Sources about - Explore the Moskova

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a425couple

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May 19, 2022, 1:27:35 PMMay 19
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Sources about - Explore the Moskova

From K-129

en.wikipedia.org
› wiki › Soviet_submarine_K-129_(1960)Soviet submarine K-129 (1960) -
Wikipedia
The K-129 (Russian: К–129) was a Project 629A (Russian: проект 629А
Projekt 629A, NATO reporting name Golf II–class) diesel-electric-powered
ballistic-missile submarine that served in the Pacific Fleet of the
Soviet Navy–one of six Project 629 strategic ballistic-missile
submarines assigned to the 15th Submarine Squadron based at Rybachiy
Naval Base near Petropavlovsk, commanded ...

military-history.fandom.com › wiki › SovietSoviet submarine K-129 (1960)
| Military Wiki | Fandom
K-129 was a Project 629A (NATO reporting name Golf-II) diesel-electric
powered submarine of the Soviet Pacific Fleet, one of six Project 629
strategic ballistic missile submarines attached to the 15th Submarine
Squadron based at Rybachiy Naval Base, Kamchatka, commanded by Rear
Admiral Rudolf A. Golosov. In January 1968, the 15th Submarine Squadron...
See full list on military-history.fandom.com

www.mhistory.net › the-sink-of-the-soviet The sinking of the Soviet
submarine K-129 and details of the ...
K-129 – Soviet ship equipped with ballistic missiles, designed according
to project 629A (Golf-II according to NATO code) Photo: CIA The captain
of the K-129 was Vladimir Kobzar, who was then named one of the best
officers of the Soviet Navy. The captain took the submarine to sea on
February 24,1968, taking off from the base on Kamchatka.

www.npr.org › 2017/09/16 › 551222628'The Taking Of K-129': How The CIA
Stole A Sunken Soviet Sub ...
Sep 16, 2017 · In 1968 — the middle of the Cold War — the Soviet
submarine K-129 disappeared, taking with it its 98-member crew, three
nuclear ballistic missiles and a tempting treasure trove of

From USS Halibut

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Halibut_(SSGN-587)
USS Halibut (SSGN-587), a unique nuclear-powered guided missile
submarine-turned-special operations platform, later redesignated as an
attack submarine SSN-587, was the second ship of the United States Navy
to be named after the halibut.
----
Halibut was used on underwater espionage missions by the US against the
Soviet Union.[11] Her most notable accomplishments include:[citation needed]
The underwater tapping of a Soviet communication line running from the
Kamchatka peninsula west to the Soviet mainland in the Sea of Okhotsk
(Operation Ivy Bells)
Surveying sunken Soviet submarine K-129 in August 1968, prior to the
CIA's Project Azorian.


From Glomar Explorer

en.wikipedia.org
› wiki › Glomar_Explorer Glomar Explorer - Wikipedia
GSF Explorer, formerly USNS Hughes Glomar Explorer (T-AG-193), was a
deep-sea drillship platform built for Project Azorian, the secret 1974
effort by the United States Central Intelligence Agency 's Special
Activities Division to recover the Soviet submarine K-129. Contents 1
Construction 2 Project Azorian 3 After Project Azorian 3.1 Mothballing

interestingengineering.com
› glomar-explorer-theGlomar Explorer - the CIA and Howard Hughes'
Attempt to Raise ...
The Glomar Explorer had pioneering precision stability equipment onboard
that kept her stationary above a point on the ocean floor despite high
winds or seas. But, the Glomar's most pioneering...

aoghs.org
› oil-almanac › secret-offshore-history-of Secret History of Drill Ship
Glomar Explorer - American Oil ...
Considered the pioneer of all modern drill ships, Glomar Explorer was
decades ahead of its time working at extreme depths for the U.S.
offshore petroleum industry. Relaunched in 1998 as the latest offshore
technological phenomenon, Glomar Explorer had begun in 1972 as a secret
project of the Central Intelligence Agency.

www.maritime-executive.com
› features › grand-finaleGrand Finale for Infamous Glomar Explorer - Part 1
Jun 18, 2015 · The Glomar Explorer itself was 618 feet long with a
115-foot beam, which was too large to transit the Panama Canal. So after
sea trials it began its long voyage on June 21, 1974

news.usni.org
› 2015/09/09 › former-cia-spy-shipFormer CIA Spy Ship Hughes Glomar
Explorer Sold for Scrap
Sep 09, 2015 · The owners of a ship used to execute one of the most
world’s most complicated and expensive pieces of espionage have sold it
for scrap. GSF Explorer — previously dubbed the


From Moskova

en.wikipedia.org
› wiki › Russian_cruiser_Moskva Russian cruiser Moskva - Wikipedia
The ship was the lead ship of the Project 1164 Atlant class, named after
the city of Moscow. The flagship of the Russian Black Sea Fleet, with a
crew of 510, Moskva was considered the most powerful warship in the
Black Sea region. The cruiser was deployed in military conflicts in
Georgia (2008), Crimea (2014), and Syria (2015).

en.as.com › latest_news › moskva-ship-how-big-is-itMoskva ship: how big
is it, when was it built, what weapons ...
Apr 14, 2022 · Moskva: key info on the damaged missile cruiser
Originally called the Slava, the Moskva was first launched in 1979,
during the Soviet Union era, before being placed into --

she sank in the Black Sea, 100 kilometres (62 mi) from the coast of Odessa.

So, 16 of these were on board:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P-500_Bazalt
Cruise missile
Surface-to-surface missile
Mass 4,800 kg (10,600 lb)
Length 11.7 meters
Diameter 0.88 meters
Warhead High explosive or nuclear
Warhead weight 1,000 kg (2,205 lb) (P-500)
Blast yield 350 kt
((My 2004 Janes Fighting Ships lists these as nuclear 350 kT !!))

and 8 of these
S-300F
Sea-based S-300F (SA-N-6)
The S-300F Fort ---- Its first installation and sea trials were on a
Kara class cruiser and it is also installed on Slava class cruisers and
Kirov class battlecruisers. It is stored in eight (Slava) --- The NATO
name, found also in colloquial use, is "Grumble".
((My 2004 Janes Fighting Ships lists these as warhead 90kg,
or nuclear ? !!))

Black Sea depth

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrOp1XPe4ZiRDID0AY2nIlQ;_ylu=c2xrA3RleHQEaXQDQWxzb1RyeQRzZWMDcmVsBHBvcwMx?fr2=p:s,v:i&fr=yhs-dcola-068&hsimp=yhs-068&hspart=dcola&type=gsp_wfd468acegsyomqwpvfc_00_00_--x1-AB2222--&param1=1&param2=cat%3Dweb%26sesid%3D9e7649d7d76d422b88b0f289e019c58a%26ip%3D71.227.211.204%26b%3DChrome%26bv%3D101.0.4951.64%26os%3DWindows-10%26os_ver%3D10.0%26pa%3Dgencoll84%26sid%3D26aab0eefeaa07f0d4f2d20357d0e971%26abid%3D%26abg%3D%26a%3Dgsp_wfd468acegsyomqwpvfc_00_00_--x1-AB2222--%26sdk_ver%3D%26cd%3D%26cr%3D%26uid%3D%26uref%3D&p=black+sea+map#id=3&iurl=https%3A%2F%2Fcdn.britannica.com%2F08%2F6008-050-93166E97%2FBlack-Sea.jpg&action=click

so, probably / likely about 500 meters depth.

Repeat of other post:

I think that we need to be patient and keep
aware of how news develops around the
sunk Russian cruiser Moskva.

It certainly had missiles that were intended
in a serious "war" to be armed with nuclear
warheads.

How confident can we be that prior to Russia
starting the Ukraine War, that they pulled it
into a well guarded port, unloaded all the
nuclear warheads, put them into land storage,
or shipped them back to the main Russian weapons
storage areas for nukes?
It would seem that that would be a rather labor
and management intensive effort.
Of things we have seen, has Russia been smart
and prudent? Or have they been rushed, sloppy, and
careless?

I think, either currently, or certainly in the future,
some deep diving submersible research will be done.

a425couple

unread,
May 19, 2022, 1:44:03 PMMay 19
to
On 5/19/2022 10:27 AM, a425couple wrote:
> Sources about - Explore the Moskova
BIG SNIP
> Repeat of other post:
>
> I think that we need to be patient and keep
> aware of how news develops around the
> sunk Russian cruiser Moskva.
>
> It certainly had missiles that were intended
> in a serious "war" to be armed with nuclear
> warheads.
>
> How confident can we be that prior to Russia
> starting the Ukraine War, that they pulled it
> into a well guarded port, unloaded all the
> nuclear warheads, put them into land storage,
> or shipped them back to the main Russian weapons
> storage areas for nukes?
> It would seem that that would be a rather labor
> and management intensive effort.
> Of things we have seen, has Russia been smart
> and prudent?  Or have they been rushed, sloppy, and
> careless?
>
> I think, either currently, or certainly in the future,
> some deep diving submersible research will be done.

this man on Quora, thinks NOT

Did the Russian ship Moskva sink with nuclear weapons on board?

Profile photo for Loring Chien
Loring Chien
I said nukes don't tick; All the nukes I've disarmed didn't tick.Apr 22

I think probably not.

Russian military like to micro manage, not delegating a lot of
authority. You hear that over and over as part of the difficulty Russian
forces are having.

I doubt that the release of nuclear weapons is in the hands of the
captain. The Weapons would be stored in Sevastopol on the Crimean
peninusla, just a short sail away.

When the wanted to use them and a very MAJOR escalation they (higher
powers than the captain) would have recalled the ship to load them, it
would not be on an instant’s notice as you might for nuclear
retaliation. There’s no situation in which the Russians would need to
fire nukes on a hour’s notice.

Sevastopol, the major Russian Naval base, is only 140 miles from where
the Moskva was stationed when she “caught fire” so they could have gone
for nukes and been back on station in 14 hours.

Meanwhile with no nukes she could carry more conventional P1000 cruise
missiles (total capacity was only 16 and they could not be reloaded on
the ship). I’m not even sure they could have loaded or changed warheads
to them… doesn’t look like it. And if the P1000 missile tubes were
breached in a fire and explosion, there would have been some nuclear
material release perhaps which was not reported.

21.3K viewsView 39 upvotes

a425couple

unread,
May 19, 2022, 6:45:24 PMMay 19
to
On 5/19/2022 10:27 AM, a425couple wrote:
> Sources about - Explore the Moskova
>
BIG SNIP
>
> so, probably / likely about 500 meters depth.
>
> Repeat of other post:
>
> I think that we need to be patient and keep
> aware of how news develops around the
> sunk Russian cruiser Moskva.
>
> It certainly had missiles that were intended
> in a serious "war" to be armed with nuclear
> warheads.
>
> How confident can we be that prior to Russia
> starting the Ukraine War, that they pulled it
> into a well guarded port, unloaded all the
> nuclear warheads, put them into land storage,
> or shipped them back to the main Russian weapons
> storage areas for nukes?
> It would seem that that would be a rather labor
> and management intensive effort.
> Of things we have seen, has Russia been smart
> and prudent?  Or have they been rushed, sloppy, and
> careless?
>
> I think, either currently, or certainly in the future,
> some deep diving submersible research will be done.

This author thinks they probably had nukes on board.

Did the Russian ship Moskva sink with nuclear weapons on board?

Jason Wills-Starin
, Autist, software enthusiast, dreamer, entrepreneur

I'm going to say yes, probably.

1. The Russians take their tactical nuclear weapons with them on
deployment, and the Moskva spent time before the Ukrainian war in the
Mediterranean “menacing” US carriers.

2. The P-500 antiship cruise missiles on that ship are huge, and
maintenance on them is a PITA. They don't switch them out, so likely 2
to 6 of them were 300kt nuclear weapons. Maybe more.

3. They never thought they'd lose the Moskva. Pride goeth before the
fall, and that ship was just chock full of pride.


Jim Wilkins

unread,
May 20, 2022, 8:48:53 AMMay 20
to
"a425couple" wrote in message news:zlvhK.368$vFlb...@fx34.iad...

Did the Russian ship Moskva sink with nuclear weapons on board?

-----------------

https://www.europhysicsnews.org/articles/epn/pdf/2019/01/epn2019501p19.pdf

"Even the huge radioactive contamination by the thermonuclear
explosions in the sixties that have released about one hundred
times more radioactivity than Chernobyl, is nowadays
diluted to a radioactivity of plutonium that does not exceed
0.1 Bq m-3 (Hirose, 2009) (Box 1). This level is negligible
in comparison to the natural radioactivity of seawater of
12000 Bq m -3 (mainly from radioactive potassium 40K)."

"Interestingly, the potassium concentration in our body is
eight times as high as that in seawater, and so in a crowd
we irradiate each other eight times stronger than while
swimming in the sea!"

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