Google Groups no longer supports new Usenet posts or subscriptions. Historical content remains viewable.
Dismiss

A game like billards

2,314 views
Skip to first unread message

WM

unread,
Oct 19, 2023, 9:04:16 AM10/19/23
to
1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
2, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, ...
3, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4, ...
4, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, ...
5, 5/2, 5/3, 5/4, ...

Push the natnumbers of the first column (without queue) into the field of fractions and store the hit fraction always there where the natnumber has come from. Try to push the natnumbers such that all matrix positions are occupied by them. That is best done by creating a pattern like

1, 2, 4, ...
3, 5, 8, ...
6, 9, 13, ...
... ,

According to this simple rule it is impossible, in eternity, to remove a fraction from the matrix or to attach a natnumber to a fraction.

You have won as soon as you understand that the last sentence is true.

Congrats, WM

JVR

unread,
Oct 19, 2023, 1:05:26 PM10/19/23
to
So what's the problem? How many times do you need people to explain
the error in your reasoning?
You cannot count infinitely many objects in finitely many steps.

Spelling error: the word you are looking for is spelled 'billiards' in English.

Reading comprehension and writing skills: unsatisfactory
Mathematical skills: nonexistent

WM

unread,
Oct 19, 2023, 2:22:30 PM10/19/23
to
JVR schrieb am Donnerstag, 19. Oktober 2023 um 19:05:26 UTC+2:
> On Thursday, October 19, 2023 at 3:04:16 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:

> > According to this simple rule it is impossible, in eternity, to remove a fraction from the matrix or to attach a natnumber to a fraction.

> You cannot count infinitely many objects in finitely many steps.

First: I need not count infinitely many elements. I have proved that every issued index fails to index a fraction, may this happen finitely or infinitely often (see first paragraph).

Second: I index as many objects as Cantor does by using the same infinite sequence as he does. He claims to index all fractions.

Regards, WM

JVR

unread,
Oct 19, 2023, 2:52:18 PM10/19/23
to
Cantor's enumeration is not a step-by-step procedure, it is a function.
Logically the enumeration of Q is a function that maps N <-> Q,
just as sin(x) is a function that maps (0, pi/2) <-> (0,1). From the latter
you should be able to see that your X's and O's are not going to get
you anywhere. And if that doesn't convince you, the fact that there
are biunique mappings from (0,1) to (0,1)x(0,1) should.

You are clearly unable to understand set theory and point set topology
as they are in use today and have been in use for 100+ years.

Python

unread,
Oct 19, 2023, 6:23:31 PM10/19/23
to
Crank Professor Wolfgang Mückenheim, aka WM wrote:
> [...]
> Second: I index as many objects as Cantor does by using the same infinite sequence as he does. He claims to index all fractions.

"It's possible to fail so it is impossible to succeed", what kind
of logic is that, Crank Professor Wolfgang Mückenheim, from Hochschule
Augsburg?



Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 20, 2023, 12:42:52 AM10/20/23
to
On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 12:23:31 AM UTC+2, Python wrote:

> "It's possible to fail so it is impossible to succeed", what kind
> of logic is that, Crank Professor Wolfgang Mückenheim,
> from Hochschule Augsburg?

It's called mückenlogic. (See: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/9599-delusional-disorder)

WM

unread,
Oct 20, 2023, 4:02:45 PM10/20/23
to
JVR schrieb am Donnerstag, 19. Oktober 2023 um 20:52:18 UTC+2:

> Cantor's enumeration is not a step-by-step procedure,

Enumeration is always a step-by-step procedure: 1, 2, 3, and so on. step by step.

> Logically the enumeration of Q is a function that maps N <-> Q,
> just as sin(x) is a function that maps (0, pi/2) <-> (0,1).

No, the first one is quantized, the second one is not.

If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces exactly the function k = (m + n - 1)(m + n - 2)/2 + m, then you should be able to find a k that is not attached by my matrices to the same field (m, n) of the matrix

1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
2, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, ...
3, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4, ...
4, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, ...
5, 5/2, 5/3, 5/4, ...
...

as by Cantor's function. But you cannot. My matrices reproduce Cantor's formula precisely because they have been deigned that way.

You argument is tantamount to claiming that the set of natural numbers is not given by the step-by-step formula {1, 2, 3, ...}.

Of course you must not cut this sequence at any point. That would make it differ from ℕ. But the complete sequence is ℕ as much as the complete sequence of my matrices reproduces Cantor's indexing. My way however shows, that not all positions of the matrix get indexed by Cantor because the fractions remain without index in every case. That's the billiards-effect.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 20, 2023, 4:05:34 PM10/20/23
to
Python schrieb am Freitag, 20. Oktober 2023 um 00:23:31 UTC+2:
> Professor Wolfgang Mückenheim, aka WM wrote:

> > Second: I index as many objects as Cantor does by using the same infinite sequence as he does. He claims to index all fractions.
> "It's possible to fail so it is impossible to succeed", what kind
> of logic is that,

Cantor fails to index all positions of the matrix. I succeed in proving that because the fractions will never get an index but they all stay at positions of the matrix.

Regards, WM

Chris M. Thomasson

unread,
Oct 20, 2023, 4:26:48 PM10/20/23
to
lol. Are you familiar with Cantor pairing?

FromTheRafters

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 7:44:13 AM10/21/23
to
on 10/20/2023, WM supposed :
> JVR schrieb am Donnerstag, 19. Oktober 2023 um 20:52:18 UTC+2:
>
>> Cantor's enumeration is not a step-by-step procedure,
>
> Enumeration is always a step-by-step procedure: 1, 2, 3, and so on. step by
> step.

[...]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enumeration#Countable_vs._uncountable

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 8:47:08 AM10/21/23
to
On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:

> If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces <bla>

A bijektion is not a "step-by-step procedure", you psychotic asshole full of shit!

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 8:47:45 AM10/21/23
to
On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:05:34 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:

> Cantor fails to index all positions of the matrix.

No, he doesn't.

WM

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 12:57:49 PM10/21/23
to
Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 14:47:08 UTC+2:
> On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
>
> > If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces <bla>
>
> A bijektion is not a "step-by-step procedure",

Counting is step-by-step procedure.

But my infinite sequence of matrices represents every pair (k, (m, n)) of the bijection. Could you find one that is not described by my matrices (which simultaneously prove that no fraction is indexed ever) then you had won. But you can't.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 1:06:04 PM10/21/23
to
They write there: An enumeration e of a set S with domain \mathbb {N} induces a well-order

When the first billiards are executed, there is no fraction enumerated. But the fractions remain in the matrix. By using the well-order you should be able to indicate the first fraction that is enumerated or leaving the matrix. Without at least one of these events the enumeration of the matrix cannot be completed.

Regards, WM

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 5:22:21 PM10/21/23
to
On Saturday, October 21, 2023 at 6:57:49 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 14:47:08 UTC+2:
> > On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > >
> > > If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces <bla>
> > >
> > A bijektion is not a "step-by-step procedure",
> >
> Counting is step-by-step procedure.

Indeed! But a bijektion is not based on counting, you psychotic asshole full of shit.

Mückenheim, geh doch bitte mal zum Psychiater und lass Dich behandeln!

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 21, 2023, 5:25:21 PM10/21/23
to
On Saturday, October 21, 2023 at 7:06:04 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> FromTheRafters schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 13:44:13 UTC+2:
> >
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enumeration#Countable_vs._uncountable
> >
> They write there: An enumeration e of a set S with domain IN induces a well-order

Ach?

> When the first billiards are executed,

Wie meinen, Mückenheim? Gehts noch? Piep-Piep?

Wann gehst Du endlich mal zum Psychiater, um Dich behandeln zu lassen?

WM

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 5:52:39 AM10/22/23
to
Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 23:22:21 UTC+2:
> On Saturday, October 21, 2023 at 6:57:49 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 14:47:08 UTC+2:
> > > On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > > >
> > > > If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces <bla>
> > > >
> > > A bijektion is not a "step-by-step procedure",
> > >
> > Counting is step-by-step procedure.
> Indeed! But a bijektion is not based on counting,

A bijection with ℕ is counting. Did Dedekind use a bijection by closed formula?

Regards, WM

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 6:50:28 AM10/22/23
to
On Sunday, October 22, 2023 at 11:52:39 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 23:22:21 UTC+2:
> > On Saturday, October 21, 2023 at 6:57:49 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > > Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag, 21. Oktober 2023 um 14:47:08 UTC+2:
> > > > On Friday, October 20, 2023 at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > If you deny that the step-by-step procedure produces <bla>
> > > > >
> > > > A bijektion is not a "step-by-step procedure",
> > > >
> > > Counting is step-by-step procedure.
> > >
> > Indeed! But a bijektion is not based on counting,
> >
> A bijection with ℕ is counting.

This statement does not make any sense.

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 7:01:08 AM10/22/23
to
On Sunday, October 22, 2023 at 11:52:39 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:

> Did Dedekind [prove the existence of] a bijection by [presenting a] closed formula?

Das ist nicht immer nötig, Mückenheim. Man kann Abzählbarkeit auch auf andere Weise beweisen.

Tipp: Die Vereinigung abzählbar unendlich vieler abzählbar unendlicher Mengen ist abzählbar unendlich.

Chris M. Thomasson

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 5:11:47 PM10/22/23
to
Fwiw, here is some experimental music I made for fun using Cantor pairing:

https://youtu.be/XkwgJt5bxKI

Chris M. Thomasson

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 8:07:32 PM10/22/23
to
Indeed.

mitchr...@gmail.com

unread,
Oct 22, 2023, 9:30:24 PM10/22/23
to
Calculating or counting can't reach the unlimited.
You would be doing them forever instead...

WM

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 3:34:11 AM10/23/23
to
Try better. Read Cantor.

Dabei nenne ich zwei wohlgeordnete Mengen von demselben Typus und schreibe ihnen gleiche Anzahl zu, wenn sie sich unter Wahrung der festgesetzten Rangordnung ihrer Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander abbilden, oder wie man sich gewöhnlich ausdrückt, aufeinander abzählen lassen.

The modern notion is bijection.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 3:34:14 AM10/23/23
to
Die Vereinigung aller Umordnungen mittels der Matrizen A_i ist eine unendliche Menge. Alle Indizes k, die Cantor in

1, 2, 4, ...
3, 5, 8, ...
6, 9, 13, ...
...

verteilt, werden auch durch die Matrixfolge (A_i) mit Matrixfeldern gepaart: (k, (m, n)).

Gruß, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 3:36:28 AM10/23/23
to
mitchr...@gmail.com schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 03:30:24 UTC+2:

> Calculating or counting can't reach the unlimited.
> You would be doing them forever instead...

Indeed, but Cantor claims "The infinite sequence thus defined has the peculiar property to contain the positive rational numbers completely, and each of them only once at a determined place." [G. Cantor, letter to R. Lipschitz (19 Nov 1883)] He calls this conting the fractions.

Regards, WM

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 12:02:11 PM10/23/23
to
On Monday, October 23, 2023 at 9:34:11 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Sonntag, 22. Oktober 2023 um 12:50:28 UTC+2:
> > On Sunday, October 22, 2023 at 11:52:39 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> > >
> > > A bijection with ℕ is counting.
> > >
> > This statement does not make any sense.
> >
> Try better. Read Cantor.
>
> Dabei nenne ich zwei wohlgeordnete Mengen von demselben Typus und schreibe ihnen gleiche Anzahl zu, wenn sie sich unter Wahrung der festgesetzten Rangordnung ihrer Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander abbilden [...] lassen.

Du bist eindeutig zu dumm, um Cantor zu verstehen.

Der englischen Sprache scheinst Du auch nicht mächtig zu sein.

> The modern notion is bijection.

The modern notion OF WHAT, you silly crank?!

Hints:

1. "_Counting_ is the process of determining the number of elements of a finite set of objects; that is, determining the size of a [finite] set." (Wikipedia)

2. A bijection is not a process.

Jim Burns

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 12:05:19 PM10/23/23
to
On 10/22/2023 5:52 AM, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag,
> 21. Oktober 2023 um 23:22:21 UTC+2:
>> On Saturday, October 21, 2023
>> at 6:57:49 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
>>> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag,
>>> 21. Oktober 2023 um 14:47:08 UTC+2:
>>>> On Friday, October 20, 2023
>>>> at 10:02:45 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:

>>>>> If you deny that
>>>>> the step-by-step procedure
>>>>> produces <bla>
>>>>
>>>> A bijektion is not
>>>> a "step-by-step procedure",
>>>
>>> Counting is step-by-step procedure.
>>
>> Indeed!
>> But a bijektion is not based on counting,
>
> A bijection with ℕ is counting.

A bijection B of set A with ℕ
is a set B ⊆ ℕ×A of pairs ⟨n,x⟩ for
each n ∈ ℕ and each x ∈ A
one match each in B and no others

Set B bijects ℕ and A ⟺
∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀x ∈ A:
∃⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B:
¬∃⟨n,x′⟩ ∈ B: x′ ≠ x ∧
¬∃⟨n′,x⟩ ∈ B: n′ ≠ n

> Did Dedekind use
> a bijection by closed formula?

_Whatever you call a bijection_
can't change that:
for B = {⟨n,p/q⟩| n = (p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p }
∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀p/q ∈ ℕ×ℕ:
∃⟨n,p/q⟩ ∈ B:
¬∃⟨n,p′/q′⟩ ∈ B: p/q′ ≠ p/q ∧
¬∃⟨n′,p/q⟩ ∈ B: n′ ≠ n

It is a radically pointless goal which
you are pursuing.
Even if, miraculously, you convinced us
to call _something else_ "bijection",
that miracle would leave the circumstances of
_your actual objection_ untouched.


Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 12:13:11 PM10/23/23
to
On Monday, October 23, 2023 at 9:34:14 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:

> Die Vereinigung aller Umordnungen mittels der Matrizen A_i ist eine unendliche Menge.

Mumbo-jumbo.

Definiere erst mal die von Dir verwendeten Begriffe, Mückenheim.

"[WM’s] conclusions are based on the sloppiness of his notions, his inability of giving
precise definitions, his fundamental misunderstanding of elementary mathematical
concepts, and sometimes, as the late Dik Winter remarked [...], on nothing at all."

Du vereinigst also irgendetwas und heraus kommt eine unendliche Menge, ja und?

> Alle Indizes k, die Cantor in
>
> 1, 2, 4, ...
> 3, 5, 8, ...
> 6, 9, 13, ...
> :
>
> verteilt, werden auch durch die Matrixfolge (A_i) mit Matrixfeldern gepaart: (k, (m, n)).

Ja, Deine Fettecke wächst von Matrix zu Matrix, und jetzt?

Hast Du damit die Mengenlehre widerlegt? Schon wieder? :-)

WAS GENAU soll denn Deine lächerliche Folge von Matrizen zeigen? Dass Deine Fettecke(n) niemals den gesamten verfügbaren "Platz" (also die gesamte Matrix) ausfüllen wird/werden? Geschenkt. Wahrlich eine großartige Erkenntnis. :-)

Zur Erinnerung: An e IN {1, ..., n} =/= IN.Aber U_(n e IN) {1, ..., n} = IN.

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 12:16:00 PM10/23/23
to
On Monday, October 23, 2023 at 9:36:28 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> mitchr...@gmail.com schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 03:30:24 UTC+2:
> >
> > Calculating or counting can't reach the unlimited.
> > You would be doing them forever instead...
> >
> Indeed, but Cantor claims "The infinite sequence thus defined has the peculiar property to contain the positive rational numbers completely, and each of them only once at a determined place." [G. Cantor, letter to R. Lipschitz (19 Nov 1883)]

Was in Gottes Namen hat Cantors Zitat mit dem von Mitch Gesagten zu tun?

Hint: "_Counting_ is the process of determining the number of elements of a finite set of objects; that is, determining the size of a [finite] set." (Wikipedia)

Dieter Heidorn

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 3:19:20 PM10/23/23
to
Fritz Feldhase schrieb:
> On Monday, October 23, 2023 at 9:34:11 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
>> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Sonntag, 22. Oktober 2023 um 12:50:28 UTC+2:
>>> On Sunday, October 22, 2023 at 11:52:39 AM UTC+2, WM wrote:
>>>>
>>>> A bijection with ℕ is counting.
>>>>
>>> This statement does not make any sense.
>>>
>> Try better. Read Cantor.
>>
>> Dabei nenne ich zwei wohlgeordnete Mengen von demselben Typus und schreibe ihnen gleiche Anzahl zu, wenn sie sich unter Wahrung der festgesetzten Rangordnung ihrer Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander abbilden [...] lassen.
>
> Du bist eindeutig zu dumm, um Cantor zu verstehen.

Er nimmt die Formulierung "Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander
abbilden" offensichtlich wörtlich: Man muss in Mückenhausen nacheinander
jedes Paar einer Bijektion konstruieren.

Dass das von Cantor natürlich nicht so gemeint ist, bringt dieser selbst
klar zum Ausdruck:

|"[Es] wird bewiesen, daß äquivalente Mengen immer eine und dieselbe
| Mächtigkeit oder Kardinalzahl haben und daß auch umgekehrt Mengen
| von derselben Kardinalzahl äquivalent sind. [...]
| Die Kenntnis nur eines /Zuordnungsgesetzes/ für zwei Mengen M und M_1
| /genügt/, um die Äquivalenz derselben zu konstatieren; doch gibt es
| immer viele, im allgemeinen sogar unzählig viele Zuordnungsgesetze,
| durch welche zwei äquivalente in gegenseitig eindeutige und
| vollständige Beziehung zueinander gebracht werden können."
(Cantor: Gesammelte Abhandlungen, S.413)

> Hints:
>
> 1. "_Counting_ is the process of determining the number of elements of a finite set of objects; that is, determining the size of a [finite] set." (Wikipedia)
>
> 2. A bijection is not a process.

Das wird WM in diesem Leben nicht mehr begreifen.

Dieter Heidorn




Jim Burns

unread,
Oct 23, 2023, 4:04:02 PM10/23/23
to
On 10/22/2023 5:52 AM, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Samstag,
> 21. Oktober 2023 um 23:22:21 UTC+2:

> [...]

> A bijection with ℕ is counting.

A bijection with ℕ is
a set B ⊆ ℕ×A of pairs ⟨n,x⟩ for
each n ∈ ℕ and each x ∈ A
one match each in B and no others
∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀x ∈ A:
∃!!⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B:

∃!!⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B :⇔
∃⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B ∧
¬∃⟨n,x′⟩ ∈ B: x′ ≠ x ∧
¬∃⟨n′,x⟩ ∈ B: n′ ≠ n


∀n ∈ ℕ: |ℕ\⟨1,…,n⟩| = |ℕ|
because
∀n ∈ ℕ:
∀i ∈ ℕ, ∀j ∈ ℕ\⟨1,…,n⟩:
∃!!⟨i,j⟩ ∈ {⟨i′,i′+n⟩| i′ ∈ ℕ}

|ℕ\⟨1,2,…⟩| = |∅|
because
ℕ = ⟨1,2,…⟩


∀n ∈ ℕ: ℕ ≠ ⟨1,…,n⟩

1 ∈ ⟨1,2,…⟩ ᣔ⤾⁺¹
∀S: 1 ∈ S ᣔ⤾⁺¹ ⟹ S ⊇ ⟨1,2,…⟩

n+1 ∈ ℕ\⟨1,…,n⟩
∀S: n+1 ∈ S ᣔ⤾⁺¹ ⟹ S ⊇ ℕ\⟨1,…,n⟩

S ᣔ⤾⁺¹ :⇔ ∀i ∈ S ∋ i⁺¹

i⁺¹≠0 ∧ ¬∃h≠i:h⁺¹=i⁺¹ ∧ ∃k=(i⁺¹)⁺¹


WM

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 7:52:19 AM10/24/23
to
Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 18:02:11 UTC+2:

> 2. A bijection is not a process.

Every pair of a bijection with |N can be counted to. This is a process.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 7:56:39 AM10/24/23
to
Jim Burns schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 18:05:19 UTC+2:
> On 10/22/2023 5:52 AM, WM wrote:

> > A bijection with ℕ is counting.
> A bijection B of set A with ℕ
> is a set B ⊆ ℕ×A of pairs ⟨n,x⟩ for
> each n ∈ ℕ and each x ∈ A
> one match each in B and no others

Every pair can be counte to.

> _Whatever you call a bijection_
> can't change that:
> for B = {⟨n,p/q⟩| n = (p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p }
> ∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀p/q ∈ ℕ×ℕ:

Not all n ∈ ℕ but only those which enumerate matrix olaces not occupied by Os.

> It is a radically pointless goal which
> you are pursuing.

It is radically pointless to believe that the matrix

1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
2/1, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, ...
3/1, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4, ...
4/1, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, ...
5/1, 5/2, 5/3, 5/4, ...
...

could be covered by the elements of the first column.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 7:58:47 AM10/24/23
to
Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 21:19:20 UTC+2:

> Er nimmt die Formulierung "Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander
> abbilden" offensichtlich wörtlich: Man muss nacheinander
> jedes Paar einer Bijektion konstruieren.

Man *kann* jedes Paar konstruieren. Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Bist Du gegenteiliger Meinung?
>
Regards, WM

FromTheRafters

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 10:00:25 AM10/24/23
to
It happens that WM formulated :
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 18:02:11 UTC+2:
>
>> 2. A bijection is not a process.
>
> Every pair of a bijection with |N can be counted to.

Yes, because it is a finite set.

> This is a process.

A demonstration might require a process so that it can be understood by
most people, but the fact of a bijection does not require a process.

FromTheRafters

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 10:01:50 AM10/24/23
to
WM expressed precisely :
Why, do you suppose that there aren't enough of them?

Dieter Heidorn

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 10:03:13 AM10/24/23
to
WM schrieb:
Selbstverständlich. Darum hatte ich ja Cantor zitiert:

|"[Es] wird bewiesen, daß äquivalente Mengen immer eine und dieselbe
| Mächtigkeit oder Kardinalzahl haben und daß auch umgekehrt Mengen
| von derselben Kardinalzahl äquivalent sind. [...]
| Die Kenntnis nur eines /Zuordnungsgesetzes/ für zwei Mengen M und M_1
| /genügt/, um die Äquivalenz derselben zu konstatieren; doch gibt es
| immer viele, im allgemeinen sogar unzählig viele Zuordnungsgesetze,
| durch welche zwei äquivalente in gegenseitig eindeutige und
| vollständige Beziehung zueinander gebracht werden können."
(Cantor: Gesammelte Abhandlungen, S.413)

Dieter Heidorn



WM

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 10:50:51 AM10/24/23
to
FromTheRafters schrieb am Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2023 um 16:01:50 UTC+2:
> WM expressed precisely :

> > It is radically pointless to believe that the matrix
> >
> > 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
> > 2/1, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, ...
> > 3/1, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4, ...
> > 4/1, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, ...
> > 5/1, 5/2, 5/3, 5/4, ...
> > ...
> >
> > could be covered by the elements of the first column.
> Why, do you suppose that there aren't enough of them?

Because otherwise the whole matrix would have been covered by them already. Geometry of measure!

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 10:55:53 AM10/24/23
to
Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2023 um 16:03:13 UTC+2:
> WM schrieb:
> > Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 21:19:20 UTC+2:
> >
> >> Er nimmt die Formulierung "Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander
> >> abbilden" offensichtlich wörtlich: Man muss nacheinander
> >> jedes Paar einer Bijektion konstruieren.
> >
> > Man *kann* jedes Paar konstruieren. Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Bist Du gegenteiliger Meinung?
> Selbstverständlich.

O, Du proklamierst dunkle Zahlen. Das hätte ich nicht erwartet.

> Darum hatte ich ja Cantor zitiert:
> |"[Es] wird bewiesen, daß äquivalente Mengen immer eine und dieselbe
> | Mächtigkeit oder Kardinalzahl haben und daß auch umgekehrt Mengen
> | von derselben Kardinalzahl äquivalent sind. [...]
> | Die Kenntnis nur eines /Zuordnungsgesetzes/ für zwei Mengen M und M_1
> | /genügt/, um die Äquivalenz derselben zu konstatieren; doch gibt es
> | immer viele, im allgemeinen sogar unzählig viele Zuordnungsgesetze,
> | durch welche zwei äquivalente in gegenseitig eindeutige und
> | vollständige Beziehung zueinander gebracht werden können."
> (Cantor: Gesammelte Abhandlungen, S.413)

Viele Zuordnungsgesetze sagen nichts über unkonstruierbare Paare. Cantor ist nicht Deiner Meinung. "Werden nun die Zahlen p/q in einer solchen Reihenfolge gedacht, [...] so kommt jede Zahl p/q an eine ganz bestimmte Stelle einer einfach unendlichen Reihe," [E. Zermelo: "Georg Cantor – Gesammelte Abhandlungen mathematischen und philosophischen Inhalts", Springer, Berlin (1932) S. 126] Natürlich kann man jede ganz bestimmte Stelle bestimmen. Sie ist ja schon bestimmt.

Gruß, WM

Jim Burns

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 11:47:27 AM10/24/23
to
On 10/24/2023 7:56 AM, WM wrote:
> Jim Burns schrieb am Montag,
> 23. Oktober 2023 um 18:05:19 UTC+2:
>> On 10/22/2023 5:52 AM, WM wrote:

>>> A bijection with ℕ is counting.
>>
>> A bijection B of set A with ℕ
>> is a set B ⊆ ℕ×A of pairs ⟨n,x⟩ for
>> each n ∈ ℕ and each x ∈ A
>> one match each in B and no others
>
> Every pair can be counte to.

Each pair ⟨n,xₙ⟩ in
minimally-each-which-can-be-counted-to B
can be counted to.
Otherwise,
an even-more-minimal set of pairs exists.

Each procedure which counts to
a pair ⟨n,xₙ⟩ which-can-be-counted-to
has two ends: ⟨1,x₁⟩ and ⟨n,xₙ⟩

⟨1,x₁⟩ is one end in the set B

For each ⟨n,xₙ⟩ in B
there is a successor ⟨n+1,xₙ₊₁⟩ in B
For each ⟨n,xₙ⟩ in B
⟨n,xₙ⟩ is not the second end in B

B does not have two ends.
Procedures have two ends.

Thus,
B is not a procedure,
such as the procedure of counting to
a pair which-can-be-counted-to.

B is not a procedure, however,
counting to any ⟨n,xₙ⟩ in B
has two ends, and is a procedure.

>> _Whatever you call a bijection_
>> can't change that:
>> for B = {⟨n,p/q⟩| n = (p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p }
>> ∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀p/q ∈ ℕ×ℕ:
>> ∃⟨n,p/q⟩ ∈ B:
>> ¬∃⟨n,p′/q′⟩ ∈ B: p/q′ ≠ p/q ∧
>> ¬∃⟨n′,p/q⟩ ∈ B: n′ ≠ n

∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀x ∈ A:
∃!!⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B:

∃!!⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B :⇔
∃⟨n,x⟩ ∈ B ∧
¬∃⟨n,x′⟩ ∈ B: x′ ≠ x ∧
¬∃⟨n′,x⟩ ∈ B: n′ ≠ n

> Not all n ∈ ℕ
> but only those which enumerate
> matrix [places] not occupied by Os.

ℕ is the minimally-each-accessible set.
ℕ₀ᣔ⤾⁺¹
ℕ = ⋂{S ⊆ ℕ| S₀ᣔ⤾⁺¹ }

S₀ᣔ⤾⁺¹ :⇔
S ∋ 0 ∧ ∀s ∈ S ∋ s⁺¹

Each place p/q in ℕ×ℕ
is enumerated by its own n in ℕ

∀n ∈ ℕ, ∀p/q ∈ ℕ×ℕ:
∃!!⟨n,p/q⟩ ∈ {⟨n,p/q⟩|n=(p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p}

n = (p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p
p+q = ⌈(((8⋅n+1)¹ᐟ²+1)/2)⌉

⌈x⌉-1 < x ≤ ⌈x⌉ ∈ ℕ

>> It is a radically pointless goal which
>> you are pursuing.
>
> It is radically pointless
> to believe that the matrix
>
> 1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ...
> 2/1, 2/2, 2/3, 2/4, ...
> 3/1, 3/2, 3/3, 3/4, ...
> 4/1, 4/2, 4/3, 4/4, ...
> 5/1, 5/2, 5/3, 5/4, ...
> ...
>
> could be covered by
> the elements of the first column.

You reject arithmetic
n = (p+q-1)(p+q-2)/2+p
p+q = ⌈(((8⋅n+1)¹ᐟ²+1)/2)⌉
in order to save two-ended-ness.

We reject two-ended-ness
ℕ₀ᣔ⤾⁺¹
ℕ = ⋂{S ⊆ ℕ| S₀ᣔ⤾⁺¹ }
in order to save arithmetic.

I don't have a proof of this,
but it seems undeniable to me that
rejecting arithmetic
should be raised among the gods of
radically pointless activities.

It is probably also radically pointless
to keep telling you (WM) things which
you refuse to hear,
but
there are many much-more-harmful
radically-pointless activities in which
I could instead be engaged.


Dieter Heidorn

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 11:49:00 AM10/24/23
to
WM schrieb:
> Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2023 um 16:03:13 UTC+2:
>> WM schrieb:
>>> Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 21:19:20 UTC+2:
>>>
>>>> Er nimmt die Formulierung "Elemente gegenseitig eindeutig aufeinander
>>>> abbilden" offensichtlich wörtlich: Man muss nacheinander
>>>> jedes Paar einer Bijektion konstruieren.
>>>
>>> Man *kann* jedes Paar konstruieren. Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Bist Du gegenteiliger Meinung?
>> Selbstverständlich.
>
> O, Du proklamierst dunkle Zahlen.

Selbstverständlich nicht. Ich "proklamiere" nur mathematisch existente
Objekte. Bijektionen haben - wie alle Funktionen - eine Definitionsmenge
und eine Wertemenge. Die Definition einer Bijektion zwischen zwei Mengen
stellt einen Zusammenhang zwischen zwei definierten Mengen her - und
dunkel ist daran nicht das Geringste.

>> Darum hatte ich ja Cantor zitiert:
>> |"[Es] wird bewiesen, daß äquivalente Mengen immer eine und dieselbe
>> | Mächtigkeit oder Kardinalzahl haben und daß auch umgekehrt Mengen
>> | von derselben Kardinalzahl äquivalent sind. [...]
>> | Die Kenntnis nur eines /Zuordnungsgesetzes/ für zwei Mengen M und M_1
>> | /genügt/, um die Äquivalenz derselben zu konstatieren; doch gibt es
>> | immer viele, im allgemeinen sogar unzählig viele Zuordnungsgesetze,
>> | durch welche zwei äquivalente in gegenseitig eindeutige und
>> | vollständige Beziehung zueinander gebracht werden können."
>> (Cantor: Gesammelte Abhandlungen, S.413)
>
> Viele Zuordnungsgesetze sagen nichts über unkonstruierbare Paare.

Die "Zuordnungsgesetze" sind Funktionen, und wie obigem Zitat zu
entnehmen ist, geht es dabei um Bijektionen. Sie besagen, auf welche
Weise Elemente der Definitionsmenge und der Wertemenge in Beziehung
gebracht werden.
Damit ist die "Konstruktion" aller Paare angegeben. Die Cantorsche
Paarungsfunktion ist ein Beispiel für eine solche Bijektion. Mit

f: ℕ×ℕ→ℕ , f(m,n) = m + (m + n - 1)*(m + n - 2) = k

sind alle Paare ((m,n),k) definiert.

> Cantor ist nicht Deiner Meinung.

Er ist es. Du verstehst es nur nicht, wie dein hilfloses Bruchstück-
Zitieren zeigt:

>"Werden nun die Zahlen p/q in einer solchen Reihenfolge gedacht, [...] so kommt jede Zahl p/q an eine ganz bestimmte Stelle einer einfach unendlichen Reihe," [E. Zermelo: "Georg Cantor – Gesammelte Abhandlungen mathematischen und philosophischen Inhalts", Springer, Berlin (1932) S. 126] Natürlich kann man jede ganz bestimmte Stelle bestimmen. Sie ist ja schon bestimmt.

Solche Zitatschnipsel besagen gar nichts. Dieser Satz steht in folgendem
Zusammenhang:

|"[Wir] gehen davon aus, daß die sämtlichen rationalen Zahlen, welche
| ≧ 0 und ≦ 1 sind, sich in der Form einer einfach unendlichen Reihe
|
| φ_1, φ_2, φ_3, ..., φ_ν, ...
|
| mit einem allgemeinen Gliede φ_ν schreiben lassen. Dies läßt sich am
| einfachsten wie folgt dartun: Ist p/q die /irreduktible/ Form für eine
| rationale Zahl, die ≧ 0 und ≦ 1 ist, wo also p und q ganze, nicht
| negative Zahlen mit dem größten gemeinschaftlichen Teiler 1 sind,
| so setze man p + q = N. Es gehört alsdann zu jeder Zahl p/q ein
| bestimmter ganzzahliger, positiver Wert von N, und umgekehrt gehört
| zu einem solchen Werte von N immer nur eine endliche Anzahl von Zahlen
| p/q. Werden nun die Zahlen p/q in einer solchen Reihenfolge gedacht,
| daß die zu kleineren Werten von N gehörigen denen vorangehen, für
| welche N einen größeren Wert hat, daß ferner die Zahlen p/q, für
| welche N einen und denselben Wert hat, ihrer Größe nach einander
| folgen, die größeren auf die kleineren, so kommt jede der Zahlen p/q
| an eine ganz bestimmte Stelle einer einfach unendlichen Reihe, deren
| allgemeines Glied mit φ_ν bezeichnet werde."

Also: Cantor betrachtet hier positive Brüche p/q mit den Eigenschaften

* p und q sind relativ prim,
* p/q ∈ [0,1]

und stellt eine Zuordnung her:

* p/q -> p + q = N .

die _nicht injektiv_ ist - und damit ist sie natürlich auch nicht
bijektiv.

Ein Zusammenhang mit der bijektiven Cantor-Funktion zur Abzählung der
Menge der positiven Brüche besteht nicht.

Dieter Heidorn

Jim Burns

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 2:03:10 PM10/24/23
to
P is the set of steps sⱼ of a process.

Steps sₛ‖sₑ exist as start‖end of P
and,
for each split F ᣔ<ᣔ H of P
some sᵢ‖sᵢ₊₁ exist as end-of-F‖start-of-H

Define k to be a process-index
iff
index-sequence ⟨1,…,k⟩ exists such that
1‖k exist as the start‖end of ⟨1,…,k⟩
and,
for each split F ᣔ<ᣔ H of ⟨1,…,k⟩
some i‖i⁺¹ exist as end-of-F‖start-of-H

i⁺¹ is non-1 non-doppelgänger non-final


For each process-set P
a process-index k exists such that
a bijection-set B exists between ⟨1,…,k⟩ and P
∀P process:
∃k process-index:
∃B bijection-set:
∀i index ∈ ⟨1,…,k⟩, ∀s step ∈ P:
∃!!⟨i,s⟩ ∈ B

Each ⟨1,…,k⟩ has two ends 1‖k

The minimally-each-process-index set
has one end. It is not any ⟨1,…,k⟩


(doubly unique)
∃!!⟨i,s⟩ ∈ B :<->
∃⟨i,s⟩ ∈ B ∧
¬∃⟨i,s′⟩ ∈ B: s′ ≠ s ∧
¬∃⟨i′,s⟩ ∈ B: i′ ≠ i


William

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 2:13:54 PM10/24/23
to
A bijection with |N, B. is a set
> Every pair of a bijection with |N can be counted to.
Indeed, every element of B can be "counted to".
B cannot be "counted to".
Message has been deleted
Message has been deleted
Message has been deleted

Fritz Feldhase

unread,
Oct 24, 2023, 3:26:05 PM10/24/23
to
On Tuesday, October 24, 2023 at 1:52:19 PM UTC+2, WM wrote:
> Fritz Feldhase schrieb am Montag, 23. Oktober 2023 um 18:02:11 UTC+2:
> >
> > 2. A bijection is not a process.

A BIJECTION IS NOT A PROCESS.

> Every pair of a bijection with IN can be counted to. This [counting] is a process [in each case].

YES, EVER PAIR OF A BIJECTION CAN BE COUNTED TO. THIS COUNTING IS A PROCESS (in each case).

BUT NO PAIR OF A BIJECTION IS THIS BIJECTION, _THE BIJECTION CANNOT BE COUNTED TO_.

*MOREOVER*: THE BIJECTION AS WELL AS EACH AND EVERY PAIR OF THE BIJECTION IS NOT A PROCESS.

WM

unread,
Oct 25, 2023, 5:57:34 AM10/25/23
to
B is countable when "every element of the set stands at a definite position of this sequence" [Cantor]. B cannot be counted to (because it is nothing more than its elements), only all elements can be counted to. Every O were removed from the matrix if all fractions could be indeXed. Of course the matrix itself does not require an index.

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 25, 2023, 6:30:47 AM10/25/23
to
Jim Burns schrieb am Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2023 um 17:47:27 UTC+2:

> B does not have two ends.
> Procedures have two ends.

No. The procedure accomplishes, according to Cantor, "that every element of the set stands at a definite position of this sequence".
>
> B is not a procedure, however,
> counting to any ⟨n,xₙ⟩ in B
> has two ends, and is a procedure.

Not according to Cantor: "such that every element of the set stands at a definite position of this sequence".

Regards, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 25, 2023, 6:41:43 AM10/25/23
to
Dieter Heidorn schrieb am Dienstag, 24. Oktober 2023 um 17:49:00 UTC+2:
> WM schrieb:
>
> >>> Man *kann* jedes Paar konstruieren. Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Bist Du gegenteiliger Meinung?
> >> Selbstverständlich.
> >
> > O, Du proklamierst dunkle Zahlen.
> Selbstverständlich nicht. Ich "proklamiere" nur mathematisch existente
> Objekte.
Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Mathematisch existente
Objekte, hier also Paare, können konstruiert werden. "such that every element of the set stands at a definite position of this sequence".

> Bijektionen haben - wie alle Funktionen - eine Definitionsmenge
> und eine Wertemenge. Die Definition einer Bijektion zwischen zwei Mengen
> stellt einen Zusammenhang zwischen zwei definierten Mengen her - und
> dunkel ist daran nicht das Geringste.

Was nicht konstruiert werden kann, gehört nicht zur Abzählung. Das hast Du abgelehnt.

> Damit ist die "Konstruktion" aller Paare angegeben. Die Cantorsche
> Paarungsfunktion ist ein Beispiel für eine solche Bijektion.

Und die führe ich aus, so dass alle O in der Matrix bleiben. Damit ist die Existenz nicht nummerierbarer Felder und damit auch die Unvollständigkeit von Cantors "Bijektion" gezeigt.

> >"Werden nun die Zahlen p/q in einer solchen Reihenfolge gedacht, [...] so kommt jede Zahl p/q an eine ganz bestimmte Stelle einer einfach unendlichen Reihe," [E. Zermelo: "Georg Cantor – Gesammelte Abhandlungen mathematischen und philosophischen Inhalts", Springer, Berlin (1932) S. 126] Natürlich kann man jede ganz bestimmte Stelle bestimmen. Sie ist ja schon bestimmt.
> Solche Zitatschnipsel besagen gar nichts.

Sie besagen, dass Du falsch liegst.

> Dieser Satz steht in folgendem
> Zusammenhang:
>
> * p/q -> p + q = N .
>
> die _nicht injektiv_ ist - und damit ist sie natürlich auch nicht
> bijektiv.
>
> Ein Zusammenhang mit der bijektiven Cantor-Funktion zur Abzählung der
> Menge der positiven Brüche besteht nicht.

Er besteht natürlich, nämlich in der Vollständigkeit. Aber wenn Du das nicht verstehst, dann zeige ich Dir dies: "The infinite sequence thus defined has the peculiar property to contain the positive rational numbers completely, and each of them only once at a determined place." [G. Cantor, letter to R. Lipschitz (19 Nov 1883)]

Gruß, WM

WM

unread,
Oct 25, 2023, 6:45:10 AM10/25/23