What is the German equivalent of James?

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Robert Melson

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Mar 18, 2007, 11:31:52 PM3/18/07
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Color me dumb. I've been looking into something else and
the question arose: English James is what in German?

Thanks,

Bob Melson


--
Robert G. Melson | Rio Grande MicroSolutions | El Paso, Texas
-----
"People unfit for freedom---who cannot do much with it---are
hungry for power." ---Eric Hoffer

W. Fred Rump

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Mar 18, 2007, 11:41:38 PM3/18/07
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Jakob

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Robert Melson

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Mar 18, 2007, 11:56:39 PM3/18/07
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In article <mailman.333.11742...@rootsweb.com>,

"W. Fred Rump" <fred...@gmail.com> writes:
> Jakob
>
> On 3/18/07, Robert Melson <mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net> wrote:
>> Color me dumb. I've been looking into something else and
>> the question arose: English James is what in German?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Bob Melson

And I'd've known that had I consulted my pocket Langenscheidt.
Doh! Another lesson in humility!

Thanks, Fred.

JeeL

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Mar 19, 2007, 7:22:26 AM3/19/07
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In Holland next to Germany is the name Jacob translated to english
James.
Jaap sun of Jacob Luijerink.

"Robert Melson" <mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net> schreef in bericht
news:IunLh.129004$_73....@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...

Guybrush Threepwood

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Mar 19, 2007, 8:12:04 AM3/19/07
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It is Jacob or Jakob. For example St. James is St. Jakob in german.

--

Gruß Guybrush


"Robert Melson" <mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:IunLh.129004$_73....@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...

William Bojanowski

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Mar 19, 2007, 11:34:51 AM3/19/07
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In article <XRnLh.129008$_73.9...@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net (Robert Melson) wrote:

> In article <mailman.333.11742...@rootsweb.com>,
> "W. Fred Rump" <fred...@gmail.com> writes:
> > Jakob
> >
> > On 3/18/07, Robert Melson <mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net> wrote:
> >> Color me dumb. I've been looking into something else and
> >> the question arose: English James is what in German?
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >>
> >> Bob Melson
>
> And I'd've known that had I consulted my pocket Langenscheidt.
> Doh! Another lesson in humility!
>
> Thanks, Fred.
>
> Bob Melson

Is this the same for Latin, also? James=Jacob?

Thanks
Boj

W. Fred Rump

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Mar 19, 2007, 1:10:17 PM3/19/07
to gen...@rootsweb.com
Jacobus is the Latin version

manaia alofa

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Mar 19, 2007, 11:53:57 AM3/19/07
to gen...@rootsweb.com
Hello All:


This has been quite interesting for me.

I've been researching on the island of (Western)Samoa
especially the forename "James" sometime now.

Seeing as how there is no letter "J" in the Samoan
language I'd never thought to find "James" another way
- till now.

"Thank You"

In Samoa Simi = Jimmy or James. Now my search has
expanded. (pronounced Simi = CEE-mee.)

<G>

I'd also forgotten Samoa was once German Samoa
(1900-1914).
....

Good topic and Good Hunting.

Regards,
--Manaia

........


--- William Bojanowski <bojan...@charter.net>
wrote:

> In article
>
<XRnLh.129008$_73.9...@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
> mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net (Robert Melson) wrote:
>
> > In article
> <mailman.333.11742...@rootsweb.com>,
> > "W. Fred Rump" <fred...@gmail.com> writes:
> > > Jakob
> > >
> > > On 3/18/07, Robert Melson
> <mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net> wrote:
> > >> Color me dumb. I've been looking into
> something else and
> > >> the question arose: English James is what in
> German?
> > >>
> > >> Thanks,
> > >>
> > >> Bob Melson



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billp49

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Mar 20, 2007, 1:32:47 AM3/20/07
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On Mon, 19 Mar 2007 03:31:52 GMT, mel...@aragorn.rgmhome.net (Robert
Melson) wrote:

>Color me dumb. I've been looking into something else and
>the question arose: English James is what in German?
>
>Thanks,
>
>Bob Melson

James in German is Joachim

Traugott Vitz

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Mar 20, 2007, 8:16:01 AM3/20/07
to
billp49 schrieb:

> James in German is Joachim

Never!

1) The supporters of the Scottish kings/pretenders by the name of James
are called "Jacobites". Ask yourself why...
2) IF in German history books the names of the Scottish kings are
translated, "James" translates to "Jakob".
3) In the New Testament, the letter of St. James features as
"Jakobusbrief" in the German edition.
4) "Joachim" exists as a male given name in English and German. It has
nothing whatsoever to do with James/Jakob. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim

Traugott

James A. Doemer

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Mar 20, 2007, 10:23:24 PM3/20/07
to
In News etoj7h$tb9$00$1...@news.t-online.com,, Traugott Vitz at
traugo...@t-online.de, typed this:

Interesting... Now, about the pronunciation, how is Jakob pronounced in
German? Is it with the English "Y" sound, as in Ja (Yah), or with the the
typical English "J" sound? I'm not explaining that well, I guess I'm
asking if it is pronounced Yakob, instead of Jakob...

Mona

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Mar 20, 2007, 10:46:36 PM3/20/07
to gen...@rootsweb.com
James A. Doemer wrote:
> Interesting... Now, about the pronunciation, how is Jakob pronounced in
> German? Is it with the English "Y" sound, as in Ja (Yah), or with the the
> typical English "J" sound? I'm not explaining that well, I guess I'm
> asking if it is pronounced Yakob, instead of Jakob...
>

Of course. The Germans always pronounce J as a Y.

Mona
--
Mona Houser
Herita...@sandyview.info
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~monajo/

billp49

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Mar 21, 2007, 1:27:43 AM3/21/07
to
On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 13:16:01 +0100, Traugott Vitz
<traugo...@t-online.de> wrote:

>billp49 schrieb:
>> James in German is Joachim
>
>Never!
>

>4) "Joachim" exists as a male given name in English and German. It has

>nothing whatsoever to do with James/Jakob. See
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim
>
>Traugott

My German relatives who were named Joachim used James in the U.S.

Traugott Vitz

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Mar 21, 2007, 3:16:20 AM3/21/07
to billp49
billp49 schrieb:

> My German relatives who were named Joachim used James in the U.S.
I can very well understand that. "Joachim" is, after all, less frequent
than "James" in an English speaking surrounding. So it makes sense to
change the less frequent name to a more common one. They probably were
bored with the frequent question "how do you spell your name?".
Nevertheless: They did not chose the exact English equivalent (which
was, in this case, exactly the same) but a similar name with the same
initial.
Other immigrants were more radical: I know of a German lady who was
baptized "Josefine", known as "Finchen", and changed her name to "Gloria"...

Traugott

James A. Doemer

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Mar 21, 2007, 7:34:23 PM3/21/07
to
In News mailman.423.11744...@rootsweb.com,, Mona at
Herita...@Sandyview.info, typed this:

> James A. Doemer wrote:
>> Interesting... Now, about the pronunciation, how is Jakob
>> pronounced in German? Is it with the English "Y" sound, as in Ja
>> (Yah), or with the the typical English "J" sound? I'm not
>> explaining that well, I guess I'm asking if it is pronounced Yakob,
>> instead of Jakob...
>
> Of course. The Germans always pronounce J as a Y.
>
> Mona

That's what I thought, thanks!


Jim Eggert

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Mar 21, 2007, 10:14:13 PM3/21/07
to gen...@rootsweb.com
On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 at 21:46:36 -0500, Mona
<Herita...@Sandyview.info> wrote:

> The Germans always pronounce J as a Y.

Well, almost always. Words borrowed from French are often pronounced
with J as the French J sound: die Jalousie, der Jeton, der
Jongleur. And words borrowed from English are often pronounced with
J as the English J sound: der Jazz, der Joker, das Jam.

I still remember the time when my high school German teacher (in
America) pronounced Jazzplatte as if it were to be read as a totally
German word (Yatsplatteh), and the laugh it induced in the Austrian
exchange student in class.

=Jim

Joan Lowrey

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Mar 21, 2007, 10:55:40 PM3/21/07
to gen...@rootsweb.com
Those "J' words seem to be of more recent origin, and more Germans
are speaking English now.

My mother told me that when I was born, her grandmother, who was born
in the Pfalz, said (note that I have an older cousin, Jean), "Chean!
Choan! Was ist diss "Chay" business?" She didn't like it because she
couldn't pronounce our English "J" sounds!

Joan Neumann Lowrey
California

phpe...@gmail.com

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Aug 24, 2019, 9:19:05 PM8/24/19
to
Bullshit. In no place in the english speaking world is Joachim considered an english expression of the name james. In fact , Joachim, which is derived from the hebrew Yehoyaqim or “ born from Yahweh, has no English equivalent. Nothing worse than internet experts with no clue.

Bernd J. Kaup

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Aug 26, 2019, 10:18:02 AM8/26/19
to
Am 25.08.2019 um 03:19 schrieb phpe...@gmail.com:
> Bullshit. In no place in the english speaking world is Joachim considered an english expression of the name james. In fact , Joachim, which is derived from the hebrew Yehoyaqim or “ born from Yahweh, has no English equivalent. Nothing worse than internet experts with no clue.
>
gmailer, your other name is slowpoke, you needed more than 12 years to
spread your wisdom over those "without clue".
We really waited for a newborn child to enhance our knowlegde.
mfg
bjk

Bernd Niemann

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Aug 26, 2019, 1:23:13 PM8/26/19
to
Hello!

Am 26.08.2019 um 16:10 schrieb Bernd J. Kaup:

> We really waited for a newborn child to enhance our knowlegde.

You made my day! *beg*

Gruß
Bernd Niemann

Ralf Lehmeier

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Aug 27, 2019, 9:38:18 AM8/27/19
to
phpe...@gmail.com schrieb:
> Bullshit. In no place in the english speaking world is Joachim considered an english expression of the name james. In fact , Joachim, which is derived from the hebrew Yehoyaqim or “ born from Yahweh, has no English equivalent. Nothing worse than internet experts with no clue.
>

James => Jakob

https://www.vorname.com/suche.html?q=James

bernd....@gmail.com

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Jun 7, 2020, 10:17:58 AM6/7/20
to
On Monday, March 19, 2007 at 10:53:57 AM UTC-5, manaia alofa wrote:
> Hello All:
>
>
> This has been quite interesting for me.
>
> I've been researching on the island of (Western)Samoa
> especially the forename "James" sometime now.
>
> Seeing as how there is no letter "J" in the Samoan
> language I'd never thought to find "James" another way

JAKOBUS

James

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Jul 31, 2021, 10:20:08 PM7/31/21
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