The Cyberstacks
8.1 Can I get answers to difficult reference questions through the
internet?
8.2 What library related web resources are available?
8.3 What newsgroups are available?
8.4 Are there e-mail discussion groups for librarians?
8.5 Where can I find online journals?
8.6 Are there any IRC channels or chat forums that are specifically
aimed at
librarians?
8.7 Who are some of the prominent librarians writing about the
Internet and
digital libraries?
8.8 How can I become more comfortable using the Internet?

9.0 Miscellanea
9.1 Where can I read more about librarianship?
9.2 Who is the Cool Library of the Week?
9.3 Does my library have a library cat?
9.4 Where can I find library-related clipart?
9.5 Where can I find free stuff for librarians and educators?
9.6 What is the biggest, or the first, or the oldest, or the most
popular...etc.?


"Libraries are reservoirs of strength, grace and wit, reminders of
order,
calm and continuity, lakes of mental energy, neither warm nor cold,
light
nor dark. The pleasure they give is steady, unorgastic, reliable, deep
and
long-lasting. In any library in the world, I am at home,
unselfconscious,
still and absorbed."
Germaine Greer
"Still in Melbourne, January 1987" in Daddy, We Hardly Knew You (1989)


"Just because the f---er's got a library card doesn't make him Yoda."
Brad Pitt as Detective Mills in the movie "Seven" (1995)

Copyright 1997 by Anthony Wilson (p...@iglou.com)

The Libraries FAQ may be posted to any USENET newsgroup, on-line
service, or
BBS as long as it is posted in its entirety and includes this
copyright
statement.
The Libraries FAQ may not be distributed for financial gain.
The Libraries FAQ may not be included in commercial collections or
compilations without express permission from the author

Anthony Wilson

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Libraries FAQ
Section 1.0 Introduction

1.1 What is a FAQ?

1.2 Where can I find the Libraries FAQ?
1.3 How can I contribute to the Libraries FAQ?

1.4 What other FAQs might interest librarians and researchers?

1.1 What is a FAQ?

FAQ is an acronym for Frequently Asked Questions (or, as some have
suggested, Frequently ANSWERED Questions), a periodic posting of
information regularly requested on Usenet newsgroups. FAQs posted to
news.answers are archived at
ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers. Hypertext versions of
posted FAQs can be found at:
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/top.html
The Libraries FAQ arose out of questions asked on soc.libraries.talk
and other library related newsgroups. It is a collection of basic
information regarding libraries and librarianship and an introductory
guide to library resources on the Internet.


1.2 Where can I find the latest version of the Libraries FAQ?

The Libraries FAQ is posted on the 16th of every other month to
news.answers, soc.answers and soc.libraries.talk. It is archived at:
ftp://rtfm.mit.edu/pub/usenet/news.answers/books/library-faq
A continually updated hypertext version of the Libraries FAQ can be
found at the Libraries FAQ Homepage:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/1107

1.3 How can I contribute to the Libraries FAQ?

The Libraries FAQ has benefited enormously from the input of its
readers. Your comments concerning updates, additions, or corrections
to the FAQ are always welcome. I would especially like to hear about
important library resources outside the US and Canada. Please send
suggestions to Anthony Wilson (p...@iglou.com).
The Libraries FAQ was created by Steve Bergson
(safra...@geocities.com). Steve is also the creator of the Medical
Libraries FAQ, http://members.tripod.com/~medlib/mdlbfaq.htm


1.4 What other FAQs might interest librarians and researchers?

A complete listing of FAQs posted to news.answers can be found at the
news.answers archive, ftp://rtfm.mit.edu . A more user friendly WWW
FAQ archive can be found at
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/FAQ-List.html For
general information regarding the creation and maintenance of FAQs,
see the Infinite Link FAQ site, http://www.ii.com/internet/faqs/ (and
its mirror http://www.best.com/~ii/internet/faqs/writing/).

Some FAQs of possible interest to librarians and researchers are:

alt.education.distance FAQ
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/education/distance-ed-faq/top.html

alt.usage.english FAQ
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/alt-usage-english-faq/faq.html

Books (category)
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/books/top.html
How to find the right place to post (FAQ)
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/finding-groups/general/faq.html

Information Research FAQ
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/internet/info-research-faq/top.html

rec.arts.books FAQ
http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/hypertext/faq/usenet/books/faq/faq.html

Anthony Wilson

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Libraries FAQ Section 3.0 Training & Education

3.1 Where can I earn a degree in library science?

3.2 Where can I earn a library technician diploma?
3.3 Can I take courses or earn an accredited library degree through
correspondence?
3.4 What conferences can I attend to keep my knowledge and skills up
to date?


3.1 Where can I earn a degree in librarianship?

The ALA site, http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oa/uslis.html , contains the
most up-to-date list of accredited programs in the U.S. For a list of
Canadian programs accredited by the ALA see:
http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oa/canlis.html
Professor Tom Wilson, Head of the Department of Information Studies,
University of Sheffield has compiled a list of international schools
of LIS, business information systems, and information technology:
http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/worldlist/wlist1.html



3.2 Where can I earn a library technician diploma?

Check out the Library Support Staff Resource Center site at the U of
Rochester for a list of schools in the U.S, Canada, Australia and the
UK: http://www.lib.rochester.edu/ssp/
The Library Paraprofessional Clearinghouse has information on
organizations, conferences, education and employment:
http://www.people.memphis.edu/~mapepin/para.htm


3.3 Can I take courses or earn an accredited library degree through
correspondence?

Yes, you can earn an Associate Degree, Diploma, Certificate, or
Continuing Education credits through distance and continuing education
programs. See: http://www.lib.rochester.edu/ssp/educate/educate.htm

3.4 What conferences can I attend to keep my knowledge and skills up
to date?

The Librarian's Datebook, maintained by Barbara Tysinger of the
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a comprehensive
listing of LIS conferences around the world,
http://www.hsl.unc.edu/libcal.htm
I would also suggest visiting the continuously updated LIBRES
Conferences and Meetings page,
http://www.curtin.edu.au/curtin/dept/sils/libres/meetings.htm .

The ALA's American Libraries Datebook,
http://www.ala.org/alonline/datebook/datebook.html, has information on
conferences, events (like National TV Turnoff Week), workshops and
study tours.

And if you need to convince your superiors that you must attend a
weekend conference in Barbados on "Book Repair for the New
Millennium", see: http://www.lib.rochester.edu/ssp/events/strategy.htm

Anthony Wilson

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Libraries FAQ Section 2.0 General Information About Libraries

2.1 What is a Library?

2.2 What is library science?
2.3 What types of libraries are there?
2.4 How long have libraries been around?

2.5 How old is librarianship?
2.6 Where can I get the latest news on libraries and library science?



2.1 What is a library?

The traditional definition is "a collection of books". The ALA
Glossary of Library and Information Science (Heartsill Young (ed.)
Chicago: ALA, 1983) defines a library as:
"A collection of material organized to provide physical,
bibliographical, and intellectual access to a target group with a
staff that is trained to provide services and programs related to the
information needs of the target group".

Will Manley adds, in his _Manley Art of Librarianship_ (Jefferson, NC:
McFarland, 1993), "An unused collection of books is simply that - an
unused collection of books. It is not a library."

2.2 What is library science?

The ALA Glossary defines it as
"The knowledge, demands and skills by which recorded information is
selected, acquired, organized and utilized in meeting the information
needs of a community of users."(pg. 132) However, Will Manley writes,
"library science is an oxymoron. There is absolutely nothing
scientific about librarianship." (pg. 175)


2.3 What types of libraries are there?

Libraries can be categorized into four basic types:
1. public libraries,
http://www.yahoo.com/Reference/Libraries/Public_Libraries/

2. school libraries,
http://www.yahoo.com/Reference/Libraries/School_Libraries/

3. academic libraries,
http://www.yahoo.com/Reference/Libraries/University_Libraries/,

and 4. special libraries, which include:

Law libraries
http://www.yahoo.com/Government/Law/Legal_Research/Libraries/
Medical libraries http://www.yahoo.com/Health/Reference/Libraries/
Art libraries http://www.yahoo.com/Arts/Libraries/
Science and engineering libraries
http://www.yahoo.com/Science/Libraries/
http://www.yahoo.com/Science/Engineering/Libraries/
Music libraries http://www.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Music/Libraries/
Government libraries
http://www.yahoo.com/Government/Documents/Libraries/
or any of the many libraries which serve organizations requiring, or
providing, specialized information (see Special Libraries Assoc.,
http://www.sla.org/ .)



2.4 How long have libraries been around?

The Sumerians are believed to have developed the first writing system
around 3500 BCE By 2700 BCE, they had established temple, private, and
governmental libraries.
If you are interested in the history of libraries and librarianship,
visit the Library History Round Table web site and consider joining
their mailing list, http://www.spertus.edu/library-history/ :

"The purpose of the Library History Round Table is to facilitate
communication among scholars and students of library history, to
support research in library history, and to be active in issues, such
as preservation, that concern library historians."

2.5 How old is librarianship?

From the Libraries FAQ 1.2 by Steve Bergson:
Much younger, but difficult to pinpoint. The _ALA Glossary..._ defines
librarianship as "the profession concerned with the application of
knowledge of media and those principles, theories, techniques and
technologies which contribute to the establishment, preservation,
organization, and utilization of collections of library materials and
to the dissemination of information through media." (pg. 130) Barbara
Ehrenreich writes, in her _Fear of Falling: The Inner Life of the
Middle Class_ (Pantheon: New York, 1989) that professionalization
occurred between 1870 and 1920 (pg. 133). I don't know if a consensus
has been reached on a specific year for this development. Certain
milestones are noteworthy, though.

1876 - Melville Dewey established the first standardized
classification system for libraries (DDC)

- the American Library Association was founded

- _Library Journal_ began publication

1882 - first ALA library conference held

1887 - Dewey established the first library school at Columbia
University (which has since closed down)

1965 - MAchine Readable Coding (MARC) coding was introduced



2.6 Where can I get the latest news regarding libraries and library
science?

NewsFlashes/Libraries, http://www.hwwilson.com/flash.html, is a
headline news service for the library community provided by the
publisher H. W. Wilson. News Flashes is updated every Monday.
The Library Journal Digital, http://www.ljdigital.com/, provides
library news and technology updates.

AcqWeb's Hot Topics section,
http://www.library.vanderbilt.edu/law/acqs/acqs.html, has links
relating to current controversies in library science.

A good source for "alternative" news is the Minnesota Library
Association Social Responsibilities Round Table (MSRRT) Newsletter,
http://www.cs.unca.edu/~davidson/msrrt/ . Editor Chris Dodge,
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Cafe/7423/index.html , provides
interesting updates on library staff unionizing, internet censorship,
price gouging by vendors, etc.


Anthony Wilson

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Libraries FAQ

Section 5.0 Citation & Classification

5.1 How does the Dewey decimal Classification (DDC) work?
5.2 What are the ten major classifications of the DDC?
5.3 What are the twenty major classes of Library of Congress?
5.4 What are the major Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) classes?
5.5 What are the ten major classes of Universal Decimal
Classification?
5.6 What other classification systems are there?
5.7 How do I cite information I find on the Internet?


5.1 How does the Dewey decimal Classification (DDC) work?

There are ten main categories in DDC. These are divided into ten
subcategories, which in turn are divided into further subcategories.
The more specific the subject of the item is, the longer the number
assigned to it is. Today the classifications are the responsibility of
Forest Press.



5.2 What are the ten major classifications of the DDC?

The Dewey Decimal System
000-099: General works (encyclopedias and similar works)
100-199: Philosophy and Psychology
200-299: Religion
300-399: Social Sciences
400-499: Languages (including dictionaries)
500-599: Natural science
600-699: Applied science
700-799: Arts
800-899: Literature
900-999: History, Geography and Biography

For a further breakdown, go to the 3 summaries site on the WWW at:
http://www.oclc.org/oclc/fp/about/ddc21sm1.htm .


5.3 What are the twenty major classes of Library of Congress?

A: General works
B: Philosophy and religion
C: History - auxiliary sciences
D: History and topography (except American)
E-F: American history
G: Geography, anthropology, folklore, recreation
H: Social sciences
J: Political science
K: Law
KE: Canadian Law
KF: U.S. Law
L: Education
M: Music
N: Fine arts
P: Language and literature
Q: Science
R: Medicine
S: Agriculture
T: Technology
U: Military science
V: Naval science
Z: Bibliography and library science
See also, Matt Rosenberg's ( geograp...@miningco.com ) Library of
Congress Classification System page at the Mining Company:
http://geography.miningco.com/library/congress/bllc.htm .

5.4 What are the classes of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) & Black's
Dental Classification?

MeSH
QS: Human Anatomy
QT: Physiology
QU: Biochemistry
QV: Pharmacology
QW: Bacteriology & Immunology
QX: Parasitology
QY: Clinical Pathology
QZ: Pathology
W: Medical Profession
WA: Public Health
WB: Practice of Medicine
WC: Infectious Diseases
WD 100: Deficiency Diseases
WD 200: Metabolic Diseases
WD 300: Diseases of Allergy
WD 400: Animal Poisoning
WD 500: Plant Poisoning
WD 600: Diseases Caused by Physical Agents
WE: Musculoskeletal System
WF: Respiratory System
WG: Cardiovascular System
WH: Hemic amp; Lymphatic Systems
WI: Gastrointestinal System
WJ: Urogenital System
WK: Endocrine System
WL: Nervous System
WM: Psychiatry
WN: Radiology
WO: Surgery
WP: Gynecology
WQ: Obstetrics
WR: Dermatology
WS: Pediatrics
WT: Geriatrics. Chronic Disease
WU: Dentistry. Oral Surgery
WV: Otorhinolaryngology
WW: Opthalmology
WX: Hospitals
WY: Nursing
WZ: History of Medicine

Black's Dental Classification
D Dentistry in general
D01-09 Form numbers
D1-17 Basic sciences
D2-29 Operative dentistry
D3-38 Prosthetic dentistry
D4-47 Orthodontics
D5-59 Dental health
D6-69 Oral pathology
D7-79 Oral surgery
D8-89 Dental practice and management
D9-95 Anesthesia


5.5 What are the ten major classes of Universal Decimal
Classification?

0: Generalities. Science and Knowledge Organization. Information
Documentation. Librarianship. Institutions. Publications.
1: Philosophy and psychology
2 : Religion and theology
3 : Social sciences; Statistics; Politics; Economics; Trade; Law;
Governments; Military affairs; Welfare; Insurance; Education; Folklore
4 : [vacant]
5 : Mathematics and natural sciences
6 : Applied Sciences
7 : The Arts. Recreation. Entertainment. Sport
8 : Language. Linguistics. Literature
9 : Geography. Biography. History


5.6 What other classification (or subject heading) systems are there?


In Canada, Canadian Subject Headings, see
http://130.15.161.74/techserv/cat/Sect03/c03c35.html is often used.
Sears is another classification system.

Randall W. Scott at Michigan State University Libraries has developed
a schedule (which he uses in conjunction with LCSH) for sequential art
material (i.e. comic books and strips). This appeared in his _Comics
Librarianship: A Handbook_(Jefferson: McFarland, 1990). For more
information on it, e-mail him at sco...@pilot.msu.edu or check out his
homepage at http://www.lib.msu.edu/comics/index.htm .

Information on David Elazar's "A Classification System for Libraries
of Judaica" can be found at his home page:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/6527/index.html

5.7 How do I cite information I find on the Internet?

As yet, there is no agreed upon method of citing Internet sources, but
most proposals are based on the MLA and APA styles of citation. Ann
Robinson's "Citing Internet Sources" page,
http://tigger.cc.uic.edu/~aerobin/citing.html , has links to several
sites which discuss citation formats. For a critique of some of the
proposed methods of Internet citation, and suggestions for a better
model, see Andrew Harnack and Gene Kleppinger's "Beyond the MLA
Handbook", http://falcon.eku.edu/honors/beyond-mla/

Some examples of Internet citation:

In the MLA style
Wilson, Anthony. Libraries FAQ. v. 1.5. Online. Available:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/1107/index.html. Feb. 16,
1997.

In the APA style
Wilson, Anthony (1996). Libraries FAQ. (v. 1.5), [Online]. Available:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/1107/index.html. [Feb.16,
1997].

For a detailed and authoritative discussion on Internet citation,
consult:
Li, Xia, and Nancy Crane. Electronic Style: A Guide to Citing
Electronic Information. Westport: Meckler, 1993.
http://www.uvm.edu/~ncrane/estyles/


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Libraries FAQ Section 6 Organizations

6.1 What organizations can I join to network with fellow
professionals?
6.2 What organizations are there for LIS students?

6.1 What organizations can I join to network with fellow
professionals?

There is an excellent list of library organizations on the WWW at the
School of Library and Informantion Science at San Jose
StateUniversity: http://witloof.sjsu.edu/prof/colleagues.htm

Some prominent organizations are:

American Association of Law Libraries
http://www.aallnet.org/
Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL)
http://aleph.lib.ohio-state.edu/www/ajl.html
American Library Association (ALA)
http://www.ala.org
Association of Research Libraries (ARL)
http://arl.cni.org
American Society for Information Science (ASIS)
http://www.asis.org/
Canadian Association of Law Libraries
http://www.kingston.net/iknet/call/e-index.html
Canadian Association of Special Libraries and Information Services
http://199.247.148.81/caslis/index.html
Canadian Library Association (CLA)
http://www.cla.amlibs.ca/
International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA)
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/ifla/
http://ifla.inist.fr/ (IFLANET European mirror)
Medical Libraries Association (MLA)
http://www.mlanet.org/
Music Library Association
http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/contents.htm
Public Library Association (PLA)
http://pla.org
Reforma, The National Assoc. to Promote Library Services
To The Spanish Speaking
http://latino.sscnet.ucla.edu/library/reforma/index.htm
Special Library Association (SLA)
http://www.sla.org/


6.2 What organizations are there for LIS students?

Most professional LIS organizations have student chapters; see the
list of library organizations on the WWW at the School of Library and
Informantion Science at San Jose StateUniversity for student chapters
of the ALA, SLA, ASIS, and the Society of American Archivists:
http://witloof.sjsu.edu/organizations.html

LISSO is the Library and Information Science Students Organization. I
have located web sites for only the University of Iowa and University
of Kentucky chapters:
http://www.uiowa.edu/~libsci/studentalumni/lisso/index.shtml
http://www.uky.edu/CommInfoStudies/SLIS/lisform.htm


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Libraries FAQ
Section 4.0 Work

4.1 What distinguishes the work of shelvers, library assistants,
library technicians and librarians?
4.2 Who decides the attitudes, policies and actions of libraries?

4.3 What do I do about mouse ball theft?

4.4 What's the latest word on book banning attempts in public
libraries?
4.5 Where do librarians stand on the use of software filters to screen

content on library Internet stations?

4.6 Where can I get information on job openings in library science?
4.7 What are information brokers?
4.8 What are some alternative careers for librarians?

4.9 Where can I find information on the outsourcing of library
services?


4.1 What distinguishes the work of shelvers, library assistants,
library technicians and librarians?

The U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, http://stats.bls.gov/ , maintains
a database of job descriptions and career outlooks. This is a helpful
place to start when researching career options:
Library Assistants and Book Mobile Drivers
http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos147.htm
Library Technicians
http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos113.htm
Librarians
http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos068.htm
Also, the Library Support Staff Resource Center provides descriptions
of the various roles played by library personnel, plus links to more
information on work roles:
http://rodent.lib.rochester.edu/ssp/overview/overview.htm

The following is from the Libraries FAQ 1.2 by Steve Bergson:

In 1927, "The Report of the Bureau of Public Personnel Administration
submitted to the Committee on the Classification of Library Personnel
of the American Library Association proposed 'a separation of clerical
from non-clerical duties.'" [Baker, P. (1986) _What About the
Workers?: Study of Non-professional Staff in Library Work_. London:
Association of Library Assistants, pg.2]. Shelvers are the minimum
wage teenagers (usually) who shelve the materials after they have been
returned. Library assistants or technicians might do any of the
following: shelving (in the absence of shelvers), circulation duties
(check in, check out, supervision), derived cataloguing, programming,
ordering, answering ready reference questions or materials processing.
Librarians might do any of the following professional tasks: book
selection, original cataloguing, making library policy, evaluating
performance of others, answering more complex reference questions,
ordealing with the complaints and concerns of patrons. Librarians may
do nonprofessional tasks in the absence of technicians and shelvers.
Library technicians and assistants may do professional tasks in the
absence of professional staff.


4.2 Who decides the attitudes, policies and actions of libraries?

For those in the thick of writing Internet access guidelines, there is
a comprehensive policy site for public libraries compiled by Jeff
Radford: http://www.ci.oswego.or.us/library/poli.htm


From the Libraries FAQ v 1.2 by Steve Bergson:

It depends on who you ask. Librarians will proudly tell you that,
being professionals, they make independent judgments based on sound,
ethical principles. They will flaunt the infamous Library Bill of
Rights (adopted 1948; revised 1961, 1967 and 1980) to prove it. The
sad truth is that librarians have often been caught between their
professional principles and nonprofessional antagonists. One type of
antagonist is the library board member/politician seeking to gain easy
publicity or to win votes at the expense of the library, its staff or
its patrons. The other type of antagonist is the narrow-minded patron
who insists that his/her opinion (on policy, book selection, hiring,
etc.) is decisive because it is his/her library (this particularly is
a problem in tax-supported and public libraries). See, Family Friendly
Libraries, http://www.fflibraries.org/ and the article:
Schweinsburg, Jane D. "Family Friendly Libraries vs. the American
Library Association" _Journal of Information Ethics_ Fall 1997: 75-87.



4.3 What do I do about mouse ball theft?

Threads on mouse ball theft have appeared on a number of library
discussion groups. Replacement mouse balls can be purchased from:
Argonaut (800) 322-3328
Prefix (800) 264-2530
Synaptech (800) 617-7865
Different vendors may have different sizes, so check to make sure that
you get the right ones. Prices seem to run $3-5 for replacement balls.


Possible solutions (from a thread on web4lib):

-Mitsumi 9-pin serial mice run about $8 (less in quantity.)
-Glue mice closed with Crazy Glue. Mice cannot be cleaned, but balls
are easily stolen and not so easily replaced. The library might still
come out ahead.
-Use touchpads. They're low in price and have no moving parts. Access
to the trackball is only through the bottom and the trackball housing
can be mounted to a desk with removeable screws.This would prevent, or
at least deter, theft of the ball.


4.4 What's the latest word on book banning attempts in public
libraries?

According to the ALA, http://www.ala.org/bbooks/ , the top 10 most
challenged books in 1997 were:
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou
It's Perfectly Normal, Robie Harris
Goosebumps Series, R.L. Stine
The Alice Series, Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
The Giver, Lois Lowry
A Day No Pigs Would Die, Robert Newton Peck
Kaffir Boy, Mark Mathabane
Bridge to Terabithia, Katherine Paterson
For an informative look at the history of book banning, see Carnegie
Mellon University's Banned Books On-line:
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/People/spok/banned-books.html

And for the Top 10 list of silly and illogical reasons to ban a book,
see http://www.ala.org/editions/wlh/top10.html

See also:

The American Civil Liberties Union
http://www.aclu.org/issues/freespeech/bbwind.html

Yahoo - Banned Books
http://www.yahoo.com/Arts/Humanities/Literature/Banned_Books/



4.5 Where do librarians stand on the use of software filters to screen

content on library Internet stations?

Content filtering software - AKA cyberfilters, AKA censorware - are
attempts to clean up the Internet for use in public libraries. The
concern generally centers over objectionable or adult material that
children may be exposed to. Foul language, sexually explicit graphics,
and pages with violent or anarchical subject matter are usually
targeted. Software filters use some combination of three strategies
for limiting access to web sites:

1. Build and maintain a list of forbidden sites. Problem: while there
are certain high profile adult sites that might be easily screened, it
is impossible to keep up with the thousands of web sites that are
being created every day.

2. Scan web pages for certain objectionable words or phrases. Problem:
this system usually brushes with too broad a stroke; conventional
bookstores, educational sites, and health organizations are often
trashed along with the "Teen Smut" pages.

3. Voluntary ratings adopted by web sites and acknowledged by the
browser, i.e. Platform for Internet Content (PIC)
http://www.w3.org/pub/WWW/PICS/ and Recreational Software Advisory
Council (RSACi) http://www.rsac.org . Problems: (a) the ACLU has
opposed voluntary ratings, citing government pressure on web sites to
self-censor, http://www.aclu.org/news/n080797a.html ; (b) there not
enough sites currently participating in the rating programs (300+?) to
make them a useful tool for libraries.

The major players in the filter business are:

Cyber Patrol http://www.cyberpatrol.com/
CYBERsitter http://www.cyberpatrol.com/
Net Nanny http://www.netnanny.com/
SurfWatch http://www.surfwatch.com/
Library Channel http://www.vimpact.net/tlc.htm

For a summary of the strengths and weaknesses of the various filters,
see Karen G. Schneider's The Internet Filter Assessment Project,
http://www.bluehighways.com/tifap/ . "The Internet Filter Assessment
Project began in April, 1997 as a volunteer project led by librarian
Karen G. Schneider to assess Internet filters used to block sites
and/or keywords. This project arose from a growing concern by many
librarians over the use of Internet filters in library systems. Over
30 librarians and information specialists have volunteered in the
assessment phase."

Censorware.Ørg, http://censorware.org , is the home of The Censorware
Project, "a group dedicated to exposing the phenomenon of censorware."
Censorware.Ørg is definitely anti-"filtering products", but it is
still a good source for news and information regarding filters in
libraries.

The pro-filter point of view can be found at David Burt's Filtering
Facts, http://www.filteringfacts.org . "FF supports the voluntary use
of filters by libraries. FF does not support legislative efforts to
mandate that libraries install filters."

The ALA has come out against the use of filtering software in
libraries:

Resolution on the Use of Filtering Software in Libraries
http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oif/filt_res.html

"RESOLVED, That the American Library Association affirms that the use
of filtering software by libraries to block access to constitutionally
protected speech violates the Library Bill of Rights. "
( NOTE: You'll find the electronic version of ALA Library Bill of
Rights at http://www.ala.org/oitp/ebillrits.html)

For more information on filters and the issues involved, I suggest the
following online articles:

Understand Software that Blocks Internet Sites
by Lisa Champelli, The Internet Advocate
A Web-based Resource Guide for Librarians and Educators Interested in
Providing Youth Access to the Net
http://www.monroe.lib.in.us/~lchampel/netadv4.html

Looking at Filters, PC magazine
http://www8.zdnet.com/pcmag/features/utility/filter/_open.htm#top

Internet World, September, 1996
http://www.iw.com/1996/09/safe.html

Internet Freedoms and Filters: Roles and Responsibilities of the
Public Librarian on the World Wide Web
by James LaRue
http://www.csn.net/~jlarue/iff.html

Filtering the First Amendment for Public Libraries: A Look at the
Legal Landscape
by Mary Minow
http://www.best.com/~tstms/filte.html

Filtering the Internet in American Public Libraries: Sliding Down the
Slippery Slope
by Jeannette Allis Bastian,
http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue2_10/bastian/


4.6 Where can I get information on job openings in library science?

Ann E. Robinson's Library Job Hunting page has a extensive list of
online job hunting sites, journals and career information:
http://tigger.cc.uic.edu/~aerobin/libjob.html
Also, the SLA and IFLA job listervs are good sources of job leads:
SLAJOB list...@iubvm.ucs.indiana.edu
LIBJOBS list...@infoserv.nlc-bnc.ca



4.7 What are information brokers?

As Marilyn M. Levine puts it in "A Brief History of Information
Brokering" , http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Feb-95/levine.html ,
information brokering is "the business of buying and selling
information as a commodity". Information brokers are independent
information professionals who may provide such services as online and
manual research, document delivery, database design, library support,
consulting, writing and publishing. See: Association of Independent
Information Professionals (AIIP) http://www.aiip.org/
There are several good articles on information brokering in the
February/March 1995 issue of the ASIS Bulletin :
http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Feb-95/index.html

If you think information brokering is for you, be sure to read:
Rugge, Sue and Alfred Glossbrenner. The Information Broker's Handbook.
McGraw/Hill, 2nd Ed. 1994.

See also, the Yahoo category on Information Brokers:
http://www.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Companies/
Information/Information_Brokers



4.8 What are some alternative careers for librarians?

Librarians are experts in the retrieval, analysis, and re-packaging of
information. It shouldn't come as a surprise that the skills acquired
and developed by librarians are prized by the "outside" world. At the
ALA's CyberLib page,
http://www.ala.org/editions/cyberlib.net/5bbest01.html , Barbara
Best-Nichols lists many of the career possibilities:
Abstractor
Analyst
Broker
Collection developer
Consultant
Database manager
and more...
NOTE: I'd like to include more information on alternative careers for
LIS grads. If you know of any books, articles or online sources that
maybe helpful to librarians or LIS students seeking different career
paths please let me know (p...@iglou.com ).

4.9 Where can I find information on the outsourcing of library
services?


outsourcing, noun, the procuring of services from an outside provider
in order to cut costs.
Example: On March 31, 1995, the Chicago office of the law firm Baker &
McKenzie fired its 10-person law library staff. While it had become
common for law firms and other businesses to contract out specific
library duties (cataloging, loose-leaf filing, etc.), at Baker &
McKenzie all library services were outsourced. On March 17, 1997,
Baker & McKenzie hired law librarian Barbara A. Schmid, as manager of
library services. Baker & McKenzie insisted the hiring was not a
retreat on library outsourcing.

For information on library oursourcing, see these bibliographies:

Library Outsourcing, from the Internet Library for Librarians,
http://www.itcompany.com/inforetriever/adm_outs.htm
Selected References On Contracting Out And Outsourcing Library
Services, from the SLA,
http://www.sla.org/membership/irc/contract.html

Anthony Wilson

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Mar 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/14/00
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Anthony Wilson
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Libraries FAQ Section 9 Miscellanea


9.1 Where can I read more about librarianship?

9.2 Where is the Cool Library of the Week?

9.3 Does my library have a library cat?

9.4 Where can I find library related clipart?

9.5 Where can I find free stuff for librarians and educators?

9.6 What is the biggest, ... or the first, ... or the oldest, ... or
the most popular...etc.?



9.1 Where can I read more about librarianship?

Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science / editors: Allen Kent
& Harold Lancour. New York: M. Dekker, 1968.
Encyclopedia of Library History / edited by Wayne A. Wiegard & Donald
G. Davis, Jr. New York: Garland, 1994.

Whole Library Handbook 2 / compiled by George M. Eberhart. Chicago:
ALA, 1995. http://www.ala.org/editions/wlh/wlh.html.

9.2 What library is the Cool Library of the Week?

It could be your library. Go to the Cool Library of the Week page:
http://www.colosys.net/coolib/




9.3 Does my library have a library cat?

If it does, it should be listed in the Library Cats Map of the United
States : http://www.ironfrog.com/catsmap.html


9.4 Where can I find library-related clipart?

The Library Graphics page has GIFs of books, computers, Batgirl and
other library related images:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/2161/graphics/

Stephanie Stokes, of Library Media & PR, has some free banners to help
promote your library. Also, check out her links to free clipart, fonts
and web page design information: http://www.ssdesign.com/librarypr/

Sue Meyers' Library Clipart Collection has a wide assortment of book
related gifs:
http://www.netins.net/showcase/meyers/library_clipart/clipart.html

You'll find colorful variations on the ALA international symbol for
libraries at Chris Olson & Associates:
http://chrisolson.com/ALAsymbols.html

Lynne LeGrow has a collection of Library Clipart to aid the library
professional, and entertain the bibliophile:
http://home.istar.ca/~allegrow/libraryclipart.htm

A great place to start a search for clipart is the Web Clipart site of
the Mining Co. Bobbie Peachey has organized the links to hundreds of
free clipart sites into helpful categories (books, computers, office,
etc.): http://webclipart.miningco.com

9.5 Where can I find free stuff for librarians and educators?

Bibliomania's Contest Links has information on literary trivia
contests and sweepstakes,
http://members.aol.com/bibliomnia/home/winbks.htm.
"Is your taste in books hardcover first edition but your budget yard
sale paperback? Then try these links to contests around the web. You
could win books or other reading accessories!"

9.6 What is the biggest, ... or the first, ... or the oldest, ... or
the most popular ... etc.?

What public library is the largest in the world?
Where was the world's first library science school was located?

What famous lover once worked as a librarian?

All these answers and much more can be found at Info Connect Lists of
Library Records, http://www.users.dircon.co.uk/~kush/Page16.htm .

Answers:
New York Public Library
Columbia University
Casanova (librarian for Count Von Waldstein)

Anthony Wilson

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Mar 14, 2000, 3:00:00 AM3/14/00
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Posting-Frequency: Every 3 months
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Anthony Wilson
p...@iglou.com

Libraries FAQ Section 7.0 Culture


7.1 How did the "Marian the Librarian" stereotype start?
7.2 What happens when downtown New York's fiercest ruling party girl
finds herself down and out working in a public library?
7.3 Can a werewolf be a librarian? Can she be happy?
7.4 Where can I find a list of sources of librarians in film?
7.5 Where can I find the lyrics for songs with libraries in them?
7.6 Who's the patron saint of librarians?
7.7 How many librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
7.8 Where can I get a list of sources of librarian images in comics?

7.9 Are there sci-fi stories where librarians have a prominent role?

7.10 Are there mystery novels where librarians have a prominent role?
7.11 What librarian is charged with helping Buffy the Vampire Slayer
fight gouls, zombies, and other creatures of the night?

7.1 How did the "Marian the Librarian" stereotype start?

The following comes from Grimes, Deborah J. "Marion the Librarian -
The Truth Behind the Image" in Scherdin, Mary Jane (ed.) _Discovering
Librarians: Profiles of a Profession_ (Chicago: ACRL, 1994), pg. 3:
"In 1950, Meredith Wilson wrote a musical entitled _The Music Man, in
which the lead female character is Marian Paroo, a small town
librarian and music teacher. The character is a self-proclaimed
spinster, who must continually resist the exhortations of everyone
around her, including the mother with whom she lives, to "find a man".
Marian is characterized as picky, hardworking, standoffish, bookish,
and, by most accounts, pitiable. The phrase, "Marian the Librarian",
was coined, along with the image, in a song in The Music Man. Over
forty years later, the image continues to permeate public opinion and
remain the stereotype of the professional librarian."


7.2 What happens when downtown New York's fiercest ruling party girl
finds herself down and out working in a public library?

PARTY GIRL
From First Look Pictures:
"Armed with a quick wit and begged or borrowed Gaultier, Mary (Parker
Posey) struggles to pay the rent. As a hostess extraordinare Mary
packs 300 of her closest friends into her Chinatown loft for a rent
party. When her roommate, Derrick (Anthony DeSando ), splits with half
the rent, and DJ Leo (Guillermo Diaz)threatens to walk out if Mary
doesn't give him a place to stay, Mary throws open her doors to the
NYPD and ends up in jail. Desperate, she calls her godmother, Mrs.
Lindendorf (Shasha von Scherler ), who bails her out but insists. Mary
take a responsible job - as a librarian! So despite her phobia of the
Dewey Decimal System, Mary becomes a 9-5er.
"Mary's having an identity crisis. Torn between the high-drama,
high-fashioned world of nightclubs and DJs and a steady paycheck as a
librarian, she's not sure if she should grow up and settle down with
Mustafa (Omar Townsend), the handsome Lebanese neighborhood falafel
vendor, or join the ranks of Rene, the aging, strung out diva of New
York's club scene. Or should she just curl up in a fetal position and
couch potato the '90's out?

"Daisy von Scherler Mayer makes her directorial debut with PARTY GIRL
having co-written the screenplay with Harry Birckmayer who produced
the film with Stephanie Koules. Starring Parker Posey (SLEEP WITH ME,
DAZED AND CONFUSED), the supporting cast includes Sasha von Scherler,
Omar Townsend, Anthony DeSando (FEDERAL HILL, Under Suspicion), Donna
Mitchell (LESS THAN ZERO, THE ROOKIE), and Guillermo Diaz (FRESH,
CROSSING THE STICKS."

Party Girl was also a FOX Network sitcom (Mondays at 9 EST.)

"Monkeys have died trying to learn the Dewey Decimal system."


7.3 Can a werewolf be a librarian? Can she be happy?

Yes; maybe. "Wilderness"", a UK TV series, features a sex-mad academic
librarian werewolf type ("Oh dear, I'm going to turn into a wolf") who
declares "academic libraries are sexy"".
Male academic type: "I've seen you around, do you work here?"
Werewolf librarian, pouting, : "I'm JUST the librarian.."


7.4 Where can I find a list of sources of librarians in film?

-Martin Raish's LIBRARIANS IN THE MOVIES An Annotated Filmography
(includes a bibliography of articles on librarians in film,
http://library.lib.binghamton.edu/subjects/liblit/introduction.html
-Shoji Ichimura's Librarians in Films database,
http://www.bekkoame.or.jp/~ichimura/libmvdb/libmvdbE.htm, and
-"Librarians on Stage and Screen" by Frederick Duda in the Whole
Library Handbook 2 (see 9.1 below):
http://www.ala.org/editions/wlh/movies.html


7.5 Where can I find the lyrics for songs with libraries in them?

The DRA Librarian's Library,
http://www.dra.com/resources/library/playitsam.htm, has the lyrics to
songs about libraries.

Yahoo lists a large number of lyric pages, many with searchable
databases:
http://www.yahoo.com/Entertainment/Music/Composition/Lyrics_and_Notation/Lyrics/


A great site is The Mudcat Cafe Digital Tradition Folk Song Database,
http://www.mudcat.org/folksearch.html which contains the words and
music to thousands of folk songs, including:

THE BOLD LIBRARIAN
(Joy Rutherford)
http://www.mudcat.org/!!-song99.cfm?stuff=Spring98+D+1433884
"He's the bold librarian.
Now, this librarian, he rode out all in the dewy morn,
Come in my bold librarian, and I'll mek thee a pot of tea."

From the unofficial web site of the former FOX and now Sci-Fi channel
TV show Sliders: http://www.brillig.com/sliders/earth-prime.shtml

"Library Rap"

Yo Homes, what's up?
What up with you?
Whatcha' gonna say?
Whatcha' gonna do?
Where you gonna go?
What we gonna see?
We're goin' to the li-bra-ree.

I'm moving down the aisle with my Homeys in tow
We're grovin' through the home of the librarian Ho
She checks us out from behind thick glasses
We walk right past and we wiggle our asses

Hemingway... Lawrence... Checkhov and Miller
Fitzgerald was a freak, Mailer is a killer...

Quiet pleeease!
Quiet pleeease!

The silence is golden
To books I am beholden
I know I'm bad
'Cuz of the knowledge that I'm holdin'
And I give you one warnin'
There will be no repeats
Get out of my face
While I'm readin' my Keats

"Library Rap" performed by MC Poindexter & The Study Crew


7.6 Who's the patron saint of librarians?

It's St. Jerome, born at Stridon, a town on the confines of Dalmatia
and Pannonia, about the year 340-2. He died in Bethlehem, September,
30 420. Pope Damasus had selected Jerome to make a new Latin
translation of the Greek New Testament. Jerome later expanded his
assignment to include the Old Testament, which he translated from the
Hebrew.
For online biographical information (and portraits):

Catholic Encyclopedia http://www.knight.org/advent/cathen/08341a.htm

Saint Jerome's House http://members.aol.com/DWFrancis/sjh.html


7.7 How many librarians does it take to change a light bulb?

Four. One to install the bulb and three to test it in staff mode for
three months before the patrons get to use the light.
Ok, I know it's bad, but the New Jersey State Library
http://www.state.nj.us/statelibrary/lbhumtoc.htm , invites you to
visit and submit your own library jokes.

For more laughs, take a look at IFLANET Library Humour,
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/ifla/I/humour/humour.htm

IFLANET also has an interesting collection of library quotes:
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/ifla/I/humour/subj.htm

Do you want to know more about strange patrons, strange things found
in books, and strange smells in the stacks? See Hypatia's Humorous
Library Tales, by Jenny "the Circ Girl",
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Parthenon/2776/
"If you had any idea what was going on in the minds of the seemingly
normal people around you all day, you'd run for your life."


7.8 Where can I get a list of sources of librarian images in comics?

For information about Batgirl and Mrs. McGreevey see Steve Bergson's
Librarians in Comics: Sources on the Libraries FAQ Homepage.

7.9 Are there sci-fi novels where librarians have a prominent role?

Most of this information comes from a thread on soc.libraries.talk
regarding librarians and libraries in sci-fi. I'd like to add more
information, i.e. plot lines, characters, etc., so please feel free to
send me information on these or other books that feature librarians.
Fire Upon the Deep, by Vernor Vinge, features a librarian as a main
character and depicts future worlds where whole civilizations live or
die by their connectivity to "the net" (internet). Her job is to
interpret the many layers of indexing that have evolved, and find the
meaningful information that's buried there. (Description supplied by
Sue Visser.)

Eon
by Greg Bear

Against the Fall of Night, and
Rama Revealed
both by Arthur Clarke

Counterclock World
by Philip K. Dick

Deathworld 3
by Harry Harrison

Direct Descent
by Frank Herbert

Restoree
by Ann McCaffrey

Protector, and
Ringworld Engineers
both by Larry Niven

1984 (Smith works in the Library of the Ministry of Truth)
by George Orwell

Gray Lensman,
Children of the Lens, and
Second-Stage Lensmen
all by Doc Smith

A Plague of Angels, and
Shadow's End
both by Sherri Tepper



7.10 Are there mystery novels where librarians have a prominent role?


Yes, and the best source of information is Marsha McCurley's
Bibliomysteries page,
http://www.carol.net/dolphin/bibliomysteries/index.htm . Besides an
extensive bibliography, McCurley includes lists of librarian
detectives, staff victims, reference works, links to other listings,
and a collection of quotes:

"...People just don't get murdered in public libraries. It's not
done." -- Police Chief, in Murder in a Library by Charles J. Dutton


7.11 What librarian is charged with helping Buffy the Vampire Slayer
fight gouls, zombies, and other creatures of the night?

Rubert Giles, a California high school librarian is "The Watcher",
the one chosen to identify and guide the single person per generation
who can slay vampires with impunity. He is Buffy's mentor, trainer,
and researcher. See, Christopher Brown-Syed's Cool Librarians of Fact
and Fiction page, http://www.lisp.wayne.edu/waycool.html .
The following quotes from Buffy The Vampire Slayer are courtesy of
Elisabeth Anne Riba, l...@netcom.com :


Willow: Uh, if you have sixth period free we could meet in the
library?

Buffy: Or not. Or we could meet someplace quieter. Louder. Uh, that
place just kinda gives me the wiggins.

Willow: Oh, it has that effect on most kids. I love it, though, it's
a
great collection, and the new librarian is really cool.

Buffy: He's new?

Willow: Yeah, he just started. He was a curator at some British
museum,
or, or The British Museum, I'm not sure. But he knows everything, and
he
brought all these historical volumes and biographies and am I the
single
dullest person alive?

Buffy: Not at all.
------------------------------------------------------------
Owen comes into the library and approaches them.

Buffy: Oh! (slides off the table) Owen! Hi!

Giles: (looks up at Owen) What do you want?

Owen: A book?

Giles: Oh!

Buffy: (to Giles) See, this is a school, and we have students, and
they
check out books, and then they learn things.

Giles: I was beginning to suspect that was a myth.
------------------------------------------------------------
Willow: Xander, we should go with Giles! He could get in trouble!

Xander: Oh, he's gone, uh, it's, he's gonna be alright. He's like
super
librarian, y'know? Everyone forgets, Willow, that knowledge is the
ultimate weapon.
------------------------------------------------------------
Giles: Mm. He thought it would behoove me to have more contact with
the
students. I did try to explain that my vocational choice of librarian
was a deliberate attempt to (draws a breath) minimize said contact,
but,
uh, he would have none of it.
------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. Calendar: Hmm. (to Buffy and Xander) You're here again? Kids
really
dig the library, don't cha?

Buffy: We're literary!

Xander: To read makes our speaking English good.

Buffy: We'll be going now. (grabs Xander and turns to leave)

Giles: Uh, w-we'll, uh, continue this conversation at another time.

Buffy: I think we're done. (they leave) (to Xander) Makes our
speaking
English is good?

Xander: I panicked, okay?

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