Google Groups no longer supports new Usenet posts or subscriptions. Historical content remains viewable.
Dismiss

Ukrainian surname "Romaniw".......

71 views
Skip to first unread message

Marc Banzet

unread,
Jan 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/27/96
to
lawso...@ccsua.ctstateu.edu wrote:
:
: My last name is Romaniw is Ukrainian, but I would like to know if this name
: is common in the Ukraine. Not too many people seem to have heard of it. If
: anyone could be some help, please let me know. Thanks!
: Mike!

For what it's worth, my mother's maiden name (which is
Ukrainian) has 3 spellings, all of which are used by my family in
Canada. They all come from the same root Ukrainian word, but somewhere
in the processing of government documents, the ignorant bureaucrat
couldn't make out what the heck these people were saying their name
was. So, he just spelled it the way he thought it sounded. The funny
thing is that my family nearly all live in the Province of Saskatchewan,
Canada, yet they still have still have different spellings--we're
talking second and third cousins here.
Again, I will cite my Premier, Roy Romanow. His name derives
from Romanov. I would almost bet money yours does too. He's most
certainly Ukrainian, so are 25% or so of the people in Saskatchewan. His
name is fairly common, and I know there are various spellings.
If your name truly comes from Romanov, you should be proud. Not
only is it Ukrainian, but it is a fairly regal last name (the Czarist
Romanov dynasty).

From one Ukrainian to another...

Marc Banzet
(even though my name is French-Alsatian,
I'm still mostly a Uke.)

Anton S. Valdine

unread,
Jan 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/27/96
to
Hi,
Onec time ago I received a message from the author of this request,
the sence of this comes only to the phaze: this surname born without
helps of moskali(moskaly - bad name for naming russians, used in Ukraine,
mostly inWest Ukraine).
I discussed this question with mr. Vl.Paley, the head of one of the Moscow
genealogical societies. he shared with me with some piece of information.
When he attended the Lvov archive, even in the sourses of Austrian Galitcia
he found the surname Moscovich, i.e. even 200-250 years ago people come from
Russia to West Ukraine.
Such surnames, with the end of iw, are mostly in the West Ukraine.
I believe that it was created from the usual for Ukraine and Russia surname
Romanoff(things are more simply, that we thing), and remade in ukranian way.
Anton Valdine
Gen...@Geneal.msk.ru


vax2.concordia.ca

unread,
Jan 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/28/96
to
In article <4ecu5g$e...@morgoth.sfu.ca>, mba...@sfu.ca (Marc Banzet) writes...

>lawso...@ccsua.ctstateu.edu wrote:
>:
>: My last name is Romaniw is Ukrainian, but I would like to know if this name
>: is common in the Ukraine. Not too many people seem to have heard of it. If
>: anyone could be some help, please let me know. Thanks!
>: Mike!
>
> For what it's worth, my mother's maiden name (which is
>Ukrainian) has 3 spellings, all of which are used by my family in
>Canada. They all come from the same root Ukrainian word, but somewhere
>in the processing of government documents, the ignorant bureaucrat
>couldn't make out what the heck these people were saying their name
>was. So, he just spelled it the way he thought it sounded. The funny
>thing is that my family nearly all live in the Province of Saskatchewan,
>Canada, yet they still have still have different spellings--we're
>talking second and third cousins here.
> Again, I will cite my Premier, Roy Romanow. His name derives
>from Romanov. I would almost bet money yours does too. He's most
>certainly Ukrainian, so are 25% or so of the people in Saskatchewan. His

My surname (married name) is from the Ukraine to Mundare, Alberta and
relatives go by Sheremata, Sheremeta and Szeremata. There are more
Sheremata/Sheremeta/Szeremata(s) in Saskatchewan. I haven't found a
connection <yet>, but they also have three spellings in the same extended
family.

Margaret Sheremata
Montreal, Quebec

Anton S. Valdine

unread,
Jan 29, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/29/96
to
Hi all,
I received the following nice message from one person who
read this newsgroup. Is there any a few bit of genealogy?
Perhaps, it's nesessary to include in the soc.genealogy.slavic
FAQ, that any natinalosm is prohibited?
Especially for the persons, who can't recognize, that Lvov,
Lviv, Lemberg had three different names for one city?
It's the pity result of the position, where genealogy gathers
with the angry to other nationality people.
It's interested that I NEVER meet such things from the syde of
jewishgeners, which have much more causes to hate russian origine
people.
We all, I believe wait creating of soc.genealogy slavic, but not for
starting the flames instead of normall discussion.
To tell thet person can't know Lvov's archive's sourses because he
doesn't know the proper spelling of the name of the town, wich has
three equal names!
What low level! It can be compared with the level of a street food market
somewhere in Moscow suburbs. I really can't expected such level anywhere
beside street market. And I met it in Internet from Canada! "--((
Anton Valdine
Gen...@Geneal.msk.ru
>From: ydia...@acs.ryerson.ca (Yuriy Diakunchak - JOUD)
>Message-Id: <960128200...@hopper.acs.ryerson.ca>
>To: gen...@geneal.msk.ru
>Subject: Re: Ukrainian surname "Romaniw".......
>X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.2 PL2]
>Lines: 23
>MIME-Version: 1.0
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>Content-Length: 982
>
>In article <AF0Da...@geneal.msk.ru> you wrote:
>: Hi,

>: Onec time ago I received a message from the author of this request,
>: the sence of this comes only to the phaze: this surname born without
>: helps of moskali(moskaly - bad name for naming russians, used in Ukraine,
>: mostly inWest Ukraine).
>
>Actually, chump (nice word for idiots in Canada), I wasn't the author of the
>original request, I was simply correcting your flawed Moskal outlook on
>how beneficial Moskovshchyna has been to the other nationalities
>unfortunate enough to live on its borders.
>
>: I discussed this question with mr. Vl.Paley, the head of one of the Moscow

>: genealogical societies. he shared with me with some piece of information.
>: When he attended the Lvov archive, even in the sourses of Austrian Galitcia
> ----
>
>If Mr. Paley can't be relied on to spell Lviv properly, how can he be
>considered an authority on the etymology of Ukrainian surnames?
>
>ciao,
>
>Yuriy
>
>


tatdar...@gmail.com

unread,
Aug 12, 2018, 10:09:02 AM8/12/18
to
I am trying to find out the same information. Romaniw was my grandfather's name and came from near Lviv, Ukraine. Any news?

On Saturday, 27 January 1996 08:00:00 UTC, Marc Banzet wrote:
> lawso...@ccsua.ctstateu.edu wrote:
> :
> : My last name is Romaniw is Ukrainian, but I would like to know if this name
> : is common in the Ukraine. Not too many people seem to have heard of it. If
> : anyone could be some help, please let me know. Thanks!
> : Mike!
>
> For what it's worth, my mother's maiden name (which is
> Ukrainian) has 3 spellings, all of which are used by my family in
> Canada. They all come from the same root Ukrainian word, but somewhere
> in the processing of government documents, the ignorant bureaucrat
> couldn't make out what the heck these people were saying their name
> was. So, he just spelled it the way he thought it sounded. The funny
> thing is that my family nearly all live in the Province of Saskatchewan,
> Canada, yet they still have still have different spellings--we're
> talking second and third cousins here.
> Again, I will cite my Premier, Roy Romanow. His name derives
> from Romanov. I would almost bet money yours does too. He's most
> certainly Ukrainian, so are 25% or so of the people in Saskatchewan. His
0 new messages