Growing Ume?

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M Schilz

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Oct 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM10/23/98
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After posting to other newsgroups, searching in my local library, as well
as searching online, I am posting my question here because subscribers
here should know what an ume is.

Specifically- I just planted two ume trees for the purpose of raising fruit.
If anyone has any experience in this matter, please email me. Replies
to previous postings were usually in the vein of "But the fruit is inedible!"
Well, it's not, as you and I are aware.

Any information related to the cultivation, care, history, varieties,
breeding, of ume would be greatly appreciated. References in English
would be doubly appreciated.

Fruitfully (I hope)
Michelle Schilz
MSc...@aol.com

Nona Myers

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Oct 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM10/24/98
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I usually get the some replies. I've also planted one ume tree
two seasons ago and hoping for some fruits this year. What two
varieties did you plant and where did you find the trees? I had
to special order mine from a local nursery. Unfortunately it did
not come with variety name.

I am familiar with ume trees having many relatives living in Ome
area of Tokyo famous for their ume trees. From observing their
behavior, it seems to be pruned in the same way as apricot trees.
For some reason, I've always thought that they were self-fertil
but fruiting improved with another ume tree nearby. Since I have
both apricot, plum, and plumcot trees near my ume tree, I am
hoping that mine will fruit.

Some ume trees will only produce very tiny fruits and others will
bear larger fruits. For making ume-shu (plum wine), larger
fruits are preferred and picked when still green. I purchased
ume fruits from my local Japanese market this year and made
ume-shu in June. It's supposed to be drinkable in six months
time, but mine is already sooo good. No comparison with all
those commercial stuff you get here. For making ume-boshi,
fruits can be picked from green stage to when slightly yellow
stage.
--
Nona Myers
(another hapa and foodie)

To learn about hapa: http://www.hapaissuesforum.org/

Reuben Muns

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Oct 25, 1998, 2:00:00 AM10/25/98
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no...@best.com (Nona Myers) wrote:

>I am familiar with ume trees having many relatives living in Ome
>area of Tokyo famous for their ume trees.

Note that the kanji for "Ome" are "ao ume".

Reuben

gary

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Oct 25, 1998, 2:00:00 AM10/25/98
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Nona Myers wrote:

> I purchased
> ume fruits from my local Japanese market this year and made
> ume-shu in June. It's supposed to be drinkable in six months
> time, but mine is already sooo good.

Do you know about ume syrup? You take an equal weight of both ume and Japanese
rock sugar (kakigori) and put them in alternating layers in a glass jar.
Sprinkle just a little "white liquor" over the top to get the juices flowing.
Put on the lid, and when the sugar disolves -- about two weeks -- it's ready.
The ume will shrivel up, having expelled all their juice. To drink, put a
tablespoon or so of the syrup in a glass, top with water, and add ice. Very
refreshing. Depending on the sourness of the ume, you may have to disolve a
little more sugar in the syrup.

For those reading this outside Japan, don't try this with granulated or cube
sugar -- it will crystalize at the bottom of the jar in one solid mass. Rock
solid.

--gary

gary

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Oct 26, 1998, 3:00:00 AM10/26/98
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that idiot gary said:

>Do you know about ume syrup? You take an equal weight of both ume and Japanese
rock sugar (kakigori) and put them in alternating layers in a glass jar.

Japanese rock sugar is actually called "kourizatou" (ice sugar). What a dope.

--gary

Nona Myers

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Oct 26, 1998, 3:00:00 AM10/26/98
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On 25 Oct 1998 17:00:01 -0800, gary <aac5...@pop13.odn.ne.jp>
wrote:

>Do you know about ume syrup? You take an equal weight of both ume and Japanese
>rock sugar (kakigori) and put them in alternating layers in a glass jar.

>Sprinkle just a little "white liquor" over the top to get the juices flowing.
>Put on the lid, and when the sugar disolves -- about two weeks -- it's ready.
>The ume will shrivel up, having expelled all their juice. To drink, put a
>tablespoon or so of the syrup in a glass, top with water, and add ice. Very
>refreshing. Depending on the sourness of the ume, you may have to disolve a
>little more sugar in the syrup.
>

This sounds really good. I will definitely make it next season I
bet it will also be good mixing this with some shiso juice. Or
even with brandy.

>For those reading this outside Japan, don't try this with granulated or cube
>sugar -- it will crystalize at the bottom of the jar in one solid mass. Rock
>solid.
>

Is this from an experience? (duck!)

Shimpei Yamashita

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Oct 26, 1998, 3:00:00 AM10/26/98
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gary <aac5...@pop13.odn.ne.jp> writes:
>
>
>
>Nona Myers wrote:
>
>> I purchased
>> ume fruits from my local Japanese market this year and made
>> ume-shu in June. It's supposed to be drinkable in six months
>> time, but mine is already sooo good.
>
>Do you know about ume syrup? You take an equal weight of both ume and Japanese
>rock sugar (kakigori) and put them in alternating layers in a glass jar.
^^^^^^^^
I think you meant to say "kourizatou." kakigori is shredded ice. Kakigori
and ume in a glass jar just gives you cold ume. :-)

--
Shimpei Yamashita <http://www.submm.caltech.edu/%7Eshimpei/>

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