John N. Buck and the House-Tree-Person Test

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Sam Sloan

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Apr 15, 2004, 2:16:51 PM4/15/04
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John N. Buck was chess master who was a psychologist. He won the
Southern Open Chess Championship in the 1930s. I believe that he was
also Virginia State Champion. My mother knew him well because he lived
near us and my mother was a psychiatrist. I spoke to him on the
telephone in the 1950s but he refused to meet me because he said that
he did not want to play chess any more.

I looked up the house-tree-person test on the Internet and found the
following reference:

http://cps.nova.edu/~cpphelp/HTP.html

Author: John N. Buck.

Publisher: Western Psychological Services.

Description: The House-Tree-Person (H-T-P) projective technique
developed by John Buck was originally an outgrowth of the Goodenough
scale utilized to assess intellectual functioning. Buck felt artistic
creativity represented a stream of personality characteristics that
flowed onto graphic art. He believed that through drawings, subjects
objectified unconscious difficulties by sketching the inner image of
primary process. Since it was assumed that the content and quality of
the H-T-P was not attributable to the stimulus itself, he believed it
had to be rooted in the individual’s basic personality. Since the
H-T-P was an outcropping of an intelligence test, Buck developed a
quantitative scoring system to appraise gross classification levels of
intelligence along with at qualitative interpretive analysis to
appraise global personality characteristics.

Scoring: The Post-Drawing Interrogation form (PDI) consists of 60
questions varying from direct and concrete to indirect and abstract.
Once the PDI has been administered and the interview has been
completed, the examiner records items of detail, proportion, and
perspective in the Scoring Folder. After completing the scoring
tables, the examiner derives an IQ figure for the percentage of raw G,
a net weighted score, a weighted "good" score, and a weighted "flaw"
sore, which then comprise the items for the profile configuration.

Robert Hyatt

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Apr 15, 2004, 2:53:35 PM4/15/04
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In rec.games.chess.computer Sam Sloan <sl...@ishipress.com> wrote:
> John N. Buck was chess master who was a psychologist. He won the
> Southern Open Chess Championship in the 1930s. I believe that he was
> also Virginia State Champion. My mother knew him well because he lived
> near us and my mother was a psychiatrist. I spoke to him on the
> telephone in the 1950s but he refused to meet me because he said that
> he did not want to play chess any more.

Your mother was a psychiatrist?

What a recommendation that is.

She'd better keep that diploma under lock and key, someone will be trying
to repo it.


:)

--
Robert M. Hyatt, Ph.D. Computer and Information Sciences
hy...@uab.edu University of Alabama at Birmingham
(205) 934-2213 136A Campbell Hall
(205) 934-5473 FAX Birmingham, AL 35294-1170

Sam Sloan

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Apr 15, 2004, 3:37:24 PM4/15/04
to
John N. Buck was chess master who was a psychologist. He won the
Southern Open Chess Championship in the 1930s. I believe that he was
also Virginia State Champion. My mother knew him well because he lived
near us and my mother was a psychiatrist. I spoke to him on the
telephone in the 1950s but he refused to meet me because he said that
he did not want to play chess any more.

I looked up the house-tree-person test on the Internet and found the
following reference:

http://cps.nova.edu/~cpphelp/HTP.html

Author: John N. Buck.

Publisher: Western Psychological Services.

'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`''`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`'`
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