OT: Pork and sauerkraut

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MizGriz

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so
I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)

--
Bambi L. Geist, MLS
VerbatiWord

Transcribing the world a word at a time.

Julianne Weight

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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On Sat, 01 Jan 2000 18:33:11 GMT, "MizGriz" <Miz...@bgeist.com>
wrote:

>OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
>of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
>know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so
>I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
>hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)


Oh, THAT's why everybody was buying tons of sauerkraut yesterday! I
thought maybe it was on sale. The grocery store was, of course,
packed. I, of course, was out of some essentials and HAD to go. So I
stood in line with all these people buying nothing but jars of
sauerkraut.

Never heard of this. What am I missing?


Julianne Weight
www.alphabest.com
www.mt-cooperative.org

PFPERSONS

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Bam,

Nope, it's black-eyed peas in the south. I'd prefer the pork and kraut,
though.

My mom also believes if you do laundry on New Years, you'll "wash away" someone
in the family in the coming year. <G> I'm sure if I confessed to the NYD
laundry I've done over the years, she'd hold me personsally responsible for the
demise of quite a few of our relatives....shhhh....

Pam

bg

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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It is an old, old country tradition. If you don't eat this particular
food on New Year's, you don't have any good luck.

I ate it every year, year afer year, for New Year's.
Had the best luck in my life when I grew up and decided I hated pork and
sauerkraut and wasn't going to eat it anymore.

Have hot dogs today.

:)

RaeMorrill

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Have hot dogs today.
>>

Oscar Meyer? <ROFL>
Rae Morrill in Maine
"Ya can't get theyuh from heeah"
_______________________________
Spam mailers WILL be reported to their respective postmasters and AOL TOSSPAM!

Julianne Weight

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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On 01 Jan 2000 19:50:56 GMT, pfpe...@aol.comeatspam (PFPERSONS)
wrote:

>My mom also believes if you do laundry on New Years, you'll "wash away" someone
>in the family in the coming year. <G> I'm sure if I confessed to the NYD
>laundry I've done over the years, she'd hold me personsally responsible for the
>demise of quite a few of our relatives....shhhh....

Well, now I have an excuse for not doing laundry NYD. Wonder if I can
come up with one for the remaining 364 days?


Julianne Weight
www.alphabest.com
www.mt-cooperative.org

Julianne Weight

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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On Sat, 01 Jan 2000 15:14:33 -0800, bg <b...@millenicom.com> wrote:

>It is an old, old country tradition. If you don't eat this particular
>food on New Year's, you don't have any good luck.


Then I guess that explains my life so far! <G>

Running out now to find some port and sauerkraut. Surely the Sausage
Shack is open today.


Julianne Weight
www.alphabest.com
www.mt-cooperative.org

JJo3408074

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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>traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
>of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
>know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so
>I've thus done it all of my adult life.

In my family it was black-eyed peas and I'm having some today....scared not to,
though have not a clue what the reason for the tradition is. I guess, for one
thing, we can be thankful that we have food to eat this new year's day. Hope
you enjoy your port and sauerkraut!
JoyJ

Melinda Meahan

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Must be something German.

Melinda, who eats Hoppin' John on NY Day in deference to her Reb mama

MizGriz <Miz...@bgeist.com> wrote:

> OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being


> of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
> know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so

> I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
> hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)

> --


> Bambi L. Geist, MLS
> VerbatiWord

> Transcribing the world a word at a time.

--
Melinda Meahan at mme...@value.net
SMT FAQ: http://www2.cybercities.com/~mombearto4/smtfaq.html
Working Parents Who Home School Discussion Group:
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Melinda Meahan

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Julianne Weight <jul...@alphabest.communicatewithme> wrote:

> Oh, THAT's why everybody was buying tons of sauerkraut yesterday! I
> thought maybe it was on sale. The grocery store was, of course,
> packed. I, of course, was out of some essentials and HAD to go. So I
> stood in line with all these people buying nothing but jars of
> sauerkraut.

I dunno. We went this morning and they were out of bottled water, out of
ramen, and out of those Catholic prayer candles -- all of which I can
probably understand -- but I can't figure out why they were out of BEETS.

Jude

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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I have never heard of the pork and sauerkraut thing, but it sounds yummy!

Years ago, a southern friend started me on the black-eyed peas thing. She
assured me that it was necessary for assuring a good year. It seems to me,
though, that she said to cook the peas with a penny. Is this my strange
memory, or is there a basis for this tradition in the south?

Judie

--
To reply, remove the "less" from the address above
JJo3408074 <jjo34...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20000101161319...@ng-cu1.aol.com...


> >traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
> >of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I
just
> >know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and
so
> >I've thus done it all of my adult life.
>

RaeMorrill

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Melinda,

Maybe because beets are frequently eaten cold or pickled?

MizGriz

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Thanks for another reason NOT to do laundry Pam!!


--
Bambi L. Geist, MLS
VerbatiWord

Transcribing the world a word at a time.


PFPERSONS <pfpe...@aol.comeatspam> wrote in message
news:20000101145056...@ng-ca1.aol.com...


> Bam,
>
> Nope, it's black-eyed peas in the south. I'd prefer the pork and kraut,
> though.
>

> My mom also believes if you do laundry on New Years, you'll "wash away"
someone
> in the family in the coming year. <G> I'm sure if I confessed to the NYD
> laundry I've done over the years, she'd hold me personsally responsible
for the
> demise of quite a few of our relatives....shhhh....
>

> Pam
>
> >OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day?
>
>

MizGriz

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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ROTFL!! Too late.....already ate it. So that's how I've been dooming
myself?? Nah, I've been a relatively lucky person all of my life. Don't
know that I can thank pork and sauerkraut for it, but I can't complain.

--
Bambi L. Geist, MLS
VerbatiWord

Transcribing the world a word at a time.


bg <b...@millenicom.com> wrote in message
news:386E8A59...@millenicom.com...


> It is an old, old country tradition. If you don't eat this particular
> food on New Year's, you don't have any good luck.
>

> I ate it every year, year afer year, for New Year's.
> Had the best luck in my life when I grew up and decided I hated pork and
> sauerkraut and wasn't going to eat it anymore.
>
> Have hot dogs today.
>
> :)
>
> Julianne Weight wrote:
> >
> > On Sat, 01 Jan 2000 18:33:11 GMT, "MizGriz" <Miz...@bgeist.com>
> > wrote:
> >

> > >OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day?

Being
> > >of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I
just
> > >know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day
and so

> > >I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I
had
> > >hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)
> >

> > Oh, THAT's why everybody was buying tons of sauerkraut yesterday! I
> > thought maybe it was on sale. The grocery store was, of course,
> > packed. I, of course, was out of some essentials and HAD to go. So I
> > stood in line with all these people buying nothing but jars of
> > sauerkraut.
> >

JBuxton569

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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<<Melinda, who eats Hoppin' John on NY Day in deference to her Reb mama>>

Okay, Melinda, WHAT is a Hoppin' John?

Judity

JBuxton569

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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<<Maybe because beets are frequently eaten cold or pickled>>

I love pickled beets, and your post reminded me that I bought a jar of it a
couple of years ago. It's been in the refrigerator since then. Do you still
think it edible? Maybe I'll try some tonight and see.

Judity

Barbara Carlson

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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I have no idea where the tradition comes from. Both my grandmothers, who
were English, said you were supposed to have Pork on New Year's Day. I
never heard of the saurkraut, and ham has always been our "pork" for New
Years. Don't know why, but we like ham, and I usually splurge once a year
and get one of those great "Honey Bakes Hams". Just finished dinner, and
it was great.

Barb C.

Robin Merica

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Jan 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/1/00
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Having just come from a friend's house where we did indeed have pork, sauerkraut
and black-eyed peas for New Year's dinner, I will gladly share what I have heard
about this "tradition".

Sauerkraut (made from cabbage): cabbage leaves represent money and prosperity
in the new year.

Black-eyed peas: good luck. Don't know how they symbolize this, however.

Pork (coming from a pig): the pig roots forward and in a new year such "forward
progress" is preferable to eating fowl on New Year's Day, as a turkey or chicken
scratches backward.

Don't believe any of this myself, but the pork loin, black-eyed peas and
sauerkraut were tasty -- my friend Angie (Louisiana born and bred) is a great
cook!

Happy New Year to all,

Robin

MizGriz wrote:

> OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being of
> no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just know
> my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so I've
> thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
> hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)
>

Melinda Meahan

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
to
JBuxton569 <jbuxt...@aol.com> wrote:
> <<Melinda, who eats Hoppin' John on NY Day in deference to her Reb mama>>

> Okay, Melinda, WHAT is a Hoppin' John?

Black-eyed peas and rice in the same venue as Red Beans and Rice

JMorngstar

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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> Maybe I'll try some tonight and see.

Make sure the cats can dial 911.

Janice

MeMe901234

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>Nope, it's black-eyed peas in the south. I'd prefer the pork and kraut,
>though.

Now I feel better. I have been reading through all of these posts and
patiently waiting for someone to mention black-eyed peas. You guys had me
worried there for awhile. For as long as I can remember, we have always had
pork and sauerkraut along with black-eyed peas on New Year's Day. I never
considered black-eyed peas a "south" thing, but I don't consider Indiana as
being in the south either.

Charlene

MeMe901234

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>Okay, Melinda, WHAT is a Hoppin' John?

I just knew that this was going to have something to do with a toliet.

Charlene

RaeMorrill

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>Okay, Melinda, WHAT is a Hoppin' John?

I just knew that this was going to have something to do with a toliet.

>.

ROFPMPL! If that didn't get you in there, nothing would.

RaeMorrill

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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I love pickled beets, and your post reminded me that I bought a jar of it a
couple of years ago. It's been in the refrigerator since then. Do you still
think it edible? Maybe I'll try some tonight and see. >.
Just make sure there are no green/blue/black spots on them first.

Sharon6650

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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I cook pork and sauerkraut because of the traditions associated with luck and
prosperity in the new year, but I also just love sauerkraut. My family hates
it, so it is one time of year when I can get away with making it. I love
smelling the kraut cooking all day, and I do get lots of complaints from my
kids about how awful it smells. And there is nothing better than leftover
kraut on hot dogs with cheddar!

Sherry

Fairjan

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>Subject: Re: OT: Pork and sauerkraut
>From: meme9...@aol.com (MeMe901234)

You have to have blackeyed peas in the south. Had mine at 12:05 a.m., right
after the 1/2 ounce of champagne I managed to get down without gagging, along
with mexican cornbread and then went to bed. No wonder I had a bellyache when
I got up yesterday morning. Of course, I love blackeyed peas anytime - all
year round. Ain't nothin' better. You just have to know how to cook them
right. I've often wondered if I didn't eat them on New Years if my luck would
be any worse than it usually is. Afraid to find out.

BTW, the only way I can stand kraut is with pork spare ribs - and then very
little. My sister eats kraut out of a can - just as a snack. Yuk!

Liz

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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MizGriz wrote:
>
> OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
> of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
> know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so
> I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
> hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)

Bambi, we always had pork and sauerkraut on NYD, but I think any part of
the pig will suffice. Therefore, since NYD this year fell on a
Saturday, and since I don't do dinner on Saturdays, I ate bacon for
breakfast just so I'd have a part of the pig. Hope this counts! Today,
Sunday 1/2, I'm having pork and sauerkraut and the kids are coming over
for dinner.

Liz

Liz

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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Melinda, me mother was from County Mayo, God bless it, yet we ALWAYS had
pork and sauerkraut. The sauerkraut may have come from my German
father's side of the family, but all of my mother's side ate pork on NYD
for good luck.

Liz

Melinda Meahan wrote:
>
> Must be something German.


>
> Melinda, who eats Hoppin' John on NY Day in deference to her Reb mama
>

> MizGriz <Miz...@bgeist.com> wrote:
>
> > OK, how many of you have traditional pork and sauerkraut on NY Day? Being
> > of no one particular ethnic background, I don't know WHY I do this, I just
> > know my mom always said you had to have pork and sauerkraut on NY Day and so
> > I've thus done it all of my adult life. Wonder what would happen if I had
> > hotdogs instead? (Cooking a huge pork roast for myself!!)
>

> > --
> > Bambi L. Geist, MLS
> > VerbatiWord
>
> > Transcribing the world a word at a time.
>

MeMe901234

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>And there is nothing better than leftover
>kraut on hot dogs with cheddar!

Yum Yum...is lunch ready yet?

Charlene

BrdSpctrum

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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We always eat some sort of pork with beans....
This time it was bacon for breakfast and barbecued porkchops with pork and
beans for supper...

Think it comes from my English ancestors... but I don't know for certain....

Have also eaten hot dogs when I didn't feel like cooking a big meal on the
theory that they contain pork.

Don't usually consider myself supersititious but this is one I will NOT break,
no matter what else happens...

Betty S.
Broad Spectrum Transcription

Sue in GA

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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>Don't usually consider myself supersititious but this is one I will NOT
break,
>no matter what else happens...


We do black-eyed peas with hog jowl (only time of the year I even buy that)
for luck, greens for greenbacks (this year it was turnip greens cooked with
rutabaga -- for the gold, you know), and in recent years we have had pork
neck bones cooked with rice. I keep hoping the rice will bring me a new
Toyota. So far, the driveway remains conspiciously full of a 9 year old
truck and a 7 year old car. The year's young yet, though.

We were always told that it was important to cook more than would be eaten
on New Year's Day, even if someone came in unexpectedly, so that we would
have abundant food in the new year. Therefore, I'm eating leftover peas,
greens and rice today.

Other superstitions left over from the "old folks": Don't do laundry (lose
a family member) or sweep out trash (you sweep out all your luck), and
hopefully the first person in the house will be male with something brought
in from outside, to symbolize good things coming in all year. This year my
son, who was working, dropped by and brought in the newspaper before we had
gone outside, so we should have covered from all angles. I'm obviously
going to be rich, driving the new Toyota, and just so lucky I can't stand
myself. <G>

Sue

egmys

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Jan 2, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/2/00
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In article <386F7F...@yahoo.com>, Liz <liz...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> The sauerkraut may have come from my German
> father's side of the family, but all of my mother's side ate pork
> on NYD
> for good luck.
> Liz

I think the sauerkraut is a German thing. The pork is definitely for
good luck, although I suspect the origin was probably something
entirely different, as my Polish family has "sledze" which is pickled
herring at midnight (barf!) and that supposedly is for good luck,
however, I have read that the real reason it started was a way to soak
up some of the alcohol consumed on NYE and helping prevent a hangover
the next day.

Here in Pittsburgh, we also have a New Year's Pretzel which is a huge
raised sweet dough baked in the shape of a pretzel, mixed with cinnamon
and nuts (I think) and covered with a white glaze and nuts or candied
maraschino cherries. They are everywhere here the day before NYE and a
good one is a nice treat, NYE or not!

Happy New Year everyone

Ed - Who is now able to sleep better after the Y2K nonevent of the
Millennium!


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Tkristo

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Jan 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/3/00
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Bambi:

My husbnd is Czech (sp? ) and we serve it with mashed potatoes. I don't make
it very well. It tastes different every time. Would you tell me how you cook
it?

Thanks.

MizGriz

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Jan 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/3/00
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Wish there was some big secret.....I cook all my roasts the same way. I
haul out (haul being the operative word cause the thing is huge) my favorite
roasting pan. Put the roast in, salt and pepper it, add one inch of water
and cover with the roasting pan lid.
When the roast is about done, I pour off the drippings and water into a
sauce pan, add the sauerkraut to the roasting pan and put it back into the
oven at 250 while I prepare the mashed potatoes and peas (just regular peas
cuz I never knew about black-eyed peas!!). Takes very little work. Tastes
delicious, IMO.

I recently had to tell my mother my secret for cooking roast beef.....the
secret was that there is no secret. My roast beef is to die for among my
family and friends. They shoulda known.....for me, simpler is better!


--
Bambi L. Geist, MLS
VerbatiWord

Transcribing the world a word at a time.


Tkristo <tkr...@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
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Melinda Meahan

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Jan 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/3/00
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egmys <egmysN...@www.com.invalid> wrote:

> Here in Pittsburgh, we also have a New Year's Pretzel which is a huge
> raised sweet dough baked in the shape of a pretzel, mixed with cinnamon
> and nuts (I think) and covered with a white glaze and nuts or candied
> maraschino cherries. They are everywhere here the day before NYE and a
> good one is a nice treat, NYE or not!

Those are German, and I have a recipe for them.

Melinda Meahan

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Jan 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM1/3/00
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Tkristo <tkr...@aol.comnospam> wrote:

> My husbnd is Czech (sp? ) and we serve it with mashed potatoes. I don't make
> it very well. It tastes different every time. Would you tell me how you cook
> it?

I smother the pork roast with sauerkraut -- over, under, and around -- in
a covered roasting pan, put scrubbed potatoes around it, and bake,
covered, at 250 degrees for 4-6 hours (a leg of pork takes 6, a loin roast
or pork butt takes only 4 hours), and serve. You can add apples, caraway
seeds, or whatever to the kraut but you don't have to. Comes out
reminiscent of choucroute garni this way and the small fry all love it.

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