From $250 to $2.1 billion just by supplying people (body shopping) to

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anon...@remailer.hastio.org

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Aug 3, 2006, 12:49:17 AM8/3/06
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From $250 to $2.1 billion just by supplying people (body shopping) to Western companies : India's Infosys story
Harish Baliga
Aug. 1, 2006

Body shopping is what Indian software companies call ''Software Development''. It is facilitated by inefficient American management in American companies that need cheap labor to service arrogant, inefficient and unproductive managers. These Americvan companies buy these Indian bodies commonly known as Cyber coolies cheap and use them to satisfy their whimsical needs.

Twenty-five years ago, with an investment of just $250, a tiny computer programming body shop company took shape in a one-bedroom apartment in the western India city of Pune.

Today Infosys Technologies has revenues of $2.1 billion and employs 58,000 people in more than two dozen countries, ranking as India's second-largest software exporter.

In the last financial year to March 2006, 1.4 million applicants applied for jobs, of whom 21,600 were hired. The company's market capitalization is about $20 billion.

Infosys, a pioneer of offshore software body shopping which AMerican and Europeans call outsourcing, is one of the great success stories of India's burgeoning technology sector.

Supplying people and selling them cheap is what made this kind Indian companies big.

http://www.indiadaily.com/editorial/12380.asp

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islam...@techemail.com

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Aug 3, 2006, 1:39:23 AM8/3/06
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anon...@remailer.hastio.org wrote:

> Today Infosys Technologies has revenues of $2.1 billion and employs 58,000 people in more than two dozen countries, ranking as India's second-largest software exporter.


I can't count how many times over the years I have heard about what a
great success story Infosys was from some Hindu freak. Frankly I
actually was starting to believe the hype. Now I learn Infosys only has
revenues of $2.1 billion, Hahahahahhahahha WHAT A GIANT ELEPHANT
WORSHIPPING JOKE. I know resturants in Manhatten that probably do that
much. You Indians are such hate-filled little brown monkeys, You are
always so fast to criticize the USA and say how great India is but when
you look at the facts India is still a pathetic shit hole, 2.1 billion
HHAHAHHAHHAHHAHHA.

Marcus Aurelius

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Aug 3, 2006, 3:26:38 AM8/3/06
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Which restaurant would that be, mohamedan?

The entire annual revenue of NY city is $45 bil.


Adi Anant

Kamal R. Prasad

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Aug 3, 2006, 4:49:43 AM8/3/06
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try a restaurant chain spread across the entire country. Olive Garden
or Hooters should be earning that much. But then, those are franchises.
>From what I read, Infosys wants to be the next IBM Global Services and
IBM wants to pre-empt that by shifting their entire services division
to India.

regards
-kamal

briangmoore

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Aug 5, 2006, 1:21:21 AM8/5/06
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Kamal R. Prasad wrote:
...

> try a restaurant chain spread across the entire country. Olive Garden
> or Hooters should be earning that much. But then, those are franchises.
> >From what I read, Infosys wants to be the next IBM Global Services and
> IBM wants to pre-empt that by shifting their entire services division
> to India.
>
> regards
> -kamal
>


Whenever I read Kamal, I get this vision of him taking a dump on my
head, and laughing hysterically.

Straydog

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Aug 5, 2006, 8:54:31 AM8/5/06
to

The impression I get is that there is both a pro-progress faction
(pro-globalists) and an anti-progress faction in India (eg. communists,
Naxalites, Maoists). The pro-progress (the globalists) also have all
developed serious swelled head problems as they get psychological
satisfaction that their still quite backwards country has SOMETHING that
beats the shit out of the US economy and that happens to be the exchange
rate and the communications technology that just hands them business on a
silver platter. China is another but slightly different but more
significant story. Reading the more broadly aimed and soberly written
stories suggests that all of that rapid growth in both India and China
will have to peak out pretty soon, maybe in China first. Think about what
that will mean. Another perspective: All these moves by IBM, DuPont,
GM, etc. to China and India hurts US jobs, but the battle ahead will be
will the US companies in China and India beat the shit out of the Indian
and Chinese companies in India and China (a new kind of imperialism) or
vice versa? There is already backlash in China. There is backslidding in
India wrt privatization and opening of markets and controling corruption.
Walmart has lost a couple of wars (out of Korea, Germany, and Indonesia,
but won in all the others). The US CEOs see India and China as prey. WE,
guys like you and I, are just the underlings that, for all of history,
got the job of watching the lions do the fighting and finding the bread
crumbs that fall our ways. Beware of economic crises (eg. a world wide
depression, and wars yet to come). Kamal has not seen enough history yet
and maybe is too young. I was like that once, too.


Kamal R. Prasad

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Aug 5, 2006, 11:33:46 AM8/5/06
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Straydog wrote:
> On Sat, 4 Aug 2006, briangmoore wrote:
>
> >
> > Kamal R. Prasad wrote:
> > ...
> >> try a restaurant chain spread across the entire country. Olive Garden
> >> or Hooters should be earning that much. But then, those are franchises.
> >>> From what I read, Infosys wants to be the next IBM Global Services and
> >> IBM wants to pre-empt that by shifting their entire services division
> >> to India.
> >>
> >> regards
> >> -kamal
> >>
> >
> >
> > Whenever I read Kamal, I get this vision of him taking a dump on my
> > head, and laughing hysterically.
> >
not sure I understand you brian.

>
> The impression I get is that there is both a pro-progress faction
> (pro-globalists) and an anti-progress faction in India (eg. communists,
> Naxalites, Maoists). The pro-progress (the globalists) also have all

we are a parliamentary democracy. Meaning in a presidential democracy
like the US, one person gets elected and has his job secure for the
term unless impeached.
In India, parties reach a consensus and form a coalition govt. they
could form a one party govt but people are not willing to give their
vote to a single party. they want the ruling party to be on the
tenterhooks and pull the carpet if there is rampant corruption. This
means, different parties with v little in common push-pull to reach a
consensus re globalization. Then there are organizations outside the
mainstream -those who believe in armed struggle coz fighting elections
requires campaign finance which trhey cannot generate. There is
heterogenity of opinion amongst the citizenry too re globalization.
Some vierw MNCs as employment providers, some view them as pollution
generators, some as land-grabbers of poor farmers, some as all of the
previous and as vultures out to prey on them.

> developed serious swelled head problems as they get psychological
> satisfaction that their still quite backwards country has SOMETHING that
> beats the shit out of the US economy and that happens to be the exchange
> rate and the communications technology that just hands them business on a
> silver platter. China is another but slightly different but more

yes -the exchange rate hands them jobs on a silver platter.

> significant story. Reading the more broadly aimed and soberly written
> stories suggests that all of that rapid growth in both India and China
> will have to peak out pretty soon, maybe in China first. Think about what
> that will mean. Another perspective: All these moves by IBM, DuPont,
> GM, etc. to China and India hurts US jobs, but the battle ahead will be
> will the US companies in China and India beat the shit out of the Indian
> and Chinese companies in India and China (a new kind of imperialism) or

not necessarily. There was a time when in the UD coloured people were
presumed to be stupid or unqualified to do heavy duty engg work.
Indians came to the US and beat americans on their own turf despite the
stereotype. Before rrc raises his hand, regardless of whether the
stereotype existed -if we can beat americans in the US, we can also
beat them in india. Americans have an edge in terms of greater access
to capital -but v little besides that.

> vice versa? There is already backlash in China. There is backslidding in
> India wrt privatization and opening of markets and controling corruption.
> Walmart has lost a couple of wars (out of Korea, Germany, and Indonesia,
> but won in all the others). The US CEOs see India and China as prey. WE,

they view both as large untapped markets of both labourers and
consumers. When you employ labour, you create a consumer. Its a 2 way
street -and I had pointed to an article on washingtonpost to you wrt
that.

> guys like you and I, are just the underlings that, for all of history,
> got the job of watching the lions do the fighting and finding the bread
> crumbs that fall our ways. Beware of economic crises (eg. a world wide

depends on how you position yourself. Its always easier to swim with
the tide than against it.

> depression, and wars yet to come). Kamal has not seen enough history yet
> and maybe is too young. I was like that once, too.

Im not suggesting that things will not misfire. But rolling back free
trade is like turning back the clock or telling the tide to go back. I
dont have a problem if you don't like it. But Im not sure I understand
how you will translate your intent to something tangible.

regards
-kamal

Straydog

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Aug 5, 2006, 12:03:25 PM8/5/06
to

Except that read this:
---
http://english.ohmynews.com/
==============
The Fight to Save India!
People's Democratic Front of India founded to fight imperialism and globalization

India today is experiencing a great economic, political, and cultural onslaught by the world's imperialist powers and leading to the degradation of human relationships... (Amaninder Pal Sharma)


http://english.ohmynews.com/ArticleView/article_view.asp?menu=A11100&no=309074&rel_no=1&back_url=

2006-08-04 09:50 KST
RSS
The Fight to Save India!
People's Democratic Front of India founded to fight imperialism and
globalization
Amaninder Pal Sharma (amaninder) Email Article Print Article
Published 2006-08-03 13:32 (KST)
The big hall of Shah Auditorium in New Delhi was alive with shouted slogans.

"Let Us Build a Resistance Movement against Liberalization, Privatization and
Globalization!"

"Down with Imperialism!"

"Resist oppression of nationalities and minorities!"

It was July 30, 2006, and the eve of the 66th anniversary of the martyrdom of
Shaheed Udham Singh.

The people gathered in the Shah Auditorium were there to witness the first
conference of the People's Democratic Front of India (PDFI), a day-old
amalgamation of 165 organizations and more than 100 Indian democratic leaders.

The PDFI encompasses organizations and individuals from all walks of Indian
society. It includes, among others, Maoists, Gandhians, Dalits, peasant and
laborer organizations, a large number of students, professors, teachers, civil
liberties activists, filmmakers, writers, singers, sculptors, legal experts,
doctors, environmentalists, and journalists.

Some important members worthy of mention are Medha Patekar, a major spokesperson
for the Save Narmada Movement, human rights activist and Supreme Court lawyer
Nandita Haksar, activist and professor of Arabic S.A.R. Geelani, B.D. Sharma,
President of Bharat Jan Andolan, the Indian People's Movement, Thomas Mathew, a
former United Nations official from India, and P. Varavara Rao, an eminent
revolutionary poet of Andhra Pradesh.

The PDFI's slogan is: "Build a Self-reliant People's Democratic India." It
encompasses a number of popular struggles. Its program and constitution specify
that:

"it is an open-ended process for all those people's organizations and
individuals who join this platform to enrich it with their struggles and ideas
for the fresh construction of a new egalitarian social order."
According to Darshan Pal, one of the conveners of the 51-member executive
committee:

"the PDFI will wage a struggle to create a genuinely democratic space in our
suffocating caste/class society. Real democratic social relations are yet to be
established in our country."
He further explained that: "Unless an anti-imperialist and patriotic movement
addresses itself closely to the questions of patriarchy, caste, nationality, and
ethnic/tribal and religious minorities in our society, it cannot hold out the
promise of affording equal rights and opportunities to all sections of the
people."

Medha Patekar of the NBA said: "India today is experiencing a great economic,
political, and cultural onslaught by the world's imperialist powers and leading
to the degradation of human relationships and even our basic infrastructure.
Social values and social relations are on the verge of collapsing."

Adding his concern to this, Amarnath Bhai, national president of Gandhian
organization, "Sarva Sewa Sangh," said:

"In every struggle for our rights police beat us up as if we were foreigners.
Instead of conflicting interests we can see the brotherhood of different
governments of the whole world, but the brotherhood of people is missing both at
the national and world level."
Designating globalization as sugar-coated poison, he added, "there is nothing
for the common people but to change India as it is."

The PDFI vows to fight imperialism, privatization, foreign debt accumulation,
contract labor and child labor.

It is also against communalism in the garb of Hindutva, caste domination,
untouchability, chauvinism, religious inequality, gender oppression, and the
saffronization of education.

It opposes a distorted presentation of history, damage to ecology and ruthless
military operations in Kashmir and the states of the North-East.

The PDFI has also declared itself against U.S. imperialist/Zionist-led
aggression against the Arab world in particular and the rest of the world
generally. The PDFI supports the promotion of autonomous regions, even within
states, for different cultural groups.

Many in India are concerned that such a large amalgamation of organizations,
containing so many different personalities, and representing so many different
streams of ideas and political ideologies cannot long sustain a struggle against
imperialism and globalization.

In the last ten years two large fronts of the same nature have been formed to
fight imperialism, namely, the Joint Action Forum of Indian People (JAFIP) and
the Forum Against Imperialism and Globalization (FAIG), but both have failed.

When we talked with Arjun Prasad Singh, a member of the executive committee of
the PDFI, he said:

"Both JAFIP and FAIG included organizations and individuals representing only
Marxist-Leninist ideology. We need to make a broad front which can include all
the democratic forces of India to lead to the formation of a PDFI but not a
clash of ideas."
As in Peru, Venezuela, and Bolivia, and in South Asian countries like the
Philippines and Nepal, the fight against imperialism can only be fought through
a broad front like the PDFI.

Moreover, the formation of the PDFI takes place when the imperialist onslaught
is at its peak.

Time will tell whether the intensity and spirit with which democratic
organizations and individuals in India fight imperialism will lead to the
formation of a sovereign, self-reliant, and genuinely democratic India.
---

>> developed serious swelled head problems as they get psychological
>> satisfaction that their still quite backwards country has SOMETHING that
>> beats the shit out of the US economy and that happens to be the exchange
>> rate and the communications technology that just hands them business on a
>> silver platter. China is another but slightly different but more
>
> yes -the exchange rate hands them jobs on a silver platter.
>
>> significant story. Reading the more broadly aimed and soberly written
>> stories suggests that all of that rapid growth in both India and China
>> will have to peak out pretty soon, maybe in China first. Think about what
>> that will mean. Another perspective: All these moves by IBM, DuPont,
>> GM, etc. to China and India hurts US jobs, but the battle ahead will be
>> will the US companies in China and India beat the shit out of the Indian
>> and Chinese companies in India and China (a new kind of imperialism) or
>
> not necessarily. There was a time when in the UD coloured people were
> presumed to be stupid or unqualified to do heavy duty engg work.
> Indians came to the US and beat americans on their own turf despite the
> stereotype. Before rrc raises his hand, regardless of whether the
> stereotype existed -if we can beat americans in the US, we can also
> beat them in india. Americans have an edge in terms of greater access
> to capital -but v little besides that.

See, here is where Indo-neoNazism is forming. Kamal sees this as some kind
of new religious crusade that includes two proclamations: i) Indians, not
anyone else, are the master race, and ii) "beating americans on their own
turf" (from what evidence do we get that? because US guys are not going
into engineering any more? or corporations give the jobs to the cheaper
guys?), and iii) its not because the exchange rate hands the jobs to them,
its because they see themselves as superior people! "We can beat the
americans..in india"? Wipro/Infosys/Tata against MS/Sun/IBM/Intel? It will
be interesting. All because of one little thing: the exchange rates.

And, please note in his last sentence above how Kamal denies that we have
anything else besides capital.

>> vice versa? There is already backlash in China. There is backslidding in
>> India wrt privatization and opening of markets and controling corruption.
>> Walmart has lost a couple of wars (out of Korea, Germany, and Indonesia,
>> but won in all the others). The US CEOs see India and China as prey. WE,
>
> they view both as large untapped markets of both labourers and
> consumers. When you employ labour, you create a consumer. Its a 2 way
> street -and I had pointed to an article on washingtonpost to you wrt
> that.

And, when new labor is made in India at the expense of existing labor in
the USA, the destroyed labor in the USA also means destroyed consumers in
the USA. This is why Samuelson said this:
------
They quoted Paul Samuelson (MIT) as saying "Comparative advantage
cannot be counted on to create...net gains greater than the net
losses from trade"
-------
And, I've pointed that out to you many many times.

>> guys like you and I, are just the underlings that, for all of history,
>> got the job of watching the lions do the fighting and finding the bread
>> crumbs that fall our ways. Beware of economic crises (eg. a world wide
>
> depends on how you position yourself. Its always easier to swim with
> the tide than against it.

I'd get out of the water and up on the beach, ASAP.

>> depression, and wars yet to come). Kamal has not seen enough history yet
>> and maybe is too young. I was like that once, too.
>
> Im not suggesting that things will not misfire. But rolling back free
> trade is like turning back the clock or telling the tide to go back.

I'm reading more about this subject than ever before. Even the people who
are in the cushy chairs can't control what is going on. The last round of
WTO talks failed completely. No one knows. I read Gilpins book, you did
not. I know that for a fact.

I
> dont have a problem if you don't like it. But Im not sure I understand
> how you will translate your intent to something tangible.

I don't have a particular intent. I see many possiblities taking place.
All out of my control, but if India is going to be a bunch of
job-stealers, and our CEOs are just going to hire only Indians, then it
will be up to people in the USA to avoid even more the school programs
where even if you do good, you won't get a job in your home country.

And, it makes no sense at all to imagine a world in the future where, in
the end, everyone born in one country will have to move to a different
country to work. Its not going to happen.

You have about 5% unemployment in your country--plus a lot of serious
problems that you have mostly ignored while spending too much time on our
problems (your "bash the USA" hobby) and ignoring/denying the good things
that came out of the USA --and we have about 5% unemployment in my
country. This may be the "standard" for capitalist-type economies and
people who can't find work will just starve or live under the bridge. The
other 95% will not help them. The story is not over in India regarding
your armed revolt (Naxalites), your communists, etc. And, I can easily
find reports about India that you either don't know about or don't care.

> regards
> -kamal
>
>

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