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Mark Riordan

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Sep 29, 1992, 9:22:45 AM9/29/92
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In article <BvByE...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk> ne...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (Michael Steven Newton) writes:
>ag...@cus.cam.ac.uk (Alasdair Grant) writes:
>
>>Let's have a Scottish group, and keep Celtic racialism out of it.
>>I mean, I don't even know whether I'm 0% or 100% Celtic, and I don't care!
>>--
>>Alasdair Grant
>
>Being Celtic is *not* a racial priviledge, it is a cultural and linguistic
>milieau, and a matter of degree. And if you don't care, you don't
>count.

Initially I thought I seperate Newsgroup for Scotland would be
fine. I would just read both. Then I thought well after a week of
uninteresting articles on a topic important to Scotland but of
no interest to me I would probably unsubscribe.

I think the pictish, scottish, celtic, irish, rangers, celtic, soccor,
linguistics etc diversity is great I have learned a lot. I don't mind
the odd article of no interest when I find one which I would not
normally have read but I find of great interest.

Personally I am for maintenance of the net-union. I am a
net-unionist I suppose. :-)

MARK
--
--
| rior...@cs.tcd.ie Mark Riordan, MIPS Project |
| Computer Science Dept. Trinity College |
| Dublin 2, Ireland |

Michael Steven Newton

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Sep 30, 1992, 8:19:31 AM9/30/92
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rior...@cs.tcd.ie (Mark Riordan) writes:

>Initially I thought I seperate Newsgroup for Scotland would be
>fine. I would just read both. Then I thought well after a week of
>uninteresting articles on a topic important to Scotland but of
>no interest to me I would probably unsubscribe.

>I think the pictish, scottish, celtic, irish, rangers, celtic, soccor,
>linguistics etc diversity is great I have learned a lot. I don't mind
>the odd article of no interest when I find one which I would not
>normally have read but I find of great interest.

>Personally I am for maintenance of the net-union. I am a
>net-unionist I suppose. :-)

I agree. If we form too many splinter groups, we'll lose a lot of
focus and diversity. As long as we can keep this group centred around
things Celtic, whether they pertain to modern day Scotland, ancient
Gaul and everything in between, and can keep away from topics better
suited to other boards, I don't particularly see a need for yet another
net news group.

Then again, Celts are famous for tribal warfare and inability to keep
cohesive, so why break the trend?

-- MN

Ray Dunn

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Oct 3, 1992, 7:21:58 PM10/3/92
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In referenced article, ne...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (Michael Steven Newton) writes:

>rior...@cs.tcd.ie (Mark Riordan) writes:
>>Personally I am for maintenance of the net-union. I am a
>>net-unionist I suppose. :-)
>
> I agree. If we form too many splinter groups, we'll lose a lot of
> focus and diversity.

Focus _and_ diversity! Wow, we Celts are clever!

You know, although I'm trying to drum up support for s.c.scottish, I like
the diversity here myself, that's one of the reasons why I initially posted
reservations about splitting off. But the diversity in s.c.celtic is also
why I would like to see somewhere else to discuss scottish, not celtic
issues.

Rather than me make some up. maybe Craig would like to post some of the
topics under discussion in his local Digital group to show what is
appropriate in a Scottish forum but not in the general celtic one.
--
Ray Dunn at home | Beaconsfield, Quebec, Canada.
(514) 630 3749 | r...@philmtl.philips.ca or ..uunet!sobeco!philmtl!ray

Craig Cockburn

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Oct 4, 1992, 4:05:45 AM10/4/92
to

In article <1992Oct3.2...@philmtl.philips.ca>, r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes...

>
>Rather than me make some up. maybe Craig would like to post some of the
>topics under discussion in his local Digital group to show what is
>appropriate in a Scottish forum but not in the general celtic one.
>--
Here's a few ideas to get you started:

Accomodation
Items wanted
Job vacancies
Pros and cons of living in Scotland
Info on areas: ie Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Borders etc
Info on Castles, Historic houses etc
Whisky
Travel questions
Haggis
Skiing
Walking
Hogmany
Poetry
Devolution/Home Rule etc
Irn Bru
Loch Ness Monster
Arranging lift sharing between south of England and Scotland
Scottish jokes
Burns night
Scots language info, books, societies
Gaelic language info, books, societies
Kilts and tartans info
Traditional music
Forthcoming concerts
Rugby
Scottish books
Weather
Traditional songs
Bagpipes
Fishing
Highland Games
Forthcoming events
Patriotism and what it means
Ravenscraig
The Housing market
Beer, pubs and breweries
Football
The environment
The Broons
Current news items
History quizes
Ceilidhs
Distilleries - visit reports
what's on the telly/radio
Historical links to the vikings
David Icke + Arran!
Getting Married at Gretna Green
White Settlers
Bird watching
theatre
Legends
Scottish cooking
Shinty

etc

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Craig Cockburn, Digital Equipment Co. Ltd, Reading, England. Suas
Internet: cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com leis
UUCP:..!decwrl!edieng.enet.dec.com!cockburn a'
Gha\idhlig!
Views here are my own, and are not necessarily those of Digital

Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,

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Oct 4, 1992, 3:56:47 PM10/4/92
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From article <1992Oct4.0...@rdg.dec.com>, by cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com (Craig Cockburn):

>
> In article <1992Oct3.2...@philmtl.philips.ca>, r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes...
>>
>>Rather than me make some up. maybe Craig would like to post some of the
>>topics under discussion in his local Digital group to show what is
>>appropriate in a Scottish forum but not in the general celtic one.
>>--
> Here's a few ideas to get you started:
>
> Irn Bru
>

This should obviously carry a Government Health Warning, since increased
levels of iron in the blood has been linked with heart attacks. There we
now have a discussion going in this group about Irn Bru.

GW

Craig Cockburn

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Oct 4, 1992, 3:51:38 PM10/4/92
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In article <1992Oct4.1...@news.clarkson.edu>, wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes...
I'll take you up on that.

Does anyone know anywhere in the south of England where you can get Irn Bru
in glass bottles ? The plastic stuff just doesn't taste the same!

Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell

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Oct 4, 1992, 9:01:33 AM10/4/92
to
Of Craig's list, three items touch on things I've been meaning to ask about:

What is Irn Bru?

Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
local Giant Eagle Supermarket.

Anyone know where I could order some of the "My Friends..." series by
Jane Duncan? Or any of her "Janet Reachfar" children's books? I have a
few (mostly obtained in second hand bookstores when I was in Scotland
several yrs. ago) and now my mother is hooked--the Janet Sandison of
Reachfar is an exact contemporary of hers--and I'd like to get some or
even just one for a Christmas gift for her.

Thanks in advance for any info.

--Barra


Everything will perish save love and music.--Scots Gaelic proverb
Harpers have pluck--but don't get strung out.--Barra the Bard

Charles E Taggart

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Oct 5, 1992, 12:43:35 AM10/5/92
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Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell wrote:

>Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
>since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
>"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
>much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
>which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
>local Giant Eagle Supermarket.

I heard a story recently (perhaps apocryphal) that a group of Scots and other
Burns aficionadoes tried to get some haggis sent over for their Rabbie
Burns Night celebration, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S.
Customs refused to admit the haggis into the country, on grounds that it
was "unfit for human consumption" by U.S.D.A. standards.

They have no sense of adventure, that lot ... the haggis I had in
Edinburgh was excellent (although I must confess that the pint of McEwan's
and the shot of Macallan that washed it down were a bit of a help).
,
-- Eamon
--
,
Charles Eamon Taggart | "Time and space are playing games with people
ea...@netcom.com | who don't understand / You can't talk about
eam...@well.sf.ca.us | the weather when you've killed the weatherman."
Santa Monica, California | -- Toasted Heretic
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Chris Cooke

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Oct 5, 1992, 7:35:10 AM10/5/92
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In article <1992Oct4.1...@news.clarkson.edu> wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes:

From article <1992Oct4.0...@rdg.dec.com>, by cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com (Craig Cockburn):
>

> Irn Bru
>

This should obviously carry a Government Health Warning, since increased
levels of iron in the blood has been linked with heart attacks. There we
now have a discussion going in this group about Irn Bru.

They have to call it "Irn Bru" because it doesn't have iron in it any more.
It used to be called "Iron Brew".

For those that don't know, it's a type of fizzy soft drink, or soda. Very
sweet and sugary. Which means that it's still bad for you...
--
-- Chris. c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (on Janet, c...@uk.ac.ed.dcs)


Chris Cooke

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Oct 5, 1992, 7:38:41 AM10/5/92
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In article <YenpihO00...@andrew.cmu.edu> bj...@andrew.cmu.edu (Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell) writes:

Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
local Giant Eagle Supermarket.

I believe that you can buy it by mail order from Charles MacSween And Son,
130 Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh EH10 4ES, Scotland, phone +44 31 229 1216.
You may still have difficulty getting it past USA customs though.

David Morning

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Oct 5, 1992, 8:06:29 AM10/5/92
to
bj...@andrew.cmu.edu (Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell) writes:

>Of Craig's list, three items touch on things I've been meaning to ask about:

>What is Irn Bru?

A soft fizzy drink made from girders.
Don't go too near magnetic field if you've had a glass of this stuff.

Dave

--

David Morning

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Oct 5, 1992, 8:15:13 AM10/5/92
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c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) writes:

>In article <1992Oct4.1...@news.clarkson.edu> wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes:

> From article <1992Oct4.0...@rdg.dec.com>, by cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com (Craig Cockburn):
> >
> > Irn Bru
> >

> This should obviously carry a Government Health Warning, since increased
> levels of iron in the blood has been linked with heart attacks. There we
> now have a discussion going in this group about Irn Bru.

>They have to call it "Irn Bru" because it doesn't have iron in it any more.
>It used to be called "Iron Brew".

All together now (in best pantomime tradition):-

OH! YES IT DOES!!!

Ferrous something-or-other-very-weird-but-I-think-ammonia-is-part-of-it.
Look on a can or a bottle.

Barr's Irn Bru has always been called that. They even had a character they
called Ba Bru and a comic strip in the People's Friend about him - until the
Race Relations Act came in and Ba Bru went the same way as the Robertsons
Jam Golly.

"Iron Brew" is the name used by other soft drink manufacturers who try to
sell copies of the original Barr's stuff. They use the name to avoid infringing
copyright.


Dave

--

Gerry Mulvenna

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Oct 5, 1992, 6:07:48 AM10/5/92
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In article <1992Oct4.1...@news.clarkson.edu> wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes:

Has anybody ever tried Irn Bru and Tequila? A friend of mine says its
makes a pleasant change from the usual shorts and mixers.

Gerry Mulvenna (osg...@v2.qub.ac.uk)

--
The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Campus Office for Information
Technology, or the Experimental Bulletin Board Service.
internet: bbs.oit.unc.edu or 152.2.22.80

Chris Cooke

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Oct 5, 1992, 10:49:46 AM10/5/92
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In article <BvnE1...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk> d...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (David Morning) writes:

>They have to call it "Irn Bru" because it doesn't have iron in it any more.
>It used to be called "Iron Brew".

All together now (in best pantomime tradition):-

OH! YES IT DOES!!!

Well, blow me down. I got my info from some random "Scotsman" or "Scotland
on Sunday" a couple of years back; they must have got it wrong. I suppose
I'm just one of those naive striplings who believe what they read in the
papers :-)

Morna J Findlay

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Oct 5, 1992, 10:54:17 AM10/5/92
to
In article <1992Oct5.0...@netcom.com> ea...@netcom.com (Charles E Taggart) writes:
>Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell wrote:
>
>>Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
>>since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
>>"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
>>much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
>>which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
>>local Giant Eagle Supermarket.
>
>I heard a story recently (perhaps apocryphal) that a group of Scots and other
>Burns aficionadoes tried to get some haggis sent over for their Rabbie
>Burns Night celebration, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S.
>Customs refused to admit the haggis into the country, on grounds that it
>was "unfit for human consumption" by U.S.D.A. standards.

McSweens, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh do mail order ( vacuum-packed )
but not to the US, as the US customs regulations don't let it in. I think
most countries have similar rules, you're not supposed to bring
sausages or "cooked meats" into the UK.


They didn't know if the US would let veggie haggises ( YUM!) in.


M

--
Morna Findlay JANET:mo...@uk.ac.ed.dcs
Thanksgiving For a National Victory (Robert Burns)
Ye hypocrites! are these your pranks? To murder men and give God thanks?
Desist, for shame! Proceed no further: God won't accept your thanks for murther.

Morna J Findlay

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Oct 5, 1992, 10:50:47 AM10/5/92
to
In article <1992Oct5.0...@netcom.com> ea...@netcom.com (Charles E Taggart) writes:
>Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell wrote:
>
>>Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
>>since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
>>"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
>>much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
>>which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
>>local Giant Eagle Supermarket.
>
>I heard a story recently (perhaps apocryphal) that a group of Scots and other
>Burns aficionadoes tried to get some haggis sent over for their Rabbie
>Burns Night celebration, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S.
>Customs refused to admit the haggis into the country, on grounds that it
>was "unfit for human consumption" by U.S.D.A. standards.


McSweens, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh do mail order. I don't know if
they send abroad, but if anyone does - they will.

I assume the ones they send are vacuum-packed.

Henk Jonkers

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Oct 5, 1992, 8:50:57 AM10/5/92
to
c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) writes:

According to the label Irn Bru still contains some iron composite
(I don't remember the exact name, ferric ... citrate or something).
I brought a bottle of Irn Bru concentrate home from Scotland (it's
quite close to the real thing, when mixed with carbonated water, and
much more efficient to take on a plane than a bottle of real Irn
Bru). I think Irn Bru is just a trade-mark of Barr's, and the name
Iron Brew is used by possible other manifacturers (although I don't
know of any).

Henk ( H.Jo...@et.tudelft.nl )

Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,

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Oct 5, 1992, 12:38:52 PM10/5/92
to
From article <1992Oct4.1...@rdg.dec.com>, by cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com (Craig Cockburn):

>
>
> Does anyone know anywhere in the south of England where you can get Irn Bru
> in glass bottles ? The plastic stuff just doesn't taste the same!
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Craig Cockburn, Digital Equipment Co. Ltd, Reading, England. Suas

Doesn't Barr's Irn Bru come in cans now. Do they still use bottles at
all?
GW

Chris Cooke

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Oct 5, 1992, 2:32:55 PM10/5/92
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In article <1992Oct5.1...@news.clarkson.edu> wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes:

Doesn't Barr's Irn Bru come in cans now. Do they still use bottles at
all?

Both - some shops sell plastic bottles of it; some places sell cans; the
traditional (e.g. chip shops) and the vaguely eco-friendly establishments
sell it in returnable glass bottles with a 10p deposit. Many shops seem to
give you the choice of returnable glass bottles and non-returnable plastic
ones.

Ray Dunn

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Oct 7, 1992, 6:18:11 PM10/7/92
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In referenced article, mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>McSweens, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh do mail order. I don't know if
>they send abroad, but if anyone does - they will.

We go through this year after year. You do it just to annoy me, don't you?

(:-)

I'd _die_ for a McSween's Haggis, I use to live just up the street from
McSween's in Bruntsfield Gdns.

Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
that you know.
--
Ray Dunn at home | Beaconsfield, Quebec | Phone: (514) 630 3749
r...@philmtl.philips.ca | du...@cam.org | uunet!sobeco!philmtl!ray

Craig Cockburn

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Oct 8, 1992, 3:07:16 AM10/8/92
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In article <1992Oct7.2...@philmtl.philips.ca>, r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes...

>In referenced article, mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>>McSweens, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh do mail order. I don't know if
>>they send abroad, but if anyone does - they will.
>
>We go through this year after year. You do it just to annoy me, don't you?
>
>(:-)
>
>I'd _die_ for a McSween's Haggis, I use to live just up the street from
>McSween's in Bruntsfield Gdns.
>
>Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
>to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
>that you know.

McSween's do a vegetarian haggis. It's OK, I've had one. Certainly worth
a try, particularly if you can't get the carnivore version.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Craig Cockburn, Digital Equipment Co. Ltd, Reading, England. Suas

Internet: cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com leis
UUCP:..!decwrl!edieng.enet.dec.com!cockburn a'
Gha\idhlig!

Views here are my own, and are not necessarily those of Digital

Morna J Findlay

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Oct 8, 1992, 9:06:29 AM10/8/92
to
In article <1992Oct7.2...@philmtl.philips.ca> r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes:
>In referenced article, mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>
>Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
>to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
>that you know.

Why don't you order a veggie one from McSweens - some people ( me)
prefer them!

I often take one with me if I'm doing a spot of weekend hill-walking.
A veggie haggis, a bit of turnip, some tatties and some butter
cooked in a youth hostel on a cold evening after some honest excercise
is a rare tea.

Ulick Stafford

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Oct 8, 1992, 11:35:47 AM10/8/92
to
>In article <1992Oct7.2...@philmtl.philips.ca> r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes:
>>
>>Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
>>to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
>>that you know.

I have never had a problem. When I come back I always fill in the yes to
have you been on a farm or are you bringing back any meat, etc. I hand to
the customs guy and walk straight through. What`s the problem?


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+ 'There was a master come unto the earth, + Ulick Stafford, PP-ASEL +
+ born in the holy land of Indiana, + Dept of Chemical Engineering, +
+ in the mystical hills east of Fort Wayne'.+ Notre Dame, IN 46556 +
+ B'fhearr liom bheith ag eitilt. + ul...@bach.helios.nd.edu +
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Charles E Taggart

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Oct 8, 1992, 1:42:56 PM10/8/92
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In article <1992Oct8.1...@news.nd.edu> ul...@stravinsky.helios.nd.edu
(Ulick Stafford) writes:
>>In article <1992Oct7.2...@philmtl.philips.ca> r...@philmtl.philips.ca
>>(Ray Dunn) writes:
>>>
>>>Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
>>>to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
>>>that you know.
>
>I have never had a problem. When I come back I always fill in the yes to
>have you been on a farm or are you bringing back any meat, etc. I hand to
>the customs guy and walk straight through. What`s the problem?

Indeed ... there are rashers, sausages and salmon vacuum-packs for sale at
the Shannon and Dublin duty-free shops, for instance. I've brought back
Irish bacon to the States with no problems.

I think that US Customs has a specific problem with haggis, though, from
what I've heard.

,

Craig Cockburn

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Oct 8, 1992, 4:55:11 PM10/8/92
to

In article <1992Oct8.1...@netcom.com>, ea...@netcom.com (Charles E Taggart) writes...

>
>Indeed ... there are rashers, sausages and salmon vacuum-packs for sale at
>the Shannon and Dublin duty-free shops, for instance. I've brought back
>Irish bacon to the States with no problems.
>
>I think that US Customs has a specific problem with haggis, though, from
>what I've heard.
>

It isn't meat that's the problem, it's haggis. It is haggis which has
been deemed unfit for human consumption and it is haggis which as been
banned. Other meat is less restricted.

Ray Dunn

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Oct 10, 1992, 6:58:23 PM10/10/92
to
In ref'd article, ul...@stravinsky.helios.nd.edu (Ulick Stafford) writes:

>>In ref'darticle r...@philmtl.philips.ca (Ray Dunn) writes:
>>>Unfortunately neither the US nor Canadian Customs allow _any_ meat products
>>>to be imported privately. Foot 'n mouth, Mad English Disease, things like
>>>that you know.
>
>I have never had a problem. When I come back I always fill in the yes to
>have you been on a farm or are you bringing back any meat, etc. I hand to
>the customs guy and walk straight through. What`s the problem?

I can't explain how you've managed to get away with it, but it's a
fact that meat should be stopped at customs.

Perhaps it's the twenty dollar bill you clip to the form?

Niall Graham

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Oct 12, 1992, 4:48:24 AM10/12/92
to
Conversation between myself and US customs official at JFK:

Do you have any food to declare?
No.
Any meat?
No, nothing.
Are you sure?
Yeah.
Any black pudding?

I laughed. Then he laughed.

Iskandar Taib

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Oct 12, 1992, 12:53:33 PM10/12/92
to
In article <Bvt0E...@dcs.ed.ac.uk> mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:

>Why don't you order a veggie one from McSweens - some people ( me)
>prefer them!

>I often take one with me if I'm doing a spot of weekend hill-walking.
>A veggie haggis, a bit of turnip, some tatties and some butter
>cooked in a youth hostel on a cold evening after some honest excercise
>is a rare tea.

I've read some interesting things on this newsgroup but this takes the
cake 9-)

Describe one of these wonders to us. What do they use for the bag? Do
they use soy protein instead of sheep parts?


By the way.. its getting that time of the year again so can someone
please post the Sawney Beane story again? I've gone and lost my copy
again 8-(


--
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Iskandar Taib | The only thing worse than Peach ala
Internet: NT...@SILVER.UCS.INDIANA.EDU | Frog is Frog ala Peach
Bitnet: NTAIB@IUBACS !

Iskandar Taib

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Oct 12, 1992, 1:00:19 PM10/12/92
to
In article <1992Oct8.2...@rdg.dec.com> cock...@edieng.enet.dec.com (Craig Cockburn) writes:
>
>In article <1992Oct8.1...@netcom.com|, ea...@netcom.com (Charles E Taggart) writes...
||
||Indeed ... there are rashers, sausages and salmon vacuum-packs for sale at
||the Shannon and Dublin duty-free shops, for instance. I've brought back
||Irish bacon to the States with no problems.
||
||I think that US Customs has a specific problem with haggis, though, from
||what I've heard.
||
|
|It isn't meat that's the problem, it's haggis. It is haggis which has
|been deemed unfit for human consumption and it is haggis which as been
|banned. Other meat is less restricted.

I dunno. I've had meat products confiscated at Customs. Mostly dry
beef and chicken curries and such. British customs supposedly don't
have this same restriction - such things can be brought into Britain
without any problems.

Iskandar Taib

unread,
Oct 12, 1992, 1:06:08 PM10/12/92
to
In article <BvnLE...@dcs.ed.ac.uk> mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>In article <1992Oct5.0...@netcom.com> ea...@netcom.com (Charles E Taggart) writes:
>>Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell wrote:
>>
>>>Where/how can I get hold of some haggis for this year's Burns Night,
>>>since the Scottish friend who got his mum to send him some (marked
>>>"Confectionary") for the past 2 yrs. is now in Japan--? I doubt VERY
>>>much if American butchers would supply the traditional ingredients,
>>>which is also why it's so hard to obtain here--I can't ask for it at our
>>>local Giant Eagle Supermarket.
>>
>>I heard a story recently (perhaps apocryphal) that a group of Scots and other
>>Burns aficionadoes tried to get some haggis sent over for their Rabbie
>>Burns Night celebration, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S.
>>Customs refused to admit the haggis into the country, on grounds that it
>>was "unfit for human consumption" by U.S.D.A. standards.
>
>McSweens, Bruntsfield Place, Edinburgh do mail order ( vacuum-packed )
>but not to the US, as the US customs regulations don't let it in. I think
>most countries have similar rules, you're not supposed to bring
>sausages or "cooked meats" into the UK.
>
>
>They didn't know if the US would let veggie haggises ( YUM!) in.
^^^^^^^^

Hagii? 9-)

Here's something that was posted a year or so ago though:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Article 5029 of soc.culture.celtic:
From: lbr...@athena.mit.edu (Lynn B Reid)
Newsgroups: soc.culture.celtic
Subject: How to order a Haggis Was: Re: Lard n Haggis
Message-ID: <1991Jan4.1...@athena.mit.edu>
Date: 4 Jan 91 17:18:33 GMT
Reply-To: lbr...@athena.mit.edu (Lynn B Reid)
Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Lines: 46
Status: OR

In response to all the Americans belating the difficulty of finding haggis,
I post our solution. Kearny, N.J., is a hotbed of expat- Scots. There are
several Scottish butchers, shops, bakers, and some good chippies there.
We buy our haggis frozen when we visit N.J., but two of the butchers
(that I know of) will also ship via U.P.S. Contact:

Royal Market
Scottish Butcher and Food Imports
576 Kearny Ave.
Kearny, N.J. 07032
(201) 991-0408
Proprietors: Charles Davidson and Claude Neilson

Stewarts of Kearny
338 Kearny Ave. also a branch in Bricktown, N.J.
Kearny, N.J. 07032
(201) 991-1436
Proprietor: Edward A. Stewart, Manager

Both butchers carry an assortment of
pies, bridies, sausage rolls; black, white, and fruit
pudding; Irish/English/Scottish Links, Square Slice Sausage, Gammon, etc.
They also carry a limited assortment of British and Scottish delicacies:
Tunnocks' Caramel Wafers, Snowballs, Irn Bru, Ambrosia Cream Rice pudding,
and the like.

Personally, we get our haggis and black pudding from Royal Market and
our pies from Stewarts. I can unhesitatingly recommend either shop; the
proprietors are very helpful and more than willing to fill special orders.
We also find that all of our favorites freeze well (except the Tunnocks,
which never make it past the borders of New Jersey....).

Hope this is a help.

--
Lynn B. Reid
Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory for Water Resources and Hydrodynamics
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, MA 02139

==============================================================================
Internet: lbr...@athena.mit.edu
Bitnet: lbr...@athena.mit.edu
UUCP: mit-eddie!mit-athena!lbreid
==============================================================================
Nobody pays me enough to care what I think.

Iskandar Taib

unread,
Oct 12, 1992, 3:04:52 PM10/12/92
to
>In article <BvnE1...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk> d...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (David Morning) writes:
>
> >They have to call it "Irn Bru" because it doesn't have iron in it any more.
> >It used to be called "Iron Brew".
>
> All together now (in best pantomime tradition):-
>

> OH! YES IT DOES!!!


Hmmmmm.. so whats the point? A drink for anemics? What does it taste
like?

Iskandar Taib

unread,
Oct 12, 1992, 2:59:47 PM10/12/92
to
In article <CC.92Oc...@arran.dcs.ed.ac.uk> c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) writes:
|In article <1992Oct5.1...@news.clarkson.edu| wal...@sun.soe.clarkson.edu (Graham Walker, 227 West Old Main,268-3847,) writes:
|
| Doesn't Barr's Irn Bru come in cans now. Do they still use bottles at
| all?
|
|Both - some shops sell plastic bottles of it; some places sell cans; the
|traditional (e.g. chip shops) and the vaguely eco-friendly establishments
|sell it in returnable glass bottles with a 10p deposit. Many shops seem to
|give you the choice of returnable glass bottles and non-returnable plastic
|ones.


Hmm.. are these like the 2 liter bottles which they use for Coca Cola
Classic in the States? Ugh...

I saw my first 3 liter bottle of Coke in Texas some years back.. Yes,
Martha, everything _IS_ bigger in Texas.

Jack Campin

unread,
Oct 12, 1992, 1:51:41 PM10/12/92
to
nt...@silver.ucs.indiana.edu (Iskandar Taib) wrote:
> mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>> Why don't you order a veggie [haggis] from McSweens - some people (me)

>> prefer them!
>> I often take one with me if I'm doing a spot of weekend hill-walking.
>> A veggie haggis, a bit of turnip, some tatties and some butter cooked
>> in a youth hostel on a cold evening after some honest exercise is a
>> rare tea.

> Describe one of these wonders to us. What do they use for the bag? Do
> they use soy protein instead of sheep parts?

The bag is plastic (some sort of tough clear film, like what's used
for other boil-in-bag foods). The meat is replaced by chopped nuts
and vegetable fat; the label doesn't say what the proportions are,
but definitely doesn't list TVP or any such abomination.

If I was trying to do it myself, I think I'd add a small amount of brown
lentil, which isn't in the MacSween's version.

--
-- Jack Campin room G092, Computing Science Department, Glasgow University,
17 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow G12 8RZ, Scotland TEL: 041 339 8855 x6854 (work)
INTERNET: ja...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk or via nsfnet-relay.ac.uk FAX: 041 330 4913
BANG!net: via mcsun and uknet BITNET: via UKACRL UUCP: ja...@glasgow.uucp

Michael G Hines

unread,
Oct 12, 1992, 5:55:19 PM10/12/92
to
Can you get Irn Bru in the US? If so, where or what distributers?

Thanks from someone willing to try anything Scottish,
Michael
hin...@purccvm.cc.purdue.edu

Morna J Findlay

unread,
Oct 13, 1992, 8:17:00 AM10/13/92
to
In article <Bw0pL...@usenet.ucs.indiana.edu> nt...@silver.ucs.indiana.edu (Iskandar Taib) writes:
>In article <Bvt0E...@dcs.ed.ac.uk> mo...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Morna J Findlay) writes:
>
>>Why don't you order a veggie one from McSweens - some people ( me)
>>prefer them!
>
>Describe one of these wonders to us. What do they use for the bag? Do
>they use soy protein instead of sheep parts?
>

Hmph - do I detect the tiniest bit of sarkiness here? :-)

Most of a traditional haggis is already veggie - oatmeal. The
bits of offal found in a traditional haggis are replaced in the
veggie ones by nuts and lentils and carrot etc. The bag is plastic.

The spices added are the same. Some meat-eaters of my
acquaintance prefer the veggie versions.

James Moore

unread,
Oct 15, 1992, 5:13:34 PM10/15/92
to
Various people write things like:

>||I've brought back
>||Irish bacon to the States with no problems.
>||
>||I think that US Customs has a specific problem with haggis, though, from
>||what I've heard.
>|
>|It isn't meat that's the problem, it's haggis. It is haggis which has
>|been deemed unfit for human consumption and it is haggis which as been
>|banned. Other meat is less restricted.

I just called the US Department of Agriculture. The basic rule is that
meat imports depend on the disease status of a country, and currently
you can't import any meat products from the UK. Haggis sometimes gets
singled out because customs officers don't realize it has meat, but
there are no special rules covering it, other than the general prohibition
on UK meat.

Commercially canned, hermetically sealed products are not covered by
the ban, so if you can find haggis cooked in the can, you're all set.

The Republic of Ireland is slightly different; you can import pork
products from the Republic, but no beef or mutton. Northern Ireland
is covered by the UK ban. Apparently, British and Irish frontier
patrols are so good they can even stop bacteria from crossing the
border :-).

If you need to know more details, call your local US embassy or
USDA office. The phone number here is 510-273-6276.

--
James Moore /|\ ja...@wrs.com
Wind River Systems \|/ Alameda, California
"Half of what he said meant something else, and the other half
didn't mean anything at all"

Chris Cooke

unread,
Oct 16, 1992, 8:12:39 AM10/16/92
to
In article <james.7...@wrs.com> ja...@wrs.com (James Moore) writes:

I just called the US Department of Agriculture. The basic rule is that
meat imports depend on the disease status of a country, and currently
you can't import any meat products from the UK.

Probably because of Mad Cow Disease, I suppose. I seem to remember reading
recently that 60000 cows have now died of this.

Ulick Stafford

unread,
Oct 16, 1992, 10:15:52 AM10/16/92
to
In article <CC.92Oct...@arran.dcs.ed.ac.uk> c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) writes:
>
>Probably because of Mad Cow Disease, I suppose. I seem to remember reading
>recently that 60000 cows have now died of this.

Died of it, or were butchered because one beast in the herd might have had it?

Jack Campin

unread,
Oct 16, 1992, 9:29:44 AM10/16/92
to
c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) wrote:
> In article <james.7...@wrs.com> ja...@wrs.com (James Moore) writes:
>> I just called the US Department of Agriculture. The basic rule is that
>> meat imports depend on the disease status of a country, and currently
>> you can't import any meat products from the UK.
> Probably because of Mad Cow Disease, I suppose. I seem to remember reading
> recently that 60000 cows have now died of this.

While this might seem a rational reason for banning UK beef imports, no
beef goes into haggis (nor are sheep fed on any of the stuff that causes
BSE), and the US meat ban was *really* motivated by tit-for-tat; it's in
response to the European ban on imports of US beef contaminated by bovine
somatostatin (a growth hormone widely used over there to boost yield).

It's not obvious that the European ban was motivated by anything other than
agripolitics, either; regulatory authorities on both sides of the Atlantic
are primarily interested in protecting profits for producers, not the
health of their consumers.

mi...@skyfox.usask.ca

unread,
Oct 16, 1992, 9:58:43 PM10/16/92
to
In a previous article, ja...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (Jack Campin) wrote:
>c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) wrote:
>> In article <james.7...@wrs.com> ja...@wrs.com (James Moore) writes:
>>> I just called the US Department of Agriculture. The basic rule is that
>>> meat imports depend on the disease status of a country, and currently
>>> you can't import any meat products from the UK.
>> Probably because of Mad Cow Disease, I suppose. I seem to remember reading
>> recently that 60000 cows have now died of this.
>
>While this might seem a rational reason for banning UK beef imports, no
>beef goes into haggis (nor are sheep fed on any of the stuff that causes
>BSE), and the US meat ban was *really* motivated by tit-for-tat; it's in
>response to the European ban on imports of US beef contaminated by bovine
>somatostatin (a growth hormone widely used over there to boost yield).
>
Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (aka mad cow disease, or BSE) is thought to be
caused by the same agent that causes scrapie in sheep. So, it makes as much
sense to ban sheep-derived meat products as beef.

Pearse

Barbara G. Jacob-McDowell

unread,
Oct 18, 1992, 7:33:44 AM10/18/92
to

I tried to indicate in my original query (and I guess i wasn't clear
enough) that I knew of the difficulty in getting haggis from the UK.
Remember my mention that my friend's mum had sent it in a box marked
Confectionary, so it would get through Customs?
Anyway, Iskander very kindly sent me an old post concerning 2
Scottish butcher shops in Kearny, NJ which have haggis and other
Scottish products. My husband and I are going to visit my folks in
northwestern NJ over Thanksgiving, so we will check them out while we
are in the area. If anyone is interested, I can post our reaction.
I appreciate all the replies I got concerning this.

--Barra

Everything will perish save love and music.--Scots Gaelic proverb
Harpers have pluck--but don't get strung out.--Barra the Bard

Roadster Racewerks

unread,
Oct 20, 1992, 8:22:19 PM10/20/92
to

Afraid I can't buy this latest argument about US-Scottish haggis imports. First
off, there is virtually no American Haggis Industry to protect. Most 'Merkuns
think haggis vaguely obscene, if they know it exists. We aren't very big on
organ meats here. Secondly, whether or not it is true (you'll have to tell me)
the word here is that sheep are the main cause of "Mad Cow Disease" diseased
sheep having once upon a time been processed as the protein in cattle feed...

Now if diseased sheep brains are indeed the reason Mad Cow spread so widely,
and haggis is made of sheep organ meats, *and* you can get Mad Cow by eating
underprocessed organ meats from diseased beasts, then I can see why they don't
want haggis let in that hasn't been properly tinned....

(This is not to say that they haven't unfairly refused sausage from EC countries
and other things to protect our industry, because they're *notorious* for
that. But not haggis. There's virtually no market. And if you must make haggis
in the US, you have to use large sausage casing instead of paunches because
they're considered "unfit". Lord knows why intestines are Ok, and stomachs
aren't... But *some* of our laws do make sense. Make sure your haggis is well
cooked! :-)

Suze
tri...@agora.rain.com

Ulick Stafford

unread,
Oct 21, 1992, 10:24:59 AM10/21/92
to
In article <BwG3p...@agora.rain.com> tri...@agora.rain.com (Roadster Racewerks) writes:
>
>(This is not to say that they haven't unfairly refused sausage from EC countries
>and other things to protect our industry, because they're *notorious* for
>that. But not haggis. There's virtually no market. And if you must make haggis

I originally said I ahd never had a problem importing meats from Ireland. It`s
as if customs in Chicago are not interested. But speaking with a friend
yesterday, he told that when he was student coming back from Germany, he
said it was very sad trying to explain to an old German lady why customs in
New York considered her magnificent sausage to be 'unfit for human consumption'.

Wallace Venable

unread,
Oct 22, 1992, 6:44:37 PM10/22/92
to
In article <Bw7ut...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk> ja...@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk (Jack Campin) writes:

>c...@dcs.ed.ac.uk (Chris Cooke) wrote:
>> In article <james.7...@wrs.com> ja...@wrs.com (James Moore) writes:
>>> I just called the US Department of Agriculture. The basic rule is that
>>> meat imports depend on the disease status of a country, and currently
>>> you can't import any meat products from the UK.
>> Probably because of Mad Cow Disease, I suppose. I seem to remember reading
>> recently that 60000 cows have now died of this.

>While this might seem a rational reason for banning UK beef imports, no
>beef goes into haggis (nor are sheep fed on any of the stuff that causes
>BSE),

Hoof and mouth disease is carried by both sheep and cows. I don't
know the current status of H&M in Britain, but it has been found there
within recent memory.

>and the US meat ban was *really* motivated by tit-for-tat; it's in
>response to the European ban on imports of US beef contaminated by bovine
>somatostatin (a growth hormone widely used over there to boost yield).

It's been in effect since before concern over hormones.

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