Age of the Universe

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The Starmaker

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Sep 22, 2021, 6:23:33 PMSep 22
to
UNKNOWN.


--
The Starmaker -- To question the unquestionable, ask the unaskable,
to think the unthinkable, mention the unmentionable, and challenge
the unchallengeable.

The Starmaker

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Sep 22, 2021, 7:19:43 PMSep 22
to
The Starmaker wrote:
>
> UNKNOWN.


First, lets look at the Timeline...

you got Hubble himself
comes up with a
'off the cuff' number..500.

H=500

Which gives the age of the universe...
2 billion years.


if the
facts don't fit
the theory...
change the facts?

dats science for you.

Makes Earth order than the universe.


So, What is the age of the universe?

(just change the numbers until you get pass earth's age)


dats science for you.


Age of the Universe? UNKNOWN



Looks like to me like another Drake's Equation fraud...

Richard Hertz

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Sep 23, 2021, 1:46:10 AMSep 23
to
THE HUBBLE CONSTANT
https://lweb.cfa.harvard.edu/~dfabricant/huchra/hubble/


Ho: 500 -----------------> Age (million of years): 1,852 (Hubble, by 1929)
Age of Earth (million of years): 3,000 (mid '30s, by radioactive dating of rocks)

Ho: 180 -----------------> Age (million of years): 5,143 (Humason, Mayall and Sandage,1956)
Ho: 75 -----------------> Age (million of years): 12,344 (Sandage,1958)
Age of Earth (million of years): 3,000 (mid '30s, by radioactive dating of rocks)

Ho: 55 -----------------> Age (million of years): 16,833 (Sandage, Tammann , early '70s)


Ho: 67.66 -------------> Age (million of years): 13,683 (Planck mission published in 2018)
Ho: 74.03 --------------> Age (million of years): 12,506 (Hubble Space Telescope, 2019)


https://www.livescience.com/32321-how-is-earths-age-calculated.html

"It was not until the 1950s that the age of the universe was finally revised and put safely beyond the age of
the Earth, which had at last reached its true age of 4.56 billion years," Lewis said. "Physicists suddenly gained
a new respect for geologists."

The Starmaker

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Sep 23, 2021, 1:11:20 PMSep 23
to
Well it looks like they are playing ping-pong with the numbers...


https://www.space.com/universe-age-14-billion-years-old

What would be the Ho for 14 billion? 65??




How about a game of chess?

The Starmaker

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Sep 24, 2021, 1:06:26 AMSep 24
to
The Starmaker wrote:
> Well it looks like they are playing ping-pong with the numbers...
>
> https://www.space.com/universe-age-14-billion-years-old
>
> What would be the Ho for 14 billion? 65??



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48 +4

Thomas Heger

unread,
Sep 24, 2021, 4:10:57 AMSep 24
to
Am 23.09.2021 um 00:24 schrieb The Starmaker:
> UNKNOWN.
>
>

I personally think, that time in the universe does not flow along a
single line like in a calender.

I would say, that time is a local phenomenon. This local time creates a
certain local timeline, which stems from the status quo at the point
'here and now'.

This time has a past and a future, which looks like a single linear
motion of time.

But this is ONLY the local impression of something more complicated.

Since 'local' can be everywhere in the universe in space and time, the
infinite number of local timelines could have angles towards others,
intertsect or even flow into opposite directions.

This makes 'age of the universe' undefined, because 'age' is a local
measure. But the local measure 'time' cannot be extrapolated from the
local case to the universe.

Maybe the universe has no age at all (in our sense of the word) or is
eternal. Possibly we need a different concept for time to define 'age of
the universe'.


TH

Richard Hertz

unread,
Sep 24, 2021, 11:24:24 AMSep 24
to
On Friday, September 24, 2021 at 5:10:57 AM UTC-3, Thomas Heger wrote:

<snip>
<snip>

You know what's funny?

About a month ago, I replied to someone who was against my perception that a human physicists
proposal about that physical laws at the Solar System had the same validity in the entire Universe.

I wrote that our Solar System (in volume) was about 1 part in a spherical OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE
that contains more than 10^60 Solar Systems (just by calculating the volume of an sphere of 13.5 bly radius).

The funny part is that we, microbes in such space, pretend to assert the validity of physical laws
WITHOUT THINKING that, if we move 7 bly in any direction, the OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE would probably
still there. verifying a "Hubble radius" of 13.5 bly. But now, the "Hubble Sphere" would have moved its
center by HALF THE HUBBLE RADIUS.

By thinking so, the FINITE Universe concept and the Big Bang Theory goes to the garbage can.

The Universe is INFINITE. with or without a BIG BANG.

And this thought makes me laugh at the arrogance of certain scientists, as well as relativists, which are not the same.

The Starmaker

unread,
Sep 24, 2021, 3:18:08 PMSep 24
to
14 billion???? Does that means exactly 14 billion, or more than 14
billion? Are we talking about close to 15 billion??


Age of the Universe...UNKNOWN

The Starmaker

unread,
Sep 24, 2021, 3:45:59 PMSep 24
to
Okay, now let's go back to the Timeline at the very beginning...

H=500 gives the age of the universe...2 billion years old.


If that number is correct, then that means the age of the earth is incorrect.

Using "The Code" 'In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.' ...means

that the "heavens *and the* earth" were created at the same time.


That would make the universe 2 billion years old.

And the earth...2 billion years old.



Yous people changed the wrong numbers!


It's stupid to base the age of the universe on the earth's incorrect age.


But, dats wat you guys call....The Sciences.


give me a break.


How did yous get into college...through the row boat team side door????


Look at a old picture of your physics teacher...he is on the row boat team.

Thomas Heger

unread,
Sep 25, 2021, 2:34:01 AMSep 25
to
I'm against big-bang theory, too.

I have a different explanation for the phenomenon called 'black hole'.

The main idea is to take spacetime as real and existent and as prior to
our observed world.

So, we see a certain part of spacetime from a certain perspective and
call the images we see 'universe'.

But that image is not universal, but an image, which WE see, because we
are where we are.

Now this 'background' called 'spacetime' could support different
timelines, which can have an angle to ours.

This would allow a vision on a region of space, where the axis of time
of that region points away from us.

Then we would see 'time from the back side'. and that local time takes
everthing with it (as time usually does).

But we could also imagine the opposite, what is called a 'white hole'.

That would be an impression, were we see the arrow of time of that
region pointing towards us.

Because that arrow points towards us, it lies actually in our own past.

Now that past is what generates an image, which we call 'universe'. But
that is not universal, because it is actually our own past light cone.

Because that image we call 'universe' actually stems from a white hole,
we call that white hole 'big bang', from where our 'universe' emerged.

But a white hole is just the other side of a black hole,

TH



Python

unread,
Sep 25, 2021, 9:42:58 AMSep 25
to
Richard Hertz wrote:
...
> The funny part is that we, microbes in such space, pretend to assert the validity of physical laws
> WITHOUT THINKING that, if we move 7 bly in any direction, the OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE would probably
> still there. verifying a "Hubble radius" of 13.5 bly. But now, the "Hubble Sphere" would have moved its
> center by HALF THE HUBBLE RADIUS.

Richard, the Big Bang model is NOT about an explosion in an empty 3D
space. You are, again, making a fool of yourself.


Richard Hertz

unread,
Sep 25, 2021, 11:32:17 AMSep 25
to
You have to read and digest the post more carefully, instead of jumping to the throat without thinking.
Think of an sphere with radius Ro = c/Ho, centered on Earth. Beyond that radius, matter recedes at speed higher than c.
This is the original, non relativistic Hubble radius of 13.5 bly.

Now, in an exercise of imagination, move the center of the sphere 7 bly at any arbitrary direction. Hubble radius
still is 13.5 bly, because we are not the center of the Universe.

This means, in this gedanke exp., that you have another 7 bly to account for, plus the previous 13.5 bly, and the estimation
of the age of the universe, with 1bly = 1by traveling at c, now gives 20.5 bly. Keep doing that, at the age of the Universe
result being infinite.

If you reject this gedanke exp., then you are validating that we are the center of the universe. Isnt't it?

Do you understand, Python, what I wrote in the previous post?



mitchr...@gmail.com

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Sep 25, 2021, 1:47:34 PMSep 25
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How would we know the age of the universe if it is an island?
How would we know it is an island?

Mitchell Raemsch

The Starmaker

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Sep 25, 2021, 2:48:15 PMSep 25
to
In other words, the age of the universe is the exact age of the earth.

The stars you see like the big dipper are the exact age of the universe.

And since the big dipper can see you...

Python

unread,
Sep 25, 2021, 9:03:08 PMSep 25
to
*every* point in space, with this meaning in the context of BB model, is
the center of the Universe

> Do you understand, Python, what I wrote in the previous post?

I do. You didn't.

Richard Hertz

unread,
Sep 26, 2021, 3:11:43 AMSep 26
to
On Saturday, September 25, 2021 at 10:03:08 PM UTC-3, Python wrote:

<snip>

> > If you reject this gedanke exp., then you are validating that we are the center of the universe. Isnt't it?
> *every* point in space, with this meaning in the context of BB model, is the center of the Universe
> > Do you understand, Python, what I wrote in the previous post?
> I do. You didn't.

Python, this is being like a child's contest. I repost some part, and beg you to have in mind the original concept
of the Hubble's Law on the expansion of the universe (not related with the BBT by Le Maitre):

> >>> The funny part is that we, microbes in such space, pretend to assert the validity of physical laws
> >>> WITHOUT THINKING that, if we move 7 bly in any direction, the OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE would probably
> >>> still there. verifying a "Hubble radius" of 13.5 bly. But now, the "Hubble Sphere" would have moved its
> >>> center by HALF THE HUBBLE RADIUS.

> > This means, in this gedanke exp., that you have another 7 bly to account for, plus the previous 13.5 bly, and the estimation
> > of the age of the universe, **********with 1bly = 1by********* traveling at c, now gives 20.5 bly. Keep doing that, at the age
>> of the Universe result being infinite.

> >> Richard, the Big Bang model is NOT about an explosion in an empty 3D space. You are, again, making a fool of yourself.

NOTE: I never mentioned an explosion in an empty space, not even the BBT. Just Hubble and his assertion about galaxies
receding from our position.


mitchr...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 26, 2021, 2:08:16 PMSep 26
to
Everywhere appears to be its own center.
This suggests there is no universal center...

Mitchell Raemsch

Thomas Heger

unread,
Sep 29, 2021, 12:48:53 AMSep 29
to
This concept is a little unusual, but could be supported by an observation:

the so called 'Pioneer anomaly'.

The Pioneer anomaly could be explained as result of acceleration by
initial start and several fly-byes.

In the spacetime view acceleration is a curve of the worldline.

Now we need recenter the frame of reference and the local time to the
probe again (after acceleration).

Then the probe 'lives' in a different 'time-domain', where the axis of
time has an angle towards our world and our local time.

This would look, as if the probe is accelerated towards the sun by an
undetectable force.


TH

Ho Im

unread,
Sep 29, 2021, 2:27:39 PMSep 29
to
Thomas Heger wrote:

> This concept is a little unusual, but could be supported by an
> observation: the so called 'Pioneer anomaly'.
> The Pioneer anomaly could be explained as result of acceleration by
> initial start and several fly-byes.

I think I got it. They want you imprisoned, the unvaccinated, in order to
maintain the social order, poor-rich, after the impeding pole-shift.

There will be a few millions, not more. It makes sense why they want
people dead now.

FEMA’S BILLING CODE FOR DEATH BY GUILLOTINE IS ICD 9 E 97 IT IS THE CODE
FOR 'LEGAL EXECUTION' https://www.bitchute.com/video/xKqZhKAay3UM/

Thomas Heger

unread,
Oct 1, 2021, 6:00:43 AMOct 1
to
Am 29.09.2021 um 20:27 schrieb Ho Im:
> Thomas Heger wrote:
>
>> This concept is a little unusual, but could be supported by an
>> observation: the so called 'Pioneer anomaly'.
>> The Pioneer anomaly could be explained as result of acceleration by
>> initial start and several fly-byes.
>
> I think I got it. They want you imprisoned, the unvaccinated, in order to
> maintain the social order, poor-rich, after the impeding pole-shift.
>
> There will be a few millions, not more. It makes sense why they want
> people dead now.

Your reply does not quite fit to the Pioneer anomaly.

But let me try to explain the idea once more:


I had an idea, how to connect GR to QM. The concept is actually simple.
You need to take spacetime of GR as prior to our observation of the
world, which is actually a structure of/in spacetime.

https://docs.google.com/present/view?id=dd8jz2tx_3gfzvqgd6

Then the particles (and so on) are internal structure of spacetime.

These 'structures' are relative and observer dependent.

The filter is the local axis of time. This time defines, which part we
can see. This part, which belongs to our own time is called our own
'time-domaine'.

If now a space-craft gets accelerated by initial starts and fly-byes,
the world line of the craft is bent away from ours.

The local time of the craft and our own axcis of time then would have an
angle, which looks, as if the probe is decelerated by an unknown force.


TH

Huy Dew

unread,
Oct 1, 2021, 3:29:16 PMOct 1
to
Thomas Heger wrote:

>> I think I got it. They want you imprisoned, the unvaccinated, in order
>> to maintain the social order, poor-rich, after the impeding pole-shift.
>> There will be a few millions, not more. It makes sense why they want
>> people dead now.
>
> Your reply does not quite fit to the Pioneer anomaly.
> But let me try to explain the idea once more:
> I had an idea, how to connect GR to QM. The concept is actually simple.
> You need to take spacetime of GR as prior to our observation of the
> world, which is actually a structure of/in spacetime.

just stop doing it. It reveals people dont undrestand yet, for long now,
those are different domains of applicability. The macro scale
understanding in quantum is close to zero. However

Australian Witch Just Resigned
https://153news.net/watch_video.php?v=385AG3UWDYY1
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