Re: The knowledge

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Cat(h)

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Jul 29, 2008, 10:05:33 AM7/29/08
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On Jul 29, 2:54 pm, Féachadóir <Féach@d.óir> wrote:
> Former google executives have launched a new search engine.
>
> The website is called Cuil -www.cuil.com- "an old Irish word for
> knowledge", according to its founders.
>
> Cuil is - among other things - the Irish for eagerness, fearsomeness,
> a gnat, a horsefly, a beetle, a bluebottle, and (with the addition of
> a fada) a rear end, a reserve or backup, a corner, and an arse.
>
> The one thing it isn't, according to the four dictionaries I just
> checked, is an old Irish word for knowledge.
>

And a goal in GAA.

Is the search engine any good?

Cat(h)

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Des Higgins

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Jul 31, 2008, 8:51:16 AM7/31/08
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It is different; it certainly ranks differently. From a few quick
tries, I prefer Google on average but it is nice to have a second way
of doing it.
The name is priceless though.
Same word in French? (Cul de Sac; the arse of the bag?)

mothed out

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Jul 31, 2008, 9:00:30 AM7/31/08
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On 31 Jul, 13:41, Féachadóir <Féach@d.óir> wrote:
> Scríobh "Cat(h)" <cathy...@yahoo.com>:
> Cuil is arse. Seehttp://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/07/29/cuil_launch/
>
> The name is one of those horrible American attempts to cash in on All
> Things Irish. According to their Wiki entry, the Irish ancestry of one
> of the founders "sparked the name Cuil, which the company states is
> taken from a series of Celtic folklore stories involving a character
> called Finn McCuill. The company says that Cuil is Irish (Gaelic) for
> knowledge and hazel."
>
> Sweet jeebus.
>
> Right. First off, Finn McCuill is an anglicised spelling. (and a new
> one to me at that, its usually anglicised as McCool). In Irish, his
> name is Fionn Mac Cumhaill, Fionn son of Cumhall. Cumhall (spelled
> cumall according to the DIL*, as the old scribes often omitted the
> séimhiú) means a champion, though Fionn's name may also indicate lowly
> origins, since cumal means slave.
>
> Maybe the idea that Cuil mean knowledge comes from a garbled memory of
> the legend of the Fionn and the Salmon of Knowledge. For a brief
> summary, seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_of_Wisdom.
> This legend also mentions hazel nuts, but the word for hazel is Coll.
>
> [* DIL: Dictionary of the Irish Language, the definitive guide to Old
> and Middle Irish, and which is now available online atwww.dil.ie]
>
> --
> 'Donegal: Up Here It's Different'
> © Féachadóir

How about An Saoirse Engine? That'll appeal to the dumbo plazzer
noraiders.

Cat(h)

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Jul 31, 2008, 10:17:15 AM7/31/08
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On Jul 31, 1:41 pm, Féachadóir <Féach@d.óir> wrote:
> Scríobh "Cat(h)" <cathy...@yahoo.com>:
> Cuil is arse. Seehttp://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/07/29/cuil_launch/
>
> The name is one of those horrible American attempts to cash in on All
> Things Irish. According to their Wiki entry, the Irish ancestry of one
> of the founders "sparked the name Cuil, which the company states is
> taken from a series of Celtic folklore stories involving a character
> called Finn McCuill. The company says that Cuil is Irish (Gaelic) for
> knowledge and hazel."
>
> Sweet jeebus.
>
> Right. First off, Finn McCuill is an anglicised spelling. (and a new
> one to me at that, its usually anglicised as McCool). In Irish, his
> name is Fionn Mac Cumhaill, Fionn son of Cumhall. Cumhall (spelled
> cumall according to the DIL*, as the old scribes often omitted the
> séimhiú) means a champion, though Fionn's name may also indicate lowly
> origins, since cumal means slave.
>
> Maybe the idea that Cuil mean knowledge comes from a garbled memory of
> the legend of the Fionn and the Salmon of Knowledge. For a brief
> summary, seehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_of_Wisdom.
> This legend also mentions hazel nuts, but the word for hazel is Coll.
>
> [* DIL: Dictionary of the Irish Language, the definitive guide to Old
> and Middle Irish, and which is now available online atwww.dil.ie]
>
> --
> 'Donegal:  Up Here It's Different'
> © Féachadóir- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks for this bit of (exceptional here) Irish culture. Most
interesting.
I tried out the search engine with a few things I know well.
The search results, as they come up, look a bit odd to me. I
understand they intended that you would have a far clearer idea of the
website in the result before clicking on any one entry. That seems to
involve including illustrations (photos, or other graphics) as part of
the entry. The trouble is, many of the photos or graphics involved
are actually utterly irrelevant to the website the individual result
is sending you to. That's a hell of a feck-up not to have ironed out
before going live!!
Methinks I'll stick to google.

Cat(h)

Cat(h)

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Jul 31, 2008, 11:10:02 AM7/31/08
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> Same word in French? (Cul de Sac; the arse of the bag?)- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -

Oh, stop. The Beloved and I called our house "Cúl Dara" - behind the
oaks, I am reliably informed - and appropriate to the location. It
gave the froggy rellies limitless titters. You see, when we don't go
about sexing farm animals, us frogs are easily entertained.

Speaking of cul de sac, I remember an earnest Kerryman, many, many
moons ago, who had taken to educating me a bit about Ireland and the
Irish language. He proceeded to tell me that cul de sac was Irish for
dead end. Which in a way, it is.

Cat(h)

bren

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Jul 31, 2008, 11:28:28 AM7/31/08
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In article <01ddb2bc-a901-46fd...@a70g2000hsh.googlegroups.com>,

You have to be careful with naming things in Irish. Back in the days a
prominent member of my home parish of Athea, Kevin Danaher, who at the
time was a high up member of the Irish Folklore Commission, came back
to the home town to give a lecture. Needless to say being a small
rural Irish village there was a big turn out to welcome back the pride
of the town, especially as the topic was folklore and the people there
are steeped in it. Kevin opened the talk with a question for the
audience.

"Do any of ye know how the places in Athea got their names?"

"Oh yes" says one man "the village used to be Rath Ronan named
after..."

"Let me stop you there!" says Kevin, "I'm not talking about the
village, I'm talking about the townlands? No? Well, I'll tell ye. Long
ago, Fionn mac Cumhaill was on his way to a family gathering and he was
carrying his grandmother on his back. As he was proceeding he tried to
jump Sugar Hill, misjudged it, stumbled and fell backwards and his
grandmother broke apart and the places her pieces fell gave the
townlands their names."

Rapt silence greeting this wonderous tale.

"So", Kevin continued, the audience now in the palm of his hand,
"Drom Fhada is named after the length of her back, Coole East and
Coole West the left and right buttock."

Suddenly a hand shot up from the audience.

"Yes Tadey?" says Kevin recognising a local old man.

"What about Poll Dorhca Kevin?"

Tadey was asked to leave the meeting after that.

bren

Doc Aay

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Jul 31, 2008, 12:03:39 PM7/31/08
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"Cat(h)" <cath...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:01ddb2bc-a901-46fd...@a70g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...


Speaking of cul de sac, I remember an earnest Kerryman, many, many
moons ago, who had taken to educating me a bit about Ireland and the
Irish language. He proceeded to tell me that cul de sac was Irish for
dead end. Which in a way, it is.

Cat(h)


That is the Merkin translation as well.

Doc

Cat(h)

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Jul 31, 2008, 12:41:28 PM7/31/08
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On Jul 31, 5:03 pm, "Doc Aay" <***docaye...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> "Cat(h)" <cathy...@yahoo.com> wrote in message

Guess what: in French, it's an impasse :-)

(Although we say cul de sac too).

Cat(h)

Cat(h)

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Jul 31, 2008, 12:42:06 PM7/31/08
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On Jul 31, 4:28 pm, b...@dspsrv.com (bren) wrote:
> In article <01ddb2bc-a901-46fd-ad60-21ca83de6...@a70g2000hsh.googlegroups.com>,
> bren- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -

I'm frantically cataloguing holes, here...

Cat(h)

bren

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Aug 1, 2008, 4:32:41 AM8/1/08
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In article <61b48647-5836-409a...@m36g2000hse.googlegroups.com>,
"Cat(h)" <cath...@yahoo.com> writes:

> I'm frantically cataloguing holes, here...
> Cat(h)

I await the results of your research with eager anticipation.

bren

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