Royal Family's Last Name?

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Horng-Juing Lee

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Aug 9, 1993, 5:04:40 PM8/9/93
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Hi,

I would like to know that does the royal family have last name? People always
refers them such as Queen Elizabeth, Prince Charles. Are these their first
name or last name? It they do have last name, then what is it?

Horng-Juing Lee

Markus Weigl

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Aug 9, 1993, 5:29:48 PM8/9/93
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Horng-Juing Lee (hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu) wrote:
: Hi,

: Horng-Juing Lee

Mountbatten-Windsor, isn't it?


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John Cormac Davis

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Aug 10, 1993, 7:54:22 AM8/10/93
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Actually, it's 'Loose-Sphincter-Clenching- Evil-Trunks ' hence their understandable wish to keep quiet about it.

Nowadays, though, the more relaxed atitude towards the Monarchy on the part
of their loyal subjects has led them to refer to the younger members of the Royal family by part, at least, of their real name.


K.C. Baker

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Aug 10, 1993, 8:57:36 AM8/10/93
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In article <CBIH1...@waterloo.hp.com> mwe...@waterloo.hp.com (Markus Weigl) writes:
>Horng-Juing Lee (hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu) wrote:
>: Hi,
>
>: I would like to know that does the royal family have last name? People always
>: refers them such as Queen Elizabeth, Prince Charles. Are these their first
>: name or last name? It they do have last name, then what is it?
>
>: Horng-Juing Lee
>
>Mountbatten-Windsor, isn't it?

Actually it's something like Saxe-Coburg-Goethe (the last is spelt incorrectly,
and I don't know the correct spelling, but it is pronounced like the author
Goethe). They changed the name to Windsor during the WW1, at the same time
as German Shepherds were renamed "Alsations", and Dachshunds were being
kicked to death in the streets.

(I don't know why all my examples of wartime civilian hysteria are rather
dog-related; just that sort of day I guess).

cheers,

Ken
--
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Department of Protein Engineering INTERNET : MB...@SEQNET.DL.AC.UK
AFRC Institute of Food Research TEL : (+44) 734 357139
Reading Berks RG6 2EF FAX : (+44) 734 267917

R.J.Hare

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Aug 10, 1993, 10:30:15 AM8/10/93
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hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu (Horng-Juing Lee) writes:

> I would like to know that does the royal family have last name? People always

Just Windsor, I think. Mountbatten is actually the surname of Phillip.

From memory, the name was changed to Windsor at the time of the Great War -
previously the name was (I think) Saxe-Coburg - deemed to be too Germanic
during a war against Germany.

I think Mountbatten is a name-change also, but I'm not sure about that one.

Roger Hare

Jonathan Beasley Murray

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Aug 10, 1993, 2:35:31 PM8/10/93
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Windsor, I was always led to believe. But--as with license plates--they
don't ever have to use it. Brenda just signs herself Elizabeth R (Regina).

>
>Horng-Juing Lee
>


Patrick Kearney

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Aug 10, 1993, 2:28:44 PM8/10/93
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R.J.Hare (rjh...@festival.ed.ac.uk) wrote:

: Just Windsor, I think. Mountbatten is actually the surname of Phillip.


I thought Phil was a bubble & squeak; he's often referred to as 'Phil
the Greek' by friends in London.

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Jonathan Beasley Murray

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Aug 10, 1993, 2:46:53 PM8/10/93
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In article <248600...@s-crim1.dl.ac.uk> mb...@s-crim1.dl.ac.uk (K.C. Baker) writes:


>Actually it's something like Saxe-Coburg-Goethe (the last is spelt incorrectly,
>and I don't know the correct spelling, but it is pronounced like the author
>Goethe). They changed the name to Windsor during the WW1, at the same time
>as German Shepherds were renamed "Alsations", and Dachshunds were being
>kicked to death in the streets.

I thought it was just that the Battenburgs changed their name to Mountbatten.

>
>cheers,
>
>Ken
>

Jon

sl...@cc.usu.edu

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Aug 10, 1993, 5:05:25 PM8/10/93
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In article <CBJsA...@festival.ed.ac.uk>, rjh...@festival.ed.ac.uk (R.J.Hare) writes:
>
> I think Mountbatten is a name-change also, but I'm not sure about that one.
>
> Roger Hare
Yeah, wasn't it Battenburgh? Another change during one of the wars (excuse my
ignorance) because we wouldn't want our Royal Family to be thought to be German.

Kirstin

Andrew Bray

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Aug 10, 1993, 4:00:37 PM8/10/93
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In article <CBIH1...@waterloo.hp.com> mwe...@waterloo.hp.com (Markus Weigl) writes:

>Mountbatten-Windsor, isn't it?

Wasn't it Saxe-Coberg before Queen Victoria changed it to Windsor?

Andy

Fragano Ledgister

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Aug 11, 1993, 3:14:52 AM8/11/93
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After the start of the First World War, the Princes of Battenberg,
being good Englishmen, changed their name to Mountbatten. The King,
having just changed his name to Windsor (though if he'd read _The
Song of Lewes_ he might have had second thoughts) gave them the
Marquisate of Milford Haven as a consolation prize.

Lord Louis Mountbatten, who started his life as a Serene Highness,
became a peer in his own right, thanks to his cousin Bertie, after
World War II.


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Sven Utcke

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Aug 11, 1993, 8:59:46 AM8/11/93
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In article <248600...@s-crim1.dl.ac.uk> mb...@s-crim1.dl.ac.uk (K.C. Baker) writes:
>Actually it's something like Saxe-Coburg-Goethe (the last is spelt incorrectly,
>and I don't know the correct spelling, but it is pronounced like the author
>Goethe).

Gotha? That would make sense (from a German point of view) --- even if
it isn't right (but might very well be).

BTW: You're sure about Saxe? I seem to recall that there is a
principality (or whatever) of Saxen-Coburg --- I dare say that's the
one in question.

Sven

William Clark

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Aug 11, 1993, 9:58:15 AM8/11/93
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I thought that the ROyal family's surname was actually Mountbatten-Windsor. The
Mountbatten came from and anglicisation of Battenberg, and the Windsor from
a similar translation of Wettin - both from the German, which was thought to
be prudent during World War I.

William Clark


Blumberg

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Aug 11, 1993, 3:01:11 PM8/11/93
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well, just to clear up the spelling, the last part of the name would be
...-Gotha (as far i, being not into monarchy, can tell), if anything.
--
Klaus Blumberg, Braunschweig, Germany.
"Menschheit ist eine humoristische Rolle." Novalis, Bluetenstaub 63

Patrick Kearney

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Aug 11, 1993, 4:31:27 PM8/11/93
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sl...@cc.usu.edu (sl...@cc.usu.edu) wrote:

I thought Battenburg was a kind of rich cake with marzipan on it.

Chris Ambidge

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Aug 11, 1993, 5:01:46 PM8/11/93
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In article <I8040101.93...@rz5nrt3.rz.tu-bs.de> i804...@ws.rz.tu-bs.de (Blumberg) writes:
>well, just to clear up the spelling, the last part of the name would be
>...-Gotha (as far i, being not into monarchy, can tell), if anything.
>--

er-- why would the Royal Family's last name be
[Saxe-Coburg-]Gotha? You could conceivably argue
that Victoria's name changed to that [?from Hanover?]
when she married Prince Albert, but by precisely the
same logic, Elizabeth married Phillip Mountbatten.

Personally, I'm a great believer in calling people what
they want to be called. I have used the Change-of-Name
Act, as have many others, and my name is now legally
the one on the paper the judge signed.

similarly, George F Handel (of Water Music fame) changed
his name from Haendel to Handel (though he didn't change
the spelling of his middle name, which was a germanic
variant of Fred, but I can't remember exactly whattitwas).
Record companies who refer to him as "Haendel" are being
(a) a tad precious and (b) wrong. He changed it to "Handel".

Likewise, the present Queen chose / signed proclamations /
whatever to indicate that the name of her house was "Windsor".
So, that's what it is.

Chris
--
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chemical engineering / university of toronto
200 college st / toronto ON / M5S 1A4 // 416 978 3106

J Henderson

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Aug 12, 1993, 5:00:44 AM8/12/93
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Patrick Kearney (pa...@sr.hp.com) wrote:
: R.J.Hare (rjh...@festival.ed.ac.uk) wrote:

: : Just Windsor, I think. Mountbatten is actually the surname of Phillip.


: I thought Phil was a bubble & squeak; he's often referred to as 'Phil
: the Greek' by friends in London.

The Greek royal family was German. I suppose the Greeks thought that the
concept of royalty (like the concept of standing in a queue) was beyond them,
Greece being the home of democracy, an' all, so they franchised the operation
to a bunch of Krauts.

--
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edinburgh university tel +44 (0)31 650 5886 (office)
department of geology and geophysics +44 (0)31 228 1536 (home)
edinburgh eh9 3jw uk fax +44 (0)31 668 3184

Wood, Victor

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Aug 12, 1993, 4:36:11 AM8/12/93
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In <CBIF...@news.cis.umn.edu> hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu writes:


Not again!!! This should be in the FAQ (Which Ive never seen) for this group!

Its Windsor (as in the burnt down castle!)

Victor Wood |
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Andy Davies

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Aug 12, 1993, 6:06:13 AM8/12/93
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>
>The Greek royal family was German. I suppose the Greeks....franchised the operation

>to a bunch of Krauts.
>
>jeremy henderson jer...@castle.edinburgh.ac.uk
>edinburgh university tel +44 (0)31 650 5886 (office)
>department of geology and geophysics +44 (0)31 228 1536 (home)
>edinburgh eh9 3jw uk fax +44 (0)31 668 3184

Surely a bunch of Danes, like at a Carlsberg factory in England.
Phil's family were middle ranking Danish aristocray I seem to remember.

Andy.


---
--------------------------
Andy Davies
an...@terminus.ericsson.se
Ericsson Camtec, England
--------------------------

John Cormac Davis

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Aug 12, 1993, 6:38:12 AM8/12/93
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Chris Ambidge / amb...@ecf.toronto.edu remarks:

>Likewise, the present Queen chose / signed proclamations /
> whatever to indicate that the name of her house was "Windsor.

And was strangely emphatic about this when she signed all those fire insurance
policies a couple of years ago... made sure they wrote down the address too...

J Henderson

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Aug 12, 1993, 7:18:40 AM8/12/93
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Andy Davies (an...@terminus.ericsson.se) wrote:
: >
: >The Greek royal family was German. I suppose the Greeks....franchised the operation

: >to a bunch of Krauts.

: Surely a bunch of Danes, like at a Carlsberg factory in England.


: Phil's family were middle ranking Danish aristocray I seem to remember.

Naah, wasn't it the *Norwegians* who asked a Dane to be king?

(extra trivium that may be completely false: the Norwegian constitution is
written in Danish)


--

Paul Taylor <pt@acl.icnet.uk>

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Aug 12, 1993, 7:48:48 AM8/12/93
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In article <CBn8r...@festival.ed.ac.uk> jer...@festival.ed.ac.uk (J Henderson) writes:
>
>Naah, wasn't it the *Norwegians* who asked a Dane to be king?

And the Albanians who asked Christopher Fry, an Englishman. I can't remember if
he turned the offer down or if they changed their minds when they discovered a
candidate with irresitable name of Zog.

Albania! Albania!
Far less repressive than Rumania!
(from the 1978 Albanian World Cup Song)

Sven Utcke

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Aug 13, 1993, 8:36:34 AM8/13/93
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In article <CBM52...@ecf.toronto.edu> amb...@ecf.toronto.edu (Chris Ambidge) writes:
> similarly, George F Handel (of Water Music fame) changed
> his name from Haendel to Handel (though he didn't change
> the spelling of his middle name, which was a germanic
> variant of Fred, but I can't remember exactly whattitwas).

Friedrich

> Record companies who refer to him as "Haendel" are being
> (a) a tad precious and (b) wrong. He changed it to "Handel".

I don't think that you have a point here. He probably didn't change
his name so much as to express a wish of not being considered German
anymore (or for whatever reason you think he did), but rather because
"Handel", pronounced by an English, sounds exactly like "Haendel"
pronounced by a German, whereas "Haendel" pronounced by an English, is
very likely to come out disgustingly awful.

(I feel with him --- just try to say "Sven Utcke", compare it with the
"proper" way --- and you will know why!)

I think it is very much like me saying that I'm from "Hamburg" (please
imagine English pronunciation here) in the "Federal Republic of
Germany", although I'm of course from "Hamburg" (German
pronunciation) in the "Bundesrepublik Deutschland". When living in a
foreign country it just makes things easier to adopt their ways to a
certain extend (I would use the English version of "Sven" if only
there would be any --- Mike for Michael, Fred for Friedrich and so
on). But I still think that (at least) German record companies are
very well justified to call him "Georg Friedrich Haendel" --- the very
same way I talk about the "Bundesrepublik ..."

If of course you have evidence of an expressed wish of him never to be
called "Haendel" anymore (say, a letter to a *German* friend --- it
obviously wouldn't do to have him saying "please don't bother with
'Haendel', you'll never be able to pronounce it anyway, so better use
'Handel' instead" --- probably clad into slightly more polite words
--- to an English), then please

a) enlighten me
b) forget about everything I wrote!

Sven

HALLAM-BAKER Phillip

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Aug 13, 1993, 10:15:03 AM8/13/93
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In article <CBIF...@news.cis.umn.edu>, hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu (Horng-Juing Lee) writes:

Rex. as in :

Henry VIII Rex.
Eddie IV Rex

They thus proudly display their pre-adamite descent from Tyranasaurus Rex.


Phill H-B

HALLAM-BAKER Phillip

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Aug 13, 1993, 10:29:46 AM8/13/93
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In article <CBK3B...@srgenprp.sr.hp.com>, pa...@sr.hp.com (Patrick Kearney) writes:

|>R.J.Hare (rjh...@festival.ed.ac.uk) wrote:
|>
|>: Just Windsor, I think. Mountbatten is actually the surname of Phillip.
|>
|>
|>I thought Phil was a bubble & squeak; he's often referred to as 'Phil
|>the Greek' by friends in London.

Phil the Greek only has one L. Thus I have two. Upon being asked by the
registra whether he wanter one L like Prince Philip or two my Father
said "Two in that case".

Looking for the day when my countrymen chose to restore the true heir and
throw off the Norman yolk...


Phill H-B

Andrew J Norman

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Aug 13, 1993, 10:57:44 AM8/13/93
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In a previous article, sv...@robots.ox.ac.uk (Sven Utcke) says:

>In article <CBM52...@ecf.toronto.edu> amb...@ecf.toronto.edu (Chris Ambidge) writes:
>> similarly, George F Handel (of Water Music fame) changed
>> his name from Haendel to Handel (though he didn't change
>> the spelling of his middle name, which was a germanic
>> variant of Fred, but I can't remember exactly whattitwas).
>
>Friedrich
>
>> Record companies who refer to him as "Haendel" are being
>> (a) a tad precious and (b) wrong. He changed it to "Handel".
>
>I don't think that you have a point here. He probably didn't change
>his name so much as to express a wish of not being considered German
>anymore (or for whatever reason you think he did), but rather because
>"Handel", pronounced by an English, sounds exactly like "Haendel"
>pronounced by a German, whereas "Haendel" pronounced by an English, is
>very likely to come out disgustingly awful.
>

Similarly Greig (the Norwegian composer) was descended from a Scotsman
called Grieg, who changed the spelling of his name so that the Norwegians
would pronounce it in the Scottish manner. Actually, Haendel (German) is
only the same as Handel (SE English) - the short "a" vowel sound is one of
the most variable parts of English regional accents. People in the SE
pronounce it more like an "e", which is similar to the German "ae".


--
/*****************************************************
* Andrew Norman n...@le.ac.uk *
* Engineering Dept, University of Leicester, England *
*****************************************************/

Paul Taylor <pt@acl.icnet.uk>

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Aug 13, 1993, 11:00:53 AM8/13/93
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In article <1993Aug13....@dxcern.cern.ch> hal...@alws.cern.ch writes:>
>
>Looking for the day when my countrymen chose to restore the true heir and
>throw off the Norman yolk...
>

...which has been sitting in the back of the Norman fridge since the last time
Norman made meringue.

A.R.D. Pepper [MFCF]

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Aug 13, 1993, 11:54:55 AM8/13/93
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In article <CBn18...@dnsserv.go.dlr.de> RM...@DLRVMS.GO.DLR.DE (Wood, Victor) writes:

>In <CBIF...@news.cis.umn.edu> hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu writes:
>
>> I would like to know that does the royal family have last name?
>
>Not again!!! This should be in the FAQ (Which Ive never seen) for this group!
>
>Its Windsor (as in the burnt down castle!)
>

Look, if we listed all the answers in regular postings, then people
would stop frequently asking the questions, and so they would no longer
be frequently asked questions, would they?

Hence, it can be said, soc.culture.british already has the best kind of
FAQ.

arp.

Daan Sandee

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Aug 13, 1993, 12:56:48 PM8/13/93
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In article <CBn8r...@festival.ed.ac.uk>, jer...@festival.ed.ac.uk (J Henderson) writes:
|> Andy Davies (an...@terminus.ericsson.se) wrote:
|> : >
|> : >The Greek royal family was German. I suppose the Greeks....franchised the operation
|> : >to a bunch of Krauts.
|>
|> : Surely a bunch of Danes, like at a Carlsberg factory in England.
|> : Phil's family were middle ranking Danish aristocray I seem to remember.

When Greece gained independence from Turkey in 1831, they offered the
crown to a scion of the House of Wittelsbach, then Kings of Bavaria,
who became King Otto I of the Hellenes. This Otto was deposed in 1869
and they got Prince George of Denmark instead. So both of you are right.


|>
|> Naah, wasn't it the *Norwegians* who asked a Dane to be king?

Yes, Haakon VII, King 1905-1957 was born a Dane.

(Dates above are from memory and thus have a standard error of +/- 4 years).
|> --
|> jeremy henderson jer...@castle.edinburgh.ac.uk

Daan Sandee san...@think.com
Thinking Machines Corporation
1010 El Camino Real, Suite 310
Menlo Park, CA 94025 (415) 329-9300

SS...@auvm.american.edu

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Aug 13, 1993, 3:21:35 PM8/13/93
to

Just to add my little bit to the FAQ

House of Hanover (surname: Guelph, from an Italian family)
names of kings from George I to Victoria

House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (surname: Wettin, from the senior line of the
same family that ruled all the other Saxe- states - e.g. Saxe-Weimar,
Saxe-Altenburg; junior Catholic line ruled Saxony)
name of Albert and his son Edward VII
also name of George V until his name-change in 1917


House of Windsor
(name derived from Windsor Castle of course by Lord Stamfordham?? in
1917)
name of George V and George VI and his daughter Elizabeth II
(I assume that ruling female monarch's are known by their father's
house rather than their husband's family name)

Elizabeth II was not Queen when she married Philip Mountbatten
(formerly Prince of Greece of Greece and Denmark of the House of
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg). Presumably her name
did change to Elizabeth Mountbatten, and therefore her two eldest
children would be Charles Mountbatten and Anne Mountbatten. Anne
has however signed herself Anne Mountbatten-Windsor on her marriage
register (1973).

In 1952, Elizabeth indicated that she would like the name of the
ruling house to be Windsor (Lord Mountbatten could therefore claim
with some truth that the House of Mountbatten had ruled for three
months!)

In 1960, Elizabeth changed the name to Mountbatten-Windsor for all
her descendants without titles. However, the family is known as


Windsor here in the American popular press.

House of Battenberg/ Mountbatten
--------------------------------
Descended from a prince of Hesse-Darmstadt (a brother of a Russian
empress Marie) who married a Polish/ French commoner, and therefore
lost his title. The family name comes from a German castle Battenberg
Then in 1917, as explained, the family name became Mountbatten.

Philip had no surname since the Greek/ Danish royal family uses no
family name. The whole title (derived from the duchy it governed) is
too much of a mouthful, and no acceptable Anglicization was possible.
Therefore, he took his mother's family's new name (his mother's maiden
name had been Battenberg).


Windsor sounds OK to me!!


Kathleen Much

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Aug 13, 1993, 6:00:00 PM8/13/93
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>Looking for the day when my countrymen chose to restore the true heir and
>throw off the Norman yolk...

Just when eggsactly was that?
--
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Fragano Ledgister

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Aug 14, 1993, 6:26:41 PM8/14/93
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In article <1993Aug13.2...@casbs.Stanford.EDU> kath...@casbs.Stanford.EDU (Kathleen Much) writes:
>In article <1993Aug13....@dxcern.cern.ch> hal...@alws.cern.ch writes:
>>
>>Looking for the day when my countrymen chose to restore the true heir and
>>throw off the Norman yolk...
>
>Just when eggsactly was that?
>--

Next time an Egbert sits on the throne.

HALLAM-BAKER Phillip

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Aug 17, 1993, 8:51:18 AM8/17/93
to

|>In article <CBn8r...@festival.ed.ac.uk> jer...@festival.ed.ac.uk (J Henderson) writes:
|>>
|>>Naah, wasn't it the *Norwegians* who asked a Dane to be king?
|>
|>And the Albanians who asked Christopher Fry, an Englishman. I can't remember if
|>he turned the offer down or if they changed their minds when they discovered a
|>candidate with irresitable name of Zog.

He turned it down with the memorable words that to be an English gentleman
was preferable to being the King of any other country.

Till Poser

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Aug 18, 1993, 10:20:02 AM8/18/93
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In article <1993Aug17....@dxcern.cern.ch>, hal...@dxal18.cern.ch,
(Phillistine Hallamian) writes:

Ho hum. Given the not unfactual assumption that You'd jump at the chance,
if only to wallow in Your "droits du seignieur" that You'd undoubtedly
impose, what does that say about Your status with regard to above statement?
Inquiring mind wants to know!

Till Poser Internet: po...@vxdsyc.desy.de
-R- DESY Computing Bitnet: POSER@DESYVAX
bldg.2b-314, Notkestr.85 Hepnet: VXDESY::POSER (13313::Poser)
D-2000 Hamburg 52 Tel.: -49-40-8998-3219

Doctor Who

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Aug 13, 1993, 11:11:46 PM8/13/93
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mwe...@waterloo.hp.com (Markus Weigl) writes:

> Horng-Juing Lee (hj...@myria.cs.umn.edu) wrote:
> : Hi,
>
> : I would like to know that does the royal family have last name? People alwa
> ys
> : refers them such as Queen Elizabeth, Prince Charles. Are these their first

> : name or last name? It they do have last name, then what is it?
>

> : Horng-Juing Lee
>
> Mountbatten-Windsor, isn't it?
>
>
CORRECT!!

R.J.Hare

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Aug 19, 1993, 3:56:09 AM8/19/93
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Frank R.A.J. Maloney

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Aug 18, 1993, 3:28:59 PM8/18/93
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In article <CBM52...@ecf.toronto.edu> amb...@ecf.toronto.edu (Chris Ambidge) writes:
>In article <I8040101.93...@rz5nrt3.rz.tu-bs.de> i804...@ws.rz.tu-bs.de (Blumberg) writes:
>>well, just to clear up the spelling, the last part of the name would be
>>...-Gotha (as far i, being not into monarchy, can tell), if anything.
>>--
>
> er-- why would the Royal Family's last name be
> [Saxe-Coburg-]Gotha? You could conceivably argue
> that Victoria's name changed to that [?from Hanover?]
> when she married Prince Albert, but by precisely the
> same logic, Elizabeth married Phillip Mountbatten.
>

Alas, your logic is decidedly non-dynastic. Victoria changed the name
of the Royal House for the reason that as a female she could not
inherit the electorship of Hanover. Exactly why she settled on the name
she chose is not clear to me, but the fact that the name was changed
had nothing to do with her marriage to Albert.

As for Elizabeth, I have read in this newsgroup from some usually
reliable posters that she either has, or will, declare that her
descendants are Windsor-Mountbattens. Further, it has been speculated
here that if she has a successor he (Charles or William) might very
well change the House name to Windsor-Mountbatten; from this remote
spot, Charles certainly appeared dotty about his dashing uncle, Lord
Mountbatten, the last viceroy of India, if memory serves.

[deletion]


>
> similarly, George F Handel (of Water Music fame) changed
> his name from Haendel to Handel (though he didn't change
> the spelling of his middle name, which was a germanic
> variant of Fred, but I can't remember exactly whattitwas).
> Record companies who refer to him as "Haendel" are being
> (a) a tad precious and (b) wrong. He changed it to "Handel".
>

Unfortunately for your argument, Handel called himself Hendel in
English, not Handel. And so signed his name, too. That's Mr. Hendel to
the likes of you and me.

Of course, when he returned to German-speaking territory, he
transformed himself back into Herr Haendel (since it's too klugy to try
to represent a-umlaut in ascii.

> Likewise, the present Queen chose / signed proclamations /
> whatever to indicate that the name of her house was "Windsor".
> So, that's what it is.
>

Might big of you, pardner.

--
Frank Richard Aloysius Jude Maloney
"When in doubt, wee-wee on the premise." -- Molly Ivins

Frank R.A.J. Maloney

unread,
Aug 18, 1993, 3:46:43 PM8/18/93
to
In article <1993Aug12.1...@terminus.ericsson.se> an...@terminus.ericsson.se writes:
>>
>>The Greek royal family was German. I suppose the Greeks....franchised the operation
>>to a bunch of Krauts.
>>
[deletion]

>
>Surely a bunch of Danes, like at a Carlsberg factory in England.
>Phil's family were middle ranking Danish aristocracy I seem to remember.
>

If you were to take a glance at Prince Philip's personal standard, you
would see heraldic claims to descent from two royal families, those of
Denmark and Greece.

The standard quarters the emblems of Denmark, three lions in blue on a
gold field strewn with red hearts; of Greece, a broad whte cross on
blue; of Mountbatten, two black pallets or vertical bars on white; and
of Edinburgh, a black castle upon a rock, also on a white field. Quite
nice, actually.

cho...@vms.ocom.okstate.edu

unread,
Aug 19, 1993, 2:45:57 PM8/19/93
to
In article <1993Aug18.1...@microsoft.com>, fra...@microsoft.com (Frank R.A.J. Maloney) writes:
> In article <CBM52...@ecf.toronto.edu> amb...@ecf.toronto.edu (Chris Ambidge) writes:
>>In article <I8040101.93...@rz5nrt3.rz.tu-bs.de> i804...@ws.rz.tu-bs.de (Blumberg) writes:
>>>well, just to clear up the spelling, the last part of the name would be
>>>
> Of course, when he returned to German-speaking territory, he
> transformed himself back into Herr Haendel (since it's too klugy to try
> to represent a-umlaut in ascii.

ü like that perhaps?
Get a Händel on your terminal. dnc (still laughing)

HALLAM-BAKER Phillip

unread,
Aug 20, 1993, 6:00:59 AM8/20/93
to

In article <CByL5...@dscomsa.desy.de>, po...@vxdsyc.desy.de (Till Poser) writes:

|>In article <1993Aug17....@dxcern.cern.ch>, hal...@dxal18.cern.ch,
|>(Phillistine Hallamian) writes:
|>
|>|>In article <24dan0...@curie.lif.icnet.uk>, p...@curie.lif.icnet.uk (Paul
|>|>Taylor <p...@acl.icnet.uk>) writes:
|>|>
|>|>|>In article <CBn8r...@festival.ed.ac.uk> jer...@festival.ed.ac.uk (J
|>|>|>Henderson) writes:
|>|>|>>Naah, wasn't it the *Norwegians* who asked a Dane to be king?
|>|>|>
|>|>|>And the Albanians who asked Christopher Fry, an Englishman. I can't
|>|>|>remember if he turned the offer down or if they changed their minds when
|>|>|>they discovered a candidate with irresitable name of Zog.
|>|>
|>|>He turned it down with the memorable words that to be an English gentleman
|>|>was preferable to being the King of any other country.
|>
|>Ho hum. Given the not unfactual assumption that You'd jump at the chance,
|>if only to wallow in Your "droits du seignieur" that You'd undoubtedly
|>impose, what does that say about Your status with regard to above statement?
|>Inquiring mind wants to know!

I have escaped with my republican principles unscathed on the
occasion that the question arose as you know damn well.

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