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RichD

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Jul 22, 2007, 1:50:08 AM7/22/07
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Where does wasabi come from?

What is the ginger for?

What are recommended wines with sushi?

--
Rich

notbob

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Jul 22, 2007, 1:57:38 AM7/22/07
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On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Where does wasabi come from?

The wasabi root.

> What is the ginger for?

To cleanse the palate between bites.

> What are recommended wines with sushi?

Saki.

nb

> --
> Rich
>

AyTee

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Jul 22, 2007, 2:26:09 AM7/22/07
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On Jul 21, 10:57 pm, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:

> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_delaney2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Where does wasabi come from?
>
> The wasabi root.
>
> > What is the ginger for?
>
> To cleanse the palate between bites.
>
> > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> Saki.
>
> nb
>
> > --
> > Rich

Sparkling wines can work pretty well with sushi. I like sushi with
Marlborough sauvignon. Sake is probably more traditional, but I know
little about it, except that sake is not really wine -- more related
to beer. Come to think of it, beer goes great with sushi.

Andy

bitter anko

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Jul 22, 2007, 2:49:53 AM7/22/07
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On 7 22 , 2:57, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:

> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_delaney2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> > Where does wasabi come from?
>
> The wasabi root.
>
> > What is the ginger for?
>
> To cleanse the palate between bites.
>
> > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> Saki.
>
> nb
>
>
>
> > --
> > Rich- -
>
> - -


Sake or some good white wine.
Try Daiginjo.
http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=daiginjo&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi

It's slightly expensive but it's better.

bitter anko

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Jul 22, 2007, 2:57:39 AM7/22/07
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The Gari ginger is for refreshing one's mouth. It removes the taste of
stuff you ate before, then makes you ready for other stuff. It's like
eatable ginger ale.

Paul M. Cook

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Jul 22, 2007, 3:22:45 AM7/22/07
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"notbob" <not...@nothome.com> wrote in message
news:kc6dnahdZMtPbD_b...@comcast.com...

> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Where does wasabi come from?
>
> The wasabi root.

It's horseradish. Also called daikon radish.

>> What is the ginger for?
>
> To cleanse the palate between bites.

It is also a digestive and settles the stomach.

>> What are recommended wines with sushi?

> Saki.

Sake, I do believe. I prefer beer with sushi. The two are a perfect match.
A nice dry beer, like a high adjunct Japanese beer is the best.

Paul


Steve Kramer

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Jul 22, 2007, 4:30:59 AM7/22/07
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RichD wrote:
> Where does wasabi come from?

In the US, the stork brings it. In the UK it's found under a cabbage leaf.

> What is the ginger for?

Fred.

> What are recommended wines with sushi?

Honeyyyyy, when are we going to Florrridaaaa?

Wasabi is a small root grown in very cool wet environments. Until
recently, it was only grown in Japan and Korea, but about 10-15 years
ago a northern California farmer was able to commercially grow wasabi in
the US.

Ginger is used for four purposes; to cleanse the pallet between
different flavors of sushi, as a vegetable eaten along with sushi, as a
flavoring in cooking, and.... get ready for this... as a great way to
prevent motion sickness!! (sea sickness, car sickness, air, etc.,) Even
ginger snaps work, as does ginger ale, and crystallized ginger candy.
Many people undergoing chemotherapy are now using ginger to prevent the
associated nausea!

While sake is the traditional wine, many people prefer a dark beer. The
sake can be drunk warm or cold depending upon the season. The beer is
best served cold.


Steve Kramer
"PhotoEnvisions" Photography
Chiang Mai, Thailand
http://www.photoenvisions.com

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Jose

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Jul 22, 2007, 9:24:03 AM7/22/07
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I have found that beer works very well with sushi, as does saki. No
surprise there. However, I also found a zinfandel that was so spicy as
to be (IMHO) borderline defective, worked extremely well and stood up to
the wasabi. IIRC it was the 1997 Lolonis Zinfandel - great with Maguro
(sushi tuna), hot Italian sausage, and other very spicy foods, but
overpowers anything else.

Jose
--
You can choose whom to befriend, but you cannot choose whom to love.
for Email, make the obvious change in the address.

Dave Fossett

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Jul 22, 2007, 9:41:51 AM7/22/07
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"Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

> "notbob" <not...@nothome.com> wrote in message
> news:kc6dnahdZMtPbD_b...@comcast.com...
>> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> Where does wasabi come from?
>>
>> The wasabi root.
>
> It's horseradish. Also called daikon radish.

Wasabi, horseradish, and daikon are three entirely different things,
although wasabi and horseradish do taste very similar (which is why
horseradish is often referred to as "Western wasabi" in Japanese and wasabi
is referred to as "Japanese horseradish" in English).


--
Dave Fossett
Saitama, Japan

James Silverton

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Jul 22, 2007, 10:10:21 AM7/22/07
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Paul wrote on Sun, 22 Jul 2007 07:22:45 GMT:


PMC> "notbob" <not...@nothome.com> wrote in message
PMC> news:kc6dnahdZMtPbD_b...@comcast.com...
??>> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
??>>> Where does wasabi come from?
??>>
??>> The wasabi root.

PMC> It's horseradish. Also called daikon radish.

??>>> What is the ginger for?
??>>
??>> To cleanse the palate between bites.

PMC> It is also a digestive and settles the stomach.

??>>> What are recommended wines with sushi?

??>> Saki.

PMC> Sake, I do believe. I prefer beer with sushi. The two
PMC> are a perfect match. A nice dry beer, like a high adjunct
PMC> Japanese beer is the best.

First let me say that I like beer with sushi. Practically any
non-sweet beer will do but my preference is for Japanese beers,
particularly the "dry" ones. I believe Japanese do drink beer
with sushi but I think tea is more usual or even water. I prefer
to drink *cold* sake before eating and, again, I believe this is
the Japanese custom.

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

E-mail, with obvious alterations:
not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

Kyle

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Jul 22, 2007, 11:27:33 AM7/22/07
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On Jul 22, 12:50 am, RichD <r_delaney2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Where does wasabi come from?

Japanese horseradish.

> What is the ginger for?

It's a palate cleanser.

> What are recommended wines with sushi?

It's better with beer or sake, IMO.


Kyle

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Jul 22, 2007, 11:29:12 AM7/22/07
to

I agree about beer & sushi. Yes, Sake is more of a beer than a wine
in that it's fermented from grains rather than grapes. It's stronger
than a typical beer and it's not seasoned w/ hops.


Chairman Mao says:

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Jul 22, 2007, 11:52:03 AM7/22/07
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Anglo-Saxon's enjoy Sushi and a cute JP girl.

"bitter anko" <kaz...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1185087459....@d30g2000prg.googlegroups.com...

Ken Blake

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Jul 22, 2007, 1:12:41 PM7/22/07
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On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 00:57:38 -0500, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:

> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > Where does wasabi come from?
>
> The wasabi root.


Actually, most "wasabi" you get in sushi bars is really just
horseradish and green food coloring. Real wasabi is very expensive.
Some high-class sushi bars have it, but you have to ask for it, and be
prepared to pay a significant amount of extra money, perhaps as much
as $25US.


> > What is the ginger for?
>
> To cleanse the palate between bites.
>
> > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> Saki.


Three points:

1. It's spelled "sake," with an "e" at the end.

2. Because it's made from rice (a grain), not fruit, sake is actually
an uncarbonated *beer*, not a wine at all.

3. Traditionally, sake is drunk with sashimi, but never with sushi.
The Japanese feel that sake with sushi is rice with rice, and don't go
together.

I normally drink either tea or beer with sushi (both are traditional),
but I've occasionally had it with wine. I think a crisp white wine,
like a sauvignon blanc, works.

But untraditional as it may be, I don't mind sake with sushi either.

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup

-bwg

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Jul 22, 2007, 1:27:26 PM7/22/07
to

My favorite is shots of ice cold vodka.

-bwg

James Silverton

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Jul 22, 2007, 2:47:11 PM7/22/07
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Ken wrote on Sun, 22 Jul 2007 10:12:41 -0700:

??>> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
??>>> Where does wasabi come from?
??>>
??>> The wasabi root.

KB> Actually, most "wasabi" you get in sushi bars is really
KB> just horseradish and green food coloring. Real wasabi is
KB> very expensive. Some high-class sushi bars have it, but you
KB> have to ask for it, and be prepared to pay a significant
KB> amount of extra money, perhaps as much as $25US.

My normal reference for all "spices" is Gernot Katter. His
article on wasabi is
http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Wasa_jap.html
It is a bit of a stretch to call wasabi a spice but anyway! One
or two interesting things are that it *is* diffficult to grow
(even if virgins in kimonos are not essential) and consequently
the real thing is expensive. Nothing disagrees with what you say
but the page makes interesting reading.

Nexis

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Jul 22, 2007, 3:39:03 PM7/22/07
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"RichD" <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1185083408.4...@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com...

Real wasabi is a root, also known as Japanese horseradish. Almost all sushi bars,
however, serve imitation wasabi, made from regular horseradish. If you can find real
wasabi, even powdered, you should try it at least once.

The ginger is served to cleanse the palate between different varieties of sushi.

The wine, well, I can't help you there...I don't drink wine :) Alot of people drink
saki with sushi, I myself drink tea, either green or oolong.

kimberly

--
http://one.revver.com/watch/324733/flv/affiliate/99865
"I think that's my bathing suit. Is that one of my bathing suits? That is totally my
bathing suit"

Ken Blake

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Jul 22, 2007, 3:48:26 PM7/22/07
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On Sun, 22 Jul 2007 18:47:11 GMT, "James Silverton"
<not.jim....@verizon.not> wrote:

> Ken wrote on Sun, 22 Jul 2007 10:12:41 -0700:
>
> ??>> On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> ??>>> Where does wasabi come from?
> ??>>
> ??>> The wasabi root.
>
> KB> Actually, most "wasabi" you get in sushi bars is really
> KB> just horseradish and green food coloring. Real wasabi is
> KB> very expensive. Some high-class sushi bars have it, but you
> KB> have to ask for it, and be prepared to pay a significant
> KB> amount of extra money, perhaps as much as $25US.
>
> My normal reference for all "spices" is Gernot Katter. His
> article on wasabi is
> http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Wasa_jap.html
> It is a bit of a stretch to call wasabi a spice but anyway! One
> or two interesting things are that it *is* diffficult to grow
> (even if virgins in kimonos are not essential) and consequently
> the real thing is expensive. Nothing disagrees with what you say
> but the page makes interesting reading.


Yes, it is interesting, thanks.

Paul M. Cook

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Jul 22, 2007, 7:25:30 PM7/22/07
to

"Steve Kramer" <st...@seatraveler.com> wrote in message
news:46a3098d$0$16335$8826...@free.teranews.com...

> RichD wrote:
> > Where does wasabi come from?
>
> In the US, the stork brings it. In the UK it's found under a cabbage leaf.
>
> > What is the ginger for?
>
> Fred.
>
> > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> Honeyyyyy, when are we going to Florrridaaaa?
>
> Wasabi is a small root grown in very cool wet environments. Until
> recently, it was only grown in Japan and Korea, but about 10-15 years
> ago a northern California farmer was able to commercially grow wasabi in
> the US.
>
> Ginger is used for four purposes; to cleanse the pallet between
> different flavors of sushi, as a vegetable eaten along with sushi, as a
> flavoring in cooking, and.... get ready for this... as a great way to
> prevent motion sickness!! (sea sickness, car sickness, air, etc.,) Even
> ginger snaps work, as does ginger ale, and crystallized ginger candy.
> Many people undergoing chemotherapy are now using ginger to prevent the
> associated nausea!
>
> While sake is the traditional wine, many people prefer a dark beer. The
> sake can be drunk warm or cold depending upon the season. The beer is
> best served cold.


If you ever eat too much and get that awful bloat feeling and you wish you
could just purge it all, squeeze some ginger into a glass, a little is all
you need, then add some cold club soda. It really helps settle the stomach
quickly.

Paul


Chairman Mao says:

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Jul 22, 2007, 8:44:41 PM7/22/07
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Any good Anglo-Saxon/Japanese Sushi resteraunts?

What about some type of European wine?

"bitter anko" <kaz...@hotmail.com> wrote in message

news:1185086993....@d30g2000prg.googlegroups.com...

Blair P. Houghton

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:41:05 AM7/23/07
to
RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Where does wasabi come from?

Sushi Chefs' noses.

>What is the ginger for?

Cleaning up after you're done.

>What are recommended wines with sushi?

"MAaaaaaaAAAh! I wanted my own California Roll!"

and

"But it's not COOOKED!"

--Blair

Blair P. Houghton

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:45:13 AM7/23/07
to
notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
>On 2007-07-22, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> Where does wasabi come from?
>
>The wasabi root.

Real wasabi does. But that green paste isn't real
wasabi. It comes from a tub of powdered ground
horseradish with artificial coloring.

>> What is the ginger for?
>
>To cleanse the palate between bites.

And the miso soup is meant to be drunk with
the meal and finished at the end.

>> What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
>Saki.

Sake. The good stuff is served cold.

I've seen Japanese people having white wine or Budweiser
with their sushi. I think the latter was just someone
being polite or adventurous.

--Blair

Blair P. Houghton

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:48:59 AM7/23/07
to
Paul M. Cook <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
>Sake, I do believe. I prefer beer with sushi. The two are a perfect match.
>A nice dry beer, like a high adjunct Japanese beer is the best.

Sake is for sashimi.

Beer is for sushi.

The idea is, since sake is made from rice, you don't
need more rice with the rice in the sushi.

It's picky. Most sushi bars would be just as happy if
you got the Sake Bomber (a small hot sake and a big beer).

I once ordered water, beer, sake, and miso soup, and the
Japanese guy next to me made a comment that informed me
that I'd just ordered four drinks for one meal.

--Blair

ravenlynne

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:52:49 AM7/23/07
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Blair P. Houghton wrote:
> I've seen Japanese people having white wine or Budweiser
> with their sushi. I think the latter was just someone
> being polite or adventurous.
>
> --Blair

Why would you have budweiser when you COULD have Kirin? Or Sapporo? I
guess it's just personal taste.

--
-Gina in Italy

Bimbo of the Death Sun #1

"evil government scientist Dirk Benedict."
- Anim8rFSK

bitter anko

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:54:10 AM7/23/07
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On 7 23 , 9:44, "Chairman Mao says:" <Mao-ze-D...@prc.com> wrote:
> Any good Anglo-Saxon/Japanese Sushi resteraunts?
>
> What about some type of European wine?

"Black cat", German white wine. I like one of those.

bitter anko

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Jul 23, 2007, 1:57:06 AM7/23/07
to
On 7 23 , 12:52, "Chairman Mao says:" <Mao-ze-D...@prc.com> wrote:
> Anglo-Saxon's enjoy Sushi and a cute JP girl.

It doesn't matter whether he is Anklo-Saxon or Anglo-Saxon, a food is
a food.

Potblak

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Jul 23, 2007, 6:55:04 AM7/23/07
to
Wasabi is good old bloody hot Japanese or Asian horseradish.
Australia exports heaps of it to Japan.
Don't ya just love it?

"RichD" <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1185083408.4...@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> Where does wasabi come from?
>
> What is the ginger for?
>
> What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> --
> Rich
>


RichD

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Jul 24, 2007, 4:58:58 AM7/24/07
to
On Jul 22, Steve Kramer <st...@seatraveler.com> wrote:
> > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> Honeyyyyy, when are we going to Florrridaaaa?

Not that kind of JAP...

> Ginger is used for four purposes; to cleanse the pallet between
> different flavors of sushi,

Are you suppose to chew it and spit out,
swallow it, or what?

How come it's never served with any other
cuisine, besides Japanese?

--
Rich

Dave Fossett

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Jul 24, 2007, 5:54:48 AM7/24/07
to
"RichD" <r_dela...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Are you suppose to chew it and spit out,
> swallow it, or what?

Just eat it like anything else. No big deal.

RichD

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Jul 24, 2007, 6:04:24 AM7/24/07
to
On Jul 22, Ken Blake <kbl...@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote:
> 3. Traditionally, sake is drunk with sashimi, but never
> with sushi. The Japanese feel that sake with sushi is rice
> with rice, and don't go together.

By that logic, one wouldn't drink a sweet wine with
a sweet dessert.

--
Rich


ravenlynne

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Jul 24, 2007, 6:42:57 AM7/24/07
to

Not really the same thing.

--
-Gina in Italy

http://www.myspace.com/ravenlynne1975

"I'm a psychopath with super powers and you're my girl!"
- Mr. Hyde, Jekyll.

Dr. Jekyll: Ever killed anyone, Benjamin?
Benjamin: Not personally. I have people.
Dr. Jekyll: You're missing out. It's like sex. Only there's a winner.

Cindy Hamilton

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Jul 24, 2007, 9:41:59 AM7/24/07
to
On Jul 24, 4:58 am, RichD <r_delaney2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Jul 22, Steve Kramer <st...@seatraveler.com> wrote:
>
> > > What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
> > Honeyyyyy, when are we going to Florrridaaaa?
>
> Not that kind of JAP...
>
> > Ginger is used for four purposes; to cleanse the pallet between
> > different flavors of sushi,
>
> Are you suppose to chew it and spit out,
> swallow it, or what?

Chew and swallow it. Think of it as a thinly sliced pickle.
Frankly, when I'm feeling barbaric (and no one is looking),
I lay a slice on top of a piece of California roll and eat it
that way. Of course, California roll is not authentic, so
I don't feel bad about breaking the rules with it.

> How come it's never served with any other
> cuisine, besides Japanese?

Because it's a Japanese condiment.

Cindy Hamilton

Chairman Mao says:

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Jul 24, 2007, 3:38:16 PM7/24/07
to
But wait, there must be some type of hate in food and IJA militancy.

Come on think hard and give me a Classic Anklo IJA militant response.


"bitter anko" <kaz...@hotmail.com> wrote in message

news:1185170226.4...@x40g2000prg.googlegroups.com...

Ken Blake

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Jul 24, 2007, 4:14:43 PM7/24/07
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On Tue, 24 Jul 2007 03:04:24 -0700, RichD <r_dela...@yahoo.com>
wrote:


Although I don't think it's really the same thing at all, I'm not
crazy about the logic either. But traditions tend to have a life of
their own, and often defy logic.

As I think I said earlier, I sometime *do* drink sake with sushi.

Blair P. Houghton

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Jul 27, 2007, 12:43:20 AM7/27/07
to
ravenlynne <raven...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Blair P. Houghton wrote:
>> I've seen Japanese people having white wine or Budweiser
>> with their sushi. I think the latter was just someone
>> being polite or adventurous.
>
>Why would you have budweiser when you COULD have Kirin? Or Sapporo? I
>guess it's just personal taste.

Japanese visitor being culturally deferential in a sushi
bar in America.

Pretty much the same reason you'd have a Tsing-tao in a
Chinese restaurant, even though Tsing-tao is swill.

--Blair

Hunt

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Sep 4, 2007, 10:52:41 PM9/4/07
to
In article <1185083408.4...@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
r_dela...@yahoo.com says...

>
>Where does wasabi come from?
>
>What is the ginger for?
>
>What are recommended wines with sushi?
>
>--
>Rich

Wasabi is basically a Japanese horseradish paste, and the pickled ginger is
often placed atop a dollop of it on some sushi dishes.

For the best match, in my experience, look towards a fruit-driven SB. I like
the Groth Napa, which is readily available and at not too high a price-point.

I'd also quickly consider a Brut Rosé.

Hunt

sf

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Sep 5, 2007, 1:49:21 AM9/5/07
to
On 5 Sep 2007 02:52:41 GMT, no...@hunt.com (Hunt) wrote:

>In article <1185083408.4...@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>r_dela...@yahoo.com says...
>>
>>Where does wasabi come from?
>>
>>What is the ginger for?
>>
>>What are recommended wines with sushi?
>>
>>--
>>Rich
>
>Wasabi is basically a Japanese horseradish paste, and the pickled ginger is
>often placed atop a dollop of it on some sushi dishes.
>
>For the best match, in my experience, look towards a fruit-driven SB.

good choice. The wine lovers term is "fruit forward". Personally,
the cheap wines I like at inexpensive restaurants are Inglenook and
(shade your eyes and stifle that gasp) Carlo Rossi. They are sold as
"house wine", with no brand attribution.

>I like the Groth Napa, which is readily available and at not too high a price-point.

Haven't heard of that winery. It sells for $18 a bottle on their web
site, so it sells for at least double in restaurants. "Sushi" isn't a
meal where I spend a lot of money on wine.


>
>I'd also quickly consider a Brut Rosé.
>

Brute Rosé? You mean Iron Horse? It retails for $50 at the source.
No thanks. Sushi is supposed to be an inexpensive meal. A $50 wine
would be twice what the total for 2 of us is for food.


--

Ham and eggs.
A day's work for the chicken, a lifetime commitment for the pig.

Fred

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Sep 5, 2007, 3:40:17 AM9/5/07
to
sf wrote in news:cresd391k7omt8p3s...@4ax.com:

> Brute Rosé? You mean Iron Horse? It retails for $50 at the source.
> No thanks. Sushi is supposed to be an inexpensive meal. A $50 wine
> would be twice what the total for 2 of us is for food.

You object to paying more for wine than for food? This is not the newsgroup
for you. It was my friend's turn to pay for dinner. The check was about
$100. The wine I brought was over $200. It is far from uncommon for someone
in this group to spend much more on the wine for a meal than the food.

Fred.

Lawrence Leichtman

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Sep 5, 2007, 11:13:22 AM9/5/07