Senior Champernoun line in England: Descent from King William the Conqueror

654 views
Skip to first unread message

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 15, 2018, 7:22:33 PM9/15/18
to
Dear Newsgroup ~

I've posted below my current file account of the senior Champernoun line which features a valid descent from King William the Conqueror. The account is based on my personal research and features information not found elsewhere in print.

Comments are invited. When answering, if quoting from primary or secondary sources, please cite them, and, if possible, provide weblinks.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

+ + + + + + + + + + + +

1. WILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, King of England, married MAUD OF FLANDERS.
2. HENRY I, King of England, by an unknown mistress, _____.
3. ROBERT FITZ ROY, Earl of Gloucester, married MABEL FITZ ROBERT.

4. ROBERT FITZ ROBERT, of Conarton (in Gwithian), Cornwaell, Castellan of Gloucester, younger son. He married HAWISE DE REDVERS (or REVIERS), daughter of Baldwin de Redvers (or Reviers), 1st Earl of Devon, by his wife, Adeliz [see DEVON 2 for her ancestry]. They had one daughter, Mabel. Sometime in the period, 1141–61, he and his wife, Hawise, made a gift to Quarr Abbey in the Isle of Wight. Sometime in the period, 1147–71, he witnessed a charter of his brother, Earl William, at Bristol to Gilbert Fitz John. Sometime in the period, 1147–50, probably before March 1148/9, he witnessed a treaty between his brother, Earl William, and Roger, Earl of Hereford. Sometime in the period, c. 1147–8, he witnessed a charter of his mother, Countess Mabel, and his brother, Earl William, announcing restorations made to Jocelin, Bishop of Salisbury. In 1154, as Robert son of the Earl of Gloucester, he conveyed to Richard the butler the manor of Conarton (in Gwithian), Cornwall for a payment 400 marks of silver and a silk cloth, and to his wife, “Harvisa” a palfrey. ROBERT FITZ ROBERT (or FITZ COUNT) died in 1170. In the period, c. 1193–1211, his widow, Hawise de Redvers, gave the manors of Fleet and Ibberton, Dorset to her grandson, Jordan de Champernoun. Sometime in the period, c.1216–26, Roger, prior of Christchurch and the convent acknowledged that they were bound to provide 20s. on the anniversary of Hawise from the land of Fleet, Dorset which she gave in free and perpetual alms to the priory.

References:

Madox, Formulare Anglicanum (1702): 3–4 (charter of Hawise de Rivers daughter of Earl Baldwin). Pole, Colls. towards a Desc. of Devon (1791): 39 (“Haisculf de Salariis, or Soleigny, of Umberleigh, died 1171, & his sonne Philip succeeded in this Kinge [Henry II], and maried Hawis, da. of Baldwin Erle of Devon, & sister of Wm de Vernun.”), 82 (“Hasculphus de Soleignio, or de Solariis, was Lord of Umberley in Devonshire, and served Kinge Henry 2 in his warres. His sonne Gilbert married Hawis, the daughter of Baldwin Redvers, Erle of Devon. Hee died anno Domini 1171.”), 422–423. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum 6(2) (1830): 1097–1098. Pertz, Chronica et Annales ævi Salici (Monumenta Germaniæ Historica, Scriptores 6) (1844): 519 (Roberti de Monte Cronica [Robert de Torigni]) sub 1170 —“Mortuo Roberto filio Roberti comitis Gloecestrie”). Worthy, Devonshire Parishes (1887): 60–66. Macray, Charters & Docs. illustrating the Hist. of the Cathedral, City, & Diocese of Salisbury (Rolls Series 97) (1891): 32–33 (charter dated c.1160 of M[abel], Countess of Gloucester, and her son, William, counsel of Gloucester; charter names her sons, William consul and Robert.). Dallas & Porter, Note-book of Tristram Risdon (1897): 127–128 (“Asculph de Solariis died Anno domini 1171 in the [18th] yeere of Henry II., and Gilbert de Solariis which had maried with Hawis, sister to Richard Erl of Devon, succeeded him, and his dwelling was also at Umberlegh. This man and his father alsoe did serve Henry II. in his British warres. He left issue Mabil his only daughter and heire, whom Jordan de Chambernon maried, and enjoyed Umberlegh and the rest of the said Gilberte's landes with her.”). C.P. 5 (1926): 686, footnote b (sub Gloucester). Collectanea Archæologica 1 (1862): 263–284. Patterson, Earldom of Gloucester Charters (1973): 63, 97–98, 155–156 (Robert and his brother, William styled “my sons” [filii mei] by their mother, Countess Mabel). Bearman, Charters of the Redvers Fam. & the Earldom of Devon, 1090–1217 (Devon & Cornwall Soc. n.s. 37) (1994): 4 (Redvers ped.). Hanna, Christchurch Priory Cartulary (Hampshire Rec. Ser. 18) (2007): 311–312. Fizzard, Plympton Priory (2008): 93n. (Hawise de Redvers was “benefactor of Quarr, Christchurch, Hartland Abbey in Devon, and the Knights Hospitallers.”). Cornwall Rec. Office: Messrs Harvey and Co, Hay, H/236 (available at available atavailable at http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.ukwww.a2a.org.uk/search/index.asp).

5. MABEL FITZ ROBERT, daughter and heiress. She married (1st) JORDAN DE CHAMPERNOUN (or CHAMBERNOUN), seigneur of Cambernon (Manche, arr. and cant. Coutances) and Maisoncelles[-la-Jourdain] (dept. Calvados, arr. and cant. Vire) in Normandy, and Umberleigh (in Atherington) and High Bickington, Devon, presumably son of Jordan de Champernoun, living 1146. They had two sons, Richard, Knt., and Jordan. JORDAN DE CHAMPERNOUN was living in 1172, in which year he owed the service of one knight in Normandy, having himself the service of two knights. His widow, Mabel, married (2nd) GUILLAUME (or WILLIAM) DE SOLERS (or SOLIERS), of Ellingham, Hampshire, Constable of Moulins-la-Marche, 1180. They had two sons, Guillaume (or William), chevalierv., and Richard, and two daughters, Philippe (wife of _____ Punchardon) and Joan (wife of William Cosyn). In 1163 he gave the church of All Souls, with the chapel of St. Mary, in Ellingham, Hampshire to the Abbey of St. Sauveur-le-Vicomte, Coutances, for the soul of his uncle, Earl Richard. He witnessed a charter of Richard, Bishop of Winchester in 1176. He was present at an assize at Caen in Normandy in 1176–7. He also witnessed a charter for King Henry II for Hôtel-Dieu du Mans. In Jan. 1177 he assisted in the Siege of Baieux. The king gave him lands recovered by inquest at Guillerville and Criquetot. In 1185–8 King Henry II of England confirmed the previous gift of Jordan de Champernoun to Lessai Abbey. At an unknown date, Mabel, lady of Maisoncelles, [grand]daughter of earl Robert and mother of Jordan de Campo Ernulfi, confirmed to the canons regular of Plessis the gift by her son, Jordan, of the church of St. Amand of Maisoncelles[-la-Jourdain] (dept. Calvados, arr. and cant. Vire) in alms for ever. In the period, c. 1193–1211, his widow, Mabel, confirmed the gift of the manors of Fleet and Ibberton, Dorset made by her mother, Hawise de Redvers, to her son, Jordan de Champernoun. In 1198 she sued Hugh de Beauchamp regarding in a plea of land in Bevarton [Binnerton], Cornwall. In 1198 she was sued in a plea in Cornwall by Hugh de Beauchamp. In 1200 she appointed her son, Richard [de Champernoun], to represent her in a plea of land against William de Botreaux in Ludgvan, Cornwall. About the year 1200 as “Mabel, daughter of Robert, son of the Earl of Gloucester,” she confirmed to John son of Richard the Butler the manor of Conarton (in Gwithian), Cornwall, excepting Penburn and Lugan, for 30 silver marks and one caparisoned horse of value of two marks, together with the service of Philip de Caul, Alfred de Trevitho, and Enoch. In 1201 William de Botreaux sued her in a plea of land at Ludgvan, Cornwall. In 1201, as “Mabil’ de Soliis,” she held 16 knights’ fees of the Honour of Gloucester. Following the loss of Normandy in 1204, her lands at Umberleigh, Devon were confiscated and granted in 1205 by King John to Master Serlo. About the same time her lands at Hanford, Dorset were likewise confiscated by the king (they being considered land of the Normans) and were granted to Alan de Roterbiaus. At an unknown date, Mabel, lady of Maisoncelles, [grand]daughter of earl Robert and mother of Jordan de Campo Ernulfi, confirmed to the canons regular of Plessis the gift by her son, Jordan, of the church of St. Amand of Maisoncelles[-la-Jourdain] (dept. Calvados, arr. and cant. Vire) in alms for ever. Mabel died shortly before 3 June 1217, when her grandson and heir, William de Champernoun, was assigned her lands in Beradton [i.e, Binnerton], Cornwall.

References:

Houard, Traités sur les Coutumes Anglo-Normandes 1 (1776): 239, 248. Pole, Colls. towards a Desc. of Devon (1791): 44, 422–423. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum 5 (1825): 198 (charter of Henry de Tracy dated 1146). Hardy, Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum 1 (1833): 274. Mémoires de la Société des Antiquaires de Normandie 8(2) (1834): 106 (undated charter of Mabire, daughter of Count Robert, mother of Jourdain de Campo Elnulfi)5, 112–113 (undated charter of Richard de Champernon)448. Hardy, Rotuli de Oblatís et Fíníbus in Turri Londinensi Asservati (1835): 135, 152, 333. Palgrave, Rotuli Curiæ Regis 1 (1835): 336. Stapleton Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniæ 1 (1840): ci, cxxviii, cxxix, cxxxiv. Collectanea Archæologica 1 (1862): 263–284. Hutchins, Hist. & Antiqs. of Dorset 4 (1870): 61. Worthy Devonshire Parishes (1887): 60–66. Vivian, Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564 & 1620 (1895): 160–165 (sub Champernowne). Feet of Fines of the 7th & 8th Years of the Reign of Richard I A.D. 1196 to A.D. 1197 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. 20) (1896): 55–56. Hall, Red Book of the Exchequer 2 (1896): 636. Round, Cal. Doc. Preserved in France 1 (1899): 192. C.Ch.R. 1 (1903): 249. VCH Hampshire 4 (1911): 563–567. Mitchell, Studies in Taxation under John and Henry III (1914): 43. Delisle, Recueil des Actes de Henri II, Roi d’Angleterre et Duc de Normandie 2 (1920): 298–303 (charter of King Henry II dated 1185–88). Curia Regis Rolls 1 (1922): 264, 438; 15 (1972): 307–308. Book of Fees 2 (1923): 1268. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe for the 5th Year of the Reign of King John Michaelmas 1203 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 16) (1938): 41, 43. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe for the 6th Year of the Reign of King John Michaelmas 1201 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 18) (1940): 231–232. Smith, Great Roll of the Pipe for the 7th Year of the Reign of King John Michaelmas 1205 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 19) (1941): 104–105. Stenton, Great Roll of the Pipe for the 8th Year of the Reign of King John Michaelmas 1206 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 20) (1942): 18–19, 143 (sub Michaelmas 1206 sub Devon: “Magister Serlo debet j palefridum (set non debet summoneri quia noin habuit pro quo promisit) pro habendo manerio de Vmbel’ quod fuit Mabil’ de Solariis tenendum per eandem firmam per quam Ricardus de Greinuill’ illud tenuit . per bailliam Willelmi de Faleisia.”). Kirkus, Great Roll of the Pipe for the 9th Year of the Reign of King John Michaelmas 1207 (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 22) (1946): 220. Stenton, Pleas before the King or his Justices, 1198–1202 2 (Selden Soc. 68) (1949): 153. Brown, Memorandum Roll for the 10th Year of the Reign of King John (1207–8) together with the Curia Regis Rolls of Hilary 7 Richard I (1196) and Easter 9 Richard I (1198) (Pubs. Pipe Roll Soc. n.s. 31) (1957): 104. Powicke, Loss of Normandy (1961): 72. Loyd, Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Fams. (1975): 26 (sub Champernowne, de Campo Arnulfi). Franklin, English Episcopal Acta 8 (1993): 107–108, 111. Bearman, Charters of the Redvers family and the Earldom of Devon, 1090–1217 (Devon & Cornwall Soc. n.s. 37) (1994): 11, 146. Power, Norman Frontier in the 12th & Early 13th Cents. (2004): 42, 75–76, 78. Cornwall Rec. Office: Arundell of Lanherne and Trerice, AR/1/101, AR/15/130 (available at http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk). Cornwall Rec. Office: Messrs Harvey and Co, Hay, H/236 (available at http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk).

6. JORDAN DE CHAMPERNOUN, 2nd son. He married EMMA DE SOLIGNY (or SUBLIGNY), daughter of Hasculf de Soligny [living 1190], seigneur of Combour Dol in Brittany, and Kilmersdon, Somerset, by Isolde (or Yseulde), daughter and co-heiress of Jean de Dol [died 1162], seigneur of Combour in Brittany. They had one son, William. Sometime in the period, 1164–1205, he granted the church and tithes of Saint-Amant-de Maisoncelles to the Priory of Plessis-Grimould, which gift was confirmed by his mother. At an unknown date, he likewise confirmed to the canons regular of Plessis and Ivrandes the previousearlier gift of his brother, Richard de Champernoun. In the period, c.1193–1211, his grandmother, Hawise de Redvers, granted him the manors of Fleet and Ibberton, Dorset. In 1206 King John assigned him Umberleigh, Devon and £15 of his mother’s lands. JORDAN DE CHAMPERNOUN died before 3 June 1217, on which date his son, William de Champernoun, was styled “grandson and heir” of Jordan’s mother, Mabel.

References:

Pole, Colls. towards a Desc. of Devon (1791): 422–423, 446 (arms of Jordan de Chambernon, of Umberlegh: Gules, a saltier verrey.). Revue de Bretagne 39 (1808): 273–282. Mémoires de la Société des Antiquaires de Normandie 8(2) (1834): 106 (undated charter of Jourdain de Camperii), 112–113 (undated charter of Jourdain de Champernon). Hardy, Rotuli Normanniæ in Turri Londinensi Asservati 1 (1835): 93. Desroches, Annales civiles, militaires et généalogiques du Pays d’Avranches (1856): 157–159 (charters of Hasculf de Soligny). Douët d’Arcq, Coll. de Sceaux des Archives de l’Empire 1(1) (1863): 522 (seal of Jourdain de Champ-Arnoul dated early 13th Cent. — Armorial. Un sautoir de vair. LégendeLegend: + SIGILL : IORDANI : DE CHAME ERNVL. Appended to a undated charter of Jordanus de Campo Arnulfi in favor of Savigny Abbey.). Mémoires de la Société académique du Cotentin 6(1888): 458–469. Vivian, Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564 & 1620 (1895): 160–165 (sub Champernowne). Auvray Histoire de la Congrégation de Savigny 2 (1897): 275–282. Round, Cal. Doc. Preserved in France 1 (1899): 195. Hylton, Notes on the Hist. of the Parish of Kilmersdon (1910): 1–13. Cal. IPM 4 (1913): no. 82. Landon, Somersetshire Pleas 4 (Somerset Rec. Soc. 44) (1919): 305–306, 359–362 (lawsuits re. Soligny inheritance). Loyd, Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Fams. (1975): 26 (sub Champernowne, de Campo Arnulfi). Abrams & Carley, Archaeology and Hist. of Glastonbury Abbey (1991): 253–256 (charter of Hasculf son of John de Soligny to Glastonbury Abbey dated c.1199–1220). Power, Norman Frontier in the 12th & Early 13th Cents. (2004): 181–182, 220, 397, 518–519 (Subligny ped.).

7. WILLIAM DE CHAMPERNOUN, of Umberleigh (in Atherington) and High Bickington, Devon, Binnerton, Cornwall, Hampton Gay and Lower Heyford, Oxfordshire, etc., son and heir. He married EVE DE BLANCHMINSTER (or WHITCHURCH), daughter and heiress of Reynold de Blanchminster (or Whitchurch), of Shrivenham and Winterbourne (in Chieveley), Berkshire, Combe-in-Teignhead, Godford (in Awliscombe), and Middle Rocombe [in Stoke-in-Teignhead], Devon, and Bolney, Oxfordshire, and Figheldean, Wiltshire, Constable and Forester of Windsor and Odiham, Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, 1237, by his 1st wife, Alice, daughter and co-heiress of Nicholas de Bolney. They had one daughter, Joan. On 3 June 1217 he was assigned lands which his grandmother, Mabel de Solers, held in Beradton [i.e., Binnerton], Cornwall. In 1228–9 he brought an assize of darrein presentment against the Abbot of Ford regarding the churches of Bickington and Umberleigh, Devon. In 1229 he was involved in a dispute with the Abbot of Tewkesbury. He witnessed an undated enfeoffment of Randulf de Trechu to William de Bodrugan. WILLIAM DE CHAMPERNOUN was living in 1235. His widow, Eve married (2nd) before 1236 HENRY FITZ ROY, Knt., of Waltham, Ashby, Brigsley, Gonerby (in Hatcliffe), Hawerby, and North Coates, Lincolnshire, and Chilham, Kent, illegitimate son of John, King of England, by an unknown mistress [see ENGLAND 5 for his ancestry]. They had no issue. He was sent as a student to the Prior of Kenilworth in 1207. In 1215 he was granted the lands of Robert Fitz Walter in Cornwall. In 1217 he and Ralph de Raleigh were granted the manor of Waltham, Lincolnshire formerly held by Alan Fitz Count to sustain them in royal service. In 1227 he acknowledged the right of Christchurch Priory to the manor of Fleet, Dorset, for which agreement Prior Roger gave him 55 marks. In 1231 he was granted all of the land of Henri de Avaugor, a Norman, in Waltham, Lincolnshire. On 21 August 1249, Geoffrey de Grandi Monte was granted all land in Beseby, in the soke of Wautham, and with the dower of Eva de Chambernun there if she should die in this time. SIR HENRY FITZ ROY died shortly before 8 April 1245. His widow, Eve, married (3rd) before 30 June 1252 GILES DE CLIFFORD (living 1276–7), of Columbjohn, Everleigh (in Broadclyst), Combe-in-Teignhead, and Godford (in Awliscombe), Devonshire, younger son of Walter de Clifford, of Clifford, Herefordshire, by Agnes, daughter and heiress of Roger de Condet. They had one son, Reynold, Knt. He witnessed a charter of his brother, Walter de Clifford, dated c.1225. In 1257 Giles and his wife, Eve, quitclaimed land in Shrivenham Hundred in Berkshire to William de Valence and his wife, Joan, in exchange for a quitclaim to the plot of land where the manor of Stauelpeth [Stallpits in Shrivenham], Berkshire was built. In 1258 he and his wife, Eve, gave one mark to have a plea in Wiltshire. Giles presented to the church of Stoke-in-Teignhead, Devon in 1259. In 1266 he was pardoned by the king due to his non-observance of the Provisions of Oxford. In 1274 he and the heirs of Thomas de Hauterive [or Dautry] were recorded as the owners of Shrivenham Hundred in Berkshire. In 1274 the king appointed a commission of oyer and terminer on complaint by Henry son of Adam de Cotes who stated that he had previously impleaded Richard Bernard and another in the court of William de Valence, Giles de Clifford, and Isabel de Hauteryve (or Dautry) of Shrivenham, Berkshire by writ of King Henry III touching a two virgates of land in Kyngescotes and on his complaint of a false judgment. In 1274–5 Joan de Champernoun [his step-daughter] arraigned an assize of mort d’ancestor against Giles de Clifford and Reginald de Clifford touching three messuages and land in Godford (in Awliscombe), Combe[-in-Teignhead], and Rocombe [in Stoke-in-Teignhead], Devon. In 1275–6 Joan de Champernoun arraigned an assize of mort d’ancestor against Giles de Clifford touching rent in Figheldean, Wiltshire. In the same period, Reynold son of Giles de Clifford arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Giles de Clifford and others touching a tenement in Over Rocombe [in Stoke-in-Teignhead] and Stoke, Devon. In 1276–7 Alice de Ralegh arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Giles de Clifford and others touching a tenement in Combe-in-Teignhead, Devon. In 1276–7 Reginald son of Giles de Clifford arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Alice widow of Giles de Clifford and Wymund de Raleye touching a tenement in Over Rocombe [in Stoke-in-Teignhead] and Stoke, Devon.

References:

Pole, Colls. towards a Desc. of Devon (1791): 44, 170, 174, 201, 248–249, 422–423, 516 (arms of Clifford of Columbjohn: Checky or and azure, a bend gules). Kennett, Parochial Antiqs. of Ambrosden, Burcester 1 (1818): 213 (charter of William de Champernoun). Lysons, Magna Britannia 6 (1822): 135. Hardy, Rotuli Litterarum Clausarum 1 (1833): 274. Roberts, Excerpta è Rotulis Finium in Turri Londinensi asservatis, Henrico Tertio rege, AD 1216–1272 2 (1836): 274. Annual Rpt. of the Deputy Keeper 44 (1883): 159. Vivian, Vis. of Devon 1531, 1564 & 1620 (1895): 160–165 (sub Champernowne). List of Sheriffs for England & Wales (PRO Lists and Indexes 9) (1898): 1. Wethered, St. Mary’s, Hurley, in the Middle Ages (1898): 232–234. Notes & Queries 9th Ser. 4 (1899): 212. Gerard, Particular Desc. of the County of Somerset (Somerset Rec. Soc. 15) (1900): 6. Desc. Cat. Ancient Deeds 4 (1902): 502. C.Ch.R. 1 (1903): 58. C.P.R. 1247–1258 (1908): 46. Rpt. & Trans. Devonshire Assoc. 44 (1912):320. VCH Oxford 6 (1959): 152–159, 182–195. Hanna, Christchurch Priory Cartulary (Hampshire Rec. Ser. 18) (2007): 311–312.

8. JOAN DE CHAMPERNOUN, daughter and heiress. She married before 17 July 1238 (date of fine) RALPH DE WILINGTON, Knt., of Poulton, Gloucestershire, Cherington, Warwickshire, Calstone Wellington, Wiltshire, etc., and, in right of his wife, of Beaford, Colhays, Manleigh, Stoke Rivers, and Umberleigh (in Atherington), Devon, Constable of Exeter Castle and Sheriff of Devon, 1254–5, son and heir of Ralph de Wilington, of Poulton, Gloucestershire, Calstone Wellington, Wiltshire, Constable of Bristol Castle, Keeper of the Town and Castle of Devizes, by Olimpia, daughter and heiress of William Franc Chevaler. They had one son, Ralph, Knt. In 1238 the Abbot of Tewkesbury quitclaimed to Ralph and his wife, Joan, all his right and claim in the advowson of High Bickington, Devon. He was appointed to tallage the royal domain in Gloucestershire in 1252. SIR RALPH DE WILINGTON was living April 1255, and presumably died before 18 Nov. 1256 (date of fine). His widow, Joan, presented to the churches of St. Gwinear, Cornwall, 1261, Huntshaw, Devon, 1277, Beaford, Devon, 1278, and High Bickington, Devon, 1278, and 1283. In 1272–3 Thomas de Hokeshill arraigned an assize of novel disseisin against Joan de Chaumbernun and others regarding a tenement in Hagerofte, Devon. In 1274–5 she arraigned an assize of mort d’ancestor against Giles de Clifford [her step-father] and Reginald de Clifford touching three messuages and land in Godford (in Awliscombe), Combe[-in-Teignhead], and Rocombe [in Stoke-in-Teignhead ], Devon. In 1275–6 she arraigned an assize of mort d’ancestor against Giles de Clifford touching rent in Figheldean, Wiltshire. She was the mesne tenant of Lower Heyford, Oxfordshire in 1275 and 1284, and in Barton (in Barton Seagrave), Northamptonshire in 1284. In 1276 Ralph de Wylington and Juliana his wife quiclaimed one message and two carucates of land in Shrivenham, Berkshire to Reynold son of Giles de Clifford, which, at their instance, he granted to Joan de Champernoun. In 1280 Joan de Champernoun and Hugh de Treverbin sued Aimery de Rochechouart [Vicomte of Rochechouart] and his wife, Maud, in the Court of Common Pleas regarding one messuage and three carucates of land in Kilmersdon, Somerset, which the said Joan and Hugh claimed as heirs of Geoffrey de Soligny. In 1286 through 1288 Joan sued William de Valence and Joan his wife for the right to hold amercements against her own men in Shrivenham, Berkshire. Sometime during the reign of King Henry III, she founded a chantry at Umberleigh, Devon. Joan was apparently still living in 1314.died before 1309, when her grandson, John de Wilington, presented to the church of High Bickington, Devon.

References:

Pole, Colls. towards a Desc. of Devon (1791): 44, 422–423. Kennett, Parochial Antiqs. Attempted in the Hist. of Ambrosden, Burcester & other adjacent Parts 1 (1818): 213 (charter of Joan de Champernoun, widow of Ralph de Wylynton). Burke, Genealogical & Heraldic Hist. of the Land Gentry 4 (1838): 526–529 (sub Willington). Luard, Annales Monastici 1 (Rolls Ser. 36) (1864): 101 (Tewkesbury Annals sub 1238: “Actum anno gratiæ MCCXXXVIII. apud Exoniam, kal. Julii. Item cum diu placitatum esset coram prædictis justiciariis inter prædictum Robertum abbatem et Radulfum de Wyltune, et Johannam filiam Willelmi de Campo Arnulfi, uxorem suam, de advocatione ecclesiæ de Bukyntune [Bickington], tandem ipse Radulfus positus loco uxoris suæ in ipsa curia ad lucrandum vel perdendum, posuit se super magnam assisam per recognitionem duodecim militum. Et cum electi essent milites, ipse abbas timens ponere se super juramentum eorum, per consilium virorum prudentum amicabiliter cum dicto Radulfo composuit, sicut in cyrografo inter eos confecto continetur.”). Annual Rpt. of the Deputy Keeper 42 (1881): 569; 44 (1883): 115; 45 (1885): 172. Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages (1883): 585–586 (sub Willington) (Willington arms: Gules, a saltier, vairée, argent and azure). Hingeston-Randolph Regs. of Walter Bronescombe & Peter Quivil (1889): 113, 144, 145, 173, 346. List of Sheriffs for England & Wales (PRO Lists and Indexes 9) (1898): 34. Notes & Queries 9th Ser. 4 (1899): 212. Gerard, Particular Desc. of the County of Somerset (Somerset Rec. Soc. 15) (1900): 6. Reichel, Devon Feet of Fines 1 (1912): 135–136, 290–291. Landon, Somersetshire Pleas 4 (Somerset Rec. Soc. 44) (1919): 102, 305–306, 359–362 (lawsuits re. Soligny inheritance). Sussex Arch. Colls. 62 (1921): 116–120. VCH Berkshire 4 (1924): 531–543. VCH Northampton 3 (1930): 176–180. VCH Warwick 5 (1949): 38–41. C.P. 12(2) (1959): 643–645 (sub Wilington). VCH Oxford 6 (1959): 152–159, 182–195. Cal. IPM 4 (1913): no. 82. VCH Wiltshire 17 (2002): 123–135. Mitchell, Joan de Valence: The Life & Influence of a Thirteenth-Century Noblewoman (2016).

taf

unread,
Sep 15, 2018, 8:09:18 PM9/15/18
to
On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 4:22:33 PM UTC-7, celticp...@gmail.com wrote:

> I've posted below my current file account of the senior Champernoun
> line which features a valid descent from King William the Conqueror.
> The account is based on my personal research and features information
> not found elsewhere in print.


Anyone interested in this connection can check the archives of the group. It has been discussed here repeatedly, back to the 1990s (but I guess now it is 'certified').

taf

CE Wood

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 7:01:19 PM9/16/18
to
I am now utterly confused. From your post of 2 Dec 2006:

"Iseult de Dol, was the daughter of Sir Gedouin de Dol, knight, died c. 1235, and his wife, Eleanor de Vitré, sister of Andre de Vitré."

and -

"Jean de Dol, seigneur of Combourg, is further identified as the son of H[asculf] de Soligny."

From this post:

"EMMA DE SOLIGNY (or SUBLIGNY), daughter of Hasculf de Soligny [living 1190], seigneur of Combour Dol in Brittany, and Kilmersdon, Somerset, by Isolde (or Yseulde), daughter and co-heiress of Jean de Dol [died 1162], seigneur of Combour in Brittany."

Are there two Iseults, one daughter of Gédouin and one daughter of Jean?

Are there two Ha(r)sculfs, one father of Emma de Soligny and one father of Jean de Dol?

Are there two Eleanors, one, Eleanor de Vitré, who married Gédouin, and one who married Jean?


CE Wood


On Saturday, September 15, 2018 at 4:22:33 PM UTC-7, celticp...@gmail.com wrote:

joe...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 8:37:32 PM9/16/18
to
On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 7:01:19 PM UTC-4, CE Wood wrote:
> I am now utterly confused. From your post of 2 Dec 2006:
>
> "Iseult de Dol, was the daughter of Sir Gedouin de Dol, knight, died c. 1235, and his wife, Eleanor de Vitré, sister of Andre de Vitré."
>
> and -
>
> "Jean de Dol, seigneur of Combourg, is further identified as the son of H[asculf] de Soligny."
>
> From this post:
>
> "EMMA DE SOLIGNY (or SUBLIGNY), daughter of Hasculf de Soligny [living 1190], seigneur of Combour Dol in Brittany, and Kilmersdon, Somerset, by Isolde (or Yseulde), daughter and co-heiress of Jean de Dol [died 1162], seigneur of Combour in Brittany."
>
> Are there two Iseults, one daughter of Gédouin and one daughter of Jean?
>
> Are there two Ha(r)sculfs, one father of Emma de Soligny and one father of Jean de Dol?
>
> Are there two Eleanors, one, Eleanor de Vitré, who married Gédouin, and one who married Jean?
>

So many Iseults, and Gedouins.

I think these are the ancestries implied by Douglas's posts, although I am unsure if the chronology works here:

1. Emma de Soligny wife of Champernoun b.say 1170
2 Hasculf de Soligny b.say 1145
3. Iseult de Dol
4. John de Soligny b.say 1125
5. Alice ?
6. Jean de Dol
7. ?
8. Hasculf de Soligny
9. Lesceline ?
12. Geldouin de Dol b.say 1090
13. Hoga
16. Oteur de Soligny
24. Jean de Dol
25. Godehilde Fougeres

1. Iseult de Dol wife of Ralph d'Aubeney b.say 1225
2 Gedouin de Dol b.say 1180
3. Eleanor de Vitre
4. John de Dol same as John de Soligny #4 above
8. Hasculf de Soligny

Joe Cook

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 10:37:05 PM9/16/18
to
Dear Carolyn ~

In my post, I stated the following:

"Hasculf de Soligny [living 1190], seigneur of Combour Dol in Brittany, and Kilmersdon, Somerset"

I should have said that Hasculf de Soligny was the seigneur of Combour, not Combour Dol.

There is a pedigree chart of the Soligny family found in Power, Norman Frontier in the 12th & Early 13th Cents. (2004): 518–519 (Subligny ped.). The chart shows Hasculf de Soligny (living 1190) and his wife, Isolde de Dol, but not their descendants.

You should be able to view the chart at the following weblink:

https://books.google.com/books?id=Vlts5rwsNosC&printsec=frontcover

Put Subligny in the search box and it should pull up the chart on page 518.

Unfortunately Mr. Power did not trace the later descendants of the Subligny family. To make those connections, you'll need to consult the following two sources:

1. Hylton, Notes on the History of the Parish of Kilmersdon (1910): 1–13.

2. Landon, Somersetshire Pleas 4 (Somerset Rec. Soc. 44) (1919): 305–306, 359–362 (lawsuits re. Soligny inheritance).

In answer to your specific question, the Champernoun family descends from the Dol family by way of Emma de Soligny, daughter of Hasculf de Soligny (living 1190), and his wife, Isolde de Dol.

The Daubeney family of Somerset, on the other hand, descends from a different Isolde de Dol, whose father, Gelduin de Dol (died 1235), was the grandson of Hasculf de Soligny (living 1190) and his wife, Isolde de Dol.

In other words, Emma de Soligny, wife of Jordan de Champernoun (he died 1217), was the great-aunt of Isolde de Dol, wife of Ralph (or Raoul) Daubeney (he died 1292).

Both Emma de Soligny and her great-niece, Isolde de Dol, have English descendants.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 11:01:39 PM9/16/18
to
I see that Everard, Brittany and the Angevins: Province and Empire 1158–1203 (2000): 212 indicates that Hasculf de Soligny (husband of Isolde de Dol) died between 1196 and 1203.

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 11:08:55 PM9/16/18
to
On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 6:37:32 PM UTC-6, joe...@gmail.com wrote:

Table One
< 1. Emma de Soligny wife of Champernoun b.say 1170
< 2 Hasculf de Soligny b.say 1145
< 3. Iseult de Dol
< 4. John de Soligny b.say 1125
< 5. Alice ?
< 6. Jean de Dol
< 7. ?
< 8. Hasculf de Soligny
< 9. Lesceline ?
< 12. Geldouin de Dol b.say 1090
< 13. Hoga
< 16. Oteur de Soligny
< 24. Jean de Dol
< 25. Godehilde Fougeres

Table Two
< 1. Iseult de Dol wife of Ralph d'Aubeney b.say 1225
< 2 Gedouin de Dol b.say 1180
< 3. Eleanor de Vitre
< 4. John de Dol same as John de Soligny #4 above
< 8. Hasculf de Soligny
>
> Joe Cook

Actually Hasculf de Soligny your #2 in the first table is the same person as Hasculf de Soligny your #8 in the second table. Everard indicates that he died between 1196 and 1203. Everard believes that Hasculf and his wife, Isolde, were married in or before 1173. Their two sons were old enough to attest to a donation dated 1183.

joe...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 11:15:33 PM9/16/18
to
Thank you for the correction,
Joe C

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 16, 2018, 11:39:48 PM9/16/18
to
I note that Brand’honneur, Manoirs et Châteaux dans le Comté de Rennes (2001): 145–146, 190 indicates that Hasculf de Soligny was a knight [chevalier] and that he died in 1197.

The date of death is footnoted but I am unable to see the author's source in the snippet view of this book.

Power, pg. 220, indicates that Hasculf de Soligny occurs in one charter as lord of Combour and standard-bearer of Saint Samson (i.e., the metropolitan see of Dol).

See the following weblink:

https://books.google.com/books?id=Vlts5rwsNosC&pg=PA220

Peter Stewart

unread,
Sep 17, 2018, 6:14:45 AM9/17/18
to
On Monday, September 17, 2018 at 1:39:48 PM UTC+10, celticp...@gmail.com wrote:
> I note that Brand’honneur, Manoirs et Châteaux dans le Comté de Rennes (2001): 145–146, 190 indicates that Hasculf de Soligny was a knight [chevalier] and that he died in 1197.
>
> The date of death is footnoted but I am unable to see the author's source in the snippet view of this book.

The footnote doesn't cite a source - it reads: "Hasculf de Subligny est mort en 1197 et non vers 1070 comme l'indique par erreur J.-Y. Copy dans Art…, p. 277-278", see https://books.openedition.org/pur/11269#ftn77.

Peter Stewart

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 17, 2018, 4:00:17 PM9/17/18
to
Thank you Peter.

DR

Joe

unread,
Sep 18, 2018, 11:16:52 PM9/18/18
to
I think you can tighten up the date of death for Jordon Champernoun to "by 1214" and also note that he was buried in Christchurch priory, Christchurch, Dorset (where his grandmother was requesting burial).

Charters of the Redvers Family and the Earldom of Devon 1090-1217, by Robert Bearman (Pub. by Devon and Cornwall Record Society, no. 37, 1994).

- P. 148, no. 118. 1213/14. Hawise de Redvers, in the presence of her brother Earl William, with her body for burial in Christchurch and for the soul of Jordon de Chambernon also buried there. Gift to her brother Earl William of all her land in Fleet, Dorset except some land to the monks of Quarr, and reserving the rights of the free tenants there. Confirmed by King John during a visit to Christchurch in January 1216.

Others I had copied:
- P. 146, no. 114. c1193xc1204. Hawise de Redvers with consent of her brother Earl William, her daughter and heir Mabel de Soliers, and her grandson Richard de Chambernon. Gift of Fleet and Ibberton to her grandson Jordon de Chambernon.
- P. 146 no. 115. c1204x1211. Hawise de Redvers at the request of her heir Jordon de Chambernon, with the advice of her daughter Mabel de Soliers. Gift to Robert le Blunt of a vigrate of land in Ibberton, Dorset.
- P. 148, no. 117. Bef. 1213/14. Hawise de Redvers at the request of her grandson Jordon de Chambernon. Gift of two acres of land in Fleet, Dorset to Arnold her cook.
- P. 142, no. 108. 1213/14. Confirmation by Earl William of the gift in no. 118 of Fleet to him from his sister Hawise de Redvers.
- P. 142, no. 109. Another confirmation by Earl William of the gift in no. 118 of Fleet to him from his sister Hawise de Redvers.

taf

unread,
Sep 19, 2018, 10:44:33 AM9/19/18
to
On Sunday, September 16, 2018 at 4:01:19 PM UTC-7, CE Wood wrote:
> I am now utterly confused. From your post of 2 Dec 2006:
>
> "Iseult de Dol, was the daughter of Sir Gedouin de Dol, knight, died c. 1235, and his wife, Eleanor de Vitré, sister of Andre de Vitré."
>
> and -
>
> "Jean de Dol, seigneur of Combourg, is further identified as the son of H[asculf] de Soligny."
>
> From this post:
>
> "EMMA DE SOLIGNY (or SUBLIGNY), daughter of Hasculf de Soligny [living 1190], seigneur of Combour Dol in Brittany, and Kilmersdon, Somerset, by Isolde (or Yseulde), daughter and co-heiress of Jean de Dol [died 1162], seigneur of Combour in Brittany."
>
> Are there two Iseults, one daughter of Gédouin and one daughter of Jean?
>
> Are there two Ha(r)sculfs, one father of Emma de Soligny and one father of Jean de Dol?
>
> Are there two Eleanors, one, Eleanor de Vitré, who married Gédouin, and one who married Jean?
>


Walter de Treverbyn and Andrew de Solenny (CIPM IV:48)

"The said Andrew died without lawful heir of his body, and the said tenements reverted to Geoffrey de Sulenny, as (his) uncle and heir, who held then of the said earl by the same service, and the said Geoffrey Dying without lawful herid of his body, the same descended to his two sisters as one heir, viz. - Iseult and Emma. From Iseult the elder her pourparty descended to Emma her daughter and heir, from her to Hugh her son and heir, from him to Walter de Treverbyn his son and heir, and from him to Hugh his son and heir, who is aged 9 years and not married, nor has wardship been sold by the said earl or his executors. . . . From Emma the younger sister issued one Oliver Camp Arnulphi her son and heir, from him one Joan his daughter and heir, from her Ralph her son and Heir, and from him one John de Welynton, who now holds his pourparty and is of full age and married."

So, setting aside the discrepancy over the name of her Champernoun son, this places Emma as the aunt of Geoffrey de Soligny.

taf

taf

unread,
Sep 19, 2018, 10:46:27 AM9/19/18
to
On Wednesday, September 19, 2018 at 7:44:33 AM UTC-7, taf wrote:

> So, setting aside the discrepancy over the name of
> her Champernoun son, this places Emma as the aunt of
> Geoffrey de Soligny.

Sorry, I meant to say aunt of Andrew and sister of Geoffrey.

taf
Message has been deleted

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 19, 2018, 2:37:36 PM9/19/18
to
I see taf has quoted a portion of an inquisition post mortem dated 1302. I've copied below the entire inquisition post mortem record. For convenience, I've inserted modern dates in brackets.

The inquisition indicates that a certain Emma was the sister and co-heir of Geoffrey de Sulenny [Suligny], of Cornwall. From her, her inheritance descended to Oliver de Champernoun her son, thence to his daughter Joan, thence to her son, Ralph, thence to his son, John de Welyngton, living in 1302.

This pedigree is sound except that Emma de Soligny's son and heir was named William de Champernoun, not Oliver de Champernoun. The evidence is iron clad that William de Champernoun was the great-grandfather of John de Welyngton, living in 1302.

According to Hylton, Notes on the History of the Parish of Kilmersdon (1910): 2-3, in 1204-5 the manor of Kilmersdon, Somerset was owned by Hasculf de Suleny, son of John de Suleny. Hasculf was in charge of the island of Jersey previous to 1212. When he sailed on crusade to the Holy Land in 1220, his son Ralph received his paternal estates in Somerset and Cornwall. Ralph in turn was succeeded by his eldest son Andrew who died in 1259. The heir of Andrew de Suleny was his uncle Geoffrey [de Suleny] surnamed the Blind living in 1265. Following Geoffrey's death, an inquisition was taken 15 March 1265/6, which found that he left sisters, some married in Cornwall and some in Brittany. By another inquisition dated 30 Edward I [1302], it alleged that Geoffrey left two sisters, Isolda and Emma, as his co-heirs. Emma reportedly is the one who married a Champernoun.

Hylton may be viewed at the following weblink:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015027894123;view=1up;seq=18

If Hylton has his facts correct, then the Hasculf son of John who occurs c.1204-5-1220 can not possibly be the same person as Hasculf de Soligny [died 1196/1203] who married Isolde de Dol. Perhaps he has confused two different men named Hasculf de Soligny's. That's easy enough to do.

Hylton provides no documentation that Geoffrey de Sulenny who came into possession of Kilmersdon, Somerset before 1265, was the uncle of Ralph, son of Hasculf son of John.

Regardless, something must be wrong with Hylton's account, because Emma de Soligny, wife of Jordan de Champernoun, was surely born c.1170/1175. it would fit chronologically for her to be the daughter of Hasculf de Soligny and Isolde de Dol. Whether she is the sister of Geoffrey de Suleny who died in 1265, I have my doubts.

There are lawsuits regarding the Soligny/Suleny inheritance in Landon, Somersetshire Pleas 4 (Somerset Rec. Soc. 44) (1919): 305–306, 359–362. I haven't yet had a chance to re-examine these records. If my memory serves me correctly, the Cornwall lands of the Soligny family descended to the Champernoun and Wilington families, but not the Somerset lands.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

+ + + + + + +
Source: Cal. IPM 4 (1913): 48.

"82. WALTER DE TREVERBYN and ANDREW DE SOLENNY.
Writ of plenius certiorari concerning the value of the lands &c. of the said Walter which are in the king’s hand by reason of the minority of his heir, 23 May, 30 Edw. I [1302].
Writ of diem clausit extremum concerning the lands &c. of the said Andrew, 16 June, 30 Edw. I [1302].
CORNWALL. Inq. Friday after St. Peter ad Vincula, 30 Edw. I [3 August 1302].
Faweton. The manor was held by the said Andrew of Richard sometime earl of Cornwall in chief by service of 1/20 knight’s fee; which earl’s fees came to the king’s hands by the death of Edmund late earl of Cornwall. The said Andrew died without lawful heir of his body, and the said tenements reverted to one Geoffrey de Sulenny, as (his) uncle and heir, who held them of the said earl by the same service, and the said Geoffrey dying without lawful heir of his body, the same descended to his two sisters as one heir, viz.—Iseult and Emma. From Iseult the elder her pourparty descended to Emma her daughter and heir, from her to Hugh her son and heir, from him to Walter de Treverbyn his son and heir, and from him to Hugh his son and heir, who is aged 9 years and not married, nor has the wardship been sold by the said earl or his executors. The said Walter died about the feast of St. John the Baptist seven years ago; his pourparty in Faweton is worth 8l. yearly, and the lands &c. held of divers other lords in Treverbyn, Tregenedwyth, and Tregenniur, are worth 20l. yearly. From Emma the younger sister issued one Oliver de Campo Arnulphi her son and heir, from him one Joan his daughter and heir, from her Ralph her son and heir, and from him one John de Welynton, who now holds his pourparty and is of full age and married." END OF QUOTE.

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 19, 2018, 11:36:15 PM9/19/18
to
Dear Newsgroup ~

I've had a chance to examine the two lawsuits regarding the Soligny/Suleny inheritance published in Landon, Somersetshire Pleas 4 (Somerset Rec. Soc. 44) (1919): 305–306, 359–362.

The lawsuit on pages 305-306 involves the Champernoun family and its claimed descent from the Soligny family. It reads as follows:

Date: 1280

"(m. 44d) Joan de Campo Ernulphi [Champernoun] and Hugh de Trenerby [Treverbin] seek against Aimery de Rupe Cawardi [Rochechouart] and Maud his wife a messuage and three carucates of land in Kynemeresdon' [Kilmersdon, Somerset] in which the same Aimery and Maud have entry only by Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucester and Hertford to whom Robert de Boyton' and Mary his wife demised them who unjustly etc. disseised thereof Geoffrey de Salney [Soligny], kinsman of the aforesaid Joan and Hugh whose heirs they are, after the first etc. And Aimery and Maud come: and they deny his right when etc. and they say that they cannot answer this writ because they say that the king impleaded them about those same tenements before R. de Hengham and his companions, justices, by his writ of right and this before the taking out of this writ and he asks for judgement whether, pending the said plea between them in the said court, they ought to answer them on this writ. And Joan and Hugh cannot deny this. Therefore a day is given to them on three weeks after S. Martin's day at Wynton' [Winchester] in county Suthamp' until etc." END OF QUOTE.

The above lawsuit may be viewed at the following weblink:

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE1217322

In the above lawsuit dated 1280, Joan de Champernoun and Hugh de Treverbin claim property at Kilmersdon, Somerset, they being the lawful heirs of Geoffrey de Soligny. The relationship of Joan and Hugh to Geoffrey de Soligny is not stated. We know from a later inquisition dated 1302 that Joan de Champernoun's grandmother, Emma, is alleged to have been the sister of Geoffrey de Soligny. The 1280 lawsuit and the 1302 inquisition appear to be the foundation for the claim that Joan de Champernoun's paternal grandmother, Emma, was a Soligny.

Notes & Queries 9th Ser. 4 (1899): 212 has a short note by H.H. Drake about this same matter. It reads as follows:

"In the important Inq. p.m., 30 Ed. I. [1302], No. 20 (see Roberts, 'Cal. Geneal.,' ii. 620), we find Oliver de Champernown set down as heir of Emma de Soligny. His daughter and heiress, who was always styled "the Lady Joan Champernown," granted lands for the celebration of masses, in her chapel at Umberleigh [Devon], for the souls of William de Campo Anulphi (Champernown), her father, and Eva, her mother, and Ralph de Willington, late her husband (Risdon, p. 316; Peter Le Neve, MSS. penes me; Pole, 'Devon,' 382, 422). Probably the jury were thinking of the great Oliver de Dinham, who shared with the Champernowns the lands of their cousin Isolda de Cardinan, the Cornish heiress ('Hundred Ro., i. 57). H.H. Drake." END OF QUOTE.

The above item may be viewed at the following weblink:

https://books.google.com/books?id=8S8f48eeZFkC&pg=PA212

Hitchins, History of Cornwall 2 (1824): 512 gives similar information to other secondary sources:

“Besides the manors of Fowey, of which we have spoken under that parish, there were two called Faweton, distinct from the former, and from each other, and probably both within the parish of St. Neot. In the reign of Henry III. one of these manors belonged to Andrew de Suleny, from whom it passed (he dying without issue) to his uncle; after whose death, as he had no children, it was inherited by his two sisters, by whom one moiety was carried in marriage to Treverbyn; and the other by a succession of female heirs to Champernowne, Willington, and Wroth.”).

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 19, 2018, 11:55:14 PM9/19/18
to
Dear Joe ~

Thank you for sharing these notes. Much appreciated.

celticp...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 20, 2018, 3:02:59 PM9/20/18
to
Dear Newsgroup ~

The following Common Pleas lawsuit dated 1295 sets forth the claims of two of the heirs of the Soligny family of Brittany and England. The two claimants in this particular lawsuit were Ellis Daubeney, 1st Lord Daubeney [died 1305] and Sir John de Wilington, 1st Lord Wilington, who as previously noted was the grandson of Joan de Champernoun (living 1288), wife of Sir Ralph de Wilington.

Ellis Daubeney claimed the property named in this lawsuit as the near kinsman and heir of Andrew de Soligny, the previous owner. He stated that he descended from John [de Dol], brother of Ralph de Soligny, father of the said Andrew de Soligny. He was telling the truth.

However, John de Wyllyngton countered that Ralph de Soligny never had a brother John born, raised, seen, or known in England, nor was John's son, Joldewyn, born, seen, raised, or known in England. John de Wyllyngton was also telling the truth, as John [de Dol] and his son, Joldewyn, were born and resided in Brittany their entire life. In short, John de Wyllyngton wasn't saying that Ralph de Soligny didn't have a brother John at all, just not a brother John born and raised in England.

In this case, John de Wyllyngton had the weaker claim, as according to a later inquisition post mortem dated 1302, he descended from Emma de Soligny, wife of Jordan de Champernoun, which Emma was the sister of Ralph de Soligny. Ellis Daubeney on the other hand claimed that he was descended from a brother of Ralph de Soligny. It appears that John de Wyllyngton was counting on the fact that Emma de Soligny and her descendants had resided continuously in England, whereas Ellis Daubeney's family resided partly in Brittany, and partly in England.

In 1295, the same year as this lawsuit, the king ordered the seizure of the lands of aliens of French allegiance. The lands of Ellis Daubeney were in fact seised but, in his case, they were quickly returned.

In an earlier post in this thread, I stated that Joan de Champernoun, wife of Ralph de Wilington, "was apparently still living in 1314." However, it is evident that she must have died sometime between 1288 (when she was last known to be living) and Easter term 1295, the date of this lawsuit.

Best always, Douglas Richardson, Salt Lake City, Utah

+ + + + + + + + + + + + +

Reference: Court of Common Pleas, CP40/108, image 134f (available at http://aalt.law.uh.edu/E1/CP40no108/aCP40no108fronts/IMG_0134.htm).

Date: Easter term 1295.
Cornwall. Ellis Daubeney through his attorney makes claim against John de Wyllyngton to two messuages, one hundred and eight five acres of arable, eighty-two acres of wood, one hundred acres of moorland, ten pounds, eleven shillings and seven pence rent and the rent of one ewe, one lamb and one hoggaster, one pound of cumin and one pair of gilt spurs, two pairs of gloves, the casting of the ironwork of one plough and to the moiety of an acre of meadow with appurtenances in Lanteglos, Husse and Fawton of which Andrew de Sulny, the kinsman of the said Ellis, whose heir he is, was seised in his demesne as of fee on the day he died etc. He says that the said Andrew, his kinsman, was seised of the said tenements with appurtenances in his demesne as of fee in time of peace, in the reign of the lord king Henry, the father of the present king, receiving from them income to the value etc. and died seised of them etc. From the same Andrew, because he had died without an heir of his body, the fee etc. resorted to one John as uncle and heir, the brother of one Ralph the father of the same Andrew; and from the same John the fee etc. descended to one Joldewyn as son and heir etc.; and from the same Joldewyn to one Isolda as daughter and heir; and from the same Isolda to one Philip as son and heir; and from the same Philip, because he died without an heir of his body, the fee etc. descended to this Ellis, who is now claiming, as brother and heir. He produces suit in support of this etc.

John appears through his attorney. He says that he is not obliged to answer him on this because, whereas the said Ellis asserts the fee etc. of the said tenements resorted from the said Andrew, on whose seisin etc., to the said John as uncle and heir, the brother of the said Ralph, the father etc., the same Ralph never had any brother named John, the heir of the same Andrew, born or raised, seen or known within the four seas of England. He puts himself on this on a jury and so asks for judgment etc.

Ellis says that he claims the said tenements as those of which his kinsman Andrew etc. died seised in his demesne as of fee and which the said John now holds, counting that from the same Andrew the fee etc. resorted to the said John as uncle and heir etc. simply and without any qualification, which resort he is ready to prove as the court should adjudge and since various interpretations can be put on the response made by John and thus his response seems ambiguous, double and uncertain he asks for judgment whether the exception in the form in which he offers it is admissible etc.

John says, as before, that the said Ralph the father etc. never had any brother named John who was seen, born or raised within the four seas of England or who was held or known as the heir of the said Andrew, on whose seisin etc., nor was the said Joldewyn, to whom the said Ellis says the fee of the said tenement descended as son and heir, seen etc., raised or known. He is ready to prove this by the jury. Since this court in such a case neither can nor ought admit any response or exception than that of which the truth can be discovered or known by that court he asks for judgment etc. If this does not suffice he will say something else.

They are adjourned to hear their judgment here three weeks after Michaelmas etc.

An English translation of the original Latin text of this lawsuit is available at the following weblink:

http://www.sd-editions.com/AnaServer?PROMEeg+52760+textframe.anv
Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages