Moroney: "H2O state table > and Dalton's Law . . .

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James McGinn

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Jan 16, 2022, 11:33:20 PMJan 16
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:28:42 PM UTC-8, Michael Moroney wrote:
> On 1/16/2022 8:59 PM, James McGinn wrote:
>
> > ARE YOU ALL REALLY THIS FUCKING STUPID?
> No, James, just you. Just you. Too stupid to put the H2O state table
> and Dalton's Law together.

Like you have a fucking clue.

Paul Alsing

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Jan 16, 2022, 11:39:29 PMJan 16
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"No one who shares a delusion ever recognizes it as such. "
Sigmund Freud

Jim Pennino

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Jan 17, 2022, 12:16:11 AMJan 17
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Backed into a corner by facts again I see and lashing out in anger and
attempts to insult as you haven't the slightest clue what the H2O state
table actually means or what Dalton's law says.


Solving Tornadoes

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Jan 19, 2022, 10:33:59 PMJan 19
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

James McGinn

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Jan 28, 2022, 1:51:37 AMJan 28
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

James McGinn

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Jan 30, 2022, 9:45:29 PMJan 30
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

James McGinn

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Feb 5, 2022, 6:44:36 PMFeb 5
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

James McGinn

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Feb 17, 2022, 7:59:58 PMFeb 17
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

Jim Pennino

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Feb 17, 2022, 9:01:17 PMFeb 17
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If you had a fucking clue, you would realize the concept of dew point
requires gaseous H2O.

That the concept of dew point works can be demonstrated with a glass of
ice water and optionally a hygrometer.


Michael Moroney

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Feb 18, 2022, 12:09:05 AMFeb 18
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Which can manifest as a "frost point" when cold enough. I recently had a
pretty example of that, pretty ice needles on a 5 gallon bucket's lid
that was outside in the cold, being used for vegetable scraps. Almost
certainly the gaseous H2O vapors from warm moist vegetable scraps
deposited as ice at the lid as it was very cold then. Of course there
are also the pretty frost patterns on (uninsulated) glass windows when
it's cold.

James McGinn

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Mar 15, 2022, 1:36:21 AMMar 15
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On Sunday, January 16, 2022 at 8:33:20 PM UTC-8, James McGinn wrote:

Jim Pennino

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Mar 15, 2022, 1:01:13 PMMar 15
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How to show room temperature gaseous H2O.

Obtain the following items:

A common quart canning jar with lid.
A small hygrometer.
A pressure gauge capable of reading pressure and vacuum down to 1 psi.
A half dozen or so of small silica gel desiccant packs.

Attach the pressure gauge to the lid of the canning jar.

Put the hygrometer in the jar along with about 1/8 teaspoon of water
and close the lid.

Note that the pressure reads zero, note the hygrometer reading and set
the jar somewhere undisturbed for a day.

Note that the water has gone away, the hygrometer reading has gone up,
and the pressure has gone up.

Carefully open the lid and slip in the silica gel desiccant packs and
close the lid.

Note that the pressure reads zero, note the hygrometer reading and set
the jar somewhere undisturbed for a day.

Note that the hygrometer reading has gone down close to zero and the
pressure has gone down.

Analysis:

According to conventional theory, the water in the jar evaporated
into gaseous H2O, raising the humidity and the total pressure in the
jar due to the partial pressure of the added gaseous H2O.

According to McGinn theory, hygrometers don't exist yet there it is
and it showed increased humidity after the water evaporated.

According to McGinn theory the water did not become gaseous, but
became nanodroplets of liquid water.

As everyone knows: PV=nRT and that only applies to gases.

Assuming you held the temperature constant in this experiment, the
only value in the equation that could change is n, i.e. the amount
of gas.

Dividing the water into smaller "pieces" of water does not change
their total volume.

According to conventional theory, when the desiccant was added, all
the gaseous H2O condensed into liquid water and gets trapped in the
structure of the silica gel. Since there is now no gaseous H2O, the
hygrometer accordingly reads close to zero, and there is no partial
pressure from the removed gaseous H2O so the pressure has gone down.

If one were to accurately measure the volume of the jar, the
amount of water in the jar and the temperature and then apply the
various gas laws, one would find that the experiment agrees with
the mathematical theories of partial pressure, gas laws, dew point
and humidity.

According to McGinn theory none of this happens though anyone can
show that it does.


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