The Bonkil (or de Bonkil) family, ancestors of Stewart of Darnley

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Wednesday, 31 January, 2007


Hello All,

Recently, an attempt to trace the connections of Christiana, wife of
Sir Alexander de Bonkil and (incorrectly presumed) mother of Margaret
(Bonkil) (Stewart) de Brechin failed to add to the known ancestry of
Margaret. However, some success has been met with concerning the Bonkil
ancestry itself.

The antiquarian John Denton of Cardew, in his manuscript concerning
the gentry and nobility of Cumberland (ca. 1610), wrote the following
concerning the Bonkill, or Bonekil, family of Uldale and Gilcrux,
Cumberland:

' ULDALE.
....
This mannor (being parcel of the barony of Allerdale),
together with the mannor of Gilcrouse, was given by Waltheof
the son of Earl Gospatrick, unto Adam the son of Lyolf
brother of Phorme the son of Lyolf baron of Greystoke, from
which Adam they descended by a daughter to the Bonekhills,
who granted forth Gillcrouse to a younger brother Robert
Bonekill: And the sons of the said Robert, Thomas Bonekill
and Walter, gave away their inheritance in Gilcrouse to
the abbey of Caldre, which Ranulph Bonekill Knt., then Lord
Paramont both of Ulndale and Gilcruse, confirmed to the
abbot. Sir Ranulph had issue Alexander, who had issue
Adam, who gave Awerthwait parcel of his mannor of Ulndale
to the priors of Carlisle. The said Adam had issue
another Alexander Bonekill whose daughter and heir first
married to John Stewart kinsman of the King of Scots,
and afterwards to David Bregham a Scottish knight of
great valour, and by him transferred the inheritance
to the family of the Breghams. This David Bregham
was a companion of W'm Walleys that was executed for
treason at London, committed against Edw. Ist by
resisting that king's attempt for the superior
Lordship of Scotland,....
David Bregham thereby forfeited his estate to
Anthony Lord Lucy, then Lord of Allerdale. ' [1]

Only one element of the foregoing account has been found to be
in error: as the ancestor of the Greystoke family was Forne fitz
Sigulf, the alleged connection with Adam fitz Liulf does not bear
out. The statement concerning John Stewart and the King of Scots
is an anachronism, as he was not near related to the then King of
Scots (his great-nephew would be King Robert II). The account as
given above has otherwise been found to be substantially correct.

The recorded descent from Adam fitz Liulf is in fact missing
one generation of names - that of his daughter, and her husband
(NN de Bonkil, or Bonekil). Minus these individuals, adequate
documentation has been found to reconstruct the pedigree from
Adam fitz Liulf to Sir Alexander de Bonkil (d. 1300) and his
daughter and heiress, Margaret (wife of Sir John le Stewart, and
of Sir David de Brechin). This pedigree will be presented in the
next post of this thread.

Cheers,

John *




NOTES

[1] John Denton of Cardew, An Accompt of the Most Considerable
Estates and Families in the County of Cumberland (Kendal:
T. Wilson, 1887), Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian
and Archaeological Society Tract Series No. 2, pp. 48-49.


* John P. Ravilious










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John P. Ravilious

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In a message dated 1/31/07 3:08:10 PM Pacific Standard Time, Therav3 writes:

<< 1.1.1.1.1.1.1a.1a.1.1 Sir John Stewart
----------------------------------------
Occ: Earl of Angus

laird of Bonkil
created Earl of Angus ca. 1327 >>
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------

CP i 153 says that he [John Stewart of Bonkyl, 1st Earl of Angus] was "...the
son and heir of Sir Alexander Stewart of Bonkyl, whom he succeeded in 1319"

What's the basis for saying he succeeded in 1319?
If we presume that he was "of age" that would push the chronology more than
you're allowing presently.

Will

John P. Ravilious

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Jan 31, 2007, 7:40:55 PM1/31/07
to

Wednesday, 31 January, 2007


Hello All,

Following is the promised pedigree giving the descent
from Adam fitz Liulf of Uldale, Cumbs. down to the issue
of Margaret de Bonkil by her two husbands, (1) Sir John
le Stewart of Bonkil (d. 1298) and (2) Sir David de
Brechin (exe. 1320).

Should anyone have comment, corrections, criticism
or additional relevant documentation, please advise.

Cheers,

John *

==========================================


1 Adam fitz Liulf
----------------------------------------

of Uldale and Gilcrux, Cumberland

cf. Hutchinson, Cumberland II:108[1]
Denton, Accompt pp. 48-49[24]

Children: NN


1.1 NN 'filia Adae'
----------------------------------------

cf. Denton, Accompt pp. 48-49[24]


Spouse: NN de Bonkil

Children: NN (?1140-)
Robert [see 1.1.2 below]


1.1.1 NN de Bonkil
----------------------------------------
Birth: ? 1140

probably Adam de Bonekil:
" Adam de Bonekil witnessed a charter by Richard Cumyn granting
the church of Lyntun roderic to Kelso c. 1160." [Watson, Roll of
Edinburgh Burgesses and Guild-Brethren (Edinburgh: J. Skinner
& Co., 1929), p. 117] [25]

cf. Denton, Accompt pp. 48-49[24]

Children: Sir Ranulf (?1175->1248)


1.1.1.1 Sir Ranulf de Bonkil
----------------------------------------
Birth: ? 1175
Death: aft Nov 1248[2]

of Bonkil, co. Berwicks. and Uldale, co. Cumbs.

writ dated 29 October 1212:
' 542. The K. [King John of England] to the Sheriff of Cumberland.
As Ranulf de Bonekil, on account of the service of his lord the K.
of Scotland, could not attend the recognizance of great assize,
which was summoned for the quinzaine of St. Michael last past
before the K., between Gilbert fitz Reinfrid and Henry de Dene,
he is not to be put in default, or lose anything by absence,
as the K. has guaranteed him that day. The Sheriff is also to
accept his attorney to follow the county and pleas, and do suit
and service for his land. The K. has granted this, for the love
and at the request of Alexander son of the K. of Scots.
Witness:- P. bishop of Winchester. Southwark. ' [Bain I:94[2],
cites Close Roll, 14 John, m. 3]


'Lord Ranulf de Bonkil', witness to charter of Patrick, son of
Patrick Earl of Dunbar dated at Roxburgh 3 Kal. April,
17 Alexander [30 March 1231] - Durham University Library
Archives & Special Collections: Misc. Charter 733 [Printed:
Raine ND App. CXXVI][3]

" Charter of Ranulf de Bonkil granting and confirming to the
monks of Coldingham the land in the "territorio" of Ederham
lying next to Edere, and called Toddehalch.
Witnesses: Patrick son of the Earl, Patrick son of Adam,
Robert de Upsetlington, David the Marshal, Thomas de Gordon,
Mathew de Normanvill, John de St Michael, William de Veteri
Ponte, Stephen de la Warderobe, Henry de Prendergest, William
de Witeslade, Alan de Swinton, Patrick de Preston, Simon son
of Thomas, Walter de Paxton, Andrew de Paxton, William de
Lumsden, and many others. " Durham University Library
Archives & Special Collections: Misc. Charter 720 [Printed:
Raine ND App. CLXIX][3]

" Charter of Ranulf de Bonkil, quitclaiming to the monks of
Coldingham the woods and moors of the Prior and Convent of
Coldingham, viz. Brokholes, Harewood and Denewood and
confirming the boundaries between Coldingham and Bonkil.
Witnesses: Patrick son of the Earl, Patrick son of Adam,
Robert de Upsetlington, David the Marshal, Thomas de Gordon,
Matthew de Normanvill, John de St Michael, William de Veteri
Ponte, Stephen de Lawarderobe, Henry de Prendergest, William
de Witeslade, Alan de Swinton, Patrick de Preston, Simon son
of Thomas, Walter de Paxton, Andrew de Paxton, William de
Lumsden, and many others. " Durham University Library
Archives & Special Collections: Misc. Charter 721 [Printed:
Raine ND App. CLXVIII][3]

' Lord Ranulf de Bonkil ', witness to charter of Patrick
'II' Earl of Dunbar, after 31 Dec 1232 (date of the Earl's
succession):
' Charter of Patrick II, Earl of Dunbar, granting to the
monks of Durham the vill of Ederham and its church, with
the chapel of Erceldon and its other chapels and pertinents,
and the vill of Nesbit.
Witnesses: Lord Ranulf de Bonkil, Lord Roger de Merley,
Lord Robert de Anesey, Lord David de Burdun, Peter the
Chaplain, David de Graham, Robert de Lumley, Patrick the
Clerk, and many others ' [ Durham University Library Archives
& Special Collections: Misc. Charter 745[3] {Printed: Raine
N.D App. CXXXV}] [3]


record of appointment of judges in an assize, 19 Sept. 1236:
' 1296. Cumberland: - Richard de Levinton, Ralf de la Ferte,
Peter de Tyllol, and Walter de Mulecastre, are appointed
Justices on an assize of novel disseisin, to be held at
Carlisle in the quinzaine of Michaelmas, which Ranulf de
Bonekill arraigns against William de Yreby, concerning
common pasturage in Boulton, pertaining to his freehold
in Ulvesdale. Durham.
[Bain, Cal. Docs. Scot. I:236[2], cites 'Patent, 20
Hen. III. m. 2. dorso.' ]


record of an agreement dated at Carlisle, ca. 28 Oct. 1242:
' 1591. Cumberland: - Final agreement in the K.'s court at
Carlisle in a month from St. Michael's day, 26th of the
K.'s reign, before Robert de Lexinton, Ralf de Sutleg',
William de Culewurthe, and Jollan de Neville, justices
in eyre; between Rannulf de Bonekille, complainant, and
Alan de Muleton and Alicia his wife, deforciants,
concerning the land within these bounds, viz., from
Swyrlehow descending to the way coming from Cockermouth
(Kokermue), and along said way towards the east as far
as a sicket descending through the middle of Harescow
and ascending by said sicket to the top of the mountain
of Braythefel, and from thence descending to Swirlhow.
Rannulf complained that Alan and Alicia claimed
(traxerunt) more thereof than pertained to their
tenement of Caldebek. Agreed between the parties in
court; viz., Rannulf acknowledged all the land within
the above boundaries to be Alicia's. For which
recognizance and fine, Alan and Alicia granted for
themselves and the heirs of Alicia that Rannulf, his
heirs and their men of Ulvedale, should have common
pasture in their land of Caldebeck for all their
animals by these bounds, viz., where Staynstanbeck
falls into Caldew, and so ascending by Stainstanbek
to its bounds of Ulvedale. Saving to Alan and
Alicia and the latter's heirs the houses and
ploughlands (frussuris) within the bounds held by them
at the date of this agreement, and liberty to plough
and sow the lattter and enclose them with a hedge,
and to farm (censare) their corn in the same at
pleasure. Saving to Rannulf and his men of Ulvedale
common pasture in said ploughlands after the crop is
off. And if their animals by defect of the enclosure,
should enter the ploughlands while under crop, they
shall not be taken, but chased back with deterioration.
Nor shall Alan or Alicia, or her heirs or their men,
erect more houses or hedges, or make more ploughland
in said bounds, than are there on the day hereof.
And Alan and Alicia grant that Rannulf his heirs and
men of Ulvedale shall have reasonable estovers, viz.,
husbote, heybote and firbote in the granters' woods
in said bounds. And warrant their grants against all.
And Rannulf has given them 25 marks of silver. '
[Bain, Cal. Docs. Scot. I:289-290[2], cites 'Feet
of Fines, 26 Hen. III. (Cumberland), No. 31.' ]


' Randulf de Bonekil.', one of the jurors who [together
with Nicholas de Sules, Gilbert de la Hay, Robert de
Mayneres, John Comin, David Comin, Richard de Munfichet,
Malcolm, son of the Earl, Dunckan Sibald, Randulf de
Bonekil, Henry de Graham, William de Valoniis, Alexander
de Strivelin, William de La hay, Walter de Bonckil,
Henry de Wyntone, John de Fentone, Henry de Halibortone
and others] supported Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith in
his oath (together with Patrick, Earl of Dunbar) before
King Henry III of England, 'Circa 1244' :
' 2671. The form of oath taken by the Earls Patric, and
Walter Cumin, viz., that they were neither of counsel or
aid, when on their part any people were sent to attack or
lay waste the K. of England's land in Ireland, or elsewhere,
to the K.'s dishonour; nor ever received any of his enemies,
especially William de Mariscis and his son.'
[Bain, I:551-3[2]]

- probably ca. 14 Aug 1244, when the Treaty of Newcastle between
Alexander II of Scots and Henry III of England resolved the
dispute [DNB I:263[4]]


letter to the Kings of Scotland and England, dated ca. 16 Nov 1248:
' 1749. Roger fitz Ralf, William de Skremerstone, Robert
Malenfaunt, Robert de Cressewelle, Patric de Gosewyk, and
Gilbert de Behulle, knights of England, and Ranulf de
Bonekulle, Robert son of the Earl, Robert de Bernham,
Robert de Durham (Donelm'), William de Mordington, and
Simon de Grubbesheved (Grubbet), knights of Scotland,
to the lieges. The Sheriff of Northumberland had received
on the day of St Edmund the Martyr, at the march of
England and Scotland, letters patent from the K. of England,
dated 10th September previous, bearing that the K. had
heard from the K. of Scotland's envoys, that the laws and
customs of the Marches of the kingdoms in the time of
their predecessors kings of England and Scotland, hitherto
used, were now less well observed; and as injury had been
done to Nicholas de Sules against said laws, the K.
commanded the Sheriff to cause the same to be inviolably
kept,...'
No Seals. Printed, Appendix, No. 5. ' [Bain, Cal. Docs.
Scot. I:323-4[2], cites 'Inq. p. m., 53 Hen. III. No. 65.' ]

cf. Denton, Accompt pp. 48-49[24]


Spouse: NN

Children: Alexander (?1200-)


1.1.1.1.1 Alexander de Bonkil
----------------------------------------
Birth: ? 1200

of Uldale, Cumberland

" Alexander de Bonkill ", granted land in Gilcrux to Holm Cultram
priory before 1249:
' 106a. (H. 1 and 2; D. art. 81).-William f. Orm de Ireby, clerk,
grants to Holm eleven acres arable in Gilecruce; i.e. 3 acres and
3 roods which he had from John f. Hamelin, of which 2½ lie together
under the tower of Laurence, and 5 roods near the garden; and 2
acres which he had from William Wrangservise, one under the barn
and the other under the cowhouse. Also half an acre which he had
from Henry de Marisco, next the barn given to the abbey; and 2
acres and 3 roods which he had from Alexander de Bonkill, i.e.
one next the land of John f. Hamelin and 7 roods in Duuehowes
[Dove-howes]. Also one acre in Watelandes which he had from
Robert de Bonekil, and the land he had from Walter de Bonekil,
of which Richard Gebbe and Adam f. Sigarith were tenants. Also
3½ acres in the upper meadow and half Threpheng every second
year.
Witnesses-Sir Walter de Ulvesby, archdeacon of Carlisle,
Sir William de Daker, sheriff [1240-49].' [Reg. Holm Cultram,
p. 41[5]]


probably the 'Alexander de Bonekehull' who is recorded in
the following Pipe Rolls of the reign of John, 1209-1213:

Of Pleas of the Forest by Hugh de Nevill and P. de Liuns
' Alexander de Bonekeskull renders account of 5 marks for the
same. In the treasury, 40s. And he owes 2 marks ' [VCH
Cumberland I:406, cites Pipe Roll, 11 John, 1209 - Roll 8,
m. 2d] [26]

Of Pleas of the Forest
' Alexander de Bonekeshall renders account of 2 marks. In
the treasury, half a mark. And he owes 20s. ' [VCH
Cumberland I:408, cites Pipe Roll, 12 John, 1210 - Roll 13,
m. 1] [26]

Of Pleas of the Forest
' Alexander de Bonekehull renders account of 20s. He has
paid it into the treasury and is quit. ' [VCH Cumberland I:410,
cites Pipe Roll, 13 John, 1211 - Roll 12, m. 1] [26]

Of Pleas of the Forest
' Alexander de Bonekehull renders account of 20s. He has
paid it into the treasury and is quit. ' [VCH Cumberland I:414,
cites Pipe Roll, 15 John, 1213 - Roll 1, m. 1] [26]

cf.

Children: Adam (?1220-)


1.1.1.1.1.1 Adam de Bonkil
----------------------------------------
Birth: ? 1220

of Bonkil [Bunkle], co. Berwicks. and Uldale, co. Cumbs.

cf. Denton, Accompt pp. 48-49[24]

Children: Sir Alexander (?1245-<1300)


1.1.1.1.1.1.1a Sir Alexander de Bonkil*
----------------------------------------
Birth: ? 1245
Death: bef 1 Apr 1300[6],[7]
Occ: laird of Bonkil

knt., of Bonkil [Bunkle], co. Berwicks. and Uldale, co. Cumbs.


record of attachment in a plea, 20 Jan. 1278-1279:
' 149. Alexander de Bonkyll, Robert of Botland, Richard
Ker, Gilbert of Liddesdale [and eight others], were
attached to answer to John de Herthwaytone, in a plea,
why they, with Cristiana wife of said Alexander, Thomas
son of Adam of Lilleburne, and Philip le Keu, when
the said John had taken Alexander's avers trespassing
at Fenewicke,...
The defendants afterwards make a fine with him for
20s. by pledge of said Alexander. ' [Bain, Cal. Docs.
Scot. II:46-47[8], cites Assize Roll (Northumberland),
7 Edw. I. m. M/4/30 4.]


' Alisaundre de Bonkil ', one of the barons of Scotland
attending the Parliament at Brigham who confirmed the Treaty
of Salisbury with England, 14 Mar 1289/90 [Stevenson I:129-130,
No. XCII[9]]

'Alexander of Bonkill', one of the auditors for the claim of
Bruce at Berwick, 2 June 1292 [Crawfurd p. 20[10] ]

' Dominus Alexander de Bonkile tenet villatam de Ulvedale,
et reddit per annum ad eosdem terminos ix l. Et dictus Alexander
venit ad pacem domini regis, et tulit breve praedicti domini
regis de seisina habenda, et obtinuit. ' [" Lord Alexander de
Bonkile held the manor of Ulvedale, et returned per annum
ix l. And the said Alexander came to the peace of the lord
king [Edward], and had a brief of the said lord king for having
seisin, and he obtained it " ] order of King Edward I dated at
Berwick, 27 Apr 1296 following the siege of Dunbar, that ' No
Scotchmen to remain upon the lands of Scotchmen in
England' [Stevenson II:42, No. CCCLVIII.[9]]


record dated 20 Aug. 1292:
' 631. The following (among others) have acquittance from
summons to common pleas in Cumberland. Creyke.
Alexander [de] Bonkil, Robert de Brus, David de
Torthorald, the abbot of Jedburgh, Walter de Corry,
John de Seton. ' [Bain, Cal. Docs. Scot. II:147[8],
cites 'Close, 20 Edw. I. m. 3, dorso.']

record dated 28 Nov. 1292:
' 631. The following (among others) are acquitted of
summons to common pleas in Northumberland. Rokesburgh.
The Abbot of Kelso, J[ohn] K. of Scotland, Robert
son of Gilbert de Umfraville, Alexander de Bonekil,
Patrick de Dunbar earl of March. ' [Bain, Cal. Docs. Scot.
II:152[8], cites 'Close, 21 Edw. I. m. 10, dorso.']

extent of lands of Scots in Northumberland ordered by King
Edward, 10 May 1296, included:
' Lilleburne et Schaudone ed duae partes villae de Fenwyke
(Alexandri de Bonkille). Non respondet de exitibus. '
[Stevenson II:49, No. CCCLIX.]

~ these were evidently the lands of his then wife Christiana de
Lilleburne, including her dower in Fenwick, Northumberland.

' Alisaundre de Bunkille [ S ' Alexand' de Bonkil ],
swore allegiance to King Edward I at Berwick, 28 August 1296
[ MacAndrew, p. 706[11] ]

heraldic seal of Sir Alexander de Bonkil:
' BONCLE, Alexander. A shield suspended from a tree of three
branches with two wyverns at the sides, bearing arms: Three
buckles. Legend (caps.):
S' . ALEXAND' . DE . BONKIL.
Diam. 1 1/16 in. Inner border beaded. Laing, i. 113.
Record Off., Homage, c. A.D. 1296, detached seals 397 and
86 - Cast. Bain, ii. pl. v. fig. 13. B.M. 15831-2. '
[Stevenson, II:253, no. 442[12]; see same arms at Cat. Seals,
p. 292[13]]

C 133/98/2
IPM of Alexander de Bonkil, alias de Bonkehill: Cumberland,
28 Edw. I [1300][7]

' Dead 1 Ap. 1300, holding Uvedale [Uldale] manor, Cumb., of Sr
Thos. de Lucy. His d. h. Margaret is in Scotland (Inq.).'
[Knights I:112[6]]

cf. SP I:13[14]

re: his 2nd wife:

'Cristiana wife of said Alexander [de Bonkil]' [Bain II:46-7[2],
from assize dated 20 Jan 1278/9]

SC 8/319/E406
Petition dated 1318/9:
Petitioners: Christiana [de Boukile], widow of Alexander de
Boukile.
Addressees: King and council.
Places mentioned: Northumberland; Uldale, [Cumberland].
Other people mentioned: Alexander de Boukile, late husband of
the petitioner; Alexander Stiward (Steward).
Nature of request: Boukile requests the grant of the manor of
Uldale which belonged to her late husband as all her lands and
tenements, goods and chattels are destroyed by the Scottish enemy,
which was taken into the king's hand after the death of Steward.
If this cannot be granted, she requests the grant of two thirds
of the manor.
Endorsement: With regard to her dower, it is to be done. '
[ "The petition is dated to 1318-1319 in accordance with the
dating given on the dorse, a date which tallies with the dating
given by Bain (Bain, vol. III, no.685). " National Archives[7]]


name provided by Andrew B. W. MacEwen (cites record from Bain,
Cal. Doc. Scot. as the source)[15]

she m. 1stly (as 2nd wife) Sir Thomas de Fenwick,
2ndly (as 2nd wife) Sir Alexander de Bonkil
____________________________

Moor, Knights of Edward I sub "Lilleburn, Sr John de" states in part:
" Pardon re Gaveston 16 Oct. 1313 and re Despensers 7 Aug. 1318.
...
Pardon of trespasses and restoration of goods to Jn. and Ralph
de L. on his surrendering Knaresburgh Cas. to Jn. de Moubray
and Wm. de Ros, and pardon to him and w. Constance of his
robbery of two cardinals, if found guilty, 19 Mar. 1318.
...
Sum'd as a Kt. of Northumb. to Gt. Council at Westminster 9
May 1324 (P.W.). He is aged 33, nephew and heir of Christiana
de Lilleburn, and has livery of her Manor of Lilleburn,
Northumb., as 1 Kt. Fee, 26 Oct. 1324 (F.R.). " [ HSP 82:40[6]]


Spouse: NN [1st wife]

Children: Margaret (-ca1304)


1.1.1.1.1.1.1a.1a Margaret de Bonkil*
----------------------------------------
Death: ca Sep 1304[14]

heiress of Bonkil, co. Berwicks. and Uldale, Cumberland

she m. 1stly Sir John Stewart,
2ndly Sir David of Brechin (dispensation) [SP I:221-2[14]]

on 7 July 1304, her then husband David of Brechin
' did homage at Stirling [to Edward I of England], where the
King was conducting the siege of the castle, and received
a precept for the restoration of him and his wife of her
lands in England.' [SP I:219,221: cites Cal. Doc. Scot.,
Nos. 1455, 1574, 1584, p. 416[14]] [Knights I:112,
cites date of seisin, 10 July 1304 (C.R.)[6] ]

Spouse: Sir John le Steward, of Bonkil [de jure uxoris]
Death: 22 Jul 1298, Battle of Falkirk[14]
Father: Alexander le Steward (1214-1283)
Mother: Joanna

Children: Isabel
Sir Alexander (>1283-ca1318) [see below]
Sir Alan (-1333)
Sir Walter
Sir James (-1333)


1.1.1.1.1.1.1a.1a.1 Sir Alexander le Steward
----------------------------------------
Birth: aft Sep 1283[14]
Death: ca 1318[7]
Occ: laird of Bonkil

of Bonkil, co. Berwicks. and Uldale, Cumberland

heir of his mother, 'still a minor' in Sept. 1304 [SP I:221[14]]

he evidently held Uldale, Cumbs., or was recognized as heir
while Uldale was held by Sir David de Brechin, in the English camp.

record of a petition, dated after 4 Mar 1315:
C 47/22/10/15
' Petition of Anthony de Lucy for a release of the manor of
Uldale, Cumberland, in the King's hand by the rebellion of
Alexander [Steward] of Bonkill '[7]

he d. ca. 1318, or shortly before: record of a petition dated
1318/9, ' Christiana [de Boukile], widow of Alexander de
Boukile.' SC 8/319/E406 [National Archives, cites Bain, vol. III,
no.685). " [7]]

Children: Sir John
NN (?1315-)


1.1.1.1.1.1.1a.1a.1.1 Sir John Stewart
----------------------------------------
Occ: Earl of Angus

laird of Bonkil
created Earl of Angus ca. 1327

charter of June 1329 calls him Earl of Angus (Barrow, p. 386)[16]

dispensation, 24 Oct 1328 (related in the 4th degree
of consanguinity) [Stuart, pp. 430-1[17], gives '1329' in error]:
[CPL II:283[18]]

Spouse: Margaret de Abernethy
Father: Sir Alexander de Abernethy (>1271-ca1316)
Mother: NN (Margaret ?) de Menteith
Marr: aft 24 Oct 1328[18],[17]

Children: Thomas Stewart, Earl of Angus (-1361)


1.1.1.1.1.1.1a.1b Margaret de Bonkil* (See above)
----------------------------------------

Spouse: Sir David of Brechin [2nd husband]
Death: Aug 1320, executed[14]
Father: Sir William of Brechin (-<1292)
Mother: Elena Comyn (->1302)

Children: Margaret de Brechin, m. Sir David de Barclay


1.1.1.1.1.1.1b Sir Alexander de Bonkil* (See above)
----------------------------------------

Spouse: Christiana de Lilleburne [2nd wife]
Death: bef 26 Oct 1324[6]
Marr: bef 20 Jan 1278[2]


1.1.2 Robert de Bonkil
----------------------------------------

of Gilcrux, Cumberland

charters granting lands in Gilcrux to Holm Cultram priory,
dated [1240-49].' [Reg. Holm Cultram, p. 41[5]]


Charter of King Henry III dated at Westminster, 19 April 1231 'granted
and confirmed to the abbot and monks of Calder all the
below written lands and tenements:
- from the gift of Ranulf le Meschin, the land of Calder with
its appurtenances in which the abbey of Calder was founded;
...
- from the gift of Robert Bonekill, one carucate of land in Little
Gilcrux which Radulf, clerk of Carlisle, held, with all its
appurtenancees; and 12 acres and one square pole of land in
Lesser Gilcrux; and one acre of meadow that is between Lesser
Gilcrux and Great Gilcrux, and pasture for 20 oxen and 12
cows, and 6 horses with their issue of one year. '
[Monasticon Anglicanum 5:340-341, Num. 1[23]]


Children: Thomas
Walter (->1240)


1.1.2.1 Thomas de Bonkil
----------------------------------------

of Gilcrux, Cumberland

apparently d.s.p., succeeded by his brother Walter

re: grants of land in Gilcrux to Holm Cultram priory:
'106b. (H. 1 and 2; D. art. 81).-W., abbot of Calder, and convent
owe Holm abbey half a mark yearly for land in Gilecruce. [John
Denton, Accompt, p. 48) says that Thomas and Walter Bonekil, sons
of Robert, gave away their inheritance in Gilcrouse to the abbey
of Calder. Abbot W. may have been Walter (c. 1255), William
(c. 1262) or Warin (c. 1286)].' [Reg. Holm Cultram, p. 41[5]]


1.1.2.2 Walter de Bonkil
----------------------------------------
Death: aft 1240[5]

of Gilcrux, Cumberland

charters granting lands in Gilcrux to Holm Cultram priory:
' 105. (C. p. 74).-Walter Bonekill [see no. 77] confirms to
William de Ireby, clerk, or his assigns, land adjoining William's
barn on the east, held of him by Richard, son-in-law of Helyas,
and Adam f. Syrit (i.e. Sigrid) [c. 1240.]' [Reg. Holm Cultram,
p. 40[5]]

'106a. (H. 1 and 2; D. art. 81).-William f. Orm de Ireby, clerk,
grants to Holm eleven acres arable in Gilecruce; i.e. 3 acres
and 3 roods which he had from John f. Hamelin, of which 2½ lie
together under the tower of Laurence, and 5 roods near the
garden; and 2 acres which he had from William Wrangservise, one
under the barn and the other under the cowhouse. Also half an
acre which he had from Henry de Marisco, next the barn given to
the abbey; and 2 acres and 3 roods which he had from Alexander
de Bonkill, i.e. one next the land of John f. Hamelin and 7
roods in Duuehowes [Dove-howes]. Also one acre in Watelandes
which he had from Robert de Bonekil, and the land he had from
Walter de Bonekil, of which Richard Gebbe and Adam f. Sigarith
were tenants. Also 3½ acres in the upper meadow and half
Threpheng every second year. Witnesses-Sir Walter de Ulvesby,
archdeacon of Carlisle, Sir William de Daker, sheriff
[1240-49].' [Reg. Holm Cultram, p. 41[5]]

'106b. (H. 1 and 2; D. art. 81).-W., abbot of Calder, and
convent owe Holm abbey half a mark yearly for land in Gilecruce.
[John Denton, Accompt, p. 48) says that Thomas and Walter Bonekil,
sons of Robert, gave away their inheritance in Gilcrouse to the
abbey of Calder. Abbot W. may have been Walter (c. 1255), William
(c. 1262) or Warin (c. 1286)].' [Reg. Holm Cultram, p. 41[5]]

probably the 'Walter de Bonckil', juror with his cousin
Ranulf de Bonkil [' Randulf de Bonekil'], who [together
with Nicholas de Sules, Gilbert de la Hay, Robert de
Mayneres, John Comin, David Comin, Richard de Munfichet,
Malcolm, son of the Earl, Dunckan Sibald, Randulf de
Bonekil, Henry de Graham, William de Valoniis, Alexander
de Strivelin, William de La hay, Walter de Bonckil,
Henry de Wyntone, John de Fentone, Henry de Halibortone
and others] supported Walter Comyn, Earl of Menteith in
his oath (together with Patrick, Earl of Dunbar) before
King Henry III of England, 'Circa 1244' :
' 2671. The form of oath taken by the Earls Patric, and
Walter Cumin, viz., that they were neither of counsel or
aid, when on their part any people were sent to attack or
lay waste the K. of England's land in Ireland, or elsewhere,
to the K.'s dishonour; nor ever received any of his enemies,
especially William de Mariscis and his son.'
[Bain, I:551-3[2]]

- probably ca. 14 Aug 1244, when the Treaty of Newcastle
between Alexander II of Scots and Henry III of England
resolved the dispute [DNB I:263[4]]


1. William Hutchinson, F.A.S., "The History of the County of
Cumberland and some Places Adjacent," Carlisle: F. Jollie,
1794 (vol. II).
2. Joseph Bain, ed., "Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland,"
Edinburgh: Her Majesty's General Register House, 1881 (Vol. I),
full title: Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, Preserved
in Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London.
3. "Durham Cathedral Muniments: Miscellaneous Charters," Durham
University Library Archives & Special Collections,
http://flambard.dur.ac.uk:6336/dynaweb/handlist/ddc/dcdmisch/@Generic__BookTextView/10523
4. "Alexander II, King of Scotland," Dictionary of National
Biography, New York: MacMillan and Co. (London: Smith, Elder &
Co.), Vol. I (1885), pp. 261-264.
5. Francis Grainger and W. G. Collingwood, "The Register and Records
of Holm Cultram," Kendal: Titus Wilson and Son, 1929, Cumberland
and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Record
Series, vol. VII.
6. Rev. Charles Moor, D.D., F.S.A., "Knights of Edward I," Pubs.
of the Harleian Society, 1929-1930, 3 Vols. (Vols. 80-83 in
series).
7. "National Archives,"
http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk/
8. Joseph Bain, ed., "Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland,"
Edinburgh: Her Majesty's General Register House, (Vol. II), full
title: Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, Preserved in
Her Majesty's Public Record Office, London.
9. Joseph Stevenson, "Documents illustrative of the history of
Scotland from the death of King Alexander the Third to the
Accession of Robert Bruce," Edinburgh: H. M. General Register
House, 1870 (Vol. I), 1870 (Vol. II).
10. George Crawfurd, "The History of the Shire of Renfrew," Paisley:
Printed and sold by Alex. Weir, 1782, (originally, Edinburgh :
Printed by James Watson, 1710), [also as cited by Burke; and
Paisley Herald article, F of Barrochan], ' containing a
genealogical history of the royal house of Stewart,..'.
11. Bruce A. MacAndrew, "The Sigillography of the Ragman Roll,"
Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 1999
(Vol. 129), pp. 663-752.
12. John Horne Stevenson, K.C. and Marguerite Wood, Ph.D., Scottish
Heraldic Seals: Royal, Official, Ecclesiastical, Collegiate,
Burghal, Personal, Glasgow: printed by Robert MacLehose & Coy.,
Limited at the University Press, 1940 (Vol. II).
13. Walter de Grey Birch, "Catalogue of Seals in the Department of
Manuscripts in the British Museum," London: Longmans and Co.,
1894, 1895 (Vol. IV), Printed by Order of the Trustees.
14. Sir James Balfour Paul, ed., "The Scots Peerage," Edinburgh:
David Douglas, 1904-1914 (9 volumes).
15. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "telephone conversation, 16 November
2005," re: (1) identification by John Ravilious of Agnes, wife
of Sir John de Douglas as Agnes de Graham (Bliss, Papal Letters),
(2) identification of Helen of Strathearn, wife of Sir David de
Graham, (3) conjectured pedigree of de Montfichet, relationship
to Abernethy of that Ilk (conjectured) and Drummond and Cunyngham
descents, (4) Alice de Fenton, wife of Sir Henry de Sinclair, as
possibly dau. of Sir William de Fenton and Cecilia Bisset, and
other matters, notes, library of John P. Ravilious.
16. G. W. S. Barrow, "Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of
Scotland," Edinburgh University Press, 1976 (2nd ed.).
17. Andrew Stuart, "Genealogical History of the Stewarts," : from
the earliest period of their authentic history to the present
times, London: Printed for A. Strahan, and T. Cadell Jun. and W.
Davies, in the Strand, 1798, .pdf image files provided by
Genealogy.com www.genealogy.com, includes texts of
dispensations relevant to the Stewart family.
18. W. H. Bliss, ed., "Calendar of Entries in the Papal Registers
Relating to Great Britain and Ireland," Papal Letters, Vol. II
(A.D. 1305 - 1342), London: for the Public Record Office, 1895,
(reprinted 1971, Kraus-Thomson, Liechtenstein).
19. John P. Ravilious, "The Ancestry of Mary Abernethy: a Menteith
Connection ?," 5 Dec 2003, cites dispensations involving the
Abernethy and Lindsay families, and others,
soc.genealogy.medieval, email the...@aol.com.
20. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "telephone conversation, 14 November
2006," re: (1) identification (proof) of Margaret,wife of Sir
Alexander Abernethy as dau. of Alexander, Earl of Menteith,
(2) Sir William Lindsay as 2nd husband of Marjory, C of Buchan,
(3) identity of 4th daughter of Neil, Earl of Carrick,
(4) problem with descent of Earls of Ross (confirmed in disp of
1319 according to John Ravilious), and other matters, notes,
library of John P. Ravilious.
21. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "telephone conversation, 19 October 2005,"
re: (1) explanation(s) for dispensation for George Campbell of
Loudoun and Elizabeth Stewart, (2) also re: 1439 dispensation
for George Campbell of Loudoun and Agnes Montgomery, widow of
Robert Cunningham, and other matters, notes, library of John P.
Ravilious.
22. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, "telephone conversation, 19 October 2005,"
re: (1) explanation(s) for dispensation for George Campbell of
Loudoun and Elizabeth Stewart, (2) also re: 1439 dispensation
for George Campbell of Loudoun and Agnes Montgomery, widow of
Robert Cunningham, and other matters, notes, library of John
P. Ravilious.
23. Sir William Dugdale, "Monasticon Anglicanum," London: Harding &
Lepard; and Longman Rees... Green, 1830, Vol. VI, Pt. 1 - Austin
Abbey of Wigmore, in Herefordshire, pp. 348-356 [Fundationis et
Fundatorum Historia], Vol. VI, Pt. 2 - Priory of Bullington,
co. Lincs., pp. 951-954, URL
http://monasticmatrix.usc.edu/bibliographia/index.php?function=detail&id=2659.

24. John Denton of Cardew, An Accompt of the Most Considerable


Estates and Families in the County of Cumberland (Kendal:
T. Wilson, 1887), Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian

and Archaeological Society Tract Series No. 2.
25. Charles B. Watson, Roll of Edinburgh Burgesses and Guild-Brethren
(Edinburgh: J. Skinner & Co., 1929), p. 117. URL:

http://scotsfind.org/burgesses_access/burgesses.pdf

26. James Wilson, A History of the County of Cumberland
(Westminster: Archibald Constable and Co., Ltd.),
Victoria History of the Counties of England series.


* John P. Ravilious

WJho...@aol.com

unread,
Feb 1, 2007, 4:58:44 PM2/1/07
to gen-me...@rootsweb.com
In a message dated 2/1/07 11:55:47 AM Pacific Standard Time, the...@aol.com
writes:

<< heir of his mother, 'still a minor' in Sept. 1304 [SP I:221[14]] >>

Does anyone have the text of what this citation says?
I'd like to know more particularly why they think he is still a minor.
Thanks
Will

Tim Powys-Lybbe

unread,
Feb 2, 2007, 1:45:43 PM2/2/07
to

Can't see anything relevant on that page but it is about events and
people from 1508 to 1858. Can you say who 'he' is and who his mother
might have been?

And I can't see what '[14]' might refer to in the reference.

--
Tim Powys-Lybbe                                          t...@powys.org
             For a miscellany of bygones: http://powys.org/

WJho...@aol.com

unread,
Feb 2, 2007, 7:47:54 PM2/2/07
to t...@powys.org, gen-me...@rootsweb.com
In a message dated 2/2/07 10:59:01 AM Pacific Standard Time, t...@powys.org
writes:

<< > << heir of his mother, 'still a minor' in Sept. 1304 [SP I:221[14]] >>
>
> Does anyone have the text of what this citation says?
> I'd like to know more particularly why they think he is still a minor. >>

Sorry Tim, a more full question should have been
It has been said that Alexander Stewart of Bonkil
(later Lord of Dreghorn)
and son of Sir John Stewart by Margaret the heiress of Bonkil
was (Alexander) "still a minor Sep 1304"
and this statement was cited to SP I:221

Does anyone have that text that might support this statement? I'd like to
see why they believe he was a minor.
Thanks
Will Johnson

The...@aol.com

unread,
Feb 2, 2007, 10:54:59 PM2/2/07
to GEN-ME...@rootsweb.com, t...@powys.org
Friday, 2 February, 2007


Dear Will, Tim, et al.,

Apologies for a typo in an early post, which caused an
evident wild goose (or cite) chase. The reference in question
should have been typed "SP II:221", not "SP I:221".

SP II:221, in re: Sir David de Brechin, states:

' Sir David was twice married. His first wife was
Margaret, daughter and heiress of Sir Alexander
of Bonkill, and widow of Sir John Stewart, called
of Bonkill, who was killed at Falkirk in 1298.
This is proved by the precept to restore her lands
in July 1304, already cited, and also by a document
referred to by Mr. Bain. From an inquiry made by
the Bishop of Carlisle as to a disputed patronage
of the church of Uldale which had belonged to her,
it appears she died about September 1304, that
she was twice married, first to John (Stewart),
and secondly, to David Brechin, and had issue
by both. Her heir by John Stewart was still a
minor. '

Validating the above is certainly reasonable. And easier,
when the correct cite is proved. Dispensa mea.

Cheers,

John

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