Could dark matter be (just) matter of parallel universes?

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ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 26, 2015, 9:40:59 PM1/26/15
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Is it possible that dark matter is the result of gravitons moving freely across universes so that the gravitational effects are those of the universes interacting with each other?

IOW, could dark matter be the result of matter from other universes, its sole effect on our universe being gravitational?

(Just interested in whether this is a plausible hypothesis: also any references welcome.)

Thanks,

Julio

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 26, 2015, 10:10:23 PM1/26/15
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On Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 2:40:59 AM UTC, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:

> IOW, could dark matter be the result of matter from other universes, its sole effect on our universe being gravitational?

I have read one objection which goes like, why should gravitons pop into our universe right there where they are needed and not randomly around. Yet, it seems easy to conceive that, if such inter-universal gravitational effects do exist, then universes just have not been evolving independently.

Julio

reber g=emc62

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Jan 27, 2015, 8:11:09 PM1/27/15
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Our twin universe is not dark matter,but anti-matter. TreBert

Yousuf Khan

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Jan 27, 2015, 9:58:01 PM1/27/15
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On 26/01/2015 9:40 PM, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
> Is it possible that dark matter is the result of gravitons moving
> freely across universes so that the gravitational effects are those
> of the universes interacting with each other?

It's not entirely clear that's how multiverses work. Some theories
suggest all universes are parallel, meaning they are all very similar to
our own universe, with galaxies and stars pretty much lining up
synchronized by grid pattern.

Other theories suggest that multiple universes are all just independent
regions of spacetime, with no alignment between them.

Also gravitons are far from proven to exist.

> IOW, could dark matter be the result of matter from other universes,
> its sole effect on our universe being gravitational?
>
> (Just interested in whether this is a plausible hypothesis: also any
> references welcome.)


Yes, it's possible, given all of the assumptions made above. But the
assumptions are big assumptions.

Yousuf Khan

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 28, 2015, 7:36:21 AM1/28/15
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 2:58:01 AM UTC, Yousuf Khan wrote:
OK, thank you!

Julio

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 29, 2015, 7:53:10 AM1/29/15
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 1:11:09 AM UTC, reber g=emc62 wrote:
> On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 6:40:59 PM UTC-8, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
> >
> > Is it possible that dark matter is the result of gravitons moving freely across universes so that the gravitational effects are those of the universes interacting with each other?
> >
> > IOW, could dark matter be the result of matter from other universes, its sole effect on our universe being gravitational?
> >
> > (Just interested in whether this is a plausible hypothesis: also any references welcome.)
>
> Our twin universe is not dark matter,but anti-matter. TreBert

The idea being that gravitational effects are inter-universal. Some universes may have more anti-matter than matter.

Matter, gravity (graviton), dark matter. Anti-matter, anti-gravity (anti-graviton), dark energy.

Looks good to me...

Julio

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 29, 2015, 8:16:14 AM1/29/15
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Does string theory (m-theory) say anything about how many universes there are?

Julio

reber g=emc^2

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Jan 29, 2015, 4:41:16 PM1/29/15
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On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 6:40:59 PM UTC-8, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
Julio There are more universes in the cosmos than flakes of snow in an endless storm. Only their spacetime is different. Half are positive. Our universe is negative.All universes are tied with a gravity grid. Its call coupling. Treb is made of positrons. TreBert

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 29, 2015, 5:53:29 PM1/29/15
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If gravitational effects (and only gravitational effects) are inter-universal, universes have not evolved independently relative to gravity, or, indeed, spacetime.

Along that line, and to all physical effects, universes must be "co-located" relative to any "out-of-spacetime": i.e. given that "out-of-spacetime transformations" do not affect gravity, nor the physics in general! But the point really would be that we, so to speak, get rid of the constants, within a single *shared* spacetime.

On Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 9:41:16 PM UTC, reber g=emc^2 wrote:

> There are more universes in the cosmos than flakes of snow in an endless storm.

Should I take it that there are as many universes (in string theory) as there are quantum bifurcations?

> Only their spacetime is different.
> Half are positive.
> Our universe is negative.
> All universes are tied with a gravity grid. Its call coupling.
> Treb is made of positrons.

I may be made of negatrons.

Julio

Double-A

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Jan 29, 2015, 6:53:23 PM1/29/15
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Hmmm! A string of universes! That sounds like a good theory!

Double-A

reber g=emc^2

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Jan 29, 2015, 8:06:44 PM1/29/15
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On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 6:40:59 PM UTC-8, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
Julio You are made of electrons. AA I knew you would tie in that string theory. I;m going with a grid theory that could be useful in QM. We make good use of grids Back in the days of Roman army it marched like a grid. Reality is if not for air-ducts being grids M&M would not be. TreBert

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 31, 2015, 1:21:30 PM1/31/15
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More speculation:

The proto-universe is of pure logic (I do have a rationale for this), its fundamental particle and interaction is the negatron. The negatron is its own anti-particle (there is no anti-negatron), and the origin of all particles. When a negatron decohers, gravitons and spacetime begin, a macro-universe, and the ripple of further decoherence, further particles, and universal bifurcation...

Path integral?

Julio

ju...@diegidio.name

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Jan 31, 2015, 1:48:35 PM1/31/15
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On Saturday, January 31, 2015 at 6:21:30 PM UTC, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
> On Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 10:53:29 PM UTC, ju...@diegidio.name wrote:
> >
> > If gravitational effects (and only gravitational effects) are inter-universal, universes have not evolved independently relative to gravity, or, indeed, spacetime.
> >
> > Along that line, and to all physical effects, universes must be "co-located" relative to any "out-of-spacetime": i.e. given that "out-of-spacetime transformations" do not affect gravity, nor the physics in general! But the point really would be that we, so to speak, get rid of the constants, within a single *shared* spacetime.
> >
> > On Thursday, January 29, 2015 at 9:41:16 PM UTC, reber g=emc^2 wrote:
> >
> > > There are more universes in the cosmos than flakes of snow in an endless storm.
> >
> > Should I take it that there are as many universes (in string theory) as there are quantum bifurcations?
> >
> > > Only their spacetime is different.
> > > Half are positive.
> > > Our universe is negative.
> > > All universes are tied with a gravity grid. Its call coupling.
> > > Treb is made of positrons.
> >
> > I may be made of negatrons.
>
> More speculation:
>
> The proto-universe is of pure logic (I do have a rationale for this), its fundamental particle and interaction is the negatron. The negatron is its own anti-particle (there is no anti-negatron), and the origin of all particles. When a negatron decohers

Coherence/decoherence as effects in the oscillation of a negatron...?

Double-A

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Jan 31, 2015, 5:10:44 PM1/31/15
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And if it weren't for gridirons, there would be no Super Bowl!

Double-A

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