Clarel of Tickhill and Aldwark

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John Watson

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Jul 24, 2014, 4:11:34 AM7/24/14
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Dear all,

In Hunter's account of the parish of Aldwark, he says that he can find no record of the name of Clarel in extents of the honour of Tickhill or as principals or witnesses to any charters of this neighbourhood before Master John Clarel became warden of the chapel of Queen Eleanor in Tickhill castle during the reign of Edward I [1]. However, Hunter was mistaken. The Clarel family was living at Tickhill, on the border between Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire since at least the mid-twelfth century. Members of the family probably held positions in the administration of the castle and Honor of Tickhill which contained over 60 knight's fees in five counties. The Honor had been in royal hands since the start of the reign of Henry II. The records concerning the family are fragmentary but it is possible to put together a tentative outline pedigree.

1. Ralph Clarel
The first Clarel to appear in English records is Ralph Clarel who is entered in the pipe rolls of 1185 when he owed 20 shillings for a warranty of the land quitclaimed to him in the court of Tickhill [2]. In an undated charter, Ralph Clarel and William his son appear as witnesses to a grant by William de Wadworth to the monks of Roche [3].

He married Sibyl, possibly a daughter of Payn de St. Mary of Rawmarsh.

2. William Clarel
Ralph Clarel appears to have died before 1197-98 when William Clarel of Tickhill appears in the pipe rolls under new pleas, and William is probably the same man who was amerced in Nottinghamshire in 1202-3 [4].

Geoffrey Clarel
Geoffrey, son of William Clarel [5]. On 10 May 1235, Geoffrey Clarel attorned William Clarel versus Andreas de Widdrington and Alice his wife in a plea concerning a carucate of land in Misen, Nottinghamshire [6].

In an undated charter, Geoffrey Clarel of Tickhill granted to Ailwin son of Robert de Tickhill, a toft in Lindrick for 6d. per year, with 4s. paid in hand [7].

Geoffrey had two sons, William, and John. Master John Clarel, who first appears as a king's clerk in 1250. He was a Canon of Southwell in the Prebendary of Norwell, a papal chaplain and clerk to kings Henry III and Edward I. John Clarel granted to the Augustinian friars of Tickhill, the manor of Tickhill for the souls of himself, his family and Sir John Maunsel, formerly Treasurer of York. In 1294 Clarel held 15 rectories, including Babworth, East Bridgford, Edingley, Harworth, Lowdham, East Markham, West Markham and North Wheatley in Nottinghamshire, all of which had been given by King John to the priory of Rouen. He was also rector of Babworth until his death on 11 May 1295.

Although Master John Clarel was a clergyman, he was not celibate. On 18 December 1298, Jordan de Insula of Halton, Yorkshire, and Alice his wife, granddaughter and one of the heirs of the late Master John Clarel granted to Robert, rector of the church of Hemmingford Abbots, all their right in a messuage in the said town next the high road leading to the cemetery of the said church, and in certain land there; the said Clarel, late rector of the said church, having acquired the said premises [8].

3. William Clarel II
William, son of Geoffrey Clarel who appeared in 1235 in the plea concerning land in Misen, Nottinghamshire [9].

In 1244, William Clarel claimed against Thomas, Prior of Bridlington, and Richard, Prior of Kirkham that they have held a plea in the Court Christian concerning chattels which are not [of a testamentary or matrimonial nature]. And against Ralph, Prior of St. Oswald's, where he prosecuted the same plea [10].

William Clarel married, before 1248, Ada, sister and heiress of Sir Adam de Quatremars [11] and widow of Geoffrey Maureward of Goadby and Cole Orton, Leicestershire. On 2 July 1248, William Clarel and Ada, his wife gave the king 1 mark for taking an assize of novel dissein before John of Lexington in the county of Leicestershire against William Maureward, concerning a tenement in Overton (Cole Orton) [12].

On 7 July 1253, William Clarel had exemption for life to from being put on assizes, juries or recognitions [13]. On 10 December 1256, the sheriff of Leicestershire was ordered to give respite from knighthood to William Clarel until Michaelmas next [14]. 1260. John Maunsel, Provost of Beverley, prosecuted William Clarel, to render a reasonable account of the time when he was bailiff of the Provostship of Beverley [15].

On 27 October 1276, the Augustinian Friars of Tickhill had a royal licence to enclose a way without the town on the north of their church between their place and the land of William Clarel to the amount of a quarter of an acre of land [16].

William had a daughter Joan, who married Robert de Aldwark. In an undated deed William Clarel granted to Robert de Aldwark and Joan daughter of William Clarel. His lands and tenements in Chelardeston (Chellaston, Derbyshire) for life with remainder to their heirs male [17].

4. William Clarel III
William Clarel, probably the son of William Clarel married, before 1284, Agnes, heiress of the manor of Aldwark in Yorkshire (whoever she was).

He first appears in the records in 1284, when Master John Clarel, his uncle, granted William Clarel of Aldwark, a messuage, a carucate of land, 20 acres of meadow, and 100 shillings of rent in Tickhill to hold of Master John during his lifetime at a yearly rent of £10 sterling [18].

At Easter 1319, Adam de Rotherham, chaplain granted to William Clarel and Agnes his wife, the manors of Penistone and Newton upon Derwent and a messuage and 10 acres of land and 12 acres of meadow in Wadworth near Tickhill, for their lives with reversion to Thomas, William's son and the heirs of his body. Adam, son of William Clarel also made a claim [19].

At Easter 1322, Eustace de Rotherham, chaplain granted to William Clarel of Aldwark and Agnes his wife, the manor of Aldwark, they and the heirs of their bodies to hold of the chief lords with remainder to William's right heirs [20].

On 24 November 1322, Roger Walgrim of Rayneberge and Alice his wife granted to Sir William Clarel, knight, and Agnes his wife, the manor of Adwick, which he had from Roger son of Sir Nicholas de Leicester, together with lands inherited from his mother Matilda[21].

On 3 February 1323, Robert de Reynbergh and Alice his wife granted the manor of Adwick to William Clarel of Aldwark. William and Agnes and their heirs to hold a moiety of the king and his heirs of the honor of Tickhill. William and Agnes and William's heirs to hold the other moiety of the chief lords. For £100 [22].

On 3 March 1328, the sheriff of York was ordered to cause a coroner for that county to be elected in place of William Clarel, who is incapacitated by infirmity [23].

Sir William Clarel of Tickhill and Aldwark died before May 1332, aged about 70 and was succeeded by his son Thomas.

If anyone can fill in any further details I would be grateful, particularly the marriage of Ralph Clarel and Sibyl de St. Mary, for which I made a note some time back, reference vol. 1 of the Curia Regis Rolls, which are no longer available online for me to confirm this.

Best regards,

John

[1] Joseph Hunter, South Yorkshire. The History and Topography of the Deanery of Doncaster in the Diocese and County of York, vol. 2 (London, 1831), 52.
[2] The Great roll of the pipe for the thirty-first year of the reign of King Henry the Second, A.D. 1184-1185, Pipe Roll Society, 34 (1913), 75
[3] William Farrer, ed., Early Yorkshire Charters; Being a Collection of Documents Anterior to the Thirteenth Century Made from the Public Records, Monastic Chartularies, Roger Dodsworth's Manuscripts and Other Available Sources, vol. 2 (Edinburgh, 1915), 337, No. 1101.
[4] John Pym Yeatman, The Feudal History of the County of Derby, vol. 1 (London, 1886), 143, 154.
[5] John Parker, Feet of Fines for the County of York, 1218 to 1231, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series 62, 1921, 22n.
[6] Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: vol. 3: 1234-1237 (1908), 176
[7] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/282/7]
[8] A Descriptive Catalogue of Ancient Deeds: Volume 3 (1900), B. 4151.
[9] Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: vol. 3: 1234-1237 (1908), 176.
[10] William Paley Baildon, Notes on the Religious and Secular Houses of Yorkshire, Vol. 1, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series 17, 1895, 18.
[11] Calendar of Fine Rolls, 27 Henry III, No. 331
[12] Calendar of Fine Rolls, 32 Henry III, No. 436
[13] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Henry III, vol. 4: 1247-1258 (1908), 209
[14] Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry III: vol. 10: 1256-1259 (1932), 112
[15] Baildon, Religious and Secular Houses, 6.
[16] Calendar of Patent Rolls, Edward I, vol. 1: 1272-1281 (1901), 164
[17] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/63/3]
[18] F. H. Slingsby, ed., Feet of Fines for the County of York, From 1272 to 1300, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series 121, 1956, 68, No. 42.
[19] CP 25/1/270/92, number 36.
[20] CP 25/1/271/97, number 19.
[21] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/194/7]
[22] CP 25/1/271/98, number 98.
[23] Calendar of Close Rolls, Edward III: vol. 1: 1327-1330 (1896), 263-272

John Watson

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Jul 25, 2014, 8:30:03 AM7/25/14
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Dear all,

Since I made my post yesterday on the early Clarell family of Tickhill and Aldwark, I have been doing some further research in the Foljambe deeds on A2A and I have also received the text of the Curia Regis case that I mentioned from a very kind lady. Some major revisions to the pedigree that I presented are required.

1. Ralph Clarell

Ralph Clarell of Tickhill apears to have married Sibyl, daughter of Pain (Pagan) of Hooton Roberts and Wilsick. This is shown by the proceedings of a case in the Curia Regis in 1201, which roughly translated reads:

Ralph Selvein, Hugh de Stinninton, William de Livet, and William de Ausuic, were sent to bear record of the court of Tickhill of the dispute between Geoffrey Clarel and Robert son of Pagan concerning six bovates of land with appurtenances in Tickhill, which Robert son of Pagan had claimed against William father of the same Geoffrey, they say that the same Robert impleaded William father of the said Geoffrey, and William came and said that he had a warrant and named the charter of Jordan eldest brother of the aforesaid Robert, who gave the land to Ralph his father, in free marriage with Sibyl his sister, and brought forth on the day the charter, and Robert son of Pagan said that the charter was false and never made by Jordan and was made six years after Jordan died and therefore that charter was retained in the hands of Ralph Murdac and William of Furneus until it was proved legal or not; and he does not know what has been done later with that charter [1].

Sibyl cannot possibly have been the sister of Jordan de St. Mary who was still alive in the early 1220's. Robert son of Pain, the brother of Sibyl appears to be the Robert son of Pain of Hooton Roberts and Wilsick who died in 1203 [2].

In an undated charter, Ralph Clarel and William his son appear as witnesses to a grant by William de Wadworth to the monks of Roche, which was also witnessed by Robert son of Pain (his brother-in-law) and Ralph son of Robert [3].

2. William Clarell

From the above Curia Regis case it is evident William, son of Ralph Clarell was dead in 1201.

3. Geoffrey Clarell

I still haven't worked out when Geoffrey son of William died, but it was probably around 1240. Geoffrey definitely had two sons, William and John. In an undated deed, William Clarell, knight, demised to John Clarell his brother, the manor of Tickhill with 60 acres of arable and 7 acres meadow, for the life of John and 6 years further, at 10 marks per annum [4].

4. Sir William Clarell

William Clarell married Ada, daughter (not widow as I previously thought) of Geoffrey Maureward of Goadby and Cole Orton, Leicestershire by his wife Ada de Quatremars. In an undated deed, William Maureward granted to William Clarell in free marriage with William's sister Ada, all land and woods which William's father and mother Geoffrey Maureward and Ada granted to William Clarell [5].

5. Joan Clarell

William Clarell was succeeded by his only daughter and heiress Joan.
In an undated deed, William Clarell granted for life to Master John Clarell his brother, all lands, etc., in Tickhill, Lyncepoll, Heselay and Marlhover, with remainder for life to Joan, daughter of William then to her next heirs for ever without power of alienation. William to have for life 15 marks per annum from the premises [6].

Joan Clarell married Robert de Aldwark.
In an undated deed William Clarel granted to Robert de Aldwark and Joan daughter of William Clarel, his lands and tenements in Chelardeston (Chellaston, Derbyshire) for life with remainder to their heirs male [7].

Robert de Aldwark was dead before 1274-75, when Geoffrey de Leukenore and John de Metingham were appointed to take the assize of novel disseisin arrainged by Joan late the wife of Robert de Aldewerk' against Robert de Shepeye and Geoffrey de Luteburg', touching a tenement in Papworth [Pipewell?], Leicestershire [8].

It is possible that Joan married secondly, Robert de Potterton, which might explain this deed in the Foljambe papers:
27 March 1302, Adam de Poterton son of Robert de Poterton grants to William Clarel his brother a messuage and 27 acres in Wadworth [9].

6. Sir William Clarell of Tickhill and Aldwark

Robert de Aldwark was succeeded by his son William, who took his mother's name of Clarell.
In an undated deed, William son of Jordan de Tickhill granted to William Clarell, son of Robert de Aldwark, the manor of Westfold and all premises in Tykehill, Sandebeck and Maltby, with some exceptions, at 1d. per annum to Sir Robert de Eccleshale [10].
In an undated deed, Adam de Hertehill in Tickhill, exchanged land with William Clarel of Tickhill, son of Robert de Aldwark [11].

Which solves the mystery of how the Clarell family came to hold land in Aldwark. Hunter and others have always considered that Aldwark came to the Clarells through Agnes wife of William Clarell. Hunter calls her "Agnes lady of Aldwark" [12]. It is evident that William Clarell inherited land in Aldwark from his father and not by marriage to Agnes.

William first appears in dated records in 1284, when Master John Clarell, his great uncle, granted William Clarell of Aldwark, a messuage, a carucate of land, 20 acres of meadow, and 100 shillings of rent in Tickhill to hold of Master John during his lifetime at a yearly rent of £10 sterling [13]. I had previously assumed that he must have been "of Aldwark" in right of his wife and therefore must have been married to Agnes. The first dated record I can find of William and his wife Agnes is in 1319.

Regards,

John

[1] Curia Regis Rolls of the Reigns of Richard I and John Preserved in the Public Record Office. Volume 1: Richard I to 2 John (1189-1201) (London, 1922), 296.
[2] William Farrer, ed., Early Yorkshire Charters; Being a Collection of Documents Anterior to the Thirteenth Century Made from the Public Records, Monastic Chartularies, Roger Dodsworth's Manuscripts and Other Available Sources, vol. 3 (Edinburgh, 1915), 11n.
[3] William Farrer, ed., Early Yorkshire Charters; Being a Collection of Documents Anterior to the Thirteenth Century Made from the Public Records, Monastic Chartularies, Roger Dodsworth's Manuscripts and Other Available Sources, vol. 2 (Edinburgh, 1915), 337, No. 1101.
[4] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/282/6].
[5] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/4/32/1].
[6] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/282/4-5].
[7] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/63/3].
[8] Patent Rolls, 3 Edward I, m. 5d, as cited in Thomas Duffus Hardy, Forty-Fourth Annual Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records (London: HMSO, 1884), 208.
[9] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/286/4].
[10] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/282/2].
[11] Nottinghamshire Archives: Foljambe of Osberton: Deeds and Estate Papers [DD/FJ/1/282/15].
[12] Joseph Hunter, South Yorkshire. The History and Topography of the Deanery of Doncaster in the Diocese and County of York, vol. 2 (London, 1831), 53.
[13] F. H. Slingsby, ed., Feet of Fines for the County of York, From 1272 to 1300, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series 121, 1956, 68, No. 42.
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