The Two john Watertons - Part 2

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John Watson

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Nov 2, 2014, 9:54:35 AM11/2/14
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John Waterton, Esquire

John Waterton, esquire was the son of Richard, son of William, son of Ingram de Waterton and was the brother of the king's esquire Robert Waterton. He was probably born between 1360 and 1370.

The first notice we have of him and his brother Robert is that they were with Henry Bolingbroke, earl of Derby's on his expedition, firstly to Calais, then to Prussia and Lithuania in 1390-91, together with their cousin Sir Hugh Waterton, who was Bolingbroke's chamberlain. John Waterton received pay as an esquire during the expedition until 30 April 1391 [1]. John and his brother Robert, master of Henry's horses, sailed with Henry to Danzig in July-August 1392, at the start of his journey to Jerusalem, but returned from Danzig to England in September 1392 [2].

John Waterton appears to have taken up residence firstly in Yorkshire and later in Lincolnshire, but exactly where is difficult to say. On 10 July 1407, John Waterton, esquire, of the county of York was one of the sureties for Henry Retford for the keeping of the county of Lincoln [3]. On 20 January 1408, John Waterton and Richard Fleming, clerk (probably the brother of Robert Waterton's wife Cecily) bought the manor of Hessle (probably near Ackworth, Yorkshire) from John Usflete of Gunneys and Margaret his wife [4]. On 1 February 1408, John Waterton of the county of York was a surety for Hugh Mortimer [5] and again on 17 February for Sir John Tiptoft [6]. He was again a surety for Hugh Mortimer on 14 May 1409 [7]. On 24 February 1410, he and his brother Robert Waterton, esquire were owed 10 marks by Sir John de Ashton and John Tuxford of Tuxford [8]. On 8 March 1410, he and his brother Robert were members of a commission of walliis et fossatis in Lindsey, Lincolnshire [9].

He was sheriff of Lincoln between 29 November 1410 and 10 December 1411, when his brother Robert replaced him as sheriff [10]. In April 1413, John de Waterton, donsel, nobleman, and his present wife, damsel, noblewoman, of the diocese of Lincoln had a papal indulgence to have a portable altar [11]. This is the only reference that I have been able to find concerning the wife of John Waterton. From the papal indulgence, it is apparent that he married more than once, but the names of his wives do not appear in any contemporary documents. Much nonsense has been published over the years claiming that his wife was from the family of Burgh or Methley, but there is no evidence for this at all.

After Henry V came to the throne in 1413, John Waterton appears to have been given two positions by the new king; as master of his horse, taking over from his brother Robert who had served as master of the horse to Henry Bolingbroke; and secondly as steward of the royal soke of Kirton in Lindsey in Lincolnshire.

On 28 April 1415, Robert Waterton and Cecily his wife granted the manor of Barlow (Barley) in Brayton, Yorkshire to John Waterton [12]. On 16 May 1415, John was on a commission of walliis et fossatis in Lincolnshire [13].

John Waterton was in Henry V's retinue as Master of the King's Horse in the expedition to France in August 1415 [14]. On 25 October 1415, he was at the battle of Agincourt with six men at arms [15].

John Waterton survived the battle and returned to England. On 4 February 1417, he was on a commission of walliis et fossatis in Lincolnshire [16] and on 16 March 1417, he was a surety for Nicholas Tourney as sheriff of Lincoln [17].

This is the last notice that I can find for John Waterton. On 5 November 1417, Sir Gerard Usflete was appointed to the office of steward of the royal soke of Kirton in Lindsey in place of John Waterton, deceased [18].

John Waterton was succeeded by his son Richard, who was probably born about 1400. Early in 1421, Richard Waterton, son and heir of John Waterton, Nicholas Harewood and William Withornwick, executors of John Waterton's will, petitioned Henry V for letters discharging them from the custody of some gold cups and other plate which had been pledged to John Waterton as a security for his wages during the Agincourt campaign [19]. On 2 May 1421, Richard son and heir of John Waterton, esquire, and his executors had a pardon from the king of "all debts, accounts, prests, receipts, liveries, wastes, stripments, dilapidations, exiles, trespasses, impeachments, misprisions, losses, actions, complaints, demands, farms, arrears, concealments, fines, issues and amercements" which seems to have covered just about everything except murder [20].

Richard Waterton later married Constance Asshenhul and was the ancestor of the Waterton family of Burn (in Brayton), Walton, Cawthorne, and Minsthorpe (in South Kirkby), Yorkshire and Corringham, Lincolnshire.

Regards,
John

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[1] Lucy Toulmin Smith, ed., Expeditions to Prussia and the Holy Land Made by Henry Earl of Derby, Camden Society, New Series, 52 (London, 1894), xlvi.
[2] Ibid., lii.
[3] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 13, Henry IV: 1405-1413 (1933), 76.
[4] CP 25/1/279/151, number 5.
[5] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 13, Henry IV: 1405-1413 (1933), 100.
[6] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 13, Henry IV: 1405-1413 (1933), 101.
[7] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 13, Henry IV: 1405-1413 (1933), 147.
[8] Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry IV: vol. 4: 1409-1413 (1932), 75-93.
[9] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry IV, vol. 4: 1408-1413 (1909), 181.
[10] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 13, Henry IV: 1405-1413 (1933), 203, 221.
[11] Calendar of Papal Registers Relating to Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 6: 1404-1415 (1904), 345.
[12] CP 25/1/280/153, number 16.
[13] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry V, vol. 1: 1399-1401 (1903), 345.
[14] N. Harris Nicolas, History of the Battle of Agincourt and of the Expedition of Henry the Fifth into France in 1415; to Which Is Added the Roll of the Men at Arms in the English Army, 3rd ed. (London, 1833), 387.
[15] Ibid., 363.
[16] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry V, vol. 2: 1416-1422 (1911), 82.
[17] Calendar of Fine Rolls, vol. 14, Henry V: 1413-1422 (1934), 191.
[18] Thomas Duffus Hardy, ed., Rotuli Normanniae in Turri Londiensi Asservati, Johanne et Henrico Quinto Angliae Regibus, vol. 1 (London, 1835), 196.
[19] Nicholas Harris Nicolas, Proceedings and Ordinances of the Privy Council of England, vol. 2 (London, 1834), 280.
[20] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry V, vol. 2: 1416-1422 (1911), 341.

al...@mindspring.com

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Nov 2, 2014, 12:01:59 PM11/2/14
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Thanks for these posts John. You are right about the pedigrees. They are mostly worthless for Watertons for this time period. I was just starting to look at them.

Do you have any idea where John and Robert "of Methley" belong in the family? They are clearly not the sons of the John with a daughter Eleanor who carried Waterton to the Babthorpes.

Doug Smith

ericgil...@gmail.com

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Nov 2, 2014, 1:37:47 PM11/2/14
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Excellent posts, John.
Thanks!
Eric

John Watson

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Nov 2, 2014, 2:30:14 PM11/2/14
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Dear Doug,

Robert and John Waterton were apparently the sons of Richard Waterton and his wife Juliana. Richard Waterton was the son of William, son of Ingram de Waterton.

Robert Waterton, Master of the Horse to Henry IV, became the owner of the manor of Methley in 1410. He gave the advowsons of the churches of Gosberkirk in Lincolnshire and Wath upon Dearne, Yorkshire to the Hospital of St. Nicholas, Pontefract in exchange for the manor of Methley.
see: Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry IV, vol. 4, p. 198

The advowson of Gosberkirk had previously been granted to him by the king, and the advowson of Wath came probably from his second wife's family, the Flemings of Wath.

Almost every pedigree of the Watertons has one or another of them marrying a daughter of Thomas de Methley, but as far as I can see there is no evidence of this.

Regards,
John

al...@mindspring.com

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Nov 2, 2014, 2:35:22 PM11/2/14
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Thanks John

I have seen the de Methley claim as well but there is no need of it toexplain his ownership.

Doug Smith

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