Surname

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RAUL E REYES

no leída,
20 dic 1998 3:00:0020/12/98
a
Have started tracing my ancestors and have found the following surnames:
Araiza, Bustillos and Tafoya. Would anybody know the origins of these names.
Will appreciate any information/help with them that anyone can give me.
Thank you, Rau...@Prodigy.Net

EBaker3036

no leída,
21 dic 1998 3:00:0021/12/98
a
ARAIZA

The surname Araisa, Araiza, or Araysa, is possible a derivation of Araiz which
is the name of a village in Navarre, and which surname can be traced back to
the early 1500s.

In a study of the top 1,500 surnames in use today among those of Hispanic
origin living in the United States, Araiza ranks 612th. In a survey of the
largest capital cities of Latin America, the surname Araiza was found only in
Mexico City. Mission record entries have been identified for the Araiza
family in California, but no family histories have been written anywhere in
Latin America, or the colonial United States as far as can be determined.

In California, Francisco Araiza, a native of Mexico, was a shop keeper at
Monterey in 1840. In the period of 1842-1845 he was in the employ of Colonel
Te'llez and made some substantial money. He was a militia officer and a judge
from 1844-1845. His wife was a daughter of Captain Segura. Soon after 1846,
Francisco Araiza left his family and went to Mexico. It is not known what
became of him.

There appears to have been another Araisa or Arayza family in Los Angeles
during the 1860s. There are five marriages that took place there during that
time. Rafael Araisa and Dionicia Rami'rez were married in March of 1859. Juan
Jose' Araisa and Dolores Garci'a were married in September of 1863. Petra
Araisa and Roma'n Arozana were married in April of 1866. Antonio Araisa and
Teodora Sa'iz were married in August of 1867. And Guadalupe Araisa and Antonio
Gonza'lez were married in August of 1869. Whether of not these couples were
related has not been determined. Aramayo, Arambel, Arambul, Arambula,
Arambulo, Aramburo, Aramburu, Aramendia, Aran, Arana, appear in the 1980 Census
List of Spanish Surnames of the U.S. Bureau of the Census.

EBaker3036

no leída,
21 dic 1998 3:00:0021/12/98
a
The surname Bustillo, or Bustillos, is French in origin. It is found early in
Vizcaya and Asturias. Villages named Bustillos are located near Valladolid,
Astorga, Leo'n, Santander, Zamora, Burgos, and Palencia.

Alonso Bustillo Salcedo, of Granada, was before the Inquisition of Granada in
1580. Luis Bustillo Herrera, of Vargas, Spain requested the office of
"ministro oficial" in 1743 before the tribunal of Logron~o. Manuel Bustillo de
la Cueva, a priest, native of Penilla, requested the same office at Toledo in
1790.

In a study of the top 1,500 surnames in use today among those of Hispanic

origin living in the United States, Bustillos ranks 684th. In a survey of the
largest capital cities of Latin America, the surname Bustillos is unique to La
Paz, Bolivia.

Several military men named Bustillos have service records on file at
Valladolid, Spain. Jose' Ignacio Bustillos, a first sergeant, was with the
seventh company, fixed infantry battalion of Castille, at Campeche, Mexico in
1796. Juan and Manuel, captain and sub-lieutenant respectively, were with the
Corona infantry in Mexico in 1769. Juan Antonio Bustillo, a lieutenant, was
with the Milicias de Caballeri'a de Montevideo, Uruguay, in 1799.

Family histories have been written for the Bustillos in Mexico, Peru, Uruguay,
New Mexico, and Texas.

In New Mexico, Juan de Paz Bustillos was among the Velasco colonists of 1693.
He was born in Mexico City and married to Manuela Antonia de Alanis. They had
two children, Josefa Antonia, born in Mexico City, and Antonio, actually a
nephew.

In Texas, Joseph Antonio Bustillo y Ceballos, son of Joseph Mondrago'n y
Zeballos, and Rosa de Torres y Guerrero, arrived in San Antonio in 1766 from
Mexico. His family has proliferated in Texas.

EBaker3036

no leída,
21 dic 1998 3:00:0021/12/98
a
TAFOYA

The surname Tafoya has not been studied by Spanish genealogists or family
historians. Its origins are not known at the present time.

In a study of the top 1,500 surnames in use today among those of Hispanic

origin living in the United States, Tafoya ranks 954th.

Family histories have been written for the Tafoyas only in New Mexico, as far
as can be determined.

In New Mexico, Juan de Tafoya and Felipa Jaguada de Ulloa were the parents of
Juan, Cristo'bal, and Antonio who were part of the re-conquest colonizers.
These men each left descendants.

This surname has not been found in any other records used to compile this study
during the colonial Hispanic period in what is today the United States. Its
beginnings in this country appear to be since 1900.

David R. Nimmons

no leída,
21 dic 1998 3:00:0021/12/98
a
Can you tell me about SANTANA and BAUZA (last a accented).

Thank you,
Marilyn
H He
O Offers
P Peace
E Eternal

Visit Marilyn's Celestial Gardens at
http://aon.net/personal/MarilynsCelestialGardens

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http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Woods/1008/christia.html
All proceeds from sales go to Piedmont Women's Center

RAUL E REYES

no leída,
21 dic 1998 3:00:0021/12/98
a
Thank you for your reponse(EB3036 12-21-98) to my Message. To continue
tracking my roots also need information on surname "Reyes" and "Romero".
Will appreciate any information/help that anyone can give me. Thank you,
Rau...@Prodigy.Net
RAUL E REYES <RAU...@PRODIGY.NET> wrote in message
news:75ke8s$1he0$1...@newssvr04-int.news.prodigy.com...

EBaker3036

no leída,
22 dic 1998 3:00:0022/12/98
a
My surname is Santana too
I got the info.from Hispanic Roots ONLINE
SANTANA

The surnames Santa Ana, Santa Anna, and Santana may, in fact, have different
origins in Spain, but for the purposes of this study they have been linked
together.

Family histories have been identified for the Santanas in Chile and Mexico.
The Chilean family is from Arica in the north, and are identified in Familias
Coloniales de la Ciudad de San Marcos de Arica, published by Juan Luis Espejo.
In an article published in the Anuario of the Academia de Genealogi'a y
Hera'ldica "Mota Padilla" entitled "Desenvolvimiento de la familia Santa Ana,"
Gabriel Agraz studies this family in Mexico.

In the manuscript collection of the Archivo Histo'rico del Museo de la Casa de
Morelos in Morelia, Michoaca'n, Mexico, in Section I, Bundle 1 (FHL film
779042, item 3), is the genealogy of Don Jose' Manuel de Santa Ana, son of
alderman (regidor) Don Juan Antonio de Santa Ana and Don~a Rosalia Rangel.
Juan Antonio was the son of Don Antonio de Santa Ana and Don~a Mari'a Josefa
Enrri'quez de Rivera, the grandson of Don Clemente de Santa Ana, Don~a Marcela
de Mata, Don Agusti'n Enrri'quez de Rivera and Don~a Paula de Trinidad. This
genealogy is fairly extensive in the others lineages as well, and dates from
the 1500s.

In the United States, Santana is the 106th most popular surname among modern
Hispanic families.

In early California there was a Santa Ana soldier at Santa Barbara in 1824. He
is the only individual with this surname identified in the Hispanic regions
during the colonial period. In Mexico there were Santana and Santa Ana
families scattered throughout the country, particularly at Saltillo in
Coahuila, Jalapa in Veracruz, Chalco in Mexico, Calimayo in Guanajuato, the
Federal District, Cuernavaca in Morelos, Puebla in Puebla, and San Pablo
Atlazalpan in Mexico.

The most famous of the Santa Ana's of course is Antonio Lo'pez de Santa Anna,
of Mexican nobility. In the fight to develop a commonwealth under the Spanish
crown, and because of Spain's intransigence to this idea, Santa Anna, from
Veracruz, proposed that "Spain is so detested that everyone would prefer to be
governed by the Moors rather than return to the Spanish yoke." He became one
of the conspirators that established the ill-fated empire of Iturbide from May
1822 to March 1823. He would later, fight for a republic, becoming famous at
the Alamo in Texas, and served as president of the new Mexican nation.

David R. Nimmons

no leída,
22 dic 1998 3:00:0022/12/98
a
Thank you for the information on SANTANA. Do you have any information on
the SANTANA's from Puerto Rico? My father was named Juan Antonio Santana.
He was born in Puerto Rico.

Muchas Gracias,

EBaker3036

no leída,
23 dic 1998 3:00:0023/12/98
a
REYES/DE LOS REYES

Reyes or de los Reyes is claimed by the bishop of Orense, Don Servando, to
originate with Clemente Reyes, from a noble Roman family around the year 230
A.D., father of the Santa Clara Regina. Other historians present as the
progenitor of this surname Gonzalo de Reyes, in the year 611, Lord of the house
and castle of Bocirios in Chantada, Lugo. From these beginnings, or others,
the surname is later found in Leo'n, elsewhere in Galicia, both Castilles,
Andaluci'a, and Murcia.

The surname Reyes or its derivation de los Reyes is the 22nd most popular
surname in the United States among all Hispanic groups. There does not appear
to be any one country where it is more prevalent.

There were many Reyes families in colonial Alta California. Antonio Faustino
Reyes, son of Juan Francisco Reyes and Mari'a del Carmen Domi'nguez, was born
in 1785 at Monterey, married in 1816 at San Gabriel, and died sometime before
1844. He and his wife Mari'a Clara Cota, had five children: Mari'a Inocencia,
Antonio Mari'a, Mari'a Petra Canuta, Facundo or Secundino, and Ygnacio. Jose'
Zeferino Reyes, a brother of Antonio Faustino, was born in 1805 at Los Angeles.
He married Mari'a Encarnacio'n Duarte and they had ten children.

In Santa Cruz, Arizona, in 1831, Dolores Reyes was the wife of Pedro Michelena;
Joaquina Reyes was the wife of Jose' Montan~o; Viviana Reyes was the wife of
Jose' Verdugo, and there were two adult males: Jose' Antonio Reyes and
Francisco Reyes, both civilians. The last two wives belonged to military men.

There were at least 26 Reyes or de los Reyes that lived in colonial Texas.
Among them were Alfonso Reyes and his wife Mari'a de los Santos in 1790.
Felis de los Reyes, was a cowboy in 1790 at La Bahi'a, living alone. The
priest of the mission in La Bahi'a at this time was Jose' Mariano Reyes. Juan
Antonio de los Reyes was an Indian servant, unmarried, also at La Bahi'a.
Jose' Reyes, age 28, was living in the household of Don Antonio Baca in 1790.
His race was coyote. In 1792 at San Fernando de Austria there was another
Jose' Reyes, a mulatto, single, and a native of the village. Possibly his
sister, was Juana Reyes, also mulatto, age 37, married to Manuel Barelas, a
mulatto of New Mexico. They had one daughter.

In Nuestra Sen~ora del Pilar de los Adaes, the Spanish capital of colonial
Texas from 1721 to 1773, the latter year brought the order to abandon that
presidio and settlement, leave behind homes and land, and move to Be'xar (now
San Antonio) The citizens that stayed in San Antonio petitioned the attorney
general of the commandancy to allow them to return to their homes. They were
not allowed to reestablish themselves at Los Adaes, but were permitted to move
to Nacogdoches, nearby. Among this list of petitioners were Juan de los Reyes,
Jose' de los Reyes, and Juan Antonio de los Reyes.

No Reyes have been identified in Colorado, New Mexico, Louisiana or Florida.

EBaker3036

no leída,
23 dic 1998 3:00:0023/12/98
a
According to Spanish genealogists, the surnames Romero, Romeo and Romeu all
belong to the same lineage. Its origins appear to be in Galicia and Aragon,
extending from there to Valencia, Catalun~a, Andalucia, both Castilles, and the
Canary Islands.

Romero is the 29th most popular surname in the United States among all Hispanic
groups. It seems to be widely spread throughout all Latin American countries.

In early California, Francisca Romero was the wife of Jose Ramon Bojorquez.
They were from Villa de Sinaloa, Mexico, and lived at the presidio of San
Francisco. They had three children. Jose Romero was a soldier of the San
Francisco company from 1819-1822. He married Maria Garcia. They lived in San
Jose and had Teodosia, Estefana, Garcia, Jose, Lovribano and Poliarno as
children. Another Jose Romero lived at San Isidro ranch near Monterey, was
married to Paula Cantua, and had Jose, Aguilino, Maria, Francisco and Juan as
children between 1829-1835.

In 1820 at Tucson, Arizona there were five Romero: Juana, Baptista, Jose, Rita
and Antonia. In 1831 in Tucson, there were twenty-two individuals carrying the
surname in at least eight households. There were also six at Tubac and seven at
Santa Cruz, making it the most popular surname in the region during that
period.

In New Mexico, Bartolome Romero arrived in 1598. He was a native of Spain, near
Toledo. He married Lucia Lopez and they had Bartolome, Matias, Agustin, Ana,
and Maria. Their genealogy has been extensively researched and can be traced
over eleven generations down to the present.

From another family was Alonso Romero, a servant at the hacienda of Felipe
Romero at Sevilleta. His real name was Alonso Cadimo. He married Maria de Tapia
and they had at least Diego and Maria. Francisco Xavier Romero, a native of
Mexico City, the son of Matias Romero and Andrea de la Cruz, arrived in New
Mexico in 1693. He married Maria de la Cruz and moved to Santa Cruz where he
was a shoemaker and also practiced medicine. In 1715 he was tried for killing
someone's ox, and exiled to Albuquerque, but returned after a petition from the
local populous. He had six legitimate children and two natural-born ones. In
1728 he was convicted of soliciting a young male patient.

In Nuestra Sen~ora del Pilar de los Adaes, the Spanish capital of colonial
Texas from 1721 to 1773, the latter year brought the order to abandon that

presidio and settlement, leave behind homes and land, and move to Bexar (now


San Antonio) The citizens that stayed in San Antonio petitioned the attorney
general of the commandancy to allow them to return to their homes. They were
not allowed to reestablish themselves at Los Adaes, but were permitted to move

to Nacogdoches, nearby. Among this list of petitioners was Francisco Romero.

EBaker3036

no leída,
23 dic 1998 3:00:0023/12/98
a
my gr grandfather was also Antonio Santana but from Mexico
EBaker

Calvin and Judy Ingram

no leída,
23 dic 1998 3:00:0023/12/98
a
Hello,
We have Romero in our family. write back soon.
from:
Mrs. Judy Ingram (maiden name is Martinez)
cin...@inficad.com
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