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Murders Most Foul

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Nov 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM11/29/00
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Newsline, Karachi, Pakistan
29 November, 2000

http://www.newsline.com.pk/september/html/coverstory4.html

Cover Story
Murders Most Foul
- By Ahmed Salim

Although the Hamoodur Rehman Commission report refutes the charges,
increasingly chilling evidence emerges to suggest the involvement of
Pakistani troops in collaboration with Al-Badr activists in the
meticulously planned execution of 50 of Bangladesh's leading
intellectuals.

On December 16, 1971, the state of Bangladesh was born, from a sea of
blood and gore. The rejoicing was, however, short-lived. Within a
week, 5000 mass graves and charnel houses were discovered, and in the
following months, other mass cemeteries were discovered all over the
new country.

In a press statement on January 1, 1972, Madame Isabella Blum, the head
of the World Peace Commission, said, "This genocide has been even more
terrible than the Nazi gas chambers."

The French writer, André Malreaux, echoed Blum's sentiments. "I have
seen atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis during World War II, but the
brutality I have witnessed here is even more terrible," he maintained.

A Sunday Times report compounded the horror. In a story printed on
December 19, 1971 the newspaper contended that before they surrendered
at Dhaka, the Pakistani army arrested and shot more than 50 of the
city's surviving intellectuals, scientists and businessmen. It was
implied that the massacre – ostensibly a sudden military operation –
was, in fact, a carefully planned elimination of elite Bengali
citizens, conducted with the full knowledge of the Pakistan high
command, including the commanding officer, General Niazi.

The newspaper further contended that the kidnapping was apparently done
early in the morning of December 14, when squads of Pakistani soldiers
drove to selected addresses, and took away men and women under armed
guard. They were taken to the Rayar Bazar's brickfield said the Times,
shot, and the corpses were lined up along the mud dykes so as to fall
into the adjoining water pools.

It is conjectured that Major General Rao Farman Ali was the principal
architect of the plan to massacre Bengali intellectuals. Rao Farman
Ali's support of the Jamaat in the 1970 elections was no secret, and,
it is believed, the emergence of the militant wing of Bangladesh's
Jamaat-e-Islami, the Al-Badar, at this time was no coincidence. The
abduction and subsequent massacre of intellectuals was widely
attributed to Al-Badar operatives and their sponsors, Pakistani army
personnel. Lending credence to Al-Badar's involvement was the fact
that the killings continued even after independence was achieved and
the Pakistan army had withdrawn. There is absolute conviction in some
circles that the Al-Badar were responsible for the mysterious murders
of Zahir Raihan (at Mirpur) and Professor Humayun Kabir.

Despite substantial evidence to the effect, however, the recently
published Hamoodur Rahman Commission Report (HCR), denies the
involvement of Pakistan army personnel in the murders of Bengali
intelligentsia.

Gen. Farman Ali categorically denies the charge levelled at him that he
had 200 intellectuals killed. The Bengalis' claim these killings
occurred on December 14, and not on December 16, as General Farman
contends. While the latter accepts that a sizeable number of corpses
were found on the morning of December 17, he maintains that Pakistani
army personnel could not have conducted the killings since they had
already surrendered on December 16. According to Maj. Gen. Farman Ali
on December 9 or 10, 1971, he was summoned by Maj. Gen. Jamshed to
Peelkhana. On reaching the headquarters he says, he saw a large number
of vehicles parked there. Maj. Gen. Jamshed was getting into a car and
asked Maj. Gen. Farman Ali to come along. On the way, Gen. Jamshed
informed Gen. Farman that they were thinking of arresting certain
people. Gen. Farman Ali maintains he advised against it. On reaching
General Niazi's headquarters he says, he repeated his advice, but
neither Gen. Niazi nor Gen. Jamshed responded. Gen. Farman Ali states
that he does not know what transpired after he left, but he thinks no
further action was taken (Para 24).

However, in his book, 'How Pakistan Got Divided,' Maj. Farman does
express the fear that "orders countermanding the earlier orders were
perhaps not issued and some people were arrested. I do not till this
day know where they were kept. Perhaps they were confined in an area
which was guarded by mujahids. The corps or the Dacca garrison
commander lost control over them after surrender and they ran away out
of fear of the Mukti Bahini who were mercilessly killing mujahids. The
detained persons might have been killed by Muktis or even by the Indian
army to give the Pakistan army a bad name. Dacca had already been taken
over by the Indians."

The Hamoodur Rahman commission accepts without demur General Farman
Ali's account of the events.

For his part, Lt. Gen. A.A.K. Niazi also denied any arrests. The
commission report reads, "When questioned on this point, Lt. Gen.
A.A.K.Niazi stated that the local commanders had, on December 9, 1971,
brought a list to him which included the names of miscreants, heads of
the Mukti Bahini etc, but not any intellectuals… but he had stopped
them from collecting and arresting these people. He denied the
allegation that any intellectuals were arrested and killed on December
9, 1971 or thereafter."

In his statement to the Hamoodur Rahman Commission, Maj. Gen. Jamshed
took a different position, which contradicted the statements issued by
General Farman and General Niazi. He maintained that it was on
December 9 and 10 that General Niazi expressed his apprehension of a
general uprising in Dacca city and ordered him to examine the
possibility of arresting certain persons according to lists which were
already with the various agencies, namely the martial law authorities
and the intelligence branch. Gen. Jamshed said a conference was held
on December 9 and 10, 1971, in which these lists were produced by the
agencies concerned, and the total number of persons to be arrested came
to about two or three thousand. According to Gen. Jamshed, he
suggested to Gen. Niazi that the proposal be dropped, and stated that
thereafter no further action was taken in this matter." (Para 26)

The commission considers the statements by all three generals as
truthful, and concludes that unless the Bangladesh authorities can
produce some convincing evidence, it is not possible to record the
finding that any intellectuals or professionals were arrested and
killed during December 1971.

The ghosts of '71 were not laid to rest after independence on the other
side of the divide either. Almost two decades after independence,
various commissions, established over the post '71 years, are
continuing to probe war crimes, identify criminals and collaborators
and bring them to justice. One of these commissions is the Ekatarer
Ghatak Dalal Nirmul Committee.

On January 19, 1992, 101 well known Bangladeshi personalities including
retired Supreme Court judges, university teachers, veterans of the
independence war, artists and journalists formed a committee known as
the Ekatarer Ghatak Dalal Nirmul Committee, to uproot the killers and
collaborators of the 1971 war of independence. The committee demanded
that the government take decisive action against Ghulam Azam, the amir,
Jamat-i-Islami of Bangladesh, who had collaborated with the Pakistani
rulers and committed heinous crimes in 1971. A trial was held, and the
people's court found Azam guilty of crimes which are usually punishable
by death in most democratic countries.

On the basis of the Nirmul Committee's investigations of the killings
of intellectuals, BBC's Channel 4 aired a documentary film titled 'War
Crimes File.' The film documented the involvement of three war
criminals in the killings of Bangladeshi intellectuals and other
serious crimes. Abu Saeed, Lutfur Rehman and Chowdry Moeen-ud-Din, all
Bengalis, were prominent members of the East Pakistan Jamaat-e-Islami
and the Al-Badar. It is common knowledge that the three also had
direct links with Gen. Farman Ali. All three men are now British
nationals. One of them is running a Muslim school, and the other two
are pesh imams of mosques in the UK.

The Nirmul Committee is currently working towards establishing a
resistance against the rise of fundamentalist forces in Bangladesh.

As the movement for accountability of Ghulam Azam, the amir of the
Jamaat-e-Islami, Bangladesh, spread, following the symbolic trial of
the amir by the People's Court on March 26, 1992, the people of
Bangladesh became vocal in their demand for the official trial of Azam
and other war criminals, including those responsible for the killings
of Bengali intellectuals. This agitation resulted in the formation of
the National People's Enquiry Commission of Bangladesh.

On March 26, 1993, a long-term programme was announced at a rally in
Dhaka to investigate the activities of front-ranking collaborators of
the martial law regime during 1971. Eight leading collaborator-
suspects were selected for investigation during the first phase of the
commission's probe. The focus of the probe was the alleged involvement
of these individuals in the murder of intellectuals, and the
establishment of grounds for initiating war crimes trials. The 11-
member commission comprised poets, writers, university teachers,
members of the judiciary, members of parliament and lawyers. Poet,
Begum Sufia Kamal, was the chairperson of the commission.

Unlike the Hamoodur Rahman Commission, which had complete access to the
information required for its report and to the people involved, the
People's Commission encountered serious obstacles in the course of its
investigation. They discovered that many documents dating to the
genocide period had been destroyed. Furthermore, government officials
demonstrated a visible reluctance to make available what information
there was in the archives. Moreover, the commission found that the
situation in the home districts of the accused during the investigation
was a cause of great concern. The ordinary people in these areas were
haunted by the memory of 1971 and suffered from an acute sense of
insecurity.

The summary of the commission's investigation revealed that during the
war the minority Hindu community were the principal targets of the
brutalities of the Yahya regime and their local allies such as the
Razakar and Al-Badar para-military forces and other collaborators, and
even after the establishment of Bangladesh continued to be victimised
by communal elements. As such they were unwilling to talk and the
commission had to gather information from their neighbours. Families
who lost near and dear ones or suffered torture provided information
only on the condition of anonymity. Many others refused to do even
that.

A report on the findings of the People's Enquiry Commission titled 'The
Activities of The War Criminals And the Collaborators' was released in
March 1994. It stated that due to the constraints mentioned, the
commission's report carried only a portion of the vast range of crimes
actually committed by the eight under investigation.

The eight accused included Abbas Ali Khan, Maulana Matiur Rehman
Nizami, Mohammed Kamruzzaman, Maulana Dilawar Hussain Sayeedi, Maulana
Abdul Mannan, Abdul Kader Molla and Abdul Alim.

Abbas Ali Khan held the second highest position in the Bangladesh
Jamaat-i-Islami and became a minister in the cabinet of quisling
governor M.A. Malik. Members of the Razakar force (who were given
short courses in military training) were, under his leadership, given
powers equal to those of the regular armed forces, and they allegedly
carried out widespread killings, rapes and looting in villages.

Maulana Matiur Rahman Nizami was the secretary general and leader of
the parliamentary party of the Jamaat-i-Islami. Addressing meetings of
the Razakars he would exhort them to "carry out [their] national duty
to eliminate those who are engaged in war against Pakistan and Islam,"
and to finish off Awami League supporters. After one such meeting, Al-
Badar forces in cooperation with the Razakars, surrounded the village
of Brishlika and burnt it to the ground.

Mohammad Kamaruzzaman, assistant secretary general of the Bangladesh
Jamaat-i-Islami, was in charge of recruiting members for and organising
the Al-Badar in Mymensingh.

A member of the Jamaat-i-Islami's Majlis-i-Shoora, Maulana Dilawar
Hussain Sayeedi took active part in the organisation of the Razakars,
Al-Badar and Al-Shams forces. He was also accused of involvement along
with Pakistani army troops in the killing of sub-divisional police
officer (SDPO) Faizur Rahman, father of Humayun Ahmad, a renowned
writer and professor of chemistry at the University of Dacca.

Maulana Abdul Mannan, the president of the Jamiat-e-Mudarresin, an
organisation of teachers of madrassahs and the owner of the daily
Dainik Inquilab, the country's second-highest circulated newspaper, was
one of the key collaborators of the Yahya regime during 1971. A
minister under General Ziaur Rahman after 1976 and subsequently in
President H M Ershad's cabinet, Mannan was also associated with the
killing of intellectuals, specifically eminent physician Alim
Chowdhury.

Abdul Kader Molla, the publicity secretary of the Jamaat-i-Islami, was
known as a 'butcher' in the Dacca suburb of Mirpur, mainly populated by
non-Bengali Muslim migrants in 1971. An eyewitness to Molla's criminal
activities in 1971 told the commission that Razakar men, under the
command of Kader Molla, brutally murdered the poet Meherunnessa in
October.

According to the commission's report, 'Abdul Alim himself carried out
execution of Bengalis by lining them in rows and shooting them.

The sons and daughters of the intellectuals killed in the war, some of
them still in the womb when their fathers were massacred, formed an
organisation in 1991 called Generation '71. The members of the
organisation say they aim to discover why their parents were
slaughtered, to investigate war crimes, and to provide financial
assistance to families who were left destitute after the '71 carnage.

The organisation is currently trying to organise itself
nationally. "We have to establish links with human rights bodies all
over the world, even in Pakistan," says Tauhid Raza, son of journalist
Sirajuddin Hossain, who was taken away one night in 1971 by para-
military personnel and Al Badar workers and was never seen again.

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Dec 26, 2000, 12:49:13 PM12/26/00
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In article <903i5i$ans$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

[ deleted for brevity ]

Newsline, Karachi, Pakistan
29 November, 2000

http://www.newsline.com.pk/september/html/coverstory4.html

BBC's Channel 4 aired a documentary film titled 'War Crimes File.' The


film documented the involvement of three war criminals in the killings

of Bangladeshi intellectuals and otherserious crimes. Abu Saeed, Lutfur


Rehman and Chowdry Moeen-ud-Din, all Bengalis, were prominent members of
the East Pakistan Jamaat-e-Islami and the Al-Badar. It is common
knowledge that the three also had direct links with Gen. Farman Ali.
All three men are now British nationals. One of them is running a

Muslim school, and the other two are pesh imams of mosques in the UK....

------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Weekly Thikana, a Bengali print journal published from New
York December 15, 2000


Thikana’s front-page coverage on desecration of Qur’an

The New York City Police Department has unconditionally apologized
for three of its police officers desecrating the Qur’an. That apology
contributed in containing the tension among the New York Muslim
community that includes Bangladeshis as well.

Two Pakistani immigrants filed a law suit on behalf of Maulana Abdul
Aziz and Mohammad Anwar Hussain. The defendants were accused of
violating US constitution. It can be mentioned that Jackson Heights is
presumed to be like a chunk of Bangladesh. On the 4th of December a
group of police officers raided 74th Street of Jackson Heights where
Maulana Abdul Aziz had operated his business. The police officers
kicked the holy Qur’ans and stacked them in garbage bags. The religious
onlookers were urging the officers to handle the religious books with
respect. But they did not listen. Rather, before departing they handed
two1, 000 dollar citations to Maulana Aziz. At the same time those
police officers raided the religious book store of Anwar Hussain. They
also desecrated holy Qur’an in that spot as well. Hussain also received
two 1,000 dollar citations.

Two separate lawsuits were lodged against the police officers who
desecrated, after ignoring requests from some fifty religious
pedestrians,the sacred book Al Qur’an belonging to the best religion of
mankind Islam. The sensitive news of desecrating Qur’an during the holy
month of Ramadan spread like a bonfire among New York’s Muslim
community.

The preparation of a greater movement started. As the law suit proceeds,
leaders of two notable Islamic organizations in the community had sat
down with the police administration. The meeting took place on the 11th
December at the 115th Precinct, which is not too far from Jackson
Heights. It may be mentioned that the police officers of that Precinct
were responsible for this act. The commanding officer and the three
accused officers were participants in the meeting. On the other side
present were Ashrafuzzaman, President of Islamic Circle of North
America (ICNA), Gazi Khankhan, Executive Director of Council on
American-Islamic Relations, community activist Fazlur Rahman
Chowdhury and the two book vendors. The police officers said in the
meeting that they did not have any knowledge of holy Qur’an. They
pointed out that they did not have any desire to desecrate the holy
religious book. The commanding officer Mr. Jamieson said, "Muslims are
increasing in this area. But we do not have any knowledge of your
religion. It would be good for us if you orient us with the fundamentals
of your religion. Then this sort of sad incidence would not occur in the
future." Mr. Gazi praised the commanding officer’s proposal. He
promised to send two clergies to the Precinct.

After the Precinct meeting, the outraged Muslims came to join another
meeting at an Iftar gathering (the breaking of fast during Ramadan) at
the ICNA office. The commanding officer Mr. Jamieson attended the
meeting. In a compassionate tone he said to the audience, "On behalf of
New York City Police Department I am asking for unconditional
forgiveness from the Muslim community. Most of us in the Precinct,
which includes me, are Christians. We have no knowledge of Al Qur’an.
More over that patrolling officers raided the vending operations on the
side walks as part of their regular duty. They found a number of
irregularities with the business ventures. As the crowd was mobilizing,
the officers became nervous and they started to pack up the merchandize
in the bags rather hurriedly. If they had any knowledge of Al Qur’an,
this sad incidence would not have occurred. Any way, I am giving you the
word that there would not be recurrence of a similar situation. But I
need your cooperation in all matters."

Accepting the commanding officers’ apology, ICNA’s President
Ashrafuzzaman Khan and CAIR-New York’s President Gazi Khankhan
asked everybody to close the chapter.

[Deleted for brevity].


???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

WAIT A MINUTE FOLKS. WHO IS THIS ASHRAFUZZAMAN KHAN?

Re: INFORMATION ON ALLEGED WAR CRIMINAL ASHRAFUZZAMAN KHAN, resident of
New York City (now heads Queens branch of ICNA -Islamic Circle of North
America).

Dear Friends,

I am not sure whether who have following information:

On 24th September 1997, a complaint case ( case no. 115/1997
Ramana Thana) was filed agains ASHRAFUZZAMAN KHAN, now resident in USA,
and others, for alleged crime committed by him in 1971 during the
Bangladesh Liberation War.

Mrs. Farida Banu, sister of martyred intellectual Professor Giasuddin
Ahmed, filed the case at the Ramana Police Station in Dhaka under the
Penal Code of Bangladesh ( Sections: 120(b), 448, 364, 302, 201, 34,
114).

In the complaint, it was reported that on 14th December 1971 morning ,
Professor Giasuddin was abducted by Asrafuzzaman Khan, Chowdhury
Mueen Uddin ( now resident in London) and others. He was
disappeared since then, and his dead body was finally found at Rayar
Baazar killing Fields on 5th January 1972.

For detail news: Please see Dainik Sangbadh 25th September 1997 Dhaka.

For further information: Contact with your nearest Bangladesh
Embassy/High Commission & Ministry of Home Affairs, Bangladesh

YOU COULD USE THIS INFORMATION TO LOBBY WITH BANGLADESH EMBASSY AND
OTHER CONCERNED OFFICIAL IN WASHINGTON/ NEW YORK. YOU CAN SEND A
LETTER OF CONCERN TO US OFFICIAL TO KNOW WHETHER THEY HAVE RECEIVED ANY
INFORMATION OR REQUEST OF EXTRADITION FROM BANGLADESH GOVERNMENT.

I believe to create pressure on Bangladesh authorities we should send
letter of concern / urgent appeal to relevant authorities in Bangladesh/
aboard.

With best regards.

Zaved H. Mahmood

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON ALLGED WAR CRIMINAL ASHRAFUZZAMAN KHAN


SOURCE:http://www.shobak.org/bangla_nuremberg/ashrafuzzaman_khan/

Genocide'71 - an account of the killers and collaborators", Published in
Dhaka Page 189: Segment where Ashrafuzzaman Khan (now in New York, and
head of Queens branch of ICNA) is cited.

Similarly, Saudi Arabia is serving as a sanctuary for some of the
leading Al-Badrs (leaders of death squads in 1971). Here we would like
to give the example of Ashrafuzzaman Khan, one of the Al-Badr high
command.

Ashrafuzzaman Khan, was one of the chief Al-Badr executioners. It has
been clearly proved that he himself shot to death 7 teachers of the
Dhaka University in the killing fields at Mirpur. A certain Mofizzuddin,
who drove the vehicle which took these helpless victims of Ashrafuzzaman
to Mirpur, has clearly identified Ashrafuzzaman as the "chief executer"
of the intellectuals.

After Liberation, Ashrafuzzaman's personal diary was recovered from
350 Nakhal Para where he resided. On two pages of the diary, the
names of 19 teachers of the University have been entered, as well as
their addresses in the University quarters. The name of the Dhaka
University Medical Officer, Mohammad Murtaza, has also been noted down
in this diary. Of these 20 persons, eight were missing on December 14:
Munier Chowdhury (Bengali), Dr. Abul Khair (History), Ghiasuddin Ahmed
(History), Rashidul Hasan (English), Dr. Faizul Mohi (I. E. R) Dr.
Murtaza (Medical Officer).

From the confession of Mofizuddin, it has been learned that
Ashrafuzzaman shot these people with his own hands. As a result of
Mofizuddin's confession, the decomposed bodies of these unfortunate
teachers were recovered from the marshes of Rayer Bazar and the mass
grave at Shiyal Bari at Mirpur. There were other names in the diary
including the following: Dr. Wakil Ahmed (Bengali), Dr. Nilima Ibrahim
(Bengali), Dr. Latif (I. E. R), Dr. Maniruzzaman (Geography), K. M.
Saaduddin (Sociology), A. M. M. Shahidullah (Mathematics), Dr. Sirajul
Islam (Islamic History), Dr. Akhtar Ahmed (Education), Zahirul Huq
(Psychology), Ahsanul Huq (English), Serajul Islam Chowdbury
(English), and Kabir Chowdhury.

On another page of the diary there were the names of 16 collaborating
teachers of the University. Apart from these there were also the names
of Chowdbury Moinuddin, the man in charge of the operation to kill
intellectuals, Showkat Imran, a member of the central Al-Badr command,
and the head of the Dhaka Badr forces.

Apart from the names of the slain intellectuals, the diary also
contained the names and addresses of several other Bengalis. All of them
lost their lives at the hands of the Al-Badr. On a small piece of paper
the name of the Member Finance of the Pakistan Jute Board, Abdul Khaleq,
had been written down, along with the name of his father, his Dhaka
address, as well as his permanent address. On December 9, 1971, the
Al-Badr took away Abdul Khaleq from his office. They demanded Taka
10,000 as ransom. The Al-Badr then went to Abdul Khaleq's house carrying
a letter from him in which he asked that the money be paid to his
kidnappers. Abdul Khaleq's wife was unable to give more than Taka 450
at the time. She promised that she would give them the rest of the money
later, and pleaded with them to return her husband. But Abdul Khaleq
never came back.

Ashrafuzzaman has also been implicated in the murder of some
journalists. It was Ashrafuzzaman who kidnapped the shift-in- charge of
the Purbodesh, and the Literary Editor, A. N. M. Gholam Mustafa.

Ashrafuzzaman Khan, was a member of the Central Committee of the
Islami Chhatra Sangha. After liberation he went to Pakistan. At present
he is employed in Radio Pakistan.

Update: Since publication of this book, Ashrafuzzaman Khan has moved
to New York and now heads the Queens branch of ICNA (Islamic Circle of
North America)

===== Zaved Hasan Mahmood

zun...@lycos.com

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Dec 27, 2000, 1:18:41 AM12/27/00
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Re. Who Killed The Intellectuals?

by Sharif Islam (published in NFB)

Abdullah Al-Amin points to a very important aspect of the history of
1971. The background of the people who were killed just before and
sometime after the surrender of the Pakistani army, and the
circumstances under which they were killed still remain a mystery. A
blanket assumption has been made that they were killed by the
defeated Pakistani army and their cohorts just prior to their
surrender. The theory was that the defeated forces and their
associates resorted to this killing in order to suppress the Bengali
nation so that they can never succeed and raise their heads as an
independent country. It was also theorized that the killing was done
in order so that Bangladesh would never be able to compete with
Pakistan.

On the surface, they appeared quite reasonable theories at the time
when we were still in the excitement of our independence. But a
closer look at the facts and the circumstances raise serious
questions as to who really were behind this heinous crime. Lets start
with some of the people who were killed duringthe middle of December
1971.

Munir Chowdhury He was quite possibly the most favored intellectual
of East Pakistan to the rulers in the West. He was awarded the
coveted job translating the famous book by Ayub Khan Friends not
Masters. He comes of a very religious family. Personally, he was not
religious, but he never opposed the integrity of Pakistan. He had a
left leaning with pro- Peking bias. He was known to be a dalal in
some quarters because of his stand on Pakistan in 1971. He was
admonished several times in Swadhin Bangla Betar Kendra as being a
collaborator. His brother (Name most probably Munim Chowdhury) was in
West Pakistan, and was well known for his staunch support for
Pakistan s integrity. (In fact, he never relinquished his allegiance
to Pakistan. He still lives in Pakistan). One has to wonder if the
Pakistani quarter had to plan for this gruesome murder, why should
they target a person like Munir Chowdhury?

Mohammad Mortaza He was the medical officer of Dhaka University
living in the university quarters. He was a staunch supporter of
Pakistan till the last day, and he was most vocal about it. He always
used to argue with people in favor of Pakistans integrity. He was a
die-hard pro- Peking leftist which was probably the reason behind his
stand on Pakistan. Anyone knowing him personally would just
bewildered why he should bear the wrath of the Pakistani forces.

Scrutiny of background of several other intellectuals will reveal
that they were people of left leaning. That included Anwar Pasha,
Rashidul Hasan of Dhaka University. So the question is: when the
Pakistani army is at the verge of their decisive defeat, and they do
not have enough time to cover their own back, why would they embark
upon such a crime? What logic would convince them that by killing two
dozens intellectuals, they will ensure crippling consequences for the
Bengalis? Why should they target, of all people, some who were
totally loyal to Pakistan? Why most of the intellectuals targeted
were left leaning? How would the elimination of those intellectuals
help Pakistan in any way? Who could be really benefited by the
killing of these intellectuals? When the Pakistani army and their
associates were not having enough time to save their own tails, why
such an odd adventurism should be on their to do list?

Then came the Zahir Raihan episode. Zahir Raihan was a young and
extremely talented film-maker by any measure with huge promise. He
was in India during the nine months in 1971. His brother novelist
Shahidullah Kaiser was among the intellectuals killed just before the
defeat of the Pakistani forces. Both of them had left leaning also.
(We must remember that Awami League was not a left party until well
after independence. The leftist force of the country considered Awami
League a reactionary force and a foe in their strive for establishing
Socialism in the country).

After Zahir Raihan came back from India, he could gather significant
information regarding the intellectual killings. He had his interest
in the matter as his brother was among the victims. He got such
information which would have made popular ideas about the killing
reversed. He held a press conference in the Dhaka Press Club either
in late December or early January declaring that he is going to
divulge the critical information about the intellectual killing among
other things very soon. He even was carrying a portfolio bag under
his arm which he said contained critical leads for the intellectual
killing mystery. This press conference got due coverage in the local
media. Within a couple of days of that press conference, Zahir Raihan
got the fateful phone call which promised him more information on the
intellectual killing. Adamant to solve the mystery, he went to meet
the unknown party in Mirpur with the protection of Indian army
contingent. It was late morning in a sunny day, and Zahir Raihan was
never seen again. The full contingent of Indian army came back safe
and sound without Zahir Raihan! The authority totally ignored the
event and hushed it up with a traditional enquiry commission. Since
then, he has been painted as a victim of the rajakars.

Nobody has ever found any slightest proof that he was abducted by the
rajakars. How could the rajakars be so brave during that time is
beyond comprehension of most people. Why the government chose to
cover up the event is still the big mystery. Who could have been at
risk of getting exposed by Zahir Raihan? What critical information he
possessed that could have changed many popular myths about the events
of 1971-72? What happened to the portfolio of documents that he had
gathered before his disappearance? Why is he not remembered
separately but lumped with the intellectuals killed before 16 th
December?

The inevitable question is that who were behind the intellectual
killings and disappearance of Zahir Raihan? Should we just accept at
face value what Awami League authorities wanted us to believe? Awami
League was totally subservient to India all along. Specially after
independence, they felt like totally debt-bound to them. They ignored
all the looting of Indian army, and persecuted those who opposed that
at the order of India. It is very natural and possible that they have
done the same on many other matters.

Who really stood to gain most by the killing of the intellectuals?
Pakistan? It does not add up. They should not have time for such a
thing at that juncture, also their gain seems to be zero. The
rajakars also would not create a new problem for themselves by this
kind of madness before their defeat and risk the wrath of the people.
They were already in big trouble. A couple of dozen intellectuals
killed would not buy them anything in independent Bangladesh.

Who was the mastermind of killing the intellectuals? Who pulled the
strings from background? They are the same people who saw a potential
competition from independent Bangladesh and who wanted to see an
obedient Bangladesh. They also wanted to make sure that the leftists
do not get any upper hand in Bangladesh once the Islamists are easily
defeated. They wanted to make sure that the Naxalbari movement did
not get any currency in Bangladesh like in West Bengal. They wanted
to see that the Pakistani forces and their cohorts became even more
hated (if that was possible) to the people of Bangladesh, and create
a field to crush the Islamic force in the name of rajakar nidhon.
This heinous act is enough to shut the mind of anybody convinced of
the association to the crime. But remember, leftists and the talented
people in cultural arena would not be any problem for the post-1971
Pakistan. It was going to be problem for India.

About this intellectual killing of 1971, the facts are more exciting
than fiction. Will anybody have the courage to come forward and
unearth the mystery with an objective mind? Will we be ready to
accept the results irrespective of who we find guilty?

In article <903i5i$ans$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

j_h...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 2:46:23 PM1/16/01
to

From: David Declerq <dec...@capitalnet.com>
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 11:11 AM
Subject: War Crimes Bangladesh


Dear Sir

I am a retired Canadian Army officer based in Ottawa advising on war
crimes concerning real and potential refugee and immigration claimants
that may seek to enter Canada but are alleged to have been involved in
War Crimes or Crimes against humanity.

I am looking for reliable information on events that took place in East
Pakistan/Bangladesh that would assist me in this matter.

Specifically I am looking for a list of war crimes/crimes against
humanity, preferably in chronological sequence mentioning date,
location, act and perpetrators, for example:

28 - 30 March 1971, village of X, 50 women raped 40 unarmed civilians
rounded up and shot, crime committed by 2nd Company, 4th Bn Y Regt.
Officer in-charge Major ABC, other participants were - names if
available.

Such a listing would greatly assist in screening and could lead to
perpetrators in Canada being held accountable for these actions.

If you could provide such documentation or tell me where I could find
it, I would be most greatful.

I am under the impression that alleged war criminals in this tragic
event came from both Pakistan proper and East Pakistan/Bangladesh and
now reside in both places.

Yours truly
David DeClerq
RR#1
Kars, Ontario
K0A 2E0
phone 613-489-2291
e-mail: dec...@capitalnet.com

tare...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 3:03:30 PM1/16/01
to
God bless David Declerq - finally some voice of reason and law in the
anarchy of 'Ghadanis' and 'Crybabies'. People found guilty for any
crime against any human being should be tried and punished by law. I
can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be tried in the court of law.
Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and 'documenary information' to
David Declerq. I can tell it will not be our Jamal dada.

TA


In article <9428ed$7m9$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

nkdat...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 5:38:26 PM1/16/01
to
In article <9429ec$8fb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> God bless David Declerq - finally some voice of reason and law in the
> anarchy of 'Ghadanis' and 'Crybabies'. People found guilty for any
> crime against any human being should be tried and punished by law. I
> can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be tried in the court of law.
> Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and 'documenary information' to
> David Declerq. I can tell it will not be our Jamal dada.
>
> TA
>

It seems from recent posts by Mr. Tarek Ali
that Mr. Jamal Hasan has somehow managed to
rub him the wrong way. Nevertheless, I would
advise Mr. Tarek Ali discretion as the better
part of valor. After all, Mr. Jamal Hasan
is in a position to help Mr. Tarek Ali.

Mr. Tarek Ali knows that Mr. Jamal Hasan is
a federal employee working for the department
of justice in Washington. In fact, Mr. Tarek
Ali has let it be known to nettors that he
has seen photos of Mr. Jamal Hasan holding
hands with the likes of Attorney General
Janet Reno. In view of Sheikh Hasina
government's determination to extradite those
that were involved in the massacre of her family
in 1975 or of, say, the Bengali-speaking
intellectuals in 1971, wouldn't it be wise of
Mr. Tarek Ali to cultivate Mr. Jamal Hasan as
a friend ? Mr. Jamal Hasan may be Mr. Tarek Ali's
only hope of saving the likes of Lieutenant
Colonel AKM Mohiuddin and Imam Ashrafuzzaman
from extradition when justice threatens
to catch up with them.


Mr. Jamal Hasa

nkdat...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 6:53:09 PM1/16/01
to
In article <942ih1$h1q$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

nkdat...@my-deja.com wrote:
> In article <9429ec$8fb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> > God bless David Declerq - finally some voice of reason and law
> > in the anarchy of 'Ghadanis' and 'Crybabies'. People found guilty
> > for any crime against any human being should be tried and punished
> > by law. I can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be tried in the
> > court of law. Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and 'documenary
> > information' to David Declerq. I can tell it will not be our
> > Jamal dada.
> >
> > TA
> >
>
> It seems from recent posts by Mr. Tarek Ali
> that Mr. Jamal Hasan has somehow managed to
> rub him the wrong way. Nevertheless, I would
> advise Mr. Tarek Ali discretion as the better
> part of valor. After all, Mr. Jamal Hasan
> is in a position to help Mr. Tarek Ali.
>
> Mr. Tarek Ali knows that Mr. Jamal Hasan is
> a federal employee working for the department
> of justice in Washington. In fact, Mr. Tarek
> Ali has let it be known to nettors that he
> has seen photos of Mr. Jamal Hasan holding
> hands with the likes of Attorney General
> Janet Reno.

Out of curiosity, I looked for the photo
that Mr. Tarek Ali had mentioned. I am
truly impressed. Nettors can see it on:

http://www.bangladesh-web.com/news/dec/31/fv4n439.htm#1

Ms. Janet Reno and Mr. Jamal Hasan seem
to be holding hands with a lot of affection.
If I were Mr. Tarek Ali, I would certainly
like to have Mr. Jamal Hasan as my ally.
Mr. Tarek Ali is not being wise in rubbing
Mr. Jamal Hasan the wrong way.

tare...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 7:42:11 PM1/16/01
to
In article <942ih1$h1q$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
nkdat...@my-deja.com wrote:
> In article <9429ec$8fb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> > God bless David Declerq - finally some voice of reason and law in
the
> > anarchy of 'Ghadanis' and 'Crybabies'. People found guilty for any
> > crime against any human being should be tried and punished by law. I
> > can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be tried in the court of law.
> > Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and 'documenary information' to
> > David Declerq. I can tell it will not be our Jamal dada.
> >
> > TA
> >
>
> It seems from recent posts by Mr. Tarek Ali
> that Mr. Jamal Hasan has somehow managed to
> rub him the wrong way. Nevertheless, I would
> advise Mr. Tarek Ali discretion as the better
> part of valor. After all, Mr. Jamal Hasan
> is in a position to help Mr. Tarek Ali.
>

I am glad that Datta babu thinks I am rubbing ONLY Jamal Hasan in the
wrong way. :)

> Mr. Tarek Ali knows that Mr. Jamal Hasan is
> a federal employee working for the department
> of justice in Washington. In fact, Mr. Tarek
> Ali has let it be known to nettors that he
> has seen photos of Mr. Jamal Hasan holding
> hands with the likes of Attorney General
> Janet Reno. In view of Sheikh Hasina
> government's determination to extradite those
> that were involved in the massacre of her family
> in 1975 or of, say, the Bengali-speaking
> intellectuals in 1971, wouldn't it be wise of
> Mr. Tarek Ali to cultivate Mr. Jamal Hasan as
> a friend ? Mr. Jamal Hasan may be Mr. Tarek Ali's
> only hope of saving the likes of Lieutenant
> Colonel AKM Mohiuddin and Imam Ashrafuzzaman
> from extradition when justice threatens
> to catch up with them.

Now I am really scared Datta babu. I guess I have no other way but to
accept Jamal Hasan as a friend! After all, he represents 'justice'
because he is an employee of DOJ (LOL). Can you do the match making for
us?

But haven't you noticed that I am the only person in the ng who wants
justice (and true justice) for everyone no matter who he/she is
following the rules of law? Why the Jamals (being in DOJ) work for
illegal things like Ghadani and break the law of civilized society and
create anarchy? Does he know anything about his job? Or is he a just
support person in DOJ without need of any knowledge about DOJ
objectives and activities?

islamisgr...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 16, 2001, 8:13:54 PM1/16/01
to
God works in mysterious ways
Rita, Canada

I suppose we have all heard stories of converts before. They are,
praise be to God, becoming very common, and growing in their number
every day. But still, I can never forget how it feels to know that
another human being whom you know personally has chosen to accept
Islam.
I do not wish to embarrass my friend, so I will refer to her as Rita,
which is not her real name.

I first met Rita in Abu Dhabi of the United Arab Emirates about three
or four years ago. At that time, she was the girlfriend of a friend of
mine. She was not exactly a paragon of virtue. Her activities with
other men were less then respectable to put it mildly, she drank in
excessive amounts (even by 'Western' standards). In short, her life was
worse than that of a typical 'free' woman in the West. Her mother was
also prone to heavy bouts of drinking and her father was no longer
alive. Her mother was a nominal Christian Canadian.

However, as the saying goes, God works in mysterious ways. Even during
this time, she was interested in religion, and had spent a bit of time
studying Islam. Needless to say, it did not exactly play a significant
part in her life; but nevertheless, it was in the back of her mind. And
that is probably all she needed.

Of course, I did not approve of her ways. However, I did not agree that
I should alienate myself from my friend or her because of my
disapproval. Today, I am glad that I stuck by that view.

During the course of the next two or three years, I spoke with Rita on
quite a number of occasions. Our talks involved all scopes of
philosophy, and almost always moved onto religion. I say this from her
point of view, because as far as I am concerned, philosophy, law and
religion are all one.

Time passed, and eventually, she left Abu Dhabi, as did I. By the time
I had left, she had already stopped her relationships with men, stopped
drinking completely and started to dress less like a 'tart' and more
like a woman of virtue. Still, she was not a Muslim.

She did not stop her investigation into Islam whilst away from Abu
Dhabi; indeed, she became much more in tune with Islam. She continually
thirsted for knowledge and whenever I heard from her, she was sending
me more material of things she had investigated regarding Islam.

This past winter, I was in Abu Dhabi again. As was she. I spoke to her
very sparingly this time; the first time had been to greet her and I
noticed that she had now developed a strong distaste of the alcoholic
habits of her mother. She had also started wearing only long dresses
and full length jumpers. I remember commenting on that occasion that I
did not believe that you could judge a woman by her hijab since many
women in the East wear it only as a symbol of status and that a woman
should only wear it if she is genuine in her desire to.

Before I left, we met again and on that occasion, I attempted to teach
her how to pray. She wore the full scarf and complied with even the
strictest Muslim jurists with regard to the dress code. I told
her, "What is the point of all this? Admit it to yourself who you are."

I then returned to Britain, thinking that I had left her still
wandering. I was mistaken. A few days ago, I received a letter from
her, postmarked from Canada. She had decided to leave her mother's home
and live in Canada, her country. She had taken the Shahada. She was now
dressed in full hijab, according to tradition, and was praying.

This from a girl who came from a drinking house, was a heavy drinker
herself and not a woman of particular chastity.

She now goes in public wearing an item of clothing that provokes a
hostile environment (one woman actually spat at her in the street) and
talks with people at any chance about Islam. Although I do not believe
that the donning of a cloth is virtue in itself, her determination to
show people, "I am a Muslim woman and I am proud of it" is something
that I respect her for.

We seem to be pretty judgmental nowadays of those who are not Muslim.
And in doing so, we alienate ourselves from those who may be potential
Muslims. In doing that, we may stop ourselves from spreading Islam in
the only real way possible; through example and through peaceful ways.

I take no credit in regard to Rita's reversion to Islam. It is to her
credit alone and through God's will. If I was a small guide, it was
insignificant compared to her own determination and will to seek truth.

She found it. And God willing, more people will follow in her path.

Hisham Zoubeir
6 March 1998

[When this article was written] Hisham Zoubeir is at the University of
Sheffield undertaking a multi-disciplinary degree in law. He has lived
in Abu Dhabi, Cairo and London. His main interests delves into peace,
equality, righteousness and spirituality.]

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 12:09:07 PM1/17/01
to
In article <9428ed$7m9$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

[deleted for brevity]

> From: David Declerq <dec...@capitalnet.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 11:11 AM
> Subject: War Crimes Bangladesh
>
> Dear Sir
>
> I am a retired Canadian Army officer based in Ottawa advising on war
> crimes concerning real and potential refugee and immigration claimants
> that may seek to enter Canada but are alleged to have been involved in
> War Crimes or Crimes against humanity.

========================================================================

SENATE AMENDS WAR CRIMES LAW; MEASURE WOULD ALLOW JUSTICE DEPT. TO TRACK
RECENT VIOLATORS

LORRAINE ADAMS
WASHINGTON POST STAFF WRITER
Friday, November 5, 1999 ; Page A10

Zihad Music was notorious in Bosnia--witnesses alleged he committed
numerous atrocities and participated in purges. But sometime after 1993,
Music--who has denied the charges against him--slipped into small-town
Vermont, and the most feared man in Prijedor became a baker in Winooski.

Last night, the Senate passed legislation to make suspected war
criminals such as Music less comfortable. The bill, approved on voice
vote, would provide the Justice Department's Nazi-hunters unit with the
first update to its charter, authorizing it to track down war criminals
of the modern era.

"For too long, too many war criminals have sought and enjoyed refuge in
the United States and our laws have been strangely silent about it,"
said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, (D-Vt.), who introduced the legislation this
summer.

The Denying Safe Havens to International and War Criminals Act of 1999
amends the Immigration and Nationality Act, expanding the grounds for
inadmissibility and deportation to cover aliens who have engaged in acts
of torture abroad.

It also widens the jurisdiction of the Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations (OSI) to investigate, prosecute and remove any
alien who participated in torture or genocide abroad--not just Nazis. It
authorizes--but does not appropriate--more money for OSI to carry out
its new mission.

"It would empower the OSI, the Nazi-hunting unit, to continue its life
past the death of the last Nazi, and to begin to deal with contemporary
human rights violators found in this country," said Gerald Gray,
executive director of the Center for Justice and Accountability, a San
Francisco human rights group.

The center estimates 7,000 to 10,000 human rights violators from recent
wars in Haiti, Yugoslavia, Rwanda and other countries live in the United
States, and has identified 60 by name. The center has filed three
lawsuits on behalf of victims against a Serb Army torturer living in
Atlanta, a Chilean intelligence officer and two Salvadoran generals in
Florida.

Since its inception in 1979, OSI has stripped 61 Nazis of their U.S.
citizenship, deported 49 and denied entry to 150.

Leahy's bill, which was co-sponsored by Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah),
has also been introduced in the House, where congressional sources
predicted the Senate vote will prompt action on the measure.

"This is very significant, especially if the Office of Special
Investigations gets the resources it needs," said Nina Bang-Jensen of
the Coalition for International Justice in Washington. "My experience
doing advocacy and lobbying on behalf of the war crime tribunals is
there's support from the far right to the far left."

______________________________________________________

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 1:04:59 PM1/17/01
to
In article <9428ed$7m9$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

> From: David Declerq <dec...@capitalnet.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2000 11:11 AM
> Subject: War Crimes Bangladesh

Dear Sir

I am looking for reliable information on events that took place in


East Pakistan/Bangladesh that would assist me in this matter.

Specifically I am looking for a list of war crimes/crimes against
humanity, preferably in chronological sequence mentioning date,

location, act and perpetrators...

=======================================================================


International Terrorism and Immigration
Policy

by Steven Emerson

January 25, 2000

United States House of Representatives

Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims

House Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims

Hearing on International Terrorism and Immigration
Policy

January 25, 2000

Testimony of Steven Emerson,

Terrorist Expert and Investigator

Executive Director, Terrorism Newswire, Inc.

Terro...@aol.com

Introductory comments:

Good morning. Before I begin my prepared comments, I would like to take
a moment to express my deepest appreciation to you, Mr. Chairman, for
holding this hearing, and, equally important, for standing up to the
orchestrated campaign to stop me from appearing. Because of the
investigative work I have carried out as a journalist and investigator
in exposing the presence of militant Islamic fundamentalists and Middle
Eastern terrorists in the United States (see attached bio), I have been
the subject of a sustained campaign of vilification, defamation and even
a threat to my life during the past five years by militant Islamic
organizations operating as self-anointed representatives of the larger
Muslim population, whom they decidedly do not represent. But without
access to accurate information about my real background to correct the
false claims being fabricated about me, some of those who receive this
information are unfortunately subject to manipulation. In the end, the
aim of this campaign is to prevent me, as well as others, from speaking
and writing about the threat of militant Islamic fundamentalism on
American soil, and thus prevent the public from being properly informed.
The very success of these organizations and their supporters, fronting
under the false veneer of being "moderate" and "mainstream," in creating
a chilling climate where free speech on this issue has been suppressed,
has become a factor in allowing foreign terrorists to operate in the
United States below the radar screen and thus avoid the scrutiny from
either the media, public officials or law enforcement. Just as
significantly, the tactics of various Islamic organizations do a
tremendous disservice to the vast overwhelming majority of Muslim
Americans who do not support violence or terrorism. Mr. Chairman, your
refusal to allow these militants to suppress free speech is to be
applauded and lauded.


Overview of international terrorist problem:

Thanks to the quick response of US Customs Agents to behavior deemed
suspicious at the Canadian border in Port Angeles on December 14, 1999,
Ahmed Ressam was caught trying to smuggle RDX explosives. A wide-ranging
investigation, unprecedented in its sweep and scope, succeeded in
identifying and arresting other members of the hitherto unknown
terrorist cell to which Ressam belonged. A plot to bomb and destroy
targets in the United States, although still not publicly identified,
had been narrowly averted.

Today the United States and Canada serve as the home for a wide spectrum
of international terrorist groups as well as indigenous "home-grown"
groups. Certainly, today's hearing focuses our attention on the threat
of international terrorism on American soil and the porous nature of US
borders. While virtually all foreign terrorist organizations from
throughout the world, including Latin America and Asia, have set up
infrastructures in the United States, the primary threat of
international terrorism on American soil stems from Middle Eastern
terrorist organizations, a fact that FBI and CIA officials have
repeatedly testified to. These organizations have set up fundraising
operations, political headquarters, military recruitment and sometimes
even command and control centers. The entire spectrum of Middle Eastern
and Islamic terrorist groups now operates on American soil, including
Hamas, Hezbollah, the Algerian Armed Islamic Group, the Egyptian Al
Gamat Al Islamiya, the Palestinian Islamic Jihad, the Islamic Liberation
Party, the PKK and Al-Qaeda, the organization of Osama bin Laden.

There are various reasons for the emergence of these groups in the
United States, which include:

· Ability to operate under our political radar screen

· Ability to hide under mainstream religious identification

· Loopholes in immigration procedures

· Ease of penetration of borders

· Limitations on FBI and other agencies performing law enforcement
functions, including INS and Customs

· More sophisticated compartmentalization of terrorist cells around
loosely structured terrorist movements

· Exploitation of freedoms of religion and speech

· Absence of a vigilant media

· Exploitation of non-profit fundraising prerogatives and lack of
government scrutiny

· Increasing cross fertilization and mutual support provided by members
of different Islamic terrorist groups

· Ease of availability of student visas from countries harboring or
supporting terrorism

· Failures by universities to keep track of foreign students and their
spouses

· Protection afforded by specially-created educational programs

· Ease of visa fraud and the invention of false credentials, from
passports, drivers licenses, credit cards and
social security numbers

· Blowback from the anti-Soviet mujihadeen that the US supported in
Afghanistan.

Despite passage of the anti-terrorism bill and a realization by law
enforcement since the World Trade Center bombing that the threat of
Middle Eastern terrorism had become part of the US and Canadian
landscapes, militants and terrorists continue to use both countries as a
base of operations. As water seeking its own level, terrorists will
gravitate to those areas that give them the greatest freedom to
maneuver. Unless choked off and stopped along the different points of
entry--ranging from the visa granting process overseas to the
hundreds of unmanned border crossing points between Canada and the
United States--terrorists will continue to come to the United States.
The list of major international terrorists and militants allowed to
enter the United States in recent years or actually granted green cards
and citizenship is nothing less than staggering.

· Sheikh Omar Abdul Rahman, head of the Egyptian Al Gamat Al Islamiya,
and convicted leader of an interdicted plot to bomb US landmarks,
bridges and tunnels in New York

· Musa Abu Marzook, one of the top three officials of Hamas (who founded
and operated a "think tank" in Chicago and Virginia

· Ali Mohammed, a top lieutenant to Osama bin Laden (and not
insignificantly, enrolled as a Special Forces sergeant at Fort Bragg)

· Wadih el Hage, secretary to Osama bin Laden

· Ramadan Abdullah Shallah, head of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad (who
served as a professor at the University of South Florida in Tampa)

· Sheikh Abdel Aziz Odeh, spiritual leader of the Palestinian Islamic
Jihad and unindicted co-conspirator in the World Trade Center bombing
(who visited the United States multiple times for fundraising and
political recruitment without any knowledge of the INS)

· Ayman Zawahiri, leader of the Egyptian Al-Gihad organization,
lieutenant to Osama bin Laden and conspirator in the assassination of
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat

· Rashhid Ghannoushi, head of the Tunisian Al-Nahdah

· Anwar Haddam, a leader of the Algerian Islamic Salvation Front (FIS)

· Leith Shbeilat, a militant Islamic leader implicated in an
assassination plot against Jordan's King Hussein

· Khalid Mishal, a top leader of Hamas, who, in his speeches in the
United States, has called for stabbings

· Kamal Hilbawi, a spokesperson for the Muslim Brotherhood, who has
called for attacks on American targets and who has encouraged carrying
out of suicide bombings

· Yusef Al Qaradawi, a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and active
supporter of Hamas and other violent groups, who has called for suicide
bombings and taking over the United States

· Qazi Hussein Ahmed, leader of Pakistani Jamaat-e-Islami, a militant
group that supports violent "jihad" or holy war

· Ramzi Yousef, the top organizer of the World Trade Center bombing

· Sheikh Abdulmunem Abu Zant, a militant Jordanian Islamic cleric, who
has routinely called for violence

· Ishaq Al-Farhan, a leader of the militant Islamic Jordan Action Front
who has issued numerous exhortations to carry out violence

· Wagdi Ghuniem, a militant Islamic cleric from Egypt, who has called
for jihad against Jews and other "enemies of Islam." (Curiously, on one
of his recent visits to the United States, Ghuniem was barred from
entering Canada because of his terrorist affiliations and sent back to
the United States, where he continued his tour exhorting Islamic groups
to carry out violence.)


Loopholes and weaknesses of immigration controls:

Foreign nationals who are terrorist operatives routinely utilize false
identity documents to illegally enter the US and/or remain here once
they have entered. There are no shortages of examples in this regard -
the recent Washington State and Vermont arrests clearly show this. The
ability of Islamic Jihad leader Abdel Aziz Odeh to have entered the US
numerous times, without leaving a record under his real name, is yet
another example. Ghazi Ibrahim Abu Mezer and Lafi Khalil were arrested
on July 31, 1997 in a Brooklyn apartment by police officers from the New
York City Police Department, based on a tip that people in the apartment
were intending to bomb the New York subway system. The arrests narrowly
averted a series of bombings that could have killed hundreds of
commuters. After the arrests, police determined that Mezer and Khalil
were in the United States illegally. Mezer was apprehended three times
by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) in the thirteen
months prior to the arrest in New York for attempting to illegally
enter the United States from Canada. At the time of arrest, the INS had
begun formal deportation proceedings against him, but he was free on
bail and had filed a request for political asylum based on his fear
that the Israeli government would arrest him for membership in Hamas.
False documents are as important to terrorists and their organizations
as their guns and bombs -- they are tools that help them ply their
international trade of death and destruction.

In addition to false documents, alien terrorists and their support
operatives frequently engage in immigration benefit fraud. One of the
most glaring examples would be asylum fraud. All one has to do is show
up at a US port of entry, even without documents, utter the two magic
words "political asylum," have any moderately truthful sounding story
and one is likely to be processed in - at least temporarily. The
tightening of the asylum process over the past couple of years has
helped - but, be a fraudulent asylum claimant showing up at a very busy
Point of Entry such as JFK Airport or Miami International Airport - and
you are likely to remain in detention for only a short time before you
are paroled out to (hopefully) appear at a later hearing! If a name
(real or false) does not appear in any of the lookout systems and the
applicant merely has an alleged "friend" to stay with in the US, then
parole from detention is most likely. Of course, it goes without saying,
terrorist aliens so released seldom show up again - and the INS, because
of serious manpower shortages and conflicting priorities, rarely pursues
such absconders. Of course, any number of other immigration fraud
schemes abound - marriage fraud, other familial relation fraud,
naturalization fraud, work visa fraud (H-1 and L-1 and "E" status - as
used by Islamic Jihad officials Ramadan Abdullah Shallah and Bashir
Nafi), investor fraud and religious worker fraud.

Smuggling of alien terrorist operatives - apart from the noted
utilization of false documents: alien terrorists use established alien
smuggling pipelines across both the US-Mexico and US-Canada border.
Maritime smuggling along the coasts, particularly via the Caribbean as
well as East and West Coast seaports, occurs. How easy can it be for a
terrorist operative to bribe his/her way onto a freighter destined to a
busy US seaport, and simply be hidden aboard the vessel until Customs
and INS have done their routine inspections, then to simply disembark
the vessel?

The issue of classified evidence in immigration proceedings is now under
assault by editorialists in the media and from some members of Congress.
What they forget is that these proceedings are administrative in nature
- not criminal - and such evidence, in spite of all the recent hoopla,
is only rarely and very selectively utilized. Deportation proceedings
ultimately result in a person being removed from the US - not sentenced
to prison (as in criminal proceedings) - even though aliens may be
detained while those proceedings go forward. As such, it should be
remembered that aliens detained hold their own cell keys -all they have
to is simply agree to be deported and they can be free - just not in the
US. Moreover, Congress itself approved of the Classified Information
Procedures Act, in which classified information can be introduced in
criminal trials without releasing this information to the defendant.

Unfortunately, too many senior INS managers do not recognize the
critically important role INS enforcement branches, particularly the
Investigations Division, can and should play in the counter-terrorism
and national security arena. These are officials at both the HQ and
field levels. INS has but a small contingent of agents dedicated to this
work - and, often those do not receive the recognition and support
from higher management they should. INS should have at least a hundred
field agents assigned to these missions - at least the same it has
assigned to Organized Crime Drug Task Force efforts - but in fact INS
has less than half that assigned to counter-terrorist efforts in the
field. I have been told that it is not unusual for very senior INS
officials - especially at headquarters (who should know otherwise), when
the topic of counter-terrorism arises in senior staff meetings, to
state, "that's the FBI's responsibility" and "what does INS have to do
with that"! Certain key, senior INS managers fail to even understand and
recognize the very statutes within the Immigration and Nationality Act
they are charged with enforcing!

New information on the Algerian and Jordanian terrorist plots:

Last fall, a stateless Mauritanian flew from Germany to Montreal. Within
days before and after his visit to a group of Algerian nationals living
in Montreal, several members of that group flew to Chechnya; another
group traveled to Vancouver and another headed for the Vermont border.

According to a superceding federal indictment released last week, Ressam
and a still fugitive accomplice Abdelmajid Dahoumane plotted " to
destroy or damage structures, conveyances or other real or personal
property within the United States." The plot, which stretches back to at
least 1998, according to federal authorities, called for
compartmentalized cells to be activated in the United States. No one
cell would know about the others, in the event that any of the
participants got arrested. Members of another cell belonging to
the same group and entering the United States through Vermont border
crossings were to rendezvous in a still undisclosed location in the
northeast. Ressam was to be met in Seattle by a Brooklyn based Algerian
Abdel Ghani Meskini. While Ressam had planned to fly to London after
leaving the explosives laden car for someone else to pick up, Meskini
was to fly from Seattle to Chicago to help secure additional funding for
the Islamic terrorist group. Telephone toll records, released by
prosecutors, show that the Seattle cell was in contact with the
Vermont-based cell through third party numbers.

The Mauritanian, whose arrival in Montreal from Germany last fall
appeared to trigger some of the movements of the cell, is still believed
to be in Montreal. Germany had notified Canada of this man's
departure from Germany and pending arrival in Montreal. US authorities
believe the Mauritanian was connected to the Al Qaeda organization, the
terrorist group headed by Osama bin Laden and had been to Pakistan and
Afghanistan where he trained in camps operated by bin Laden.

At about the same time that the Mauritanian left Germany for Montreal to
rendezvous with the Algerian terrorist cells, several other Islamic
militants connected to bin Laden began activating another terrorist
plot. Khalil Deek, a Palestinian who became a US citizen in 1991,
traveled from Peshawar, Pakistan to Amman, Jordan, where he helped
organize a terrorist plot to bomb tourist sites, including the Radisson
hotel. In charges made public last week, Jordanian prosecutors alleged
that Deek conspired to carry out terrorist attacks in Jordan and had
acquired explosives in furtherance of that conspiracy. A dozen
Jordanians and an Iraqi and Algerian were arrested by Jordanian
authorities in the first week of December as being members of that same
conspiracy. Deek had been extradited from Pakistan to Jordan on December
17, 1999. Deek served as facilitator in the underground railroad
operated by bin Laden, arranging the transport of terrorists and
explosives.

According to intelligence sources, Deek trained in a bin Laden camp near
Khost, Afghanistan. An accomplice of Deek in the same bin Laden camp, a
person by the name of Idris, was arrested by Pakistani authorities at
the same time that Deek had been picked up. Another terrorist colleague
of Deek, a Palestinian who goes by the name Abu Zubeida, escaped arrest
as did another suspected conspirator in the Jordanian plot, a man named
Hejazzi. Hejazzi traveled on an American passport and had previously
driven a taxi in the Boston metropolitan area. He had rented a house in
Amman where he stored a vast amount of explosives. Hejazzi's whereabouts
are unknown today. US authorities believe that he was connected to
other members of terrorist cells still active in the United States. That
he was able to acquire a US passport and use of the US as a base of
operations only further illustrates the problem we face.

Hejazzi's accomplice, Deek, who had lived in Anaheim, California, is the
focus of a still unraveling US investigation. US authorities acquired
his computer disks and are now studying them. Although Deek's
brother told a reporter last week that he (Khalil Deek) had left the
United States in March 1997, federal authorities believe that he may
have been in the United States as recently as September 1999--although
they are not certain at this moment as they try to reconstruct his
movements. But authorities have determined that while he lived in the
United States, he was involved in wiring transactions of sums totaling
tens of thousands of dollars to overseas destinations. Interestingly,
Deek made the transactions not from Anaheim, where he lived and worked,
but rather from Chicago, where he flew multiple times en route to
Pakistan. Deek was also associated with a Californian registered Islamic
non-profit charity called Charity Without Borders, whose existence was
disclosed last week. As also disclosed, Deek's brother, Tawfeeq, has
been involved with the Islamic Association for Palestine, described by
former FBI official Oliver Revell as a "front group" for Hamas, and has
allowed his mosque to host fundraisers for the Holy Land Fund for Relief
and Development, a non-profit fundraising organization that has been
linked to Hamas, with offices in Texas, Illinois and New Jersey.

Although the President's Executive Order of January 1995--and renewed
again several days ago--orders the seizure of assets belonging to
terrorist groups, and the 1996 anti-terrorist legislation similarly
ordered the freezing of terrorist assets of some 30 groups, very little
money has actually been seized. With the primary exception of funds
belonging to Musa Marzook, the head of the Hamas politburo who was
deported in 1997, the US Government has not designated terrorist
affiliates in the United States.

he problem, of course, is that terrorists don't openly raise funds for
explosives or guns but rather for "humanitarian" purposes, such as
education or for orphans.

nkdat...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 1:32:34 PM1/17/01
to
In article <942pp2$n8u$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> In article <9429ec$8fb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
> tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> God bless David Declerq - finally some voice of reason and law in
> the anarchy of 'Ghadanis' and 'Crybabies'. People found guilty for any
> crime against any human being should be tried and punished by law. I
> can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be tried in the court of law.
> Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and 'documenary information' to
> David Declerq. I can tell it will not be our Jamal dada.
>
> TA
>
>
> > It seems from recent posts by Mr. Tarek Ali
> > that Mr. Jamal Hasan has somehow managed to
> > rub him the wrong way. Nevertheless, I would
> > advise Mr. Tarek Ali discretion as the better
> > part of valor. After all, Mr. Jamal Hasan
> > is in a position to help Mr. Tarek Ali.
> >
>
> I am glad that Datta babu thinks I am rubbing ONLY Jamal Hasan in the
> wrong way. :)
>

If Mr. Tarek Ali re-reads my post, he'll realize that
I was worried that Mr. Jamal Hasan had rubbed him the
wrong way. I don't think it particularly matters if
Mr. Tarek Ali tries to rub Mr. Jamal Hasan the wrong
way. Mr. Jamal Hasan doesn't need Mr. Tarek Ali. It is
Mr. Tarek Ali who stands to gain by cultivating Mr. Jamal
Hasan as an ally. Who knows when Mr. Tarek Ali mught need
him.

>
> > Mr. Tarek Ali knows that Mr. Jamal Hasan is
> > a federal employee working for the department
> > of justice in Washington. In fact, Mr. Tarek
> > Ali has let it be known to nettors that he
> > has seen photos of Mr. Jamal Hasan holding
> > hands with the likes of Attorney General
> > Janet Reno. In view of Sheikh Hasina
> > government's determination to extradite those
> > that were involved in the massacre of her family
> > in 1975 or of, say, the Bengali-speaking
> > intellectuals in 1971, wouldn't it be wise of
> > Mr. Tarek Ali to cultivate Mr. Jamal Hasan as
> > a friend ? Mr. Jamal Hasan may be Mr. Tarek Ali's
> > only hope of saving the likes of Lieutenant
> > Colonel AKM Mohiuddin and Imam Ashrafuzzaman
> > from extradition when justice threatens
> > to catch up with them.
>
> Now I am really scared Datta babu. I guess I have no other way but to
> accept Jamal Hasan as a friend! After all, he represents 'justice'
> because he is an employee of DOJ (LOL). Can you do the match making
> for us?
>

Mr. Tarek Ali shouldn't depend on others
for the match-making. He should court Mr.
Jamal Hasan himself.

>
> But haven't you noticed that I am the only person in the ng who wants
> justice (and true justice) for everyone no matter who he/she is
> following the rules of law? Why the Jamals (being in DOJ) work for
> illegal things like Ghadani and break the law of civilized society and
> create anarchy? Does he know anything about his job? Or is he a just
> support person in DOJ without need of any knowledge about DOJ
> objectives and activities?
>

Mr. Jamal Hasan seems to be in a position to help
Mr. Tarek Ali. Out of curiosity, I looked for


the photo that Mr. Tarek Ali had mentioned. I am
truly impressed. Nettors can see it on:

http://www.bangladesh-web.com/news/dec/31/fv4n439.htm#1

Ms. Janet Reno and Mr. Jamal Hasan seem to be holding

hands with a lot of love and affection. If I were Mr.


Tarek Ali, I would certainly like to have Mr. Jamal
Hasan as my ally.

In article <9428ed$7m9$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 1:37:01 PM1/17/01
to
In article <944ms4$8pf$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

International Terrorism and Immigration Policy by Steven Emerson

January 25, 2000 / United States House of Representatives


Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims

House Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims / Hearing on International


Terrorism and Immigration Policy
January 25, 2000
Testimony of Steven Emerson,

=======================================================================
IN DEFENSE OF STEVEN EMERSON AND DANIEL PIPES

by Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi

Secretary General, Italian Muslim Association (AMI);
Imam, Italian Islamic Community (ICCII);
Director, Cultural Institute, Italian Islamic Community;
Member, International Council, Root & Branch Association

ROME, Italy, Yom Rishon (Day One -- "Sunday"), 9 Tishri, 5760 (September
19, 1999), Root & Branch:

KARIMA ASKS:

Usually, I agree with your positions, but if I'm not mistaken , and I
could be...so if I am please forgive me, you recently wrote very
positive things about Daniel Pipes and his analysis of Islam in America.
I must tell you that I was more than a little bit distressed with your
opinions.

SHAYKH PROF. PALAZZI ANSWERS:

I wrote, and I am ready to confirm it, that I appreciate what Dr. Pipes
-- as a journalist -- is doing to expose "Islamism" (I would rather say
"pseudo-Islamic radicalism") and the danger it presents to American
society and to the Western world. This does not mean that I agree with
everything which Dr. Pipes writes about Islam.

Dr. Pipes is a secular American Jew. I am a believing Muslim. What Dr.
Pipes writes about Islam (and about other subjects, too) reflects his
secular American perspective. I by no means agree with what Dr. Pipes
says about the Prophet Muhammad (S), the Holy Qur'an, the history of
Islam, etc. However, insofar as Dr. Pipes is working to unmask the
hidden face of "Islamism", I welcome his contribution.

"Islamism" is NOT a spontaneous mass movement, but a worldwide front
fueled by certain political and economic interests. Dr. Pipes and Steven
Emerson are two of the very few American journalists working to
reveal the truth about the "Islamists". In this regard, I appreciate the
work of Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes, although I do not agree with their
attitude towards Islam in particular and with their secular worldview in
general.

Muslims are the main victims of the "Islamists". Thanks to the
"Islamists", Western public opinion has acquired a very bad impression
of Islam. Thanks to Ahmad Yasin, the "Muslim Brotherhood", Osama Bin
Laden, CAIR and their ilk, millions of people throughout the world are
convinced that Islam is based on intolerance, violence and fanaticism.

Muslims should be in the forefront of efforts to refute the "Islamists"
and to counter their abuse of Islam. Unfortunately, either from fear or
for other reasons, Muslims are doing virtually nothing to distinguish
authentic Islam from the counterfeit image presented by the "Islamists".
This task is being carried out by a few brave non-Muslims such as Dr.
Pipes and Mr. Emerson.

We must learn from Dr. Pipes and Mr. Emerson, though not in the field of
religion. The same is true of Hisham Kabbani. He is a false shaykh and
leader of a non-Muslim cult, and I am personally attempting to refute
his incorrect ideas about Islam.

Nevertheless, when Mr. Kabbani met with U.S. State Department officials
and denounced the dangers of extremism in the United States and the plan
by which extremists are taking control of most U.S. Islamic Centers and
Mosques, I stated categorically that I agree with his detailed analysis
and that I admire his courage.

Hisham Kabbani correctly identifies the origin of contemporary
radicalism in Wahhabism. Kabbani correctly divides contemporary radicals
into two groups: "militants" (those who directly engage in terrorism)
and "non-militants" (those who indirectly support terrorism while
maintaining a false respectability so that they can get invited to
receptions at the White House -- i.e., the wolves in sheep's clothing).
I agree with Mr. Kabbani 100% on this issue.

I would also add that the center of worldwide radicalism is a sect
called the "Muslim Brotherhood". This sect has sections engaged in
direct terrorism such as Hamas and sections not directly engaged in
terrorism such as CAIR.

Although their links to Hamas are clear, CAIR is permitted to act freely
in the United States. CAIR claims to "represent" the Muslim Community
and launches hate campaigns against journalists, senators and others
who interfere with their true terrorist agenda.

Let us look at CAIR's carryings-on during the past few years. I receive
all of their press releases. Their main activity seems to be launching
savage hate campaigns against Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes. CAIR & Co.
openly slander Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes as "enemies of Islam" and as
"Islamophobes".

CAIR slanders Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes for a very simple reason. What
is it? Does CAIR's slander against Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes flow from
the fact that Emerson and Pipes are non-Muslims who write about Islam
from a secular perspective?

Muslims are a minority in the Western world. Most Westerners come from
either Christian or secular backgrounds. In commenting on Islam, most
Westerners, whether they be Christian missionaries and ministers or
secular professors, orientalists and journalists, recycle the same ideas
first generated by Goldziher.

Every day, "experts" in America and Europe, in the academia, government
circles and the media, comment about Islam from their non-Muslim
perspectives. Usually these "experts" make the same kind of comments
about the Muslim religion that we read in the writings of Mr. Emerson
and Dr. Pipes, or make comments that to our Muslim ears sound even
worse.

So is this the reason why CAIR attacks Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes? Is the
ignorance of authentic Islam reflected in the writings of these two
gentlemen the reason why CAIR labels them as "Islamophobes"?

No.

According to the con artists at CAIR, anyone who denounces radicalism is
"Islamophobic". CAIR cares to attack Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes BECAUSE
THEY ARE REVEALING THE TRUE RADICAL AGENDA, AS WELL AS REVEALING THE
CONNECTION BETWEEN CAIR AND THOSE ORGANIZATIONS THAT ARE CLASSIFIED AS
TERRORIST BY UNITED STATES LAW.

Muslims must NOT be fooled by the carpetbaggers at CAIR who claim to
defend "the honor of Islam". All CAIR wants to to destroy the
reputations of brave men such as Mr. Emerson and Dr. Pipes who reveal
the terrorist, criminal nature of their organization.

Hoping - insha Allah Ta'ala - that this explanation clarifies my point
of view, and waiting to hear from you, wa-s-salamu 'alaykum wa
rahmat-Ullahi wa barakatuH.

Shalom from Rome,

Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi [islam...@flashnet.it]

ABOUT SHAYKH PROF. ABDUL HADI PALAZZI:

Shaykh Prof. Palazzi is Secretary General of the Italian Muslim
Association (AMI), an Imam of the Italian Islamic Community (ICCII) and
Director of the Community's Cultural Institute. Prof. Palazzi holds a
Ph.D in Islamic Sciences by decree of the Grand Mufti of the Kingdom of
Saudi Arabia.

Shaykh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi is a Member of the International Council
of the Root & Branch Association.

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 2:50:42 PM1/17/01
to
In article <9429ec$8fb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
People found guilty for any crime against any human being should be
tried and punished by law. I can not wait for the crimes of 1971 to be
tried in the court of law. Now lets see who provides 'reliable' and
'documenary information' to David Declerq. .................
========================================================================

The Daily Star
International News
Volume 2 Number 250
May 04, 1999


http://dailystarnews.com/199905/04/n9050413.htm#BODY6


US a safe haven for alleged war criminals?

BOSTON, May 3: Alleged war criminals have found a safe
haven in the United States in recent years, under the noses of
immigration officials and sometimes with help from the US government,
The Boston Globe reported Sunday, reports AP.

The newspaper said it found evidence that people from
countries including Haiti and El Salvador, and people involved in the
breakup of Yugoslavia, have settled in this country and begun new lives,
despite evidence of their involvement in serious human rights abuses.

The list includes three alleged participants in ethnic
cleansing in Yugoslavia; several former associates of Somali strongman
Mohammed Siad Barre; 16 Haitian military officers; and a Salvadoran
general accused of covering up the massacre of four American churchwomen
in 1980, according to the Globe.

"I was a member of the Haitian army high command," said
Carl Dorelien, a former head of personnel for the 7,000-member army that
seized power from President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 1991 and killed as
many as 4,000 civilians. "I lived like a king in my country."

Dorelien, who now lives in a resort community in Port St
Lucie, Florida, won dlrs 3.2 million in a Florida lottery in 1997. At
the time, lottery officials described him as a penniless immigrant and
political refugee.

But Dorelien says the US military got him a five-year visa
after the corrupt Haitian army was forced from power in 1994 by 20,000
US troops. Fifteen other Haitian military officers have since joined him
in the United States and are living mainly in New York and Florida, he
said.

Dan Cadman, chief of the Immigration and Naturalisation
Service's national security unit, said his agency is concerned about the
problem of human rights offenders taking shelter here. But he said it is
relatively rare.

"The concern is deep, but that doesn't necessarily suggest
there is a widespread problem," Cadman said.

The US government has invested millions of dollars in a
program to hunt down Nazis who slipped into the country after World War
II. But some human rights monitors say more recent war criminals have
been overlooked.

"It's in the thousands," said Gerald Gray, who last year
founded the Center for Justice and Accountability to track down human
rights violators and bring them to justice.

The San Francisco-based center has filed lawsuits against
two alleged war criminals - a Bosnian Serb refugee living in Atlanta who
allegedly tortured prisoners and a former Chilean secret police officer
living in Miami accused of torturing and executing a former government
official.

"It is really appalling to think that the United States
has become the retirement home of choice for murderers and despots,"
said William Ford, a New York attorney whose sister Ita, a nun, was
killed by members of the Salvadoran national guard.

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 3:10:04 PM1/17/01
to
In article <9428ed$7m9$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

> From: David Declerq <dec...@capitalnet.com>

> I am under the impression that alleged war criminals in this tragic
> event came from both Pakistan proper and East Pakistan/Bangladesh and
> now reside in both places.

=======================================================================

A PAKISTANI HUMANIST WRITES TO SALEEM SAMAD OF BANGLADESH


Dear Saleem Samad,

I am Director, Urdu Publications in Sustainable
Development Policy Institute(SDPI), Islamabad. Basically, I am a Punjabi
Poet and have been University Teacher Journalist and folklorist. I
occasionally write 'Newsline' and 'Herald'. The proposed anthology will
be in English . I am trying to bring it out on 25-26 March. The
tentative contents are attached herewith.

My two other books

1- Ten Days That Dismembered Pakistan-Yahya-Mujib-Bhutto
talk, 16-25 March 1971 and

2- Hamoodur Rahman Commission Report-Text and Related
Documents-are already in press to be released in couple months. The
later is being released on Feb 21 from Dhaka.

Thanks for your interest and attention

Ahmad Salim

*****
We Owe An Apology To The People of Bangladesh

Compiled and Edited by
Ahmad Salim

(A) Poets & Writers from West Pakistan Who supported the
cause of Bangladesh during the war of Independence 1971.

Poems


1. Fiaz Ahmad Fiaz
2. Habib Jalib
3. Ahmad Salim
4. Sheikh Ayaz
5. Ajmal Kahattak

Prose/Diary


1. Sheikh Ayaz (Jail Diary 1971)
2. Other Sindhi and Pashtu Writings

(B) West Pakistan Politicians on 1971


1. Punjab Pakistan Front’s plea to disown Bhutto: Report
of PPF’s meeting at Lahore on March 3, 1971.

2. Transfer the power to Awami League now------ Only
solution of crisis: Report of the Press Conference at Karachi Press Club
on March 4, 1971, by Air Marshal (Retd.) Asghar Khan.
3. RTC: Hazarvi backs Mujib’s decision ---- Bhutto
criticized: Speech by Maulana Hazarvi at Jabees Hotel on March 4, 1971.

4. ‘Postponement undemocratic’ ---- NAP hartal call:
Meeting of Baluchistan Provincial Nation Awami Party (Wali Group) at
Quetta on March 4, 1971.

5. Immediate transfer of power urged: Meeting of the
workers of the Bangla National League at Dacca on March 4, 1971.

6. Many leaders support Mujib’s Four Demands--- Bhutto’s
intransigence held responsible for crisis: Statement issued on March 7,
1971 by Mian Nizamuddin Haider, MNA--- Elect and a leader of the
Bahawalpur United Front, etc.
7. National Assembly minority groups back Awami League’s
four-point Demand—Plea for Interim Government’s at centre and Provinces:
Report of the meeting held on March 13, 1971, at Lahore by minority
groups the National Assembly Delegation to Chief President Yahya and
Sheik Mujib.
8. Early transfer of power urged—Bhutto blamed for crisis:
History will never forgive Bhutto Report of Begum Tahira Masood’s speech
on March 14, 1971.
9. Minority Parties Leaders Criticize Bhutto’s speech:
Press report on March 16, 1971.
10. Bhutto’s stand contradictory, says Asghar: Statement
by Air Marshal Asghar Khan on March 15,1971, at Peshawar.

11. Wali urges transfer of Power to Sovereign CA--- West
Wing no longer one political entity: Leaders Slate Bhutto; Press report
on March 16, 1971.

12. All eyes riveted on Dacca --- No question of 2
majority parties in one country: Statement by Mian Mohammad Khan
Daultana, President, and Council Muslim League on March 16, 1971,at
Lahore.
13. Daultana, Wali, and Mufti resent postponement:
Statements by three Parliamentary Group leaders on March 22, 1971.

14. Wali, Mufti, Bizenjo oppose bid to revive One Unit:
Text of the joint statement on March 24, 1971, at Dacca.

15. CML opposed to N.A. being split in two: Announcement
by Mian Mumtaz Mohammad Khan Daultana, President of the Council Muslim
League . in Lahore on March 20, 1971.
16.Open Letter to General Yahya Khan by Malik Ghulam
Jilani.

(C) Journalists who wrote in favour of Bangladesh during
1970s

1. Mazhar Ali Khan - Reality of Bangladesh
5 Parts 18.11.72 to 26.11.72 in DAWN
2. Syed Najiullah--- Nov. 1972, DAWN
3. Attack on Dawn
4. Elections In Bangladesh 11-3-1973 in The Pakistan Times
5. Mujib’s Triumph 10-3-1973 in The Pakisatn Times

(D) We Owe an Apology to the people of Bangladesh


1. Professor Karrar Hussain, What Should We tell our
children about East Pakistan? The Frontier Post, Dec.1991

2. I.A. Rahman, This Is What We tell them now, The
Frontier Post, Dec. 13,1991
3. Editorial Weekly ‘Zindgi’ Lahore Dec. 28, 1990
4. Letter of Bengali intellectuals and writers to
Pakistan; Intellectuals/ Writers, Dec.30,1995

5. Pakisatn, Writers beg for apology, Dhaka, March 1996
6. Women’s Action Forum beg for apology, Dhaka, March 1996
7. Shehzad Amjad, We Owe an Apology to the people of
former East Pakistan The News, Nov. 29,1996

8. Hafizar Rahman, Can the Bengalis forgive us? The News,
Dec. 21, 1996
9. Ahmad Salim, The Final Count Down, Monthly Herald,
April 1997
10. Ahmad Salim, Night of the Generals, Monthly Herald,
April 1997
11. Ahmad Salim, The long Journey Home, Newsline, Dec.
1997
12. Dr. Tariq Rahman, Saying Sorry to Bangladesh, The
News, Feb 2, !998
13. Shehzad Amjad, The Call of Justice, The News, Nov. 22,
1998
14. Hafizur Rahman, Why Bengal Was Ignored? DAWN, Sep.2000

(E) Hamoodur Rahman Commission Report


1. Zahid Hussain A Nation’s Shame, Newsline Sep.2000
2. Amir Mir and Najum Mushtaq, Crime and Punishment?
Newsline, Sep. 2000
3. S. G. M. Badruddin Witness to Trajedy Newsline Sep.
2000
4. Ahmad Salim, Murders Most Foul, Newsline, Sep.2000

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 17, 2001, 5:21:18 PM1/17/01
to
In article <944u6i$fv3$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

A PAKISTANI HUMANIST WRITES TO SALEEM SAMAD OF BANGLADESH

Dear Saleem Samad,

I am Director, Urdu Publications in Sustainable
Development Policy Institute(SDPI), Islamabad. Basically, I am a
Punjabi Poet and have been University Teacher Journalist and folklorist.
I occasionally write 'Newsline' and 'Herald'. The proposed anthology
will be in English . I am trying to bring it out on 25-26 March. The
tentative contents are attached herewith.

========================================================================

News from Bangladesh December 8, 1999

Feature


The trouble with my Pathan heritage, really?

By Jamal Hasan

"You may take me for a Pucca Bangalee if you take a cursory look at me.
However, deep inside me there are still vestiges of some Pathan genes.
This is my own personal story. The story of my ancestors who came all
the way from the mountains of Hindu Kush so many years ago only to
transform them into local Bangalee."

I myself is a living relic of my ancestors. Like so many of them, I
also call my self a Bangalee, notwithstanding so many Pathan genes in my
blood.

Before I go into details of my heritage I want to lead you in a short
tour of the enigmatic world of ethnicity and roots. Every other weekend
we travel to Virginia to visit our in-laws. During our last visit, I
stopped at the local barber shop for a long overdue tonsorial service.
The barber was a loquacious Greek who talked at length of his younger
days when Indian movies were his passion. Among so many pretty
bodacious Bombay beauties - Nargis was his femme fatale, and Lata, the
nightingale, was his favorite singer.

That evening as we came out of an oriental store, I noticed a car
parked just next to ours. My wife and I were astonished to notice that
the driver, who looked every inch a Chinese, was listening to Indian
music. But then we reasoned, "What's the big deal! If a Greek man can
be fond of Indian music, why not a Chinese?" But my curiosity had been
aroused. And I went over to the "Chinese" driver and asked him if he
understood the lyrics of the Asha Bhonsle song that was blaring
through his car's speakers and he was listening to with such obvious
delight. The mystery was solved when he replied, "Yes, I do. My
ancestors are Chinese but I was born in India." I must admit that this
is the first time I had met a person like him. It left me wondering if
he was a Chinese-Indian or a Chinese-Indian-American.

You see, increased mobility is globalizing our society in ways that are
unprecedented. It is no longer uncommon to come across multiply
hyphenated Americans like that Chinese-Indian-American fan of Asha
Bhonsle. I am, myself, a Pathan-Bengali American!

In multiethnic countries like India, it may not be unusual for migrants
from one state taking on the linguistic identity of another state. The
famous journalist M. J. Akbar, the editor of Asian Age, is a good
example. He is of Kashmiri heritage from his mother's side and of
Bihari heritage from his father's side. But he grew up in West Bengal
and, to all intents and purposes, he is a Bengali like you and me.

While I used to live in Florida I had an interesting encounter with a
Pakistani. He used to work in a convenience store and was very popular
with his customers. He didn't quite look like the average Pakistani.
Furthermore his English lacked the distinctive touch of Urdu that is so
common among his compatriots. I soon found out the reason. He was
originally from Noakhali and had migrated to Karachi when he was in his
twenties. Needless to say, we always spoke to each other in Bangla once
we figured out that we shared the same linguistic heritage. He assured
me that there are hundreds of thousands of Bengalis like him who are
settled in Pakistan.

Perhaps you have guessed it right that chauvinistic Pakistanis are not
quite happy about the Bengalis who live in their midst in Pakistan. It
is assumed that all such Bengalis must necessarily be illegal
immigrants. Xenophobic Pakistanis have been campaigning for long to
force the expulsion of all such "illegal immigrants" from their country.

Whenever I think of the "Biharis" or the stranded Pakistanis now living
in Red Cross Camps in Mohmmadpur, Dhaka, it evokes a mixed feeling
inside me. I can't figure it out for the life of me why an increasing
number of Pakistanis now disapprove of their repatriation. Nawaz
Sharif's foreign minister, for example, was quite blunt about his
feelings when he told journalists that he did not consider the Biharis
to be Pakistanis. Those among the stranded Pakistanis who date back to
the pre-1971 generation continue to dream of their PROMISED LAND. But
their offspring, raised in independent Bangladesh, have learned the
language of the soil and do not necessarily share their parents' dream.
Many of them are quite reluctant to journey to an unknown land a
thousand miles away.

Concerning ethnicity, I myself have some interesting tale to tell. My
grandmother told me how her father Serajul Huq Khan had helped a young
man in his quest for education. That young man was no other than the
father of Kabir Chowdhury. Halim Chowdhury unabashedly acknowledged his
gratitude to my great grand father when he told him with great feelings,
"I can never repay the debt I owe you." In British time, many affluent
Bengali Muslims lent a helping hand to young Muslim boys of promise who
were often groomed to be their future sons-in-law. The generosity of
well to do philanthropic Muslim Bengalis left an indelible mark in the
social evolution of East Bengal. In my personal life, thanks to such
philanthropy, I have seen the rise of one famous civil servant, one
notable physicist and a famous millionaire in Bangladesh.

When my maternal grandmother was alive we often teased her for her
conspicuous "Peshawari nose." In fact, her facial feature was
distinctively Pathan. I had been told that she was of Pathan heritage
but had not discovered any concrete evidence till one of my uncles
published a book on the genealogy of my mother's side of the family.
The book is titled, "The Saber Khan Family: The Branches and the Roots."
The book starts with the life of Saber Khan, who is my grandmother's
great grandfather. Saber Khan was an ambitious Pathan born in 1792.
His great grandfather was Patla Khan. Even to this day, there is a lane
in Puran Dhaka named after him. Saber Khan's Pathan ancestors had
settled in East Bengal more than four hundred years ago. It is said
that they belonged to the clan of one of the Pathan Kings in East
Bengal. Marriage outside the family used to be rare among such clannish
families. That may be why many a descendent has retained his Pathan
feature even after so many generations in Bengal.

The Saber Khan book has numerous charts to illustrate the different
branches of the family and their current status. I found out that many
of Khan's descendants have been quite successful in life. The first
Muslim civil surgeon in undivided Bengal, Dr. Fazlur Rahman Khan was a
direct descendent. Abdur Raschid Khan was another notable descendent.
Raschid Khan was a political activist of note. He was active in Khilafat
Movement, and later on joined the Non-Cooperation Movement with
Deshbandhu C. R. Das. Rabindranath Tagore renounced his Knighthood to
protest the barbaric killing in Jalianwallabagh. Abdur Raschid Khan,
likewise, renounced his title, Khan Bahadur, after 1919 to protest
British atrocities on the Turks. In 1921 he was imprisoned by the
British for a year. In those days, it was indeed rare for a Muslim
Bengali to be jailed for his political beliefs and activities. In 1929
he joined the Swaraj Dal and was appointed by Deshbandhu C.R. Das to be
the Secretary of the party. Raschid Khan went on to become the Deputy
Chief Executive Officer of Calcutta Corporation.

I have found out from the book that the descendants of Saber Khan are
now scattered all around the globe. I am sure many a reader will
realize that he shares with me a common ancestor in that enterprising
Pathan who had made East Bengal his home. Saber Khan's immediate
ancestors were from Manikganj and Nawabganj of Dhaka. Saber Khan had
moved to West Bengal but then moved back to finally settle down in
Shainpukur, Dhaka.

My grandmother often told us about her sister-in-law Akhter Mahal Syeda
Khatun. Khatun was a prolific writer at a time when there were very of
them among Muslim Bengali women. Akhter Mahal's works drew praise from
none other than Kazi Nazrul Islam during a short stay of the poet at her
residence. Akhter Mahal's untimely death deprived the Bengalis of a
writer who had the potential to be another Begum Roqeya Sakhawat
Hussain. The promising point is we did not let her literary gem
vanish into the thin air. Two of my sisters contributed their time and
energy to build up a manuscript of her book. In 1978, a book comprising
Akhter Mahal's literary works was published. In the publication
ceremony held in Dhaka we had a formal gathering of relatives where some
renown literary figures were guest speakers.

I found an interesting feature of commonality among descendants of Saber
Khan, especially among those from Shainpukur and Azizpur in Dhaka and
from Mirzapur in Tangail. They were conspicuous by their religious
tolerance and maintained very amicable relationships with their Hindu
neighbors. My grandmother was raised in a family with some Urdu
influence. But I have seldom come across a Muslim Bengali in her age
group who could take such a non-communal view of the world.

Shafique Rehman is yet another descendant of Saber Khan who has attained
fame in the field of journalism. I have another cousin who is now a
vice president of Motorola.

The liberation struggle was a trying time for all Bengalis. My
relatives were no exception. Many of them participated actively in the
struggle for liberation. An uncle from Shainpukur has many a story of
mukti juddho for his nephews and nieces. He, more than other relatives,
stands out in Bangladesh for his Pathan features and can easily pass off
as a visitor from Quetta or Abbotabad in Pakistan. He is a physician by
profession. In 1971, as he went from village to village in the service
of the Mukti Bahini, he would often be mistaken as a man "from the other
side" till he was introduced as a bona fide Bengali. He spent much of
1971 treating members of the Mukti Bahini at different sites.

I am not a geneticist. But I consider the Pathan genes in me as good
news as well as bad news. First the good news. Like the stereotyped
Pathan, I will never forget the past, least of all what Bengalis had to
endure in 1971. This, in turn, will help to keep alive in me the spirit
of 1971. And now the bad news. The rage and anger reserved for the
marauding Pak army and their cohort is not conducive to maintaining the
tranquility of my soul. In memory of my late ancestors I can only say,
"Let the Pathans who love the land of Bengal continue to contribute
their mite to keeping alive the spirit of 1971."

************************************************************************

Shomir

unread,
Jan 17, 2001, 6:05:37 PM1/17/01
to
If only our Bihari resident Tarok molla had the same feelings and emotional
attachment with Bangladesh as Mr. Jamal Hasan!!

Shomir

===============

j_h...@my-deja.com wrote:

> In article <944u6i$fv3$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
>
> A PAKISTANI HUMANIST WRITES TO SALEEM SAMAD OF BANGLADESH
>
> Dear Saleem Samad,
>
> I am Director, Urdu Publications in Sustainable
> Development Policy Institute(SDPI), Islamabad. Basically, I am a
> Punjabi Poet and have been University Teacher Journalist and folklorist.
> I occasionally write 'Newsline' and 'Herald'. The proposed anthology
> will be in English . I am trying to bring it out on 25-26 March. The
> tentative contents are attached herewith.
> ========================================================================
>
> News from Bangladesh December 8, 1999
>
> Feature
>
> The trouble with my Pathan heritage, really?
>
> By Jamal Hasan

................... rest of the article deleted to save bandwidth

tare...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 17, 2001, 8:49:21 PM1/17/01
to
Yep, the moment I saw the picture of Jamal Hasan, I immediately figured
out that this is a Pathan! What is the meaning of such an 'ashare'
story? This Jamal guy is a number one hate monger nationalist, and
wants to thrive on creating dissension in the country for fishing in
muddy water. And now he is preaching universalism and humanism. Feel
like puking. The central message of his writings is hate, inciting bad
feelings and creating law and order situation in Bangladesh. His 'gul-
goppo' would fit well in the weekend magazine section of a cheap
newspaper as a fiction, but not as an article.

TA


In article <9455si$nn0$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

nkdat...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 18, 2001, 12:30:31 AM1/18/01
to
In article <9455si$nn0$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
j_h...@my-deja.com wrote:
>
> That evening as we came out of an oriental store, I noticed a car
> parked just next to ours. My wife and I were astonished to notice
that
> the driver, who looked every inch a Chinese, was listening to Indian
> music. But then we reasoned, "What's the big deal! If a Greek man can
> be fond of Indian music, why not a Chinese?" But my curiosity had been
> aroused. And I went over to the "Chinese" driver and asked him if he
> understood the lyrics of the Asha Bhonsle song that was blaring
> through his car's speakers and he was listening to with such obvious
> delight. The mystery was solved when he replied, "Yes, I do. My
> ancestors are Chinese but I was born in India." I must admit that
> this is the first time I had met a person like him. It left me
> wondering if he was a Chinese-Indian or a Chinese-Indian-American.
>

The HINDU
17 January, 2001

Hindi movies spearheading cultural conquest
By Kesava Menon

MANAMA, JAN. 17. ``Do you know Anthony,'' asked the Palestinian
Christian taxi-driver. ``Have you seen Akbar,'' asks a Bedouin tour
guide a few weeks later. Understanding the queries can be just as easy
as saying Amar, Akbar, Anthony if the person to whom the questions are
posed is aware of the influence that Bollywood wields over audiences all
over West Asia.

Ministers and business leaders visiting countries in West Asia and North
Africa extol the mantra of India's info-tech capabilities while seeking
either funds or opportunities for local investment. But in this ICE
(Information, Communications, Entertainment) age, it is the last segment
that is leading the Indian charge into new markets.

These markets are really not new, and Indian visitors will be astonished
at the large number of people who remember ``Ichakdana...'' and old
numbers from Raj Kapoor movies. What is new is that young people who are
familiar with satellite TV and are exposed to strong doses of western
culture are drooling over the Amir Khans, Hrithik Roshans and Aishwarya
Rais.

It is as if there was one era when Raj Kapoor wooed audiences and a new
era where the Bollywood brat pack wows them. But there is one link
between the two eras, a link is so dominant that it looms over both the
golden era of Hindi films and the present razzmatazz. This is, of
course, the Big B - ``Amit Bachaan'', as he known from Morocco to Iran.
In these parts Mr. Amitabh Bachchan does not need Kaun Banega Crorepati
to refurbish his image and his popularity, for they never seem to have
faded. It might be only slight exaggeration to say that Mr. Bachchan
seems to have earned more goodwill for the country than five decades of
diplomacy.

If the geographic spread of Bollywood's imprint is impressive, the depth
of its hold can also be astonishing. An usher in the Israeli Parliament,
Knesset, draws the Indian visitor aside and says he has over 400 Hindi
movie cassettes.

A waiter in Lebanon is more interested in enacting dance sequences from
recent hits than in laying the table. In Jordan, a Bedouin taxi driver
almost sends his vehicle off the road as he mimics his daughter's
reactions to the films she watches on channel TV.

Sometimes though the popularity of Hindi film culture can have
embarrassing consequences. Recently this correspondent saw a poster
outside a movie theatre in Amman showing Dharmendra at his macho-best
with ropes around his neck and a killer look in his eyes.

Interested in finding out whether Sholay was actually being exhibited,
he walked inside only to discover that the poster and other similar ones
were being used to cover what was actually being shown. To put it
delicately, what was on the menu was definitely not family
entertainment.

There can be learned theses in social psychology to explain the
phenomenal impact of Hindi movies. But the answer seems very simple.
Youth in West Asia and North Africa, as in India are quite dazzled by
the styles of dress and attitude, the gizmos and the action that western
TV and films have to offer. But Western mores have not penetrated to any
great depth.

Family values, undying love, the belief in fighting for justice and the
importance of male bonding are concepts still considered highly
relevant.

And all this comes wrapped in technical finesse that movies made in this
part of the world have yet to attain. (Iran, of course, produces high
quality cinema that do well on the festival circuit, but what we are
talking of here is popular cinema.)

One problem is that the blurring of identities that goes with such
cross-cultural pollination can sometimes be very severe. Hindi film
music has borrowed so much and so randomly from the different strands of
West Asian music that some times, especially when attention levels drop,
it is difficult to pinpoint whether the tune on the radio is Arabic or
Hindi.

But there is the advantage that an Indian in West Asia only has to sing
Anhoni ko honi kar de, honi ko anhoni to strike a instant rapport and
get friendly with the natives.

>
> You see, increased mobility is globalizing our society in ways that
> are unprecedented. It is no longer uncommon to come across multiply
> hyphenated Americans like that Chinese-Indian-American fan of Asha
> Bhonsle. I am, myself, a Pathan-Bengali Am

nkdat...@my-deja.com

unread,
Jan 18, 2001, 12:59:37 AM1/18/01
to
In article <945i2u$2ng$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> Yep, the moment I saw the picture of Jamal Hasan, I immediately
> figured out that this is a Pathan! What is the meaning of such an
> 'ashare'story? This Jamal guy is a number one hate monger nationalist,
> and wants to thrive on creating dissension in the country for fishing
> in muddy water.

My, my, my! Mr. Tarek Ali must be really mad with Mr. Jamal
Hasan for some reason to have succeeded in discovering hate
mongering and dissension in an article on multiculturalism!!!!
I am beginning to fathom why Mr. Tarek Ali is afraid that
singing the John Lennon song, "Imagine" will affect his brain
( "matha bigre [jabe]" ) !!!

> And now he is preaching universalism and humanism. Feel
> like puking.

Goodness gracious! Message of universalism and humanism
makes Mr. Tarek Ali puke?!! I am afraid even to imagine
what makes him hold his food down.

> The central message of his writings is hate, inciting bad
> feelings and creating law and order situation in Bangladesh.

Tut, tut tut! Mr. Tarek Ali should learn to hide his true
for his own good. Mr. Jamal Hasan works for the department
of justice in Washington. He and Ms. Janet Reno (the current
Attorney General) have been photographed holding hands
very lovingly and affectionately. Mr. Tarek Ali would do
well to court the power couple as his ally.

Surely Mr. Tarek Ali has heard what the evil Awami Leaguers
have been up to. They have been trying to extradite the
likes of Lt. Colonel Mohiuddin (alleged Mujib killer)
and Ashrafuzzaman (President of ICNA) to face trials in
Bangladesh.

The Awami Leaguers are capable of anything and everything.
And, as things are going, they are sure to get re-elected
this year. And then these evil Awami Leaguers might even
be tempted to try to extradite a perfectly innocent man
like Mr. Tarek Ali. Wouldn't it be wise of Mr. Tarek Ali
to court Mr. Jamal Hasan from now on itself. That way
Mr. tarek Ali will be able to count on people like
Mr. Jamal Hasan and Ms. Janet Reno to be in his corner
if the Awami Leaguers ever attempt to extradite Mr.
Tarek Ali. Mr. Tarek Ali would be very wise and judicious
to keep Mr. Jamal Hasan in good humor.

CAIR

unread,
Jan 18, 2001, 7:19:45 AM1/18/01
to
In article <944ooc$al1$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
j_h...@my-deja.com wrote:

>In article <944ms4$8pf$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
>
>International Terrorism and Immigration Policy by Steven Emerson
>January 25, 2000 / United States House of Representatives
>Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims
>House Subcommittee on Immigration and Claims / Hearing on International
>Terrorism and Immigration Policy
>January 25, 2000
>Testimony of Steven Emerson,
>=======================================================================
>IN DEFENSE OF STEVEN EMERSON AND DANIEL PIPES
>

WHO IS STEVEN EMERSON?

FOR BACKGROUND, SEE:

STEVEN EMERSON'S CRUSADE - "Why is a journalist pushing questionable stories from behind the
scenes?"
By John F. Sugg - http://www.fair.org/extra/9901/emerson.html

-----

WHAT OTHERS SAY ABOUT STEVEN EMERSON'S WORK

This heavy-handed bit of racist manipulation [Rick Lazio's smear campaign against America Muslim
groups] grew out of a story...inspired by the machinations of one Steven Emerson, a discredited
"terrorism expert" last heard trying to pin the Oklahoma City bombing on the Arabs by noting
that "inflict[ing] as many casualties as possible...is a Middle Eastern trait."
(The Nation, 11/27/2000)

"Preaching tolerance towards all Jews and intolerance to those Muslims you happen to deem
radical is not fresh. Perhaps with more people like Emerson, we can succeed in keeping the
Middle East riddled with conflict..."
(Scott Livingston, The Daily Free Press (Boston U.), 11/22/1999)

Alexander Cockburn writing in the Wall Street Journal, 6/14/1990
"Mr. Emerson's prime role is to whitewash Israeli governments and revile their critics."

Florida's Weekly Planet newspaper Senior Editor John Sugg quotes two unnamed Associated Press
reporters who said Emerson gave them a document on terrorism supposedly from FBI files: "One
reporter thought he'd seen the material before, and in checking found a paper Emerson had
supplied earlier containing his own unsupported allegations. The two documents were almost
identical, except that Emerson's authorship was deleted from the one purported to be from the
FBI. 'It was really his work,' one reporter says. 'He sold it to us trying to make it look like
a really interesting FBI document.'" (Weekly Planet, May 1998)

The Christian Science Monitor (1/22/96)
"Moreover, since the end of the cold war, Islam is increasingly described by a coterie of
writers and policymakers as a new seedbed for anti-Western aggression, replacing communism. Some
journalists have made a virtual industry out of this view. The most prolific is Steven Emerson,
whose film 'Jihad in America,' shown recently on PBS, describes America as a training ground for
Islamic terrorism. Muslims almost universally know and loathe Mr. Emerson's work, calling it
biased and distorted. "

Leslie Gelb, President, Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)
Mr. Gelb called Emerson a "grand inquisitor" for trying to censor a CFR publication. (Forward,
5/10/96)

Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR)
"It's this sort of slippery use of evidence that makes people wary of Emerson's reporting."
(EXTRA!, May/June 1995)

"There's more than a little bigotry in Emerson's obsession with Muslim terrorists." (EXTRA!,
July/August 1995)

The Washington Post called Emerson a "pro-Israel researcher and author." Aug. 8, 1995

The Jerusalem Post said Emerson has "close ties to Israeli intelligence." Sept. 17, 1994

In a review of Emerson's book "The American House of Saud," The Economist (Feb. 8, 1986)
reviewer wrote: "The conspiracy theory of history always finds believers -- blame the Jews, or
the communists, or the blacks, and thus seek absolution. Mr. Steven Emerson...blames the
Arabs..."

Professor Jack Shaheen, author of "The TV Arab"
In a commentary on "Jihad in America" in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, he said: "'Jihad' is
perilous television, pandering to stereotypes that feed collective hatreds."

Investigative Reporter Robert Friedman
"...Emerson says that all criticism of him is venal; he puts his critics into the same camp as
the Muslim fundamentalists and extremists. There is no logical link between criticizing
Emerson's biased reporting and being pro-fundamentalist. That's Emerson's conspiracy theory."
(The Nation, August 28/September 4, 1995)

"He gets it wrong all the time. Emerson has no credibility left. He can't get on TV and most
publications won't pick him up." (Weekly Planet newspaper, May 1998)

"For the first forty-eight hours (after the Oklahoma City bombing), Emerson was a fixture on
radio and TV, waging jihad on Islam." (The Nation, May 15, 1995)

The New York Times Book Review
Said Emerson's 1991 book Terrorist was "marred by factual errors...that betray an unfamiliarity
with the Middle East and a pervasive anti-Arab and anti-Palestinian bias." (5/19/91)

Security expert Vincent Cannistraro called Emerson "dishonest" and "Joseph McCarthy-like."
Forward, 1/26/96 "Word has got around on what he (Emerson) is, that he's a paid polemicist, not
a journalist." (Weekly Planet newspaper, May 1998)

Terrorism Expert Tony Cooper
During a televised panel discussion on the Dallas PBS affiliate following the airing of "Jihad
in America," Cooper called Emerson's PBS program "propaganda" and said Emerson was a "stranger
to the truth."

Journalist Jane Hunter
"There are thousands of ax-grinders in journalism, pushing tantalizing stories with few
verifiable facts. Most collect rejection slips, but Steven Emerson finds one respectable media
outlet after another for his work, which is sometimes nimble in its treatment of facts, often
credulous of intelligence sources, and almost invariably supportive of the Israeli government."
(EXTRA!, October/November 1992)

Media Critic and Journalism Instructor, Reese Erlich
In a radio commentary on "Jihad in America," he said, "Rather than illuminating a serious issue,
the documentary uses McCarthyite techniques to attack a range of legal political and religious
groups..."

Arthur Lowrie, Adjunct Professor of International Studies at the University of South Florida
"Emerson's two main themes were that an 'Islamic Internationale' exists and is directing an
anti-Western terror campaign and that a network of Islamic terrorist cells exists throughout the
United States. He failed to provide any hard evidence for either allegation." (Middle East
Policy, 1995)

Chip Berlet wrote in 1995 in Covert Action Quarterly, a journal that investigates intelligence
operations, "Emerson makes unsubstantiated allegations of widespread conspiracies in Arab
American communities and brushes aside his lack of documented evidence by implying it only
proves how clever and sinister the Arab/Muslim menace really is."

The Center for National Security Studies has reported: "Steven Emerson has asserted that the FBI
is severely restricted in infiltrating known extremist groups, that it has no terrorism data
base like the CIA's, and that it is powerless to stop extremist groups from masquerading as
'religious' groups. All of these claims are incorrect."

John Sugg, Editor of The Weekly Planet newspaper - "It should be noted that Jihad in America was
largely funded by the Carthage Foundation and the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation, widely
referred to as right-wing think tanks."

"Emerson constantly attributes allegations of widespread Muslim conspiracies to unnamed
intelligence sources. And, as has been reported in numerous articles...Emerson has been dead
wrong on many of his most sensational stories."

Friday, March 20, 1998, in the Miami Herald - "The Secret War" By Martin Merzer

".....I call (Steven) Emerson, but we don't get off to a great start. I mention that I wrote a
brief newspaper story about this affair last year."

'''Oh, really?'' he says instantly. ''What perspective did you take? That this is a brutal
Zionist plot against the weak, underprivileged Arab minority?''"....

"....In January 1996, during a public forum to air complaints about his and The Tampa Tribune's
coverage, Emerson seemed to take delight in provoking the largely Muslim audience and then
pointing to their angry reaction as proof of their instability."

STEVEN EMERSON IN HIS OWN WORDS

ON THE DOWNING OF EGYPTAIR 990
EMERSON: Well, look, there are lots of reports out of Egypt today about what the pilot said, or
what the relief pilot may have said: the Shahada, a prayer that someone says. It's a major tenet
of Islam AND SOMETIMES IT'S SAID BEFORE YOU COMMIT AN ACT OF TERRORISM...(emphasis added) (NOTE
- The "Shahada" is the Islamic declaration of faith.)
(CTV [Canada] Television, November 17, 1999)

ON THE ALLEGED PLOT TO BOMB NEW YORK CITY SUBWAYS
"The US has become occupied fundamentalist territory." (The Jerusalem Post, August 8, 1997, p.
9)

ON THE DOWNING OF TWA FLIGHT 800
Reuters news service quotes Emerson as saying he is "confident that a bomb brought down the
plane." Emerson went on to say that the crash could be a plot by "the permanent floating
(Islamic) militant international." (Reuters, July 31, 1996)

I have no doubt whatsoever, at this point, that it was a bomb that brought down TWA Flight 800 -
not a missile, but a bomb..." (CNBC, RIVERA LIVE, August 23, 1996)

ON THE OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING
"This (the bombing) was done with the intent to inflict as many casualties as possible. That is
a Middle Eastern trait." (CBS News, April 19, 1995)

"Oklahoma City, I can tell you, is probably considered one of the largest centers of Islamic
radical activity outside the Middle East." (CBS News, April 19, 1995)

ON ISLAM
In The Jewish Monthly (March 1995), Emerson wrote, "The level of vitriol against Jews and
Christianity within contemporary Islam [Note he did not say "radical Islamic fundamentalism."],
unfortunately, is something that we are not totally cognizant of...We don't want to accept it
because to do so would be to acknowledge that (Islam)...sanctions genocide, planned genocide, as
part of its religious doctrine." He added that "Unfortunately, nearly all (emphasis added) of
the Islamic organizations in the United States that define themselves as religiously or
culturally Muslim in character have, today, been totally captured or dominated by radical
fundamentalist elements..."

"First, radical Islamic fundamentalism cannot be reconciled with the West. The hatred of the
West by militant Islamic fundamentalists is not tied to any particular act or event. Rather,
fundamentalists equate the mere existence of the West --- its economic, political and cultural
systems --- as an intrinsic attack on Islam. The sooner Americans realize that no compromise or
reconciliation is possible, the sooner radical fundamentalists will realize that the West cannot
be manipulated."

"This means saying something that is politically incorrect: That all militant radical
fundamentalists are potential members of this loose federation of terrorists."
The San Diego Union-Tribune, June 28, 1993

"Moreover, the traditional immunity given to religious institutions can no longer apply if the
battle against Islamic fundamentalist terrorism is to be won."
Detroit Free Press, June 27, 1993

ON PALESTINIANS
"The Palestinians are not interested in or capable of living in peace with the Israelis. Most
Palestinians have sheer hatred for Jews."

"(intra-Palestinian attacks)...are indicative of the venom and brutality of Palestinian
society."
Newsday, October 25, 1990

WHO STEVEN EMERSON WORKS FOR

"EMERSON: Right now, I am freelancing. I've left US News now -- it's about seven months. And I
am working for publications as diverse as PENTHOUSE MAGAZINE (emphasis added) to the Wall Street
Journal..."
(Transcript of interview on Booknotes program, Air date: May 13, 1990)

WHO WORK'S WITH STEVEN EMERSON

Senior Editor John Sugg of Florida's Weekly Planet newspaper noted the following about sources
attesting to Emerson's credentials and characterizing American Muslim groups as allies of
terrorists. Sugg wrote:

"These sources are Steven Pomerantz and Oliver 'Buck' Revell. Not noted is that Pomerantz and
Revell are officers of the same institute, and that both have a close association with Emerson.
They are hardly independent sources. In fact, the three spend most of their time nowadays
quoting each other about what excellent terrorism experts they all are. Revell is prominent in
Emerson's 'Jihad in America.'

"There's a fourth member of the association -- Yigal Carmon. A ranking member of Israel's
intelligence and military establishment, he is considered to the right of even the current Likud
government. As The Nation has reported (and never disputed by Emerson), Carmon was part of the
'gang of three' that spent much time lobbying Congress to derail the Middle East peace process
- and Carmon even stayed at Emerson's home on his visits to the United States. (The Nation,
August 28/September 4, 1995 and May 15, 1995) Carmon is part of Revell's and Pomerantz's
institute -- its 'Mideast Regional Director.' ...And Emerson even shuttles Carmon around to
introduce him to journalists as an 'expert' on the Middle East.

"Of course, these four people spend their time (and make money) out of portraying Arabs and
Muslims as terrorists...I don't think it's too extreme to conclude that, considering the
involvement of a top Israeli spook with Emerson and his friends, we have something much more
sinister going on than 'journalism' and an institute studying terrorism."

HOW OTHERS USE EMERSON'S WORK

"Islam is like a cancer eating away at the planet earth...That is why we, at Truth seekers, have
launched a new crusade to combat the forces of Islam before it is too late...If you have any
doubt as to whether Muslims in America pose a clear and present danger to our lives, liberties,
and property, get the video entitled 'American Jihad' (sic) by Steven Emerson."
Truth Seekers mailing, February 1998

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 18, 2001, 12:10:42 PM1/18/01
to
In article <9460o7$dq4$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,
nkdat...@my-deja.com wrote:

> My, my, my! Mr. Tarek Ali must be really mad with Mr. Jamal
> Hasan for some reason to have succeeded in discovering hate
> mongering and dissension in an article on multiculturalism!!!!
> I am beginning to fathom why Mr. Tarek Ali is afraid that
> singing the John Lennon song, "Imagine" will affect his brain

========================================================================

Dialog between civilizations

[ letter to my Pakistani friend, Ras Siddiqui ]

By Jamal Hasan

April 12, 1999

Dear Mr. Ras Siddiqui:

Here's the reply I had promised you earlier.

Bengali is among the most widely spoken languages of the world. In
the subcontinent, it is second only to Hindi in terms of number of
speakers. Bengali is the national language of Bangladesh and is the
official language in the Indian states of West Bengal and Tripura.
Unfortunately, it hasn't yet made an impact on the socio-cultural
landscape of the world that is commensurate with a language that is the
mother tongue of a quarter billion people.

The day of Mother Teresa's funeral was a memorable one for me. All
the big personalities of US news media were in Calcutta.

Dan Rather of CBS, Tom Brokaw of NBC, Peter Jennings of ABC, and
Christiane Amanpour of CNN were covering the final moments of her
funeral. I had never had the opportunity to visit Calcutta but have
always wanted to because of the city's role in the 19th century cultural
renaissance of Bengal. The western media gave me a satisfactory glimpse
of the city on that day.

Slums and shantytowns (typical ingredients of western coverage of
any third world city) were conspicuous by their absence on TV. It
showed, instead, old historical buildings, parks, green fields etc. I
felt overwhelmed when I heard the refrain of a Tagore song on TV. It was
midnight in America. I flipped through the major channels - ABC, NBC and
CBS. All the TV stations were broadcasting either a Bengali speech or a
Bengali song. It was a surrealistic experience! I realized all at once
how much my mother tongue, Bengali, means to me.

Bengali does mean a lot to me. But I am open minded enough to know
that there is a world beyond the one of Bengali speakers.

I was full of admiration for President Khatami of Iran when he
stated in a public forum that he wants to initiate "a dialogue between
different civilizations". I, too, believe in people to people
interaction and exchange of ideas. Huntington's "Clash of Civilizations"
is not my cup of tea.

Yesterday I was watching an interview on a cable channel. This was
on a Sunday program that is broadcast from a local TV station. James
Zogby of the Arab American Institute was interviewing Congressman Tom
Campbell (Republican) from California. Campbell seemed to be sympathetic
toward the Palestinian cause. It was a viewer call-in show and he
received quite a few laudatory remarks from Arab-American viewers.

Mr. James Zogby, a Christian-Arab, is doing a good job of
mobilizing US public opinion in favor of the Palestinian cause.

So is the Christian-Palestinian, Edward Said of Columbia
University. They are providing a voice for a people who had
traditionally failed to received a favorable audience among Americans.
Hannan Ashrawi is another Christian- Palestinian who is being heard with
increasing respect by Americans.

Former US Senator James Abourezk was yet another Arab-American of
Christian heritage who did a yeomanly job in presenting the Arab cause
in the Capitol Hill. None of the above was a Muslim. But they all felt a
bond with the long suffering Palestinians because of their linguistic
and ethnic heritage.

They had all felt compelled to speak up for the Arabic speaking
Palestinians.

Even before the British Raj came into being, Bengal, Bihar and
Orissa were part of the same kingdom. Sirajuddowla was its last Nawab
till his defeat in 1757 at the hands of the British at the Battle of
Plassey. Since then, political boundaries have been drawn and redrawn
through the land many a time. Geography made cousins of Bengalis and
Biharis who inhabited the same kingdom not too long ago. But history has
made them estranged cousins. It is indeed ironic that Biharis in
Bangladesh have been waiting patiently in refugee camps for well over a
quarter century to be repatriated to the land they consider their own,
namely, Pakistan. They Indus is dearer to them than the Ganges. They
would rather be on the shores of the Arabian Sea than of the Bay of
Bengal.

Historical evolution can indeed send us to unlikely destinations.

At the beginning of this century, Hindu Bengalis dominated the
cultural and literary activities in Bengal. Muslims, for reasons rooted
in history, had shunned the western ways and thoughts ushered in by the
British Raj. It kept them at once aloof and backward in an era where
modern innovations had become the preserve of the Europeans. At the
start of this century, Muslim Bengalis were Muslims rather than Bengalis
not just in the eyes of the Hindu Bengalis, but even in their own eyes.
This was of course an aberration. This state of affairs couldn't
continue for ever. But it would be a while before it would get
corrected.

While the downtrodden Bengali Muslims were busy eking out a living,
the Muslim elite preferred to stay busy with pan-Islamic causes like the
Khilafat Movement. It was fashionable among these upper class Muslim
Bengalis to speak Urdu even at home.

Many knew Farsi as well. Some wrote poems in Urdu and Farsi.

One of my relatives of that era was the proud author of a book of
Farsi poems. This was quite typical of the Muslim Bengalis of Calcutta
in the early 1920's.

The Hindu Bengali got a headstart over the Muslim Bengalis with the
advent of reformers like Raja Rammohan Roy. It was the Hindu Bengalis
who were at the forefront of the cultural renaissance in 19th century
Bengal. The Brahmo Samaj took a modernist stance by discarding
traditional Hindu mores. It went on to play a major role in the cultural
renaissance. The Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore was the
quintessential renaissance man. His humanistic philosophy has left a
permanent imprint in Bengal on Muslims and Hindus alike.

Kazi Nazrul's appearance on Bengal's cultural horizon had a
profound influence on the Muslim Bengalis who, for the first time, began
to take as much pride in being a Bengali as they took in being a Muslim.
Muslim Bengalis suddenly realized that they had as much right to
Bengal's language and culture as her Hindus. The Muslim Bengalis were
the "new kid in town." Kazi Nazrul Islam blazed a new trail as Muslim
Bengalis reclaimed their rightful place in Bengal's literary and
cultural milieu. Urdu and Farsi continued to influence them but in a
different way.

The change was epitomized by journals with names like "Saogat" and
"Mahe Nao". The Muslims in Bengal had started to become "Bengalis."

A recent interview of renowned Bangladeshi poet Sufia Kamal was
very revealing. She said that Urdu and Arabic had been the preferred
language of discourse in her family. She took to Bengali against the
wishes of her elders. But, today, it is a brand new world.
"Bangla-charcha" has spread beyond the realm of Bengali speaking people.
Mr. Abu Syed Ayub from Bihar not only mastered the language but went to
become one of the foremost scholars on Rabindranath Tagore.

I was highly gratified to learn that Rabindranath is taught to high
school students in Iran. Dr. Farshad Araghi is the Chairperson of
Sociology Dept at the Florida Atlantic University where I had worked
earlier. He is among the Iranians who have studied Tagore in great
depth. He has taken great pains to learn the language because he
believes that he cannot do justice to Tagore unless he reads his work in
the original.

It is interesting to note that the Bengali wave began to overwhelm
the Mussalmans of East Bengal in earnest once it became East Pakistan
after the 1947 partition of Bengal. The Bengali identity gradually
overtook the Muslim identity.

Bangladesh would be the ultimate outcome of this transformation.

Field Marshall Ayub Khan understood the perils to nation building
in this cultural evolution. He even had Rabindranath Tagore banned on
Pakistan Radio in a futile bid to stem the tide of this insidious
development. He was all for a lingua franca for Pakistan. Needless to
say, Bangla wasn't his idea of Pakistan's lingua franca. Non-Bangla
words, like "hawaii bandar," were incorporated in Bengali news
broadcasts from Karachi to make it more "Pakistani." In his bid to
channelize Bengali in the right direction, East Pakistan's Governor,
Monem Khan, went to the extent of requesting authors to write Tagore
songs that would be at once Pakistani and Islamic. It was as if Winston
Churchill was asking writers to come up with Shakespearean plays that
would fulfill the political needs of the sprawling British Empire.

Such puerile efforts of the Pakistani rulers in Islamabad were
bound to fail. The Muslim Bengali of East Pakistan became more of a
Bengali during the Ayub Khan regime than his ancestors had ever been.
Political movements like the 6 point demand in the 1960's, the 11 point
demand in 1969 and, of course, the Liberation Struggle in 1971 were
logical outcomes of this change. Any observer of Pakistan can attest to
the communication gap between the east wing and the west wing of
Pakistan from 1947 thru 1971. The political power had been usurped by an
influential and powerful group in the west.

This ruling oligarchy had no clue to the political and cultural
changes that were taking place in the east. It was guided solely by its
determination to usurp a disproportionate share of the country's wealth
for itself and to go to any length, even genocide, to preserve its
colonial rule in East Pakistan.

I had started this essay with the Bihari question because it had
touched me personally. I have seen with my own eyes the dismal living
condition among the Biharis in the so-called Geneva camp in Mohammedpur.
My heart bleeds to think that anyone must endure such humiliation and
hardship. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman had urged the Biharis to
assimilate with the mainstream Bengalis after Bangladesh was liberated.

He spoke out against victimizing the Biharis. In fact, he even
termed the Biharis as "Amanat" of Bangladesh. All Biharis were offered
Bangladeshi citizenship. Those that accepted the offer are living as
fullfledged citizens of the country.

But those that declined the offer to opt for Pakistan instead have
been rotting in refugee camps for the last twenty seven years. It is the
height of injustice for Pakistan's ruling elite to discard these Biharis
like the rind of a squeezed lemon after using them as the cat's paw from
1947 through 1971.

Let me cite a few examples of the evolution among Muslim Bengalis.
Hussain Shaheed Suhrawardy is remembered as a champion of the Bengali
cause. He was Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman's mentor. Suhrawardy's
primary language (as of many a West Bengali Muslim) was Urdu. He was not
particularly fluent in Bengali. His speeches in "Bengali" were
labored and often times heavily laced with Urdu. It has been said that
he once had addressed the audience in a political meeting as
"Bhadromohodoy ebong magee-gon". He seemed quite oblivious to the fact
that "magee" is a derogatory word for woman.

The Awami League leader, Dr. Kamal Hossain, has played a prominent
role in Bangladesh. After liberation, he had accompanied Bangabandhu
back to Bangladesh from a prison cell in Pakistan. Currently, he is the
United Nations Special Investigator for Afghanistan. Urdu continues to
be the primary language in Dr. Hossain's household. And he speaks
Bengali with an unmistakable Urdu accent.

1971 brought forth some interesting adjustments across the
Urdu-Bangla fault line. Some of my relatives living in West Pakistan
were Urdu speaking. They had to trek through Afghanistan to escape from
Pakistan. To their dismay, they were greeted with hostility when they
finally reached their village in Bangladesh. Disillusioned, they went
back to Pakistan. But pretty soon they realized that their heart was in
Bangladesh.

Eventually they came back to Dhaka. In their own way they finally
realized that "Home is where the heart belongs," as was said so aptly by
a character in the Meera Nair movie,"Mississippi Masalla."

The birth of Bangladesh has had a profound effect on Pakistan.

Ethnic, linguistic and cultural identities are coming to the fore
at the expense of religious identity. Not surprisingly, the change in
Pakistan has been anything but peaceful. Tribalism, sectarianism and
savagery seem to be triumphing over peaceful coexistence. The Sindhis,
the Balochs and the Pathans have all found encouragement in the events
of 1971.

Their aspirations for nationhood cannot be suppressed for long.

But, unfortunately, the road might prove to be just as bloody as
1971 because the rulers have failed to learn from its debacle in
Bangladesh. It continues to believe that the problem of national
integration can be solved by sweeping all ethnic and linguistic
differences under the rug of religious solidarity. "We are all Muslims,"
is its refrain even as it tries to smother the nationalistic aspirations
of Sindhis, Balochs or Pathans.

Pakistan was torn asunder in 1971. And it runs the danger of
breaking into many more pieces because it has failed to learn from the
1971 tragedy.

Technological progress and higher literacy rates in the coming
decades will aggravate the centrifugal forces in Pakistan as each
linguistic group will demand a nation of its own. The problem will be
particularly acute because of the Punjab factor. Punjab, by itself,
constitutes a majority in multilingual Pakistan. But traditionally,
Punjab has misused this majority to push for an unionist state instead
of a federal one. Ironically, Punjab's hegemonistic ambitions will be
the catalyst that may pose a greater threat to Pakistan's integrity.

India is by no means the model for a federal state. It has failed
dismally to cope with nationalistic movements in Kashmir and Punjab.
Kashmir is still bleeding. Nevertheless, India's diversity has saved it
from itself. No province in India constitutes a majority by itself. As a
result, the middle class from different regions of the country have been
forced into wheeling and dealing to come up with a ruling coalition.
This is especially true today now that India has entered the era of
coalition politics.

The recently concluded Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Treaty helped
Bangladesh to contain the ethnic eruption in the region.

The Prime Minister of my native land was the peace warrior.

Now she is a proud winner of a UNESCO award given to her for her
crucial role in initiating the peace process in the south east corner of
Bangladesh. Many peace loving citizens of South Asia expect Pakistan and
India would sit together to find a political solution of the Kashmir
crisis. And that political solution ought to reflect the hopes and
aspirations of all the ethnic and religious groups of the great Kashmir
nation.

It goes without saying that it is to India's credit that it was
able to transform a separatist party in the South into a party with a
stake in united India. It is because of the Dravidian South that
India continues to retain English as an associate official language of
the Union. I have come across many a Tamilian or a Keralite who knows
little or no Hindi. Yet they all seem supporters of the coalition
politics that is holding India together. India has been able to cope
surprisingly well with the Aryan-Dravidian racial divide that effects
the people's view of something as fundamental as the Ramayana. The Aryan
north can shrug off attempts by the Dravidian south to hold to a more
benign image of the demon king Ravan or of Bengali poet Madhusudan
Dutt's portrayal of Ravan's son Meghnad as a greater hero than either
Ram or Lakshman.

The current century has witnessed many more conflicts than any
other century in the past.Unfortunately, this trend threatens to spill
over to the next century. Ethnic and linguistic groups will continue to
clash against each other till the world learns how to live and let live.
And when that happens, the world will finally turn into a global
village.

I end with a quote from my favorite John Lennon song which says it
all:

"Imagine there's no countries
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for

And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace
You may say I'm a dreamer
But I'm not the only one
I hope someday you'll join us
And the world will live as one"


Thanks for listening.

Sincerely yours,

Jamal Hasan

po...@hotmail.com

[Reprinted from NEWS FROM BANGLADESH, April 20, 1999 for wider
dissemination.
Thank you. W.Zaman].

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 18, 2001, 12:28:32 PM1/18/01
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In article <9460o7$dq4$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,


nkdat...@my-deja.com wrote:

[deleted for brevity]

> Surely Mr. Tarek Ali has heard what the evil Awami Leaguers
> have been up to. They have been trying to extradite the
> likes of Lt. Colonel Mohiuddin (alleged Mujib killer)
> and Ashrafuzzaman (President of ICNA) to face trials in
> Bangladesh.

=======================================================================


News from Bangladesh / Feature / October 11, 2000

Glimpses from my trip to the good old Dhaka.

By Jamal Hasan


A sudden family urgency prompted me to visit Bangladesh, which became my
top priority. It was going to be my sojourn to our native land after
almost a decade. My frequent flier relatives warned me one thing about
the first encounter in Dhaka airport. They told me quite a few horror
stories. How some greedy officials of the airport and civil aviation
jump on the tired and unwise Bengali visitors like vultures on a robin's
nest or how the countless transportation agents fall onto their preys,
etc. etc. I was also told not to give my luggage to anyone unless I have
absolute confidence in that person. As the typical demand from the
over-enthusiastic helpers is for U.S. dollars, I was well advised to
carry as many single dollar bills. My preparedness for unforeseen
circumstances became futile. As I reached my final destination, things
did not come out as I apprehended.

After an exhaustive journey through the Middle East, my plane landed in
a sweaty summer-day in Dhaka. I realized the humidity is much more in
abundance than that of the tropical South Florida, which used to be my
place of residence for more than sixteen years. Now a bona fide
Marylander who is being accustomed to shoveling snow in the front yard,
my body is yet to readjust to fresh barrage of humidity. But I was
mentally prepared to embrace any kind of maladjustment of mundane
physical comfort.

My journey to my native land was primarily occurring at a time of
historical ethos. The leakage of Hamoodur Rahman Commission Report could
produce such a ripple effect was hard to fathom. After I arrived in
Dhaka, I found a few dailies were carrying excerpts from the report on a
daily basis. Twenty-nine years is a long period and a calculated policy
of erasing the memory of 1971was successfully conducted during much of
the two successive army generals' rule. And suddenly, the HRC report
comes in the forefront and things would never be the same! I thought my
trip to Dhaka was occurring at a time where an Ekattur activist may find
the ultimate Nirvana.

The colossal buildings and apparent affluence of certain segment of the
population gave me the awe. The well-decorated restaurants catering to
authentic oriental and South Asian cuisine could make a westerner
spellbound. The excessive glamorization of eateries may someone wonder
is the country one of the least developed countries in the world? As I
peeped through the 19th floor window of a multistoried BRAC (Bangladesh
Rural Advancement Committee) building, Dhaka's skyline reminded me of a
South Florida urban landscape. The concrete jungles are reminiscent of
any metropolis. But the road condition and traffic situation? I would
rather say we are destined to a black hole to comment rather mildly.

Going back to Ekattur matters. The invitation to join a seminar by the
esteemed editor of Ajker Kagoj, a Bengali daily was something I could
hardly reject. The seminar was a Round Table Conference on the Hamoodur
Rahman Commission Report. On a September day the meeting was scheduled
at five p.m.

The Meena House (where the Paper office is located), a multistoried
building is not too far from my Dhaka residence. The round table in the
meeting place could fit the literal meaning of the terminology. I
reached the place may be half an hour before the scheduled time. The
presence of wireless microphones was an indication that Bangladesh is
not far behind in present day technology of audio matters. I was
contended to see that most of the participants took their seats before
the bell struck five. Two BNP MPs, namely Col. (Ret'd) Oli Ahmed (Bir
Bikram) and Col. (Ret'd) Akbar Hossain, two former Muktijuddhas were the
star participants. The other Muktijuddha from across the aisle was Awami
League MP Major (Ret'd) Rafiqul Islam who happened to be a former Home
Minister. Three Dhaka University Professors, namely, Dr. Rafiqul Islam,
Dr. Shamsul Huda Haroon and Dr. Momtajuddin Ahmed represented the
liberal and secular wing of the complex and effervescent Bengali
intelligentsia. Also were present a veteran leftist political leader
Haider Akbar Khan Rano, Ambassador Waliur Rahman and the Minister for
Law and Parliamentary Affairs Abdul Matin Khosru. I realized, the
moderator of the session the newspaper editor Kazi Shahed Ahmed had
quite a big task to conduct.

I was totally impressed and definitely amazed watching the exchange of
comments between the minister and opposition MP's. It was an
extraordinary example of civility. I was thinking if Bangladesh politics
in every facet could be an arena of such civility, we would seldom be
termed as a nation of uncivilized political elements. While the
moderator appeared to have good rapport with most of the participants,
sometimes he had to face the hurdles of smoothing out the bitter and
often emotional outburst of seemingly divergent points of view. I found,
although, the common denominator of the participants' background to be
pro-liberation, there was definitely certain difference of angle. This
became more evident in the deliberation of BNP MP's presentations. In
his speech MP Col (Ret'd) Oli Ahmed made it a point that the present
lawlessness in the society gets precedence over the tragedy of 1971.
Similarly MP Col. (Ret'd) Akbar Hossain brought the now debated subject
of the exact casualty figure of 1971. He mentioned that the total figure
of the war casualty would not be more than few hundred thousand.
Interestingly Major (Ret'd) Rafiqul Islam became forthcoming in refuting
that argument. He brought a number of sample scenarios and gave some
statistical inferences that might be attributed to estimating a figure
close to three million. The difference in Ekattur philosophy gave me a
realization of the bottom line where the partisan politics had some
layers of influence. I assessed that there was evolving an unparalleled
linkage among the pro-Ekattur political personalities going beyond
partisan lines. This I felt a healthy sign in a nascent democracy.

Dr. Rafiqul Islam gave a startling background information of Hamoodur
Rahman, the person. He made the case that the one time Chief Justice of
Pakistan could be anything but a friend of Bengali cause. Dr. Shamsul
Huda Haroon provided a vivid conjecture of the menace of parochial
politics in Bangladesh history. While exchanging divergent opinions, the
often usage of "apology" gave an ideal parliamentarian setting. In this
respect, Ambassador Waliur Rahman should be given due credit. Most
interesting thing to observe was the presence of Stanley Wolpert's
autobiography of Z.A. Bhutto in the Parliamentary Affairs Minister's
hand. He was quoting from the book a few times. And interestingly Zulfi
story became very relevant with the discourse.

An acting minister on my left side and an opposition member of
parliament on my right, I was having the ultimate surreal experience. My
dream of seeing all the Bengali pro-Ekattur activists beyond party lines
might come true was becoming true. From far away through the Internet we
may gather the stereotypical view that all the Bangladeshi politicians
are on each others' throat, the Round Table Conference did not give me
that idea. Rather, I had every element to be positive about future. I
became more than a bit of optimistic that the figments of unresolved
issues of 1971 may get a chance to be resolved.

When the microphone came to me, I gave a rather dismal picture of
expatriate Bengalis in USA. I mentioned about the noble activism of
Armenians worldwide who even lobbied US Congress during Soviet era to
launch a Congressional hearing on Armenian genocide converting the then
Senator Bob Dole as a great champion of Armenian cause. nterestingly, at
the Ajker Kagoj meeting I did not have any clue that Armenian genocide
issue could once again hit the consciousness of American psyche and open
a Pandora's box in American politics today. Just a few days ago,
Washington Post carried big headlines about the ultimatum from the
powerful Turkish lobby to halt any more condemnation of Ottoman Turkish
genocidal act occurred eighty years ago. Pakistan strategically, in US
view, falls far behind Turkey. Yet, the expatriate Bengalis failed
miserably to create any uproar in Capitol Hill opening the old wound of
1971. May be that is why Pakistani Chief Executive's spokesperson Javed
Jabbar or Abdus Sattar show the audacity to forget the past. What a
cruel joke!

My short trip to Bangladesh gave me high hope of fulfilling the
political obligation of the nation where our roots belong. I think the
current dynamic should lead us to the ultimate destination of resolving
the unresolved issues of Bangladesh genocide of 1971. The timely
disclosure of Hamoodur Rahman Commission Report gave a new jolt in the
moribund politics of 1971 activism. I felt there was a resurgence of
Spirit of Liberation in Bangladesh. That was the biggest hope I gathered
during my short trip to Dhaka.

j_h...@my-deja.com

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Jan 18, 2001, 1:25:00 PM1/18/01
to
In article <947829$egp$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

[deleted for brevity]

> Dialog between civilizations
>
> [ letter to my Pakistani friend, Ras Siddiqui ]
>
> By Jamal Hasan
>
> April 12, 1999
>
> Dear Mr. Ras Siddiqui:
>

> ............ The problem will be particularly acute because of the


Punjab factor. Punjab, by itself, constitutes a majority in multilingual
Pakistan. But traditionally, Punjab has misused this majority to push
for an unionist state instead of a federal one. Ironically, Punjab's
hegemonistic ambitions will be the catalyst that may pose a greater
threat to Pakistan's integrity.

========================================================================

A STATEMENT BY MUNAWAR LAGHARI
BEFORE THE CONGRESSIONAL HUMAN RIGTS CAUCAS ON THE OCCASION OF THE
INTERNATIONAL DAY IN SUPPORT OF TORTURE VICTIMS
JUNE 22, 1999

Leading an authentic life according to conscience, honesty and a
commitment to truth can, at times, be very difficult. I was hardly of 18
years when, as a member of a family of poor peasants, my concerns for
the poor, needy and oppressed people were continually troubling me.

These were the days of General Zia's Martial Law. To speak of one's own
rights, of lashes inflicted upon people, of independence, peace and
democracy was deemed a great crime. Due to global interests, the
United States had maintained close relations with Zia and supported both
him and his imposition of martial law. In those days, the person who
spoke of democracy was considered an agent of the KGB.

The Pakistani army and the Rangers raided our home more than 15 times.
They took away everything; they did not even leave a single one of our
pet chickens. They stripped my uncles, aunts and cousins naked and
rained lashes on their bare backs. Mortal pen sometimes stops to mention
such things or flowing tears from the poor eyes vanish away the written
matters. At the top of these tortures, which is actually very difficult
to describe or write down, is the arrest of my own blood, my father, my
mother and my brother, being dragged to the police station and inhuman
insult.

Now I am constrained to disclose that in order to avoid torture and
inhuman insult for championing the freedom of women, child labor,
reduction of school fees, improvement in the standards of teaching and
schools and universities in general, fostering love among the student
community, and speaking against the torture of my parents, it was
necessary for me to go into exile. Life is preferred to death; even if
the cost is greater in choosing it, it makes possible the saving of even
more lives. This exile continues for fifteen years and I have not seen
my sweet parents during all this time. Until now, I am not in the
position to correspond with them because of the strict espionage of the
cruel government.

Thirst for human blood, the claws of brutes and savage animals,
espionage and torture by sophisticated weapons are still obstacles that
obstruct the expression of human values and the innate love between
mother and son.

Today, I am not in the position to express all my feelings for the
reasons set forth above. But those feelings are there, in my heart of
hearts especially on Mother's Day, Father's Day, Lover's Day,
Thanksgiving and Christmas. Accordingly, in hearing my words, will you
kindly keep in view the tender relationship between mother and son,
lover's and beloved, brother and sister.

Now, I briefly relate the hardships and sufferings that I have
experienced during all these fifteen years.

Once the army captured me and inflicted great inhuman torture upon my
person by making me naked and sprinkling very hot water on my body which
caused blisters on my skin. The blisters and injuries took years
together in their healing. They immersed chiles in my anus. My brown
complexion had so much darkened that nobody could even recognize me.
Anyway, after some time, I was able to escape the dark dungeons
and remained fugitive to unknown places where God almighty kept me
alive. Sometime afterwards, I was again captured by the brutes. But God
is great who blinded their eyes and they released me saying that I
was not the same Munawar. Thanks to God.

Now I have received shelter in your great country where the human honor
and dignity are safe. I am working in a non-profit organization, the
World Sindhi Institute. I do not ask you for a job but approach
your gracious honor with an humble appeal that you may kindly condescend
to inquire of the Pakistan government what is the fault of this
petitioner and his relatives that they cannot see each other for so many
years.

I may point out that it is some hidden hands which actually rule the
country. I believe you are in a position to gain their permission for me
to see my parents, brothers and sister and the rest, and that this
humble creature of God serves his parents whom he has not seen for the
last 15 years.

Thank you very much, O saviors of humanity and personal dignity.

tare...@my-deja.com

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Jan 18, 2001, 8:15:08 PM1/18/01
to
Has anyone noticed that this Datta guy uses the term 'rubbing' so often
and repeatedly?


In article <944og1$a8m$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

nkdat...@my-deja.com

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Jan 18, 2001, 8:33:26 PM1/18/01
to

> In article <9484em$9np$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,


> tare...@my-deja.com wrote:
> > Has anyone noticed that this Datta guy uses the term 'rubbing' so
> > often and repeatedly?
> >
>

> As usual, Mr. Tarek Ali is very insightful!
> But if he knows what is good for him, he
> should try to win over Mr. Tarek Ali as
> an ally and "rub" shoulders with him if
> possible.
>

Mr. Tarek Ali is of course most welcome to
"rub" shoulders with himself. But he should,
in the mean time, try to have Mr. Jamal Hasan
in his corner. An ally in DOJ would stand in
good stead if Mr. Tarek Ali wants to save
alleged killers like Lt. Colonel Mohiuddin
and Ashrafuzzaman from extradition. In fact,
Mr. Jamal Hasan might even agree to save
Mr. Tarek Ali from extradition.