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Angola: Updates/Commentary, 1
By sendmey...@theblacklist.net

Angola: Updates/Commentary, 2
By sendmey...@theblacklist.net

White out Black History Month
By kw...@theblacklist.net

Zimbabwe: Am I paranoid?
By TBLe...@earthlink.net

WEST PAPUAN ACTIVISTS IN GRAVE DANGER
By kw...@theblacklist.net

------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 14:05:42 -0800 (PST)
From: SendMeYourNews <sendmey...@theblacklist.net>
Subject: Angola: Updates/Commentary, 1


From: "Africa Action" <ap...@igc.org>
Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 11:19:24 -0500
Subject: Angola: Updates/Commentary, 1
Reply-To: ap...@igc.org

Angola: Updates/Commentary, 1
Date distributed (ymd): 020302
Document reposted by Africa Action

Africa Policy Electronic Distribution List: an information
service provided by AFRICA ACTION (incorporating the Africa
Policy Information Center, The Africa Fund, and the American
Committee on Africa). Find more information for action for
Africa at http://www.africaaction.org

+++++++++++++++++++++Document Profile+++++++++++++++++++++

Region: Southern Africa
Issue Areas: +political/rights+ +economy/development+
+security/peace+

SUMMARY CONTENTS:

This series of two postings contains a number of short documents
concerning the prospects for peace in Angola after the Feb. 22
death of Jonas Savimbi.

In this posting:
(1) a brief introductory note by Africa Action senior research
fellow William Minter, (2) excerpts from the most recent issue of
the Angola Peace Monitor, reporting on Savimbi's death and
international reaction, and (3) a report from the Jesuit Relief
Service on the reaction to Savimbi's death and the current
situation in Luena, Moxico province, Angola.

In another posting sent out today:
(1) a brief excerpt from a Feb. 27 speech in Washington by
Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano, (2) an article from
allafrica.com reporting on the Feb. 26 meeting of Presidents
Chissano, dos Santos, and Mogae with President Bush, (3) a
statement from Angolan traditional leaders at a Feb. 20 meeting in
Luanda hosted by the Open Society Institute, and (4) a UN press
briefing on the humanitarian situation in Angola.

+++++++++++++++++end profile++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Introductory Note from Africa Action

Jonas Savimbi died in combat on February 22 in the bush in the area
of Moxico province which was his guerrilla base from 1968 to 1974,
the final years before Angolan independence. His capacities for
deception and persistence were already well-developed in that
period, as he combined his nationalist campaign with a secret
agreement with the Portuguese military to join forces against the
rival Popular Movement for the Liberation of Angola (MPLA), which
later became the ruling party in independent Angola.

After 1974, Savimbi won support from large numbers of Angolans on
the basis of regional and ethnic appeals. But he also relied on
South Africa and the U.S. to back his campaign of terror against
civilians as well as government targets. Returning to war after two
successive peace pacts in the 1990s and the loss of his
international sponsors, he relied on iron discipline to control his
soldiers and on diamonds to provide the means of war.

[for a good summary of Savimbi's background, more extensive and
accurate than the majority of media accounts, see
Shana Wills, Washington's 'Freedom Fighter,' Africa's 'Terrorist',
in Foreign Policy in Focus, Feb. 27, 2002;
http://www.fpif.org/commentary/2002/0202savimbi_body.html]

Commentators are almost unanimous that the death of Jonas Savimbi
has removed one of the greatest single obstacles to peace in
Angola. But the scars of war and social fragmentation are deep.
Until now, the government in Luanda gained much of what
credibility it had from the contrast to Savimbi. Now it faces both
high expectations and profound skepticism of its capacity to shift
from war to peace.

Luanda is being advised from all quarters to seize the opportunity
to substitute dialogue for continued war. Some in Washington are
reportedly also pushing for elections as soon as possible. Yet the
chances for real peace are unlikely to advance far in formal talks
unless there are also more fundamental changes, including a turn
towards greater openness and, above all, investment of the
country's oil wealth in meeting the humanitarian, social, and
economic crises. Without such changes, moreover, elections are as
likely to stir up conflict as to assuage it.

Speaking the day after the meeting of three African presidents with
U.S. President Bush, Mozambican President Chissano listed some of
Mozambique's lessons on the requirements for a successful peace
process. Characteristically diplomatic, President Chissano did not
present these comments as advice for either his Angolan or U.S.
counterpart. Nevertheless, his message, stressing the need for a
culture of tolerance and for attention to social and economic
factors, was clear.

There is indeed a new opportunity for peace in Angola. Taking
advantage of it, however, requires fundamental changes for both
Luanda and its current international partners.

- - William Minter, Senior Research Fellow

************************************************************

Angola Peace Monitor

Issue no.6, Vol. VIII, 6th February 2002

The Angola Peace Monitor is produced every month by ACTSA - Action
for Southern Africa. ACTSA, 28 Penton Street, London N1 9SA,
e-mail: ac...@actsa.org, fax 44 20 7837 3001, tel 44 20 7833 3133

[Excerpts only: for full issue and archive see
http://www.actsa.org/apm]

Jonas Savimbi killed

UNITA leader Jonas Savimbi was killed on 22 February following a
fierce battle between his rebel troops and the Angolan army (FAA).
The battle took place in the locality of Lubuei in Moxico province,
some 100 km away from the Zambian border.

Jonas Savimbi died on the same day as some of his most senior
generals, including Brigadier "Big Joy" and Brigadier Mbula. The
Angolan army states that they ambushed Savimbi's military column.
During the fighting around 25 UNITA people from his platoon were
killed. Fighting is also reported to have taken place between FAA
and other UNITA forces who had the task of diverting military
attention away from their leader, led by Mbula and Big Joy.

To allay the cynicism of some foreign journalists, the government
put the body of Savimbi on show to journalists at the nearby town
of Lucusse. The Angolan news agency, ANGOP, reported that following
this the body was buried in the nearby cemetery.

The decisive battle took place following several major FAA
victories over UNITA, including a large-scale ambush on a column of
UNITA fighters who were attempting to flee to Zambia earlier in the
week. During fierce fighting many senior UNITA generals were
captured or killed. ...

Sources indicate that fierce fighting is continuing in Moxico,
where many of Savimbi's top troops - including his "presidential
guard" - remain under siege.

Several senior UNITA figures are reportedly still alive including
vice-president Antonio Dembo, secretary-general Paulo Lukamba Gato,
chief of staff General Geraldo Abreu "Kamorteiro", General Esteves
"Kamy" Pena and General Camalata Numa. ...

Prospects for peace brighter

Jonas Savimbi had centralised power within UNITA to such an extent
that the main military, political and financial aspects of the
organisation were handled primarily by him. His death has
considerably improved prospects for peace in Angola as UNITA is no
longer an insurrectionary force threatening the survival of the
state.

Jonas Savimbi led UNITA in a war against the Angolan government
since the country gained independence in 1975. Relying heavily on
the American CIA and the apartheid South African regime for
protection and support, he denied Angola the opportunity to
flourish.

Today, two generations of children have known nothing but conflict.
Angola is now ranked one of the worst places in the world to be a
child - nearly one in three die before their fifth birthday because
of war and war-induced poverty. More than half a million people
have died, and millions have been forced to flee their homes.

There have been lulls in the fighting. In 1991, negotiations led to
a cease-fire and the following year United Nations-supervised
elections were held. Rejecting the results, Savimbi led his troops
back into war, seizing much of the country. It was not until the
Angolan army managed to recover much of the lost ground that Jonas
Savimbi allowed his organisation to enter into another peace
agreement - the Lusaka Protocol - in 1994. This time he used the
peace process as a breathing space to rearm his organisation under
the noses of the United Nations using funds from his conflict
diamonds. Eventually UNITA led the country back into full-scale war
in 1998, using its new conventional army to try and seize the
country. However, this effort failed, leading to the Angolan
government's determination to destroy Savimbi's fighting force. ...

The Angolan government has moved quickly to call for the end to
conflict. In a statement on 23 February the government appealed to
"all those, that voluntarily or involuntarily, were associated to
these terrorist practices to consider their options and reintegrate
themselves in the normal life of the country, contributing in this
way to the consolidation of the democratisation and national
reconciliation process". It continued that it will soon issue "a
communique containing a detailed programme to cease all hostilities
in Angola".

The government reiterated its "intention to completely implement
the Lusaka Protocol and also considers that all Angolan political
parties are essential for Angola's democratisation". It called for
the nation to remain calm and tranquil, "respecting law and order,
particularly the right to differences and peaceful co-existence of
all Angolans".

During a visit to Portugal on 25 February Angolan President Jose
Eduardo dos Santos expressed hope that the prospects for dialogue
would improve. He stated that "we have to look to the future and
Angolans from all quarters have to be able to pardon, pave the way
for rapid national reconciliation and establish bridges to define
as rapidly as possible a cease-fire conducive to the
demilitarisation of UNITA".

On the question of elections, which have not been held since 1992,
the President stated that "if we rapidly advance this year to
conclude a cease-fire and the demilitarisation of UNITA it may be
that in one to two years elections will be held in Angola". ...

International reaction to Savimbi's death

Leaders of states and international organisations have united in
hope that the death of Jonas Savimbi will provide an opportunity
for Angola to finally achieve peace.

Namibia's foreign minister Theo-Ben Gurirab told the Namibia
Broadcasting Corporation that Savimbi "chose to live by the sword
and inevitably he died by the sword".

Uganda's Defence Minister Amama Mbabaza was more blunt in his
comments, when he told AFP on 23 February that "there are no
regrets. He was trouble maker for Angola, and Uganda never
supported his cause". He continued that "Savimbi represented the
reactionary forces in African politics, we think that if it is true
that he is dead, it would be good for the region and the world".

The South African president, Thabo Mbeki, was far more reticent.
According to the South African Press Association, President Mbeki
said on 24 February that he would prefer not to comment on Unita
leader Jonas Savimbi's death until he had had a chance to apply his
mind properly to the matter. Deputy foreign minister, Aziz Pahad,
said that Savimbi's death will "affect the capacity of UNITA to
sustain itself".

Mozambique's president, Joaquim Chissano, on 24 February regretted
that Savimbi's life "ended in this way, which he could easily have
avoided if he had cooperated with the government". What was
important now, he added, was for all Angolans, regardless of
whether or not they were UNITA sympathisers, "to look ahead, and
commit themselves to national reconciliation, and the consolidation
of democracy, to end the suffering imposed by the war".

Savimbi had been a major obstacle to peace, said President
Chissano, because of his excessive pride, and his failure to keep
his promises.

President Chissano recalled that after independence, Savimbi allied
himself with the mortal enemy of African nations, the apartheid
regime which then ruled South Africa, which provided him with
massive military support.

The United Nations Secretary General, Kofi Annan, stated his
support for the peace process. His spokesperson, Stephane Dujarric,
said that "as far as the secretary general is concerned, it has
created a new situation and he hopes that all stakeholders will
take advantage of it to take the peace process forward".

The representative of the European Union to the Great Lakes Region,
Aldo Ajello, said on 23 February in Luanda that the death of Jonas
Savimbi was an "appropriate time for a definite peace in Angola".
He continued that "the death of a man is always sad news, but at
the same time, and in this case, it is an opportunity for peace and
peace concerns all people of Angola".

UNITA's representative in Portugal, Carlos Morgado stated on
Portuguese television "from now on, the scenario has changed, we'll
have to find new paths. But this will never mean a military
surrender. There'll be no military victory [for the government]".

However, UNITA Renovada, a group of leading UNITA figures that have
decisively broken away from Jonas Savimbi's orbit, called on all of
Savimbi's followers to "reject any option that seeks the
continuation of the armed rebellion begun by Jonas Savimbi".

UNITA Renovada's spokesperson in the United States, Dinho Chingunji
was more sanguine about the news. He announced "Savimbi is
dead!!!"... For me this is definitely a cause to celebrate because
of the genocide that Savimbi carried out against my family".

He continued that "people in UNITA, especially those in the bush
who because of Savimbi security could not leave or make their
feelings known in fear of their lives and that of their families,
now are coming out in hundreds and the truth will come out".

...

Angolan government announces full withdrawal from DRC

The Angolan government on 31 January announced that it had removed
its last soldiers from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Angolan army had assisted Laurent Kabila in ousting the late
dictator, Mobutu Sese Seko in May 1997, in an attempt to halt UNITA
using the country as a staging post for its insurrection. In 1998
Angolan forces were involved in fighting when they saved Kabila
from being overthrown by Rwandan and Ugandan-backed rebels.

In its report on 13 November 2001, the United Nations Panel of
Experts on the Illegal Exploitation of Natural Resources and Other
Forms of Wealth of the Democratic Republic of Congo stated that it
"believes that the involvement of Angola in the DRC is based on
strategic concerns" and that "Angola is believed to be the only
country that has not received any significant compensation for its
military involvement in the DRC".

The fact that the Angolan army has not been engaged in economic
activities in DRC is the main explanation why it has been so fast
in pulling out of the country. ...

************************************************************

JRS DISPATCHES No. 107 - 28 February, 2002

Twice monthly news bulletin

JRS DISPATCHES is from the International Office of Jesuit Refugee
Service, CP 6139, 00195 Roma Prati, Italy. Tel: +39-06 689.77.391;
Fax: +39-06 687.92.83; Email: dispa...@jesref.org; JRS on-line:
http://www.jesref.org;

[Excerpts]

ANGOLA: WHAT NEXT AFTER DEATH OF REBEL LEADER

The news of the death of veteran Angolan rebel leader Jonas Savimbi
has been greeted in the town of Luena with much public celebration
and expressions of hope for an end to the country's long-running
civil war. Savimbi was killed by government forces on 22 February,
during a fierce gun battle that resulted in heavy casualties for
both the UNITA rebels and the regular army. JRS Luena report that
when confirmation of the rebel leader's death reached the town,
people fired guns into the air during two hours of celebrations.
Many local people strongly believe that the war has come to an
end, that UNITA lacks the resources to continue the conflict, or
a commander who can match Savimbi's strength and aggressiveness.
Many captured UNITA rebels have confirmed that their movement's
capacity has been heavily reduced of late, fuelling the
government's belief that it will soon be able to put an end to the
civil war.

Despite the general optimism in Luena, major challenges still have
to be faced by the people of Angola if peace is to be given a
chance.

-Many Angolans have suffered badly and lost family members during
the conflict. ''Our discussions with them indicate that they are
not prepared to forgive easily'', reports JRS Luena. The
Government thus needs to construct an effective reconciliation and
reconstruction project for the future.

-War has become a profitable business for many in Angola. Top
government officials, military personnel and others have enjoyed
huge benefits because of the conflict. How prepared are these
people to see peace emerge?

-How prepared is the government to set up democratic structures
that will allow for the expression of opposing views and
philosophies?

-If peace returns, Angola will receive a lot of returnees from
Zambia and DR Congo. Because of the infestation of mines
throughout the country, many of the returnees may settle
temporarily in provincial cities. Does the government have the
capacity and will to deal adequately with these returnees?
''Despite these obstacles, if the government, civil society and
political parties seize this moment as a genuine chance for peace,
justice, and reconciliation, let us also hope the international
community can play its part to assist Angola in bringing about an
end to the war," writes JRS Angola.

ANGOLA: HUMANITARIAN CRISIS DEEPENS

JRS in the Angolan town of Luena reports that the number of
Internally displaced people has risen dramatically of late as a
result of increased military operations in Moxico, and other
nearby provinces. The government believes that the rural
populations in the villages have been a logistical resource for
UNITA's guerrilla warfare in terms of supplies. As a result the
government has embarked on a clean-up operation moving rural
people to Provincial capitals and settling them in camps, a move
that has been condemned by the UN as contributing to a growing
number of displaced civilians. The UN estimates that up to four
million people - almost one third of the Angolan population - have
now been forced to flee their homes as a result of the
long-running civil war.

In the city of Luena alone, the displaced population has reached
more than 89,000. During the month of January nearly 6000 people
entered the city, 90 per cent of whom were women, children, and
the elderly. The total number of orphans in Luena, including
displaced and resident children, is 258, many of whom live in sub
standard conditions at a local orphanage. Clothing, food and basic
non-food items are urgently required for these children. On 12
February, addressing the UN Security Council, UN Under Secretary
General for Humanitarian Affairs, Kenzo Oshimo, described the
status of children in Angola as ''catastrophic'', with 30 percent
of all children dying before the age of five.

The new reality of Luena had not been anticipated by the
humanitarian agencies, most of whom had not created contingency
plans to receive such large numbers of displaced people. Most NGOs
on the ground are already operating at full capacity and simply do
not have sufficient resources to respond to the growing
anticipated needs of the thousands now arriving in the city. The
delivery of humanitarian supplies has also been severely hampered
by the poor condition of the Luena airstrip, the overall insecure
environment, and the fact that surrounding areas are heavily
mined, limiting access to agricultural land.

************************************************************
This material is being reposted for wider distribution by
Africa Action (incorporating the Africa Policy Information
Center, The Africa Fund, and the American Committee on Africa).
Africa Action's information services provide accessible
information and analysis in order to promote U.S. and
international policies toward Africa that advance economic,
political and social justice and the full spectrum of human rights.

Documents previously distributed, as well as a wide range of
additional information, are also available on the Web at:
http://www.africaaction.org

To be added to or dropped from the distribution list write to
ap...@igc.org. For more information about reposted material,
please contact directly the source mentioned in the posting.

Africa Action
110 Maryland Ave. NE, #508, Washington, DC 20002.
Phone: 202-546-7961. Fax: 202-546-1545.
E-mail: africa...@igc.org.
*****************************************

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------------------------------

Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 14:05:19 -0800 (PST)
From: SendMeYourNews <sendmey...@theblacklist.net>
Subject: Angola: Updates/Commentary, 2


From: "Africa Action" <ap...@igc.org>
Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 11:19:24 -0500
Subject: Angola: Updates/Commentary, 2
Reply-To: ap...@igc.org

Angola: Updates/Commentary, 2
Date distributed (ymd): 020302
Document reposted by Africa Action

Africa Policy Electronic Distribution List: an information
service provided by AFRICA ACTION (incorporating the Africa
Policy Information Center, The Africa Fund, and the American
Committee on Africa). Find more information for action for
Africa at http://www.africaaction.org

+++++++++++++++++++++Document Profile+++++++++++++++++++++

Region: Southern Africa
Issue Areas: +political/rights+ +economy/development+
+security/peace+

SUMMARY CONTENTS:

This series of two postings contains a number of short documents
concerning the prospects for peace in Angola after the Feb. 22
death of Jonas Savimbi.

In this posting:
(1) a brief excerpt from a Feb. 27 speech in Washington by
Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano, (2) an article from
allafrica.com reporting on the Feb. 26 meeting of Presidents
Chissano, dos Santos, and Mogae with President Bush, (3) a
statement from Angolan traditional leaders at a Feb. 20 meeting in
Luanda hosted by the Open Society Institute, and (4) a UN press
briefing on the humanitarian situation in Angola.

In another posting sent out today: (1) a brief introductory note by
Africa Action senior research fellow William Minter, (2) excerpts
from the most recent issue of the Angola Peace Monitor, reporting
on Savimbi's death and international reaction, and (3) a report
from the Jesuit Relief Service on the reaction to Savimbi's death
and the current situation in Luena, Moxico province, Angola.

+++++++++++++++++end profile++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Excerpt from speech by Joaquim Alberto Chissano, President of the
Republic of Mozambique, at the Woodrow Wilson Center, Washington,
February 27, 2002.

[The full text of President Chissano's speech is available at:
http://usinfo.state.gov/regional/af/a2022702.htm
For more coverage of President Chissano's visit to Washington, see
http://allafrica.com/stories/200202260002.html]

Mozambique's experiences in peace building and national
reconciliation teach us some lessons fro a successful transition
from war to peace and development, some of which I would like to
briefly mention:

* The adoption of an inclusive and comprehensive approach
comprising military, economic, and social dimensions in the peace
building process is one of the keys to success;

* The recognition that the search for peace and reconciliation are,
per se, a permanent process; thus it is important to promote a
culture of peace and tolerance.

* Preservation of a permanent dialogue is a condition to build up
confidence;

* Permanent learning is important for monitoring new and modified
problems;

* The strengthening of the civil society and community
organizations and encouragement of their participation in domestic
affairs are an important factor to avoid sentiments of exclusion;

* Development of partnership with donors based on co-responsbility
and recipient ownership is vital;

* The establishment of a permanent interaction between development,
poverty reduction and eradication strategies, and peace building is
crucial so as to address the main problems of the country.

This is not a recipe, but rather an attitude we have adopted to
raise hope among our people, and make them feel that a better
future lies primarily in their hands.

**************************************************************

'Seize the Moment', Bush Urges Southern African Leaders

http://allAfrica.com February 27, 2002

By Charles Cobb Jr., Washington, DC

[reposted with permission of allAfrica.com; an additional article
reporting on President dos Santos' speech to the Corporate Council
on Africa is at: http://allafrica.com/stories/200202270245.html]

Events in Angola, particularly the death of Unita leader Jonas
Savimbi five days ago, dominated an hour-long meeting between
President George W. Bush and Angolan President Jose Eduardo Dos
Santos, Mozambican President Joaquim Alberto Chissano, and Botswana
President Festus Mogae on Tuesday.

The charismatic but tyrannical Unita leader ruled his guerrilla
movement, the Union for the Total Independence of Angola, with a
rod of iron for 35 years. He repeatedly abandoned peace agreements
with the MPLA government and went back to fighting a war against
the MPLA government which, some estimates say, has claimed a
million lives. Most analysts believe Savimbi's death presents the
best chance so far, to reach a lasting agreement.

Bush said he supports calls for a ceasefire and, in a statement
issued after the White House meeting with the African leaders, he
urged Angola's president to "seize the moment... President Dos
Santos has it within his power to end 26 years of fighting by
reaching out to all Angolans willing to lay down their arms."

In a wide-ranging interview with allAfrica.com after the meeting,
Mozambique's President Joaquim Chissano said Dos Santos told Bush
that "the situation now brings about a better prospect for peace
and reconciliation." However, the Angolan President also cautioned
that, while he hopes quickly to achieve a ceasefire, it will depend
heavily "on the will of those who are fighting."

Unita has continued fighting and says the government must adopt a
unilateral ceasefire. In the first reported Unita attack since
Savimbi's death nine people were killed on Monday and 15 wounded,
according to Portugal's Lusa news agency.

The Washington meeting was planned before Savimbi's death and is
the second "mini summit" President Bush has held with African heads
of state. In addition to discussing Angola, said Chissano, the
leaders pressed for more help with the Aids crisis besieging
Africa, and raised issues of poverty and development, and
"capacity-building" in Africa. For his part, Bush said that his
policy "was to put Africa as a priority," according to Chissano.

Both U.S. officials and the African Presidents characterized the
meeting, which ran for 15 minutes longer than scheduled, as "good."
But when asked if Bush had made any specific commitments, Chissano
said, "No. We didn't go into details. We spoke of principles."

**************************************************************

The role and the voice of traditional authorities

Presented by by His Majesty King Muatchissengue wa Tembo Lunda-
Tchokw, (Eastern Provinces of Lunda-Sul and Lunda-Norte), and
signed by 65 other chiefs from provinces including Uige, Moxico,
Lunda Sul, Lunda Norte, Bie, Malange, Huambo, Kuanza Norte, and
Kuanza Sul.

At a conference on "The role of the international community and of
civil society in the resolution of the Angolan conflict," hosted
by the Open Society Institute Angola, in Luanda, Hotel Tropico, 20
February 2002

Fundacao Open Society, Alameda do Principe Real 41, Miramar,
Luanda, Angola; tel/fax: 244-2-343667; e-mail:
osisa...@netangola.com

Excellencies
Members of the National Assembly
Government representatives
Religious entities
Representatives of the diplomatic community
Representatives of political parties
Distinguished members of civil society
Representative of the Open Society Initiative in Angola

Esteemed colleagues

We would like, first of all, to thank Mr Rafael Marques, Open
Society representative in Angola, for the opportunity he has given
us to express the ideas of the traditional authorities who met at
the headquarters of the Angolan Forum of Traditional Authorities.

Time does not allow us to make a longer input, so we will
concentrate on the matter of the armed conflict.

The war in Angola has already touched everyone, and much effort has
already been put into the search for a solution. Yet the war never
seems to stop. Because the interests and hidden agendas of those
who wage and who support the war continue to complicate the
process of building a real and lasting peace.

The traditional authorities and local communities are witness, more
disgusted on each occasion, to the destruction of peace, to the
squandering of their natural resources and the killing of the
Angolan people.

The majority of the population has been and continues to be forced
to abandon their homelands, their fields - all that they possess.

Angola today is a land of displaced people, people live in inhumane
conditions in displaced peoples' camps on the edges of the big
cities.

With much sadness, we see that there is little or no political will
to transcend this situation. This lack of will is reflected in the
behaviours of the parties at war, of the international community
and even by some of the Angolan people.

This is all because the interests of particular individuals are, at
the moment, still stronger than the will of the people. Why? More
than anything else, the international community and the Angolan
political parties have done their best to divide and weaken the
people. Today, the Angolan people lack direction.

We, the chiefs, have already taken account of the fact that this
war is contrary to the interests of Angolan communities. On the
contrary, the continuation of the war is destroying lives and
cultural identities - customs and costumes - particular to each
community, not to mention the dehumanisation to which displaced
people have fallen victim.

This war is being fueled by leaders or commanders who appear to be
interested in creating a "new man", a new kind of Angolan citizen,
with new cultural values and morals unfamiliar to the majority.

Is this the vision that our politicians have for Angola? Doing away
with Angolans so as to invent a new people? Are they going to kill
all the people, in order to hand over Angola to someone else? Are
they going to kill all the people because they hate the people so
much, or because they do not identify with the cultural values of
Angola?

From the Bible, one of the Proverbs of King Solomon, chapter 11,
verse 14, says that "Where no counsel is, the people fall: but in
the multitude of counselors there is safety."

We, the heirs of the kingdoms that make up Angola, are treated as
miserable, backward people who do not know the meaning of
civilisation.

So, we the chiefs ask our children, the politicians who govern us
or who seek to govern us: To be civilised, does that mean to order
and to oversee the death of one's own people? To loot the riches
of the country? To destroy one's own country in the name of the
enemy? But who is the enemy who deserves the honour of such a
sacrifice, the sacrifice of an entire nation?

A father who has no bread to offer his own children, invites the
neighbours and their children to a banquet. Can we say that such
a father is civilised?

Whenever we have a problem, the first thing we do is to call on a
foreigner to solve our problems. So it was at independence, so it
was during the various peace processes. So let us consider: We
have a snake in the hen-house which is Angola, and we call on a
fox to chase the snake away. Let us ask, will the fox be more
interested in chasing after the chickens to eat them, or will he
be just as concerned about the snake? And if there are not one but
three foxes what are they going to do?

We, the chiefs, as the the true heirs to the cultures, the
traditions and the riches of our people, do not accept our
political leaders' view of themselves as civilised.

Therefore

We call on all Angolan communities, the youth, the elders, men and
women, representatives of the churches and other social
institutions, to join together with their traditional leaders in
order to devise ways of defending their rights and protecting
their cultural heritage in all its diversity, protecting the
people's natural resources and their lands.

We, the chiefs, demand the recognition of and respect for the
cultural identity of all Angolans.

We, the chiefs decree that peace must be discussed at the level of
communities (by means of consultation and debate), in order that
all Angolans may make known their ideas on the future of the
country. Peace is more than just an order to lay down weapons.
What happens after that?

To begin with, we call on communities to cease handing over their
sons to those who wage war, for such people are only destroying
the country and the people, while they hide their own sons away in
Europe or America. And it is also in Europe and America that these
gentlemen hide the wealth of Angola and receive support for their
policies, which are against the interests of the children of
Angola.

But there are also communities who feed the war by feeding their
own children: the soldiers of the Angolan Armed Forces, the police
officers, the UNITA guerrillas - all of them children of
communities. These same communities are the main victims of the
war, for they become reduced to the state of third-class citizens.
These are the communities who are suffering in the displaced
people's camps, subject to hunger, nakedness, misery and death.

Today, Angola has almost ceased to exist. The country is little
more than Luanda. Family has come to mean only those who live in
Luanda, since those who live in the provinces are condemned to
isolation.

This is why we believe that the peace process needs to start at the
bottom and not from the top down, so that those who are at the top
may come to understand that their position depends on those who
are at the bottom.

The leaves and the branches, however strong or impressive they may
be, are completely depending on the roots that support them.

For the good of Angola and of all Angolans who are truly patriotic
and who love their nation, the chiefs, meeting in the Angolan
Traditional Leaders' Forum, call on the people to demand a
sovereign national conference on peace and the future of Angola.

At this conference we must define the roles of the political
parties, of civil society, of traditional leaders and of the
churches in the resolution of the Angolan conflict. Such a
definition will help in the creation of a common understanding of
the reconciliation process and of open and patriotic government,
and in the reconstruction of the country.

It is at this conference that we will be able, as Angolans, to draw
up a vision for the future of Angola, so that tomorrow, new
generations may be able to follow the paths of righteousness and
prosperity.

Many thanks for your attention

************************************************************

14 February 2002

PRESS BRIEFING ON ANGOLA
Erik de Mul, UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Angola

(Excerpts; full briefing available on http://www.un.org)

The humanitarian situation in Angola was dramatic, with shocking
statistics that were similar to those of Afghanistan, Erik de Mul,
United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator for that country told
correspondents at a Headquarters press briefing this afternoon.

Mr. de Mul said that currently in Angola, life expectancy was 44
years, with 33 per cent of all households living below the poverty
line. Thirty per cent of all children died before they reached the
age of five while one third of the total population--4 million out
of 12 million--were displaced. The displacement trend was
continuing for two reasons; action by the National Union for the
Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) that forced people to move;
and military "cleaning" operations, which again made people decide
to leave their places of origin.

"We basically have an appeal to two parties," Mr. de Mul went on to
say. One was to the international community, to try and impress
upon them the need to do more, and to do it quickly. The other was
to the Government of Angola. The efforts of the Government of
Angola in trying to address the needs of the population had been
"too little, too late". That was the assessment of the United
Nations, the non-governmental organizations, and the international
community at large.

That assessment, continued Mr. de Mul, was also shared by the
Government and resulted in a meeting of the Angolan Cabinet last
Monday, in which they admitted that the situation was bad. The
outcome was a statement with a list of actions, which would be
undertaken immediately to help alleviate the situation in the
country.

When asked to elaborate more about who was most to blame for the
present humanitarian disaster in Angola, Mr. de Mul said it would
be difficult to be that specific. "We are basically trying to deal
with the consequences of actions taken by both UNITA and the
Government and it is very difficult to say how many people are on
the move as a result of one or the other," he said. Activities by
both entities resulted in increased numbers of displaced people.
The problem was widespread and not limited only to certain
provinces or areas of the country.

When asked how the Government was responsible for the movement of
people, Mr. de Mul said that, in principle, when it came to
internally displaced persons, the Government should be the first
one to respond. But, that had not necessarily been the case and
the international community had been trying to pick up the pieces.
The point, nevertheless, was that all the non-governmental
organizations and United Nations agencies were at the end of their
rope. There was no longer any flexibility. "They can only do as
much as they can," he said. Hence the idea of appealing more to
the donor community and the Angolan Government to do more and to do
it fast", he said.

When asked what percentage of the internally displaced persons had
access to emergency assistance, Mr. de Mul said the problem was
that, for security and logistical reasons, access by the
international community to the displaced was limited. The
Government had been asked to try and develop systems to bring
relief goods to the displaced, and not only military equipment and
personnel, if they have access to them.

When asked how many out of the 4 million displaced had access to
relief assistance, Mr. de Mul said he would estimate that about
half of that figure could be reached by the international
community. But, regarding the other half, "there are pockets of
people that we think are not reached at all". Others, who could
also not be reached, were being held by the Angolan authorities.

...

Replying to another question about the movement of people, he said
UNITA was in a guerilla warfare mode and was carrying out
unpredictable actions in areas where it was difficult to judge
where the action would take place. Those actions resulted in the
movement of people. At the same time, the Government and the army
were involved in trying to clean up areas where they thought UNITA
elements were located. In that process, people, for reasons of
fear and insecurity, went on the move as well. ...

************************************************************
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To be added to or dropped from the distribution list write to
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************************************************************

_____Sent To Your Mail Box From: ______
http://www.theMarcusGarveyBBS.com
NEWS, EVENTS, FORUMS and more..
TheBlackList - "The New Negro World"
Satisfying the African Need to Know

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 13:58:02 -0800 (PST)*Black World Events
From: TheBlackList News <kw...@theblacklist.net>
Subject: White out Black History Month


White out Black History Month
http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20020302/life/life3.html

Paul A. Reid, Staff Reporter
life...@gleanerjm.com

Jamaica Gleaner
WESTERN BUREAU:

SOMETIMES IT seems that we, as Jamaicans, can't help ourselves and
therefore must copy everything the Americans do.

While the celebration of Black History Month in February is not new
here, it still baffles my mind as to its importance. In the absence of
any conclusive research, it is my opinion that Black History Month
celebration is an American creation, the same as Kwanzaa (an African
American celebration which takes place December 26 through January 1)
and should not be taken seriously.

In my humble opinion Black History Month is a result of successive
generations of Americans ignoring the achievements of Black people and
are now trying to make up for centuries of neglect.

Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against Black people being aware of
their history, culture and achievements, but why set aside one month --
the shortest one of the year, if you have not noticed -- and then ignore
all these issues during the other 11 months.

If the powers that be were serious they would push for Black
achievements to be recognised year round and for the real history of
Black people to be taught in schools as part of the curriculum. Why we
were taught mainly European and American history in high school (at
least when I attended) was always a mystery to me.

The management of Television Jamaica (TvJ) does not seem to be
learning anything at all and if we were to follow their lead we would be
heading down the wrong path. After its predecessor, the Jamaica
Broadcasting Corporation (JBC), insisted on airing that horrible series
about Shaka Zulu, TvJ throughout last month aired movies by African
American director Spike Lee in celebration of Black History. But whose
history?

The South African Broadcasting Corporation under the rule of apartheid
was responsible for that Shaka Zulu series, making little provision for
the truth. King Shaka was depicted as a vicious animal who would kill
and maim to attain and stay in power.

I might not have seen all of Mr. Lee's movies but there is nothing in
the ones I have seen that would be a celebration of Black History. I
will even venture to say that they do not even reflect Black Americans
in a positive light.

Fine, he did a creditable job with the movies about Malcolm X and
Hurricane Carter but he had little choice as these were no works of
fiction. Most of his other works, however, were nothing but a vehicle
for his rage against white America.

I hope that one of these days, maybe in our lifetime, we will get out
from under the shadow of American culture and start appreciating ours.
Chances are if we take the time to look, we will find a lot to
celebrate.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
--

It's your turn! We want to know what's on your mind. What do you have
to say about current issues in Jamaica and the world? Send your comments
to Lifestyle, Editorial Department, The Gleaner Company, 7 North Street,
Kingston or email us at life...@gleanerjm.com

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
: ( || ) BLACK WORLD EVENTS calendar & list of events );
(((((((((((((((((((((((((()))))))))))))))())))))))))))))))))))))))))()()
: () Search it http://www.BlackWorldEvents.com :
: () Post it: http://www.BlackWorldEvents.com :[][][][][][][][][][][]
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2002 18:59:10 -0500
From: "TheBlackList moderator" <tble...@earthlink.net>
Subject: Zimbabwe: Am I paranoid?


There are three subscribers who regularly
post messages to TheBla...@topica.com
concerning the situation in Zimbabwe.....

Now, the strangest thing is occurring.
I am unable to receive messages from them at
TheBla...@topica.com

I have triple checked and I see no obvious reason
why I should not receive messages from these three
addresses.

I KNOW that these three addresses are posting
messages to TheBla...@topica.com because
the address is listed in the HEADER and everything
else that should be obviously normal is normal.

It should be noted that I receive the cc: from these three
addresses at other mailboxes. Strange!

So it is not that I am restricting messages concerning
Zimbabwe, I can't figure how to receive them in the first
place.

Until I've solved this mystery, there may be two self
evident conclusions that leads back to one obvious answer.

Keep your ears to the rail!!!
We are never alone. <I warn>

"Truth crushed to the earth will rise again."

:Kwasi Akyeampong
moderator
TheBlackList Information Service -
http://www.topica.com/lists/TheBlackList
For People Who Dare to Think

------------------------------

Date: Saturday, 2 Mar 2002 08:00:25 -0800 (PST)
From: TheBlackList News <kw...@theblacklist.net>
Subject: WEST PAPUAN ACTIVISTS IN GRAVE DANGER

----- Original Message -----
From: "IAWP" <webm...@koteka.net>
To: <IA...@topica.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 02, 2002 3:01 AM
Subject: (IAWP) WEST PAPUAN ACTIVISTS IN GRAVE DANGER

International Action for West Papua (IAWP)
West Papua is the next East Timor
http://www.koteka.net/
"A careless whisper can cost many lives"

WEST PAPUAN ACTIVISTS IN GRAVE DANGER

Sem Karoba, global spokesman for the West Papuan
Student Alliance, and John Rumbiak, from the Institute
for Advocacy and Human Rights have been given priority
listing by Amnesty International as being in grave
danger for their lives.

It is understood that a substantial bounty has been
placed on their heads - dead or alive.

Only recently, the moderate independence campaigner and
leader of the Papua Presidium Council, Theys Eluay, was
assassinated in similar circumstances.

Sem especially is well known in ecological and
activist circles in Europe; he's a veteran of several
speaking tours highlighting the struggle for West
Papuan autonomy. For over 40 years the people of West
Papua have been striving for independence, first from
the Dutch and then from Indonesia, which invaded the
country in 1963 with UN compliance.

Indonesia is not going to give up without a fight: West
Papua (or Irian Jaya as Indonesians call it) is incredibly
rich in mineral resources.

Suppression of indigenous resistance by the Jakarta regimes
has always been brutal.

On December 1st 2000, the people of West Papua
declared 'Enough is enough: independence or death!'.
Indonesia has made it clear which option it would
prefer. Since that date countless Papuans have been
murdered, brutalised or rounded up and imprisoned. The
moderate Theys is dead and now the authorities openly
want the same fate for the unashamedly radical Sem
Karoba and John Rumbiak.

"Anything that happens to me will bring a serious
impact on the Koteka people all over the world, in the
villages, the towns, the jungles. But they are
determined to eliminate people like us. They did it
clearly to Theys. They have done it to Arnold Ap, Tom
Waiggani, Willem Onde, Hans Bomay , Simon Alom and now
they are threatening John Rubiack and me"- Sem Karoba

WE ARE BEGGING YOU TO HELP

Hassling beareaucrats is normally a total waste of
time; in this instance it could save lives. When
trouble flared in the town of Wamena in 2000, people
from Europe contacting the Indonesian authorities and
asking searching questions in English made a serious
difference: no politician wants to attract an
international scandal!

So we are asking EVERYONE who can access a fax machine
to fax Wamena Police Station, West Papua, on
0062 969 31110 and demand to know IN ENGLISH about the
fate of Sem Karoba and John Rumbiak. Mention Amnesty
International, mention what you will but PLEASE DO IT,
then DO IT AGAIN. These men's lives might well depend
on our actions.

Thank You

ENDS

[For those fortunate enough not to be sharing your world with fax
machines, the phone number for Wamena police station is: 62-969-31110.
Keep trying, it doesn't work very well, and when you get through you're
unlikely to get someone who speaks english, but just keep saying the
names, including Sem Karoba who is from Wamena, and Amnesty
international.]

West Papua is the next East Timor! Help prevent another humanitarian
disaster on a grander scale about to happen.

http://www.koteka.net - On guard, for West Papua.


_____Sent To Your Mail Box From: ______
http://www.theMarcusGarveyBBS.com
NEWS, EVENTS, FORUMS and more..
TheBlackList - "The New Negro World"
Satisfying the African Need to Know

------------------------------

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expressed on TheBlackList.
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