Yanukovich: Chekhov was a great Ukrainian poet

12 views
Skip to first unread message

The Black Monk

unread,
Jan 29, 2010, 6:48:10 PM1/29/10
to
God forbit that Sovok-style George Bush comes to run the country:

http://unian.net/eng/news/news-359810.html

Candidate for the post of President of Ukraine, leader of the Party of
Regions Victor Yanukovych promises to sign the Decree on restoration
of house-museum of Russian writer Anton Chehov – ‘White country
cottage” in Yalta in case if he wins the presidential election.
According to an UNIAN correspondent, V. Yanukovych said at “Crimea”
state television radio company that he remembers about anniversary of
Anton Chehov, having called him “A Ukrainian, Russian writer” and then
he named him a poet.

-------------

BM

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Jan 29, 2010, 11:12:38 PM1/29/10
to

Innocent tongue slips are common among politicians who spend 18 hours
per day 7 days per week on a campaign trail.

But if you think that only Sovoks make tongue slips, then
Yuanukovich's rival Yulia Tymoshenko is a huge Sovok:

http://hvylya.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2973:2010-01-06-20-25-37&catid=2:2009-04-12-12-00-04&Itemid=8

January 6, 2010

Tymoshenko confuses Christmas with Easter

Today, on Christmas, speaking on the radio Yulia Tymoshenko said at
the end: "Christ has risen! Glorify him!"

Obviously, Yuliya is confusing Christmas with Easter. This is hardly
surprising given her show-off pretensions on being religious.

www.pravda.com.ua/rus/news/4b62e2fdc4eb8/

Confused Tymoshenko offers Tigipko to become President

Tymoshenko confused the post of Prime Minister and President. "I
publicly invited Sergei Tigipko to become President upon my election
victory", - said Tymoshenko, who is running for the post of
President.

http://www.aif.ru/politic/news/44533

Tymoshenko confused China with Somalia

Ukrainian Yulia Tymoshenko, candidate for president of Ukraine
admitted that she is jealous of China, where they "cut off hands and
everything else" for corruption. Of course, China does no such thing.
Tymoshenko has confused Confucian China with a Muslim country living
under Sharia law.

http://korrespondent.net/ukraine/politics/687156

On a political TV talk show, Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko
confused Ukrainian city Bryanka with Russia's Bryansk.

Tymoshenko, not paying attention to the fact that the other
participants called the city correctly, called Bryanka "Bryansk" six
times in a row.

The Black Monk

unread,
Jan 29, 2010, 11:53:32 PM1/29/10
to
On Jan 29, 11:12 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

<ostap_bender_1...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 29, 3:48 pm, The Black Monk <ch....@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > God forbit that Sovok-style George Bush comes to run the country:
>
> >http://unian.net/eng/news/news-359810.html
>
> > Candidate for the post of President of Ukraine, leader of the Party of
> > Regions Victor Yanukovych promises to sign the Decree on restoration
> > of house-museum of Russian writer Anton Chehov – ‘White country
> > cottage” in Yalta in case if he wins  the presidential election.
> > According to an UNIAN correspondent, V. Yanukovych said at “Crimea”
> > state television radio company that he remembers about anniversary of
> > Anton Chehov, having called him “A Ukrainian, Russian writer” and then
> > he named him a poet.
>
> Innocent tongue slips are common among politicians who spend 18 hours
> per day 7 days per week on  a campaign trail.


No, it's much more than a slip of the tongue. Here's the man in
action:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y


> But if you think that only Sovoks make tongue slips, then
> Yuanukovich's rival Yulia Tymoshenko is a huge Sovok:
>

> http://hvylya.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2973:2...


>
> January 6, 2010
>
> Tymoshenko confuses Christmas with Easter
>
> Today, on Christmas, speaking on the radio Yulia Tymoshenko said at
> the end: "Christ has risen! Glorify him!"
>
> Obviously, Yuliya is confusing Christmas with Easter. This is hardly
> surprising given her show-off pretensions on being religious.

No, that's a slip of the tongue.

>  www.pravda.com.ua/rus/news/4b62e2fdc4eb8/
>
> Confused Tymoshenko offers Tigipko to become President
>
> Tymoshenko confused the post of Prime Minister and President. "I
> publicly invited Sergei Tigipko to become President upon my election
> victory", - said Tymoshenko, who is running for the post of
> President.
>
> http://www.aif.ru/politic/news/44533

That's a Freudian slip?

> Tymoshenko confused China with Somalia
>
> Ukrainian Yulia Tymoshenko, candidate for president of Ukraine
> admitted that she is jealous of China, where they "cut off hands and
> everything else" for corruption.  Of course, China does no such thing.
> Tymoshenko has confused Confucian China with a Muslim country living
> under Sharia law.
>
> http://korrespondent.net/ukraine/politics/687156

In China they shoot them rather than cut their hands off. Big
difference.

> On a political TV talk show, Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko
> confused Ukrainian city Bryanka with Russia's Bryansk.
>
> Tymoshenko, not paying attention to the fact that the other
> participants called the city  correctly, called Bryanka "Bryansk" six
> times in a row.

You're comparing getting two letters wrong in the name of an obscure
city to describing Chekhov twice as a "poet"?

BTW here's a whole lot of other Yanukovichian stupidity for you to
enjoy:

http://pravda.com.ua/articles/4b604afcc7c0a/

regards,

BM

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Jan 30, 2010, 1:45:08 AM1/30/10
to

let me put it this way: even in atheist USSR, the biggest atheists
knew that the famous phrase "Xristos voskres!"/"Christ has been
resurrected!" is said on Easter not on Christmas. And yes, saying
that Chekhov was a poet is not as bad as the Prime Minister of a
Christian country, who herself pretends to be religious, saying
"Christ has been resurrected!" on Christmas.

>
> BTW here's a whole lot of other Yanukovichian stupidity for you to
> enjoy:
>
> http://pravda.com.ua/articles/4b604afcc7c0a/
>

Well, those were accidental "mis-speaks" due to long grueling
campaigns, that are common not only to Tymoshenko and Yanukovych but
to all politicians. But stupidities in prepared speaches are much
worse. Take a look at how Tymoshenko's American handlers turned her
into a plagiarist:

http://www.seychas.ua/politics/2009/9/3/news/12777.htm

Tymoshenko Cought on Plagiarism

03.09.09, 10:28

Speaking in Gdansk, September 1, Prime Minister of Ukraine Yulia
Tymoshenko exactly repeated a speech of Robert Kennedy.

"The fact that Yulia Tymoshenko, in her speech in Gdansk on September
1, word for word repeated a fragment of speech of Robert Kennedy's
speech devoted to Martin Luther King April 4, 1968, - is a great
embarrassment to her American PR technologers", - says Herman.
............................

Why didn't her Americans handlers warn Tymoshenko that the speeches
that they write for her, contain plagiarism? Did they expect that
nobody would notice?

Valtsu

unread,
Jan 30, 2010, 8:15:05 AM1/30/10
to
Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr. wrote:
> On Jan 29, 8:53 pm, The Black Monk <ch....@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> On Jan 29, 11:12 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."
>>
>>
>>
>> <ostap_bender_1...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Jan 29, 3:48 pm, The Black Monk <ch....@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>>> God forbit that Sovok-style George Bush comes to run the country:
>>>> http://unian.net/eng/news/news-359810.html
>>>> Candidate for the post of President of Ukraine, leader of the Party of
>>>> Regions Victor Yanukovych promises to sign the Decree on restoration
>>>> of house-museum of Russian writer Anton Chehov � �White country
>>>> cottage� in Yalta in case if he wins the presidential election.
>>>> According to an UNIAN correspondent, V. Yanukovych said at �Crimea�

>>>> state television radio company that he remembers about anniversary of
>>>> Anton Chehov, having called him �A Ukrainian, Russian writer� and then
So, is Tymoshenko the Sara Palin of Ukraine?

The Black Monk

unread,
Jan 30, 2010, 9:41:22 AM1/30/10
to
On Jan 30, 1:45 am, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

Which makes it that much obvious that Tymoshenko's comment was a slip
of the tongue rather than proof of ignorance. In the Ukrainian
village where I have family, the priest, after a few drinks, also
confused the two once. It was funny and the village was mentioning it
months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
difference between Christmas and Easter.

Yanukovich's comments, when viewed in the context of his history of
stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.

regards,

BM

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Jan 31, 2010, 12:48:57 AM1/31/10
to

Maybe. Just as Yanukovych's "Anna Akhmetova" slip.

Are you suggesting that Tymoshenko makes her speeches while drunk?

Look, we are all biased. We all find excuses for our candidates, while
assuming the worst about opponents. What makes you different from most
other highly intelligent is that you refuse to admit bias and see the
other side, even if this is pointed to you ten times over.

>
>  It was funny and the village was mentioning it
> months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
> difference between Christmas and Easter.
>

Don't you think that it would be possible for your priest also to
mistakenly call Chekhov "a poet", under the same circumstances?

>
> Yanukovich's comments, when viewed  in the context of his history of
> stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.
>

That's because you are totally biased and unabashed in your
biasedness. Everybody, even those who barely know how to read, knows
that Chekhov is famous for his prose, not his poetry. This was clearly
a tongue slim made by Yanukovich in the heat of a radio interview.


As far as the "context" goes, I have shown that Tymoshenko has made
numerous mistakes in her speeches.

Given the number of years that both Yanukovych and Tymoshenko have
been in politics, the number of slips for both of them is quite
understandable.

I make similar mistakes myself. For example, in my very first thread I
wrote "80 million people were killed at Salaspils" when I meant "80
thousand". And I have a PhD in math. And Widass still insists that
this proves that I can't tell a million from a thousand. Same as you
insisting that Yanukovych had never heard of Chekhov.

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Jan 31, 2010, 12:52:54 AM1/31/10
to
On Jan 30, 9:48 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

Missing word: "people"

>
> is that you refuse to admit bias and see the
> other side, even if this is pointed to you ten times over.
>
> >  It was funny and the village was mentioning it
> > months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
> > difference between Christmas and Easter.
>
> Don't you think that it would be possible for your priest also to
> mistakenly call Chekhov "a poet", under the same circumstances?
>
> > Yanukovich's comments, when viewed  in the context of his history of
> > stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.
>
> That's because you are totally biased and unabashed in your
> biasedness. Everybody, even those who barely know how to read, knows
> that Chekhov is famous for his prose, not his poetry. This was clearly
> a tongue slim
>

That's "slip"

The Black Monk

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 12:59:56 AM2/1/10
to
On Jan 31, 12:48 am, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."
Sure.

I rather think I'm no more biased than anyone else. And while I'm
against Yanukovich, I'm not for Tymoshenko.

>
> >  It was funny and the village was mentioning it
> > months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
> > difference between Christmas and Easter.
>
> Don't you think that it would be possible for your priest also to
> mistakenly call Chekhov "a poet", under the same circumstances?

Sure. But did you see the Yanukovich video? He paused before calling
Chekhov a poet (as if unsure of what he was - writer? poet?), and
called him a poet twice. It wasn't a slip of the tongue but a
reflection of ignorance.

>
> > Yanukovich's comments, when viewed  in the context of his history of
> > stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.
>
> That's because you are totally biased and unabashed in your
> biasedness. Everybody, even those who barely know how to read, knows
> that Chekhov is famous for his prose, not his poetry.

One would think.

> This was clearly a tongue slim made by Yanukovich in the heat of a radio interview.

It was a video interview. See for yourself:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y

Referring to Chekhov as Ukrainian may have been a slip but not his
calling him a poet.

> As far as the "context" goes, I have shown that Tymoshenko has made
> numerous mistakes in her speeches.
>
> Given the number of years that both Yanukovych and Tymoshenko have
> been in politics, the number of slips for both of them is quite
> understandable.

Would you say the same about George Bush too and excuse his numerous
demonstrations of stupidy or ignorance the same way?

> I make similar mistakes myself. For example, in my very first thread I
> wrote "80 million people were killed at Salaspils" when I meant "80
> thousand". And I have a PhD in math. And Widass still insists that
> this proves that I can't tell a million from a thousand. Same as you
> insisting that Yanukovych had never heard of Chekhov.

He obviously has heard of him (otherwise he wouldn't have called him a
poet) but probably has never read him, unless required to in school
and them forgotten all about him, and probably doesn't know that he
wasn't known for his poetry.

regards,

BM

>
> > > > BTW here's a whole lot of other Yanukovichian stupidity for you to
> > > > enjoy:
>
> > > >http://pravda.com.ua/articles/4b604afcc7c0a/
>
> > > Well, those were accidental "mis-speaks" due to long  grueling
> > > campaigns, that are common not only to Tymoshenko and Yanukovych but
> > > to all politicians. But stupidities in prepared speaches are much
> > > worse. Take a look at how Tymoshenko's American handlers turned her
> > > into a plagiarist:
>
> > >http://www.seychas.ua/politics/2009/9/3/news/12777.htm
>
> > > Tymoshenko Cought on Plagiarism
>
> > > 03.09.09, 10:28
>
> > > Speaking in Gdansk, September 1, Prime Minister of Ukraine Yulia
> > > Tymoshenko exactly repeated a speech of Robert Kennedy.
>
> > > "The fact that Yulia Tymoshenko, in her speech in Gdansk on September
> > > 1, word for word repeated a fragment of speech of Robert Kennedy's
> > > speech devoted to Martin Luther King April 4, 1968,   - is a great
> > > embarrassment to her American PR technologers", - says Herman.
> > > ............................
>
> > > Why didn't her Americans handlers  warn Tymoshenko that the speeches
> > > that they write for her, contain  plagiarism? Did they expect that

> > > nobody would notice?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

vello

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 6:59:18 AM2/1/10
to

I'm not too deply into Uke politics - but by me most important thing
is - they ELECT their rulers! Seems like nothing if to look from West,
but in context of post-Soviet world, it is great achievement by me. a
guy or girl wanting to run Ukraine must make ukrainians to support him
- say, in Russia, it is KGB, Gazprom and military you need behind you
to challenge Putin, not some average muzhiks.

The Black Monk

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 9:02:22 AM2/1/10
to
> to challenge Putin, not some average muzhiks.- Hide quoted text -

That's always been something differentiating Ukraine from Russia and
the cause of so much misunderstanding between the two otherwise very
similar nations. As the great Russian historian Vernadsky noted,
Ukraine retianed the democratic customs/political culture of Rus
times, while Russia has an Asian political model. This has had its
advantage for Russia historically - unlike Ukraine or Poland Russia's
politics haven't been defined by chaos.

While there is much talk of post-Soviet Russia adopting a Chinese
model, it is probably more likely to adopt a more civilized Japanese
political model which allows for much more individual rights. Japan
if you recall, despite having free elections has basically been
governed by the same political party for 50 years, which is interwoven
with a handful of huge industrial conglomorates beholden to the state.

regards,

BM

The Black Monk

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 9:12:32 AM2/1/10
to
On Jan 31, 12:48 am, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

<ostap_bender_1...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 30, 6:41 am, The Black Monk <ch....@hotmail.com> wrote:
>

Another Yanukovichism (article in Russian):

http://www.lenta.ru/news/2010/02/01/proffesor/

regards,

BM

vello

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 11:38:57 AM2/1/10
to

how much I know "Japanese model" is democracy with no "power party",
"national leader", "national Japanese democracy" and other things.
Yes, one party dominated there for a long time but no records they
keep power by controlling media and manipulating law and justice. And
just in 2009 they lost their position pretty democratically collecting
less votes then opposition so today's Japanese govt and prime are for
another party.
By Freedom index, despite not in top group, Japan is on row with
Italy, Latvia and Greece, so no doubt it is democratic. Japan is/was
not governed by some "father of Nation" but by Japanese people.

The Black Monk

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 3:54:55 PM2/1/10
to

So if Russia follows the Japanese model, in 40 years it will have a
government other than that of United Russia or whatever version Putin
and his heirs create, and will then be as democratic as Greece or
Italy.

regards,

BM

vello

unread,
Feb 1, 2010, 5:21:19 PM2/1/10
to
no way I'm professional about political system of Japan, but how much
I know there was no "strongman" in Japan after ww2 or later, no govt
controlled media, "governors" set by govt, not elected locally etc
etc. With "help" of US they got a modern democratic constitution after
ww2 and it is arguable was Japan 40 years ago less democratic then
today. So for Russia taking "Japan way" would mean end with the power
of mikado (and some gas shoguns) and start with the pover of people.

lorad

unread,
Feb 2, 2010, 4:48:02 PM2/2/10
to
On Jan 29, 8:12 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

<ostap_bender_1...@hotmail.com> wrote:
> On Jan 29, 3:48 pm, The Black Monk <ch....@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > God forbit that Sovok-style George Bush comes to run the country:
>
> >http://unian.net/eng/news/news-359810.html
>
> > Candidate for the post of President of Ukraine, leader of the Party of
> > Regions Victor Yanukovych promises to sign the Decree on restoration
> > of house-museum of Russian writer Anton Chehov – ‘White country
> > cottage” in Yalta in case if he wins  the presidential election.
> > According to an UNIAN correspondent, V. Yanukovych said at “Crimea”
> > state television radio company that he remembers about anniversary of
> > Anton Chehov, having called him “A Ukrainian, Russian writer” and then
> > he named him a poet.
>
> Innocent tongue slips are common among politicians who spend 18 hours
> per day 7 days per week on  a campaign trail.

Da! komrad Karla, Izz Truuu!
Spetzially for russkie propagandiisti.and bosseki

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Feb 3, 2010, 5:52:17 AM2/3/10
to

Vello, I know that your own media has brainwashed you into thinking
that Putin's control over the top three Russian TV networks is
something that can never happen in any democratic country, but
certainly Italy under the rule of President Berlusconi is much worse.
Berlusconi controls all top 6 (six!) networks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_in_Italy

Most-viewed channels

The Auditel measures television ratings in Italy. The channels with a
viewing share of >= 1.0% according to Auditel's measurements in
September 2008 are: [14]

Rai Uno 21.80%
Canale 5 20.33%
Rai Due 10.60%
Italia 1 10.83%
Rai Tre 9.07%
Rete 4 8.28%

Rai Uno, Rai Due and Rai Tre belong to the government directly.

Canale 5 is an Italian private television network of Mediaset, the
media branch of Fininvest. Fininvest is a financial holding company
controlled by Silvio Berlusconi's family and managed by Silvio
Berlusconi's oldest daughter Marina Berlusconi.

Italia 1 is an Italian commercial television station on the Mediaset
network, the media branch of Fininvest. Fininvest is a financial
holding company controlled by Silvio Berlusconi's family and managed
by Silvio Berlusconi's oldest daughter Marina Berlusconi. It is
oriented especially at young people.

Rete 4 (pronounced Retequattro) is an Italian television station
belonging to the Mediaset network, the media branch of Fininvest.
Fininvest is a financial holding company controlled by Silvio
Berlusconi's family and managed by Silvio Berlusconi's oldest daughter
Marina Berlusconi.. It is an Italian private commercial TV channel.

In fact, there is only one private network in Italy not owned by
Silvio Berlusconi - La7 - and it is miniscule, owning only a 3.08%
market share.

Any questions?

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Feb 3, 2010, 6:07:49 AM2/3/10
to

Exactly. You are biased against Yanukovich and any other politician
who is responsive to the Russian-Ukrainian community.

>
>
> > >  It was funny and the village was mentioning it
> > > months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
> > > difference between Christmas and Easter.
>
> > Don't you think that it would be possible for your priest also to
> > mistakenly call Chekhov "a poet", under the same circumstances?
>
> Sure.  But did you see the Yanukovich video?  He paused before calling
> Chekhov a poet (as if unsure of what he was - writer? poet?), and
> called him a poet twice.  It wasn't a slip of the tongue but a
> reflection of ignorance.
>

Actualy, he paused at least 20 times in that short segment. He paused
in every sentence at least 3 times. He was talking exactly the way I
talk if I don't get much sleep the night before. But Yanukovich hasn't
had much sleep in the last 6 months or so, being a presidential
candidate.

Moreover, he called Chekhov "a great writer" several times in the
beginning, only to say "a great poet" at the very end.

You are being totally biased.

>
> > > Yanukovich's comments, when viewed  in the context of his history of
> > > stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.
>
> > That's because you are totally biased and unabashed in your
> > biasedness. Everybody, even those who barely know how to read, knows
> > that Chekhov is famous for his prose, not his poetry.
>
> One would think.
>

Just as one would think that jesus resurrected on Easter and not on
Christmas.

We all lose control over our words when tired.

>
> > This was clearly a tongue slim made by Yanukovich in the heat of a radio interview.
>
> It was a video interview.  See for yourself:
>

What's the difference? Is it easier to control your words on
television than on radio? You seem to be creating excuses for your
bias on the fly.

>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y
>
> Referring to Chekhov as Ukrainian may have been a slip but not his
> calling him a poet.
>

On the contrary. He seems to want to make great Russian writers to be
also great Ukrainian writers. But calling him first "a writer" several
times, but later - "poet" - seems to be because he was too tired to
find the right word.

>
> > As far as the "context" goes, I have shown that Tymoshenko has made
> > numerous mistakes in her speeches.
>
> > Given the number of years that both Yanukovych and Tymoshenko have
> > been in politics, the number of slips for both of them is quite
> > understandable.
>
> Would you say the same about George Bush too and excuse his numerous
> demonstrations of stupidy or ignorance the same way?
>

Yanukovich in that interview seemed to be very tired and half-dead
from sleeplessness. Bush was very perky when he made his mistakes.

See for yourself:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y

>


> > I make similar mistakes myself. For example, in my very first thread I
> > wrote "80 million people were killed at Salaspils" when I meant "80
> > thousand". And I have a PhD in math. And Widass still insists that
> > this proves that I can't tell a million from a thousand. Same as you
> > insisting that Yanukovych had never heard of Chekhov.
>
> He obviously has heard of him (otherwise he wouldn't have called him a
> poet) but probably has never read him, unless required to in school
> and them forgotten all about him, and probably doesn't know that he
> wasn't known for his poetry.
>

Oh god, you are grasping at straws, which is ridiculous given that
Yanukovich doesn't have nearly enough votes to win.

vello

unread,
Feb 3, 2010, 8:20:33 AM2/3/10
to
On Feb 3, 12:52 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

Italy is shame of EU and is not listed on top rank by Freedom house -
all civilized nations are normally in that "top rank". But Berlusconi
owns those channels as private businessman, not as a "national leader"
of Italy.

vello

unread,
Feb 3, 2010, 8:27:47 AM2/3/10
to
On Feb 3, 12:52 pm, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

Karla, I replied without reading deeply into your post - do you count
state channels as Berlusconi ones? They don't belong to any particular
party but to Italy as whole. Rai Uno is expecially critical on
Berlusconi coz Berlusconi's Canale 5 is Rai Uno's first competition.

The Black Monk

unread,
Feb 3, 2010, 9:22:45 AM2/3/10
to
On Feb 3, 6:07 am, "Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr."

Which other politican in Ukraine am I biased against? I think Tyhypko
is no worse than anyone else.

I suppose I am biased against an ignorant lumpenprole with an assault
history who brags that prison time made him a stronger person, being
president of Ukraine. Don't you think that any normal person would
feel that way? And don't you think it is collossal bias for anyone to
support such a creature, simply because he represents the "Russian-
Ukrainian comunity?"


> > > >  It was funny and the village was mentioning it
> > > > months later but hardly evidence that the priest can't tell the
> > > > difference between Christmas and Easter.
>
> > > Don't you think that it would be possible for your priest also to
> > > mistakenly call Chekhov "a poet", under the same circumstances?
>
> > Sure.  But did you see the Yanukovich video?  He paused before calling
> > Chekhov a poet (as if unsure of what he was - writer? poet?), and
> > called him a poet twice.  It wasn't a slip of the tongue but a
> > reflection of ignorance.
>
> Actualy, he paused at least 20 times in that short segment. He paused
> in every sentence at least 3 times. He was talking exactly the way I
> talk if I don't get much sleep the night before. But Yanukovich hasn't
> had much sleep in the last 6 months or so, being a presidential
> candidate.
>
> Moreover, he called Chekhov "a great writer" several times in the
> beginning, only to say "a great poet" at the very end.

Maybe ghe couldn't tell the difference?

> You are being totally biased.

No, you are. You are like a Republican in 2006 desperately sticking
to the story that Bush is a smart man who is merely a poor public
speaker.

> > > > Yanukovich's comments, when viewed  in the context of his history of
> > > > stupidity, is indicative of total ignorance on the other hand.
>
> > > That's because you are totally biased and unabashed in your
> > > biasedness. Everybody, even those who barely know how to read, knows
> > > that Chekhov is famous for his prose, not his poetry.
>
> > One would think.
>
> Just as one would think that jesus resurrected on Easter and not on
> Christmas.
>
> We all lose control over our words when tired.
>
>
>
> > > This was clearly a tongue slim made by Yanukovich in the heat of a radio interview.
>
> > It was a video interview.  See for yourself:
>
> What's the difference? Is it easier to control your words on
> television than on radio? You seem to be creating excuses for your
> bias on the fly.

No, just pointing out the reality.

>
>
> >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y
>
> > Referring to Chekhov as Ukrainian may have been a slip but not his
> > calling him a poet.
>
> On the contrary. He seems to want to make great Russian writers to be
> also great Ukrainian writers. But calling him first "a writer" several
> times, but later - "poet" - seems to be because he was too tired to
> find the right word.

So he is so stupid that when tired he can't come with a word other
than poet to describe Chekhov?

>
>
> > > As far as the "context" goes, I have shown that Tymoshenko has made
> > > numerous mistakes in her speeches.
>
> > > Given the number of years that both Yanukovych and Tymoshenko have
> > > been in politics, the number of slips for both of them is quite
> > > understandable.
>
> > Would you say the same about George Bush too and excuse his numerous
> > demonstrations of stupidy or ignorance the same way?
>
> Yanukovich in that interview seemed to be very tired and half-dead
> from sleeplessness. Bush was very perky when he made his mistakes.
>
> See for yourself:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIsuyWOvO6Y
>
>
>
> > > I make similar mistakes myself. For example, in my very first thread I
> > > wrote "80 million people were killed at Salaspils" when I meant "80
> > > thousand". And I have a PhD in math. And Widass still insists that
> > > this proves that I can't tell a million from a thousand. Same as you
> > > insisting that Yanukovych had never heard of Chekhov.
>
> > He obviously has heard of him (otherwise he wouldn't have called him a
> > poet) but probably has never read him, unless required to in school
> > and them forgotten all about him, and probably doesn't know that he
> > wasn't known for his poetry.
>
> Oh god, you are grasping at straws, which is ridiculous given that
> Yanukovich doesn't have nearly enough votes to win.

Actually he might have enough to win, as many western Ukrainians are
disgusted by both candidates and won't vote. Yanukovich can count on
45% of the electorate voting for him. If enough of the other 55% stay
home, he wins the election.

regards,

BM

>
>
>
>
> > > > > > BTW here's a whole lot of other Yanukovichian stupidity for you to
> > > > > > enjoy:
>
> > > > > >http://pravda.com.ua/articles/4b604afcc7c0a/
>
> > > > > Well, those were accidental "mis-speaks" due to long  grueling
> > > > > campaigns, that are common not only to Tymoshenko and Yanukovych but
> > > > > to all politicians. But stupidities in prepared speaches are much
> > > > > worse. Take a look at how Tymoshenko's American handlers turned her
> > > > > into a plagiarist:
>
> > > > >http://www.seychas.ua/politics/2009/9/3/news/12777.htm
>
> > > > > Tymoshenko Cought on Plagiarism
>
> > > > > 03.09.09, 10:28
>
> > > > > Speaking in Gdansk, September 1, Prime Minister of Ukraine Yulia
> > > > > Tymoshenko exactly repeated a speech of Robert Kennedy.
>
> > > > > "The fact that Yulia Tymoshenko, in her speech in Gdansk on September
> > > > > 1, word for word repeated a fragment of speech of Robert Kennedy's
> > > > > speech devoted to Martin Luther King April 4, 1968,   - is a great
> > > > > embarrassment to her American PR technologers", - says Herman.
> > > > > ............................
>
> > > > > Why didn't her Americans handlers  warn Tymoshenko that the speeches
> > > > > that they write for her, contain  plagiarism? Did they expect that
> > > > > nobody would notice?- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted
>

> ...
>
> read more »- Hide quoted text -

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Feb 4, 2010, 3:36:21 AM2/4/10
to

Of course. Just as the top Russian channels don't belong to any
particular party but to Russia as whole. :-)

Only boobs, brainwashed by the Western mass media, don't know that
Italy doesn't have a free press, and has less freedom of the press
than more than 70 other countries, including Namibia and, btw, S.
Korea.

Even Nauru, the tiny South pacific country famous for recently
recognising S. Ossetian independence, has much more freedom of the
press than Italy.

Berlusconi controls 90% of all Italian national TV media, which is
more than Putin's control of Russian media.

http://web.archive.org/web/20040927133724/http://www.ifj-europe.org/default.asp?index=2451&Language=EN

European Federation of Journalists

Journalists In New Protest as Berlusconi’s Grip on Italian Media
Becomes A Stranglehold

30/04/2004

The International Federation of Journalists today accused Italian
legislators of sacrificing pluralism and democracy to strengthen Prime
Minister Silvio Berlusconi's hold over the media.

“This decision further reinforces Mr Berlusconi's control over 90% of
television – in the private and public sector,” said White. “Even
worse, it permits him to acquire more newspapers and radio stations
and strengthens his grip on the country’s media landscape.”

Berlusconi owns three private television stations and exercises
considerable influence over the state broadcaster. He also has assets
in the publishing industry and controls newspapers. “Now the man who
is already Italy's biggest media magnate will be able to increase his
monopoly,” said White.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silvio_Berlusconi

Influence on the media

Berlusconi's extensive control over the media has been widely
criticised by both analysts[59] and press freedom organisations, who
allege Italy's media has limited freedom of expression. The Freedom of
the Press 2004 Global Survey, an annual study issued by the American
organization Freedom House, downgraded Italy's ranking from 'Free' to
'Partly Free' [60] due to Berlusconi's influence over RAI, a ranking
which, in "Western Europe" was shared only with Turkey (as of
2005[update]). Reporters Without Borders states that in 2004, "The
conflict of interests involving prime minister Silvio Berlusconi and
his vast media empire was still not resolved and continued to threaten
news diversity".[61] In April 2004, the International Federation of
Journalists joined the criticism, objecting to the passage of a law
vetoed by Carlo Azeglio Ciampi in 2003, which critics believe is
designed to protect Berlusconi's reported 90% control of the Italian
national media.[62]

Berlusconi's influence over RAI became evident when in Sofia, Bulgaria
he expressed his views on journalists Enzo Biagi and Michele Santoro,
[63] and comedian Daniele Luttazzi. Berlusconi said that they "use
television as a criminal means of communication". They lost their jobs
as a result.[64]

This statement was called by critics "Editto Bulgaro". English
translation: "They use Biagi - what's the name of the other one?
Santoro, but the other one... Luttazzi - have made of public
television, paid with everyone's money, is criminal. I believe that it
is a precise duty of the new management [of RAI] to prevent this from
happening again."

http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=7850

Videocracy' ads can't air on Italy state TV
2009 09 03

From: google.com

Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009.

Italy's state broadcaster RAI has refused to air ads promoting
"Videocracy," a Swedish documentary examining the influence of
television on Italian culture over the last 30 years, because it says
the spots are an offense to Premier Silvio Berlusconi.

Ostap S. B. M. Bender Jr.

unread,
Feb 4, 2010, 3:38:45 AM2/4/10
to

You are right. The way it worked was that Berlusconi first built his
private TV empire, then used this empire to brainwash the Italian
electorate to elect him to office, where he can maximise his ownership
of Italy as his private domain.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages