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Students: don't be fooled by the silly "New Calculus" of Mr Gabriel

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Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 13, 2021, 6:23:36 AM4/13/21
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Mr Gabriel's "New Calculus" will not give you an advantage in understanding mathematics and will stall your mathematical development if you take it too seriously. As someone with multiple mathematics degrees and a teaching qualification in mathematics, I am genuinely disturbed by the idea that students, perhaps suffering from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and other very common difficulties, might have their precious time and effort wasted by this.

Calculus and analysis can be tricky subjects to learn, and even trickier to master. There is a lot of material to digest; many definitions, many techniques, the calculus books are sometimes 1000 pages long, and the analysis books seem to be packed with a blizzard of inequalities. You might have spent days learning an idea and then weeks later it feels as if you have forgotten it all.

It can look very daunting. This is a perfectly normal feeling and neither signifies that you cannot do it, nor that the mathematics community does not know what it is doing. There are many books on the same subjects, and different students will be better served by different choices of books, or different ways of presenting the same ideas. Teachers cannot always cater for every preference at once; but that does not mean there isn't a good book FOR YOU out there.

It is perfectly normal for it to take years to master these topics, and it is perfectly normal to struggle at various stages. It is normal to struggle at the beginning when a mathematical concept is new. It is normal to struggle when the topics have become more abstract. It is normal to struggle when connections between different ideas need to be explored, because the cognitive load is demanding. It is normal for memories to fade after the pressure of exams has ended, unless you practice to help solidify those memories afterwards.

This is true for most people; it doesn't really matter which university you go to, or how smart you are (even genius's sometimes need feedback from other experts: Leonhard Euler and John Nash did for example).

The solution to this is to find study methods that work FOR YOU (which might not be the same as what works for someone else), and which books work best FOR YOU. I will give what I hope is a helpful list for both at the end of this post, including some genuinely useful YouTube channels. Once you find material and approaches that work for you, you can be surprised at how much more smoothly things go; but it is never truly easy, because maths is abstract and often subtle, and abstraction is always difficult.

And it is perfectly normal for "philosophical" questions about a subject to sometimes occur to students, which they might find difficult to verbalize, and might not feel their book is directly addressing.

Under no circumstances is the right response to this, to seek refuge in silly ancient Greek metaphysics, amateur psychology, and fantasizing that 150 years worth of mathematics experts missed the real value of an ancient Greek geometry book that had been regularly read and understood for centuries; nor that they are clueless about set theory that has been thought about for 150 years. Philosophers and mathematicians of many cultures have been thinking about abstract ideas of number and space for millennia; Mr Gabriel's ideas are neither deep, nor special, nor generally effective.

Qualified mathematicians and teachers, including myself, have read Mr Gabriel's New Calculus and are not impressed by it. It can work in a very small class of situations, just like other pre-limit methods which existed in the 16th century, but beyond that not really. It also struggles with basic and important ideas like points of inflection, which are important in pure mathematics, game theory, the calculus of variations and other areas.

Some examples of this kind of historical development can be found here, in this lovely 25 minute 1980's BBC/Open University video starring mathematics historian Jeremy Gray:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObPg3ki9GOI

Needless to say, Mr Gabriel's approach cannot be used to develop a useful calculus of variations nor indeed many of the standard methods of modern mathematical physics.

Mr Gabriel is also mistaken in believing that he has a special insight into the concept of number. Elementary conceptions of number were common in higher mathematics pre-20th century. Leonhard Euler gave a much smoother and fruitful offering of one in his lovely book:

"Elements of Algebra"

which has been read since the 18th century, and can still be purchased in various abridged forms today. Euler was a genius and clear explainer, but no one (especially not Euler himself) claims he was a genius because of his smooth presentation of a number concept.

POSITIVE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STUDENTS

1] Concerning philosophy

Most philosophical difficulties with early set theory have been satisfactorily addressed, but the detailed explanations can be very hard and dwelling on them during undergraduate studies is often not advisable because it can take far too long, and is better approached when you have more experience.

There is nothing wrong with having philosophical opinions that differ from the mainstream per se, provided they are not dogmatic and provided they possess clarity. They should be clearly thought out, should not inhibit your ability to do core mathematics (algebra, calculus etc.) and shouldn't descend into silly conspiracy theories about academia.

If, for example, students feel drawn to a more algorithmic and less Cantorian approach to mathematics than is normally presented, then I would suggest they look up Professor Harold M. Edwards, who has championed an algorithmic approach to mathematics for many years. His webpage is here:

https://math.nyu.edu/faculty/edwardsd/

In particular his book on elementary number theory:

Higher Arithmetic: an algorithmic introduction to number theory

might be suitable for such students. I do not share Professor Edwards' philosophical opinions, but at least he is intellectually sober and does genuinely good mathematics within the framework he advocates. So if you dislike or struggle with Cantorianism, then try Edwards instead, don't waste your time with vague ancient Greek metaphysics and ultra-finitist nonsense.


2] On psychology and learning

Psychologists have been studying the learning of mathematics for decades, and some genuinely useful advice for studying more effectively has come out of it. Look up:

- spaced practice and retrieval practice

- Frayer models/diagrams

- the brilliant lecture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlU-zDU6aQ0&t

- the benefits of cardio-vascular exercise for improving study focus (the neurologist John Ratey has presented good stuff on this kind of thing)

- The psychologist Anders Ericsson, who researched the development of expertise.

Don't fall into the trap of thinking that if you stare at a problem for a few minutes and can't do it, that this means you aren't able to be very good at the subject. Many mathematicians need to ponder things at length and return to the same thing in an iterative fashion over a period of time. Even genius's like Nobel prize winning mathematical physicist Roger Penrose do this, and if you want to see what slow, fallible pondering can produce, look up his book:

The Road to Reality

which provides beautiful illustrations of what many of the mathematical ideas you study can be used to do in physics. You won't find a better guide than Penrose on that sort of thing. A brilliant teacher and a true inspiration.

The book: How to Solve it, by G. Polya, is a classic short guide for undergraduates in developing problem solving skills in mathematics. Far more worthy of your time than Mr Gabriel's output.


3] Books on analysis

The best book on analysis FOR YOU, is the one that is easiest to learn from FOR YOU. There is no universally suitable book and no book is perfect. An excellent book for students who lack confidence is:

Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis 2nd ed, by Rod Haggarty.

It goes at a gentle pace, has diagrams, historical asides, and solutions to exercises. Good for self-study. It's only significant drawback is that it doesn't construct the real numbers. But for that, you can look up explanations of Dedekind cuts on the internet.

I found my first and second year courses on real analysis quite difficult at first, but I bought Haggarty's book, threw myself into it and I aced my courses and went on to study the Calculus of Variations at MSc level later on. I didn't disrupt my education by indulging the silly idea that real analysis was built on obvious delusions and lies. That way represents the slow decent into bitterness and madness.

A book which is somewhat more difficult (but not impossibly hard), but which has a beautiful style of exposition and does look at Dedekind cuts, is the classic text:

A Course in Pure Mathematics (centenary edition), by G.H. Hardy

Having both texts so that you can switch between them is a perfectly good strategy. Don't be afraid to have different books on the same subject. Professional mathematicians often do.


4] Genuinely helpful YouTube channels

One of the least toxic places on YouTube, hosted by a university lecturer, lots of short advice videos about studying mathematics, book reviews and much else:

The Math Sorcerer: https://www.youtube.com/user/themathsorcerer

For good lecture series on mathematics and other topics, such as linear algebra, visit MITOpenCourseWare

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEBb1b_L6zDS3xTUrIALZOw

For some very beautiful visual presentations of mathematical ideas, you would find it hard to do better than 3Blue1Brown:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAw

Best of luck with your mathematics studies, and don't allow yourselves to be done a disservice by silly conspiracy theories. Seek assistance from your college or university if you are having difficulty with a particular subject or study in general; it is perfectly normal, and can be dealt with by seeking out good advice from your tutors, library or study support departments. Not by wasting your time on delirious rantings on the internet.

Kindest Regards

FromTheRafters

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Apr 13, 2021, 6:39:02 AM4/13/21
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Quantum Bubbles explained on 4/13/2021 :
> Mr Gabriel's "New Calculus" will not give you an advantage in understanding
> mathematics and will stall your mathematical development if you take it too
> seriously. As someone with multiple mathematics degrees and a teaching
> qualification in mathematics, I am genuinely disturbed by the idea that
> students, perhaps suffering from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and other
> very common difficulties, might have their precious time and effort wasted by
> this.

You are not alone in this concern.

Alan Mackenzie

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Apr 13, 2021, 6:54:43 AM4/13/21
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Quantum Bubbles <ross.pro...@gmx.com> wrote:

[ Lots of helpful suggestions for fruitful study material and methods. ]

Thanks for all that, even though it's a few decades too late for me. ;-)

> Kindest Regards

--
Alan Mackenzie (Nuremberg, Germany).

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 13, 2021, 3:53:49 PM4/13/21
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Just to add to what I said, a collection of nice lecture videos on real analysis, including a construction of both the rational numbers and the also a construction of the real numbers using Dedekind cuts can be found here

http://analysisyawp.blogspot.com/

the camera is a bit fuzzier than I would like, but the lecturer is brilliant, sometimes In the same league as Gilbert Strang's excellent linear algebra lectures on the MIT Open Course-ware YouTube channel.

Kind Regards

Eram semper recta

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Apr 13, 2021, 4:00:11 PM4/13/21
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On Tuesday, 13 April 2021 at 06:23:36 UTC-4, Troll ross.pro...@gmx.com wrote:
> Mr Gabriel's "New Calculus" will not give you an advantage in understanding mathematics and will stall your mathematical development if you take it too seriously.

You mean if they take it just a "little" seriously, then perhaps it won't affect their mathematical development? LMAO. Could you quantify a "little" using epsilon-delta arguments and a suitable function. Too funny. You pathetic fucking crank!

> As someone with multiple mathematics degrees

Indeed and I am the high priest Melchizedek. LMAO.

> and a teaching qualification in mathematics, I am genuinely disturbed by the idea that students, perhaps suffering from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and other very common difficulties, might have their precious time and effort wasted by this.

It is due to the fact that these poor students are exposed to grand imbeciles like you that the suffer from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and many other difficulties. Because YOU are a fucking moron who doesn't know SHIT about mathematics, much less has ever understood it. :)

>
> Calculus and analysis can be tricky subjects to learn, and even trickier to master.

The New Calculus is very easy to learn. Your bullshit is impossible to understand, never mind learn.

> There is a lot of material to digest; many definitions, many techniques, the calculus books are sometimes 1000 pages long, and the analysis books seem to be packed with a blizzard of inequalities. You might have spent days learning an idea and then weeks later it feels as if you have forgotten it all.

Keep talking moron. The above paragraph tells students all they need to know. With every bit of drivel you write on this newsgroup, you confirm what I have always stated about orangutan mainstream academics.

Your honour, I yield my time to this moron. Please let him continue! LMAO.

>
> It can look very daunting. This is a perfectly normal feeling and neither signifies that you cannot do it, nor that the mathematics community does not know what it is doing. There are many books on the same subjects, and different students will be better served by different choices of books, or different ways of presenting the same ideas. Teachers cannot always cater for every preference at once; but that does not mean there isn't a good book FOR YOU out there.

Right. There is a good book and it's written by John Gabriel:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CIul68phzuOe6JZwsCuBuXUR8X-AkgEO/view

It is the most important mathematics book ever written.

>
> It is perfectly normal for it to take years to master these topics,

No, it is not normal. "Perfectly normal" sounds like you protest too much, you pathetic crank!

The New Calculus does not require years, only a few months and the difference in understanding between the drivel you memorised and the New Calculus is an unpassable gulf. Chuckle.

> and it is perfectly normal to struggle at various stages. It is normal to struggle at the beginning when a mathematical concept is new. It is normal to struggle when the topics have become more abstract. It is normal to struggle when connections between different ideas need to be explored, because the cognitive load is demanding. It is normal for memories to fade after the pressure of exams has ended, unless you practice to help solidify those memories afterwards.

Dear student. If you can't see through this, the you are indeed a fucking moron who deserves to suffer as this fool has and still does.

>
> This is true for most people; it doesn't really matter which university you go to, or how smart you are (even genius's sometimes need feedback from other experts: Leonhard Euler and John Nash did for example).
>
> The solution to this is to find study methods that work FOR YOU (which might not be the same as what works for someone else), and which books work best FOR YOU. I will give what I hope is a helpful list for both at the end of this post, including some genuinely useful YouTube channels. Once you find material and approaches that work for you, you can be surprised at how much more smoothly things go; but it is never truly easy, because maths is abstract and often subtle, and abstraction is always difficult.

There is a book out there for you? LMAO. The fact that you dear student need to find a book that is tailored to your personal perspective is a HUGE red flag.

>
> And it is perfectly normal for "philosophical" questions about a subject to sometimes occur to students, which they might find difficult to verbalize, and might not feel their book is directly addressing.

Of course it normal to have philosophical questions. For fuck sakes, mathematics came from philosophy! Being a natural born Greek philosopher, I know this better than the Limey punk who is spending his idle time trying to put you off the New Calculus.

I AM the Calculus GOD. No one has ever understood calculus as I have. NO ONE. Not even the so-called founders. They were all fucking morons compared to my genius except perhaps for Archimedes to whom I might be related!

>
> Under no circumstances is the right response to this, to seek refuge in silly ancient Greek metaphysics, amateur psychology, and fantasizing that 150 years worth of mathematics experts missed the real value of an ancient Greek geometry book that had been regularly read and understood for centuries; nor that they are clueless about set theory that has been thought about for 150 years. Philosophers and mathematicians of many cultures have been thinking about abstract ideas of number and space for millennia; Mr Gabriel's ideas are neither deep, nor special, nor generally effective.

Ha, ha. Keep driveling moron!

>
> Qualified mathematicians and teachers, including myself, have read Mr Gabriel's New Calculus and are not impressed by it. It can work in a very small class of situations, just like other pre-limit methods which existed in the 16th century, but beyond that not really.

You are not even a mathematician's arse. Moreover, the New Calculus works in ALL appropriate situations. In fact, the methods of calculus are both NULL and VOID unless a SMOOTH function is being considered.

> It also struggles with basic and important ideas like points of inflection, which are important in pure mathematics, game theory, the calculus of variations and other areas.

Rubbish. A very misleading term here by this limey baboon is "calculus of variations" - this is a bullshit expression which is unremarkable and is no different from the ideas of basic calculus. DO NOT be fooled students! I first saw this expression in the Britannica Encyclopedia at age 9, long before this shitbag was born. Calculus has NOTHING to do with variation or change.

>
> Some examples of this kind of historical development can be found here, in this lovely 25 minute 1980's BBC/Open University video starring mathematics historian Jeremy Gray:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObPg3ki9GOI

Don't waste 25 minutes of your time on bullshit.

>
> Mr Gabriel is also mistaken in believing that he has a special insight into the concept of number.

I do and the proof is here:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hasWyQCZyRN3RkdvIB6bnGIVV2Rabz8w

> Best of luck with your mathematics studies, and don't allow yourselves to be done a disservice by silly conspiracy theories.

Wow. I wonder why anyone would write a rant this long if indeed what I claim was just "silly conspiracy theories".

Students: Notice that there is not a single refutation of my all important and great work, the New Calculus. Therefore, the asshole who wrote this:

i. Must be right.
ii. Must be an ignorant and jealous crank.

Which? Use your brain!

I won't be wasting my time with this troll. This is a one off comment for the sake of those who might happen on this vomit.


> Kindest Regards

Sergio

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Apr 13, 2021, 4:22:30 PM4/13/21
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Thanks for the link!

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 13, 2021, 4:57:29 PM4/13/21
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I thank Mr Gabriel for taking the time to respond to my comment.

As human beings we of course all hope that Mr Gabriel gets the help that he seems to need. As mathematics practitioners and/or educators, however we can but try to limit the damage that his promotion of mathematical illiteracy might cause.

The following quotes of Mr Gabriel's might be documented by some AI bot one day cataloging a human mind's ever worsening decent into madness.


"I AM the Calculus GOD. No one has ever understood calculus as I have. NO ONE. Not even the so-called founders. They were all fucking morons compared to my genius except perhaps for Archimedes to whom I might be related! "

Notice, dear readers, the constant need of Mr Gabriel for self-aggrandizement, the need to put-down the genuine achievements of others that he feels threatened by (and possibly very jealous of, because they are after all, his betters), and is only willing to grant genuine accomplishments to others if he can associate his sense of identity with them, in however a flimsy way. Signs of a very fragile sense of self, requiring constant overcompensation.


""calculus of variations" - this is a bullshit expression which is unremarkable and is no different from the ideas of basic calculus. DO NOT be fooled students! I first saw this expression in the Britannica Encyclopedia at age 9, long before this shitbag was born. Calculus has NOTHING to do with variation or change."

An interesting comment, as it suggests Mr Gabriel has been under the misapprehension since he was 9 years old, that the Encyclopedia Britannica is a mathematics textbook. Actually, come to think of it, that might explain quite a lot about Mr Gabriel's rather subpar and unlettered level of mathematical output. The calculus of variations is an advanced area of applied mathematics, that is way out of Mr Gabriel's league. He can't even understand Euler's Elements of Algebra. Very sad.



"Wow. I wonder why anyone would write a rant this long if indeed what I claim was just "silly conspiracy theories".

Students: Notice that there is not a single refutation of my all important and great work, the New Calculus. Therefore, the asshole who wrote this:

i. Must be right.
ii. Must be an ignorant and jealous crank.

Which? Use your brain! "

By Mr Gabriel's reasoning the large effort that biologists have to put into debunking creationism means that creationism is true and biologists are just jealous cranks. Such is the miserable standard of rationality he displays here.

As I said. As human beings we should pity Mr Gabriel, and hope he recovers whilst he still has some lead in the pencil. You should pity him, but not allow him to waste your precious time at university. You can do better than Mr Gabriel.

There is a real choice to make:

i. You can choose to have faith in your own ability to overcome commonly experienced intellectual obstacles and master the mathematics that has given us quantum mechanics, chaos theory, general relativity and all of the modern technology we take for granted. The ability to build the internet, build super sonic aircraft, to map the human genome, to treat cancer, to study the human brain and to begin the long march towards quantum computers and nuclear fusion reactors. You can choose to learn the mainstream mathematics that is demonstrably right and effective,

or

ii. You can choose to believe that mathematically illiterate fairy stories and armchair psychology nonsense partly inspired from borderline delirious philosophy books written before we even knew germs existed, are somehow more insightful than the scientific community of the past 100 years (and before...).

The path of reason that Albert Einstein and Alan Turing followed, or the path of descending into ego-maniacal self-sabotage.

Your choice.

Kind Regards

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 13, 2021, 5:32:20 PM4/13/21
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No worries Sergio,

The camera isn't perfect, but I hope it proves to be helpful.

Kind Regards

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 13, 2021, 5:34:44 PM4/13/21
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The pleasure was mine Sir.

I suspect it was somewhat more than a few decades too late for Mr Gabriel, but we can live in hope :-) .

Kind Regards

arx bodius

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Apr 14, 2021, 2:32:48 AM4/14/21
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Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always simple and logical.
With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my calculus test.
To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician and a great teacher of mathematics

Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's work in just a few hours and see for himself.

FromTheRafters

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Apr 14, 2021, 4:41:10 AM4/14/21
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on 4/14/2021, arx bodius supposed :
Sure, but if they understand calculus they will realize he is wrong.

Were the answers you got wrong related to the existence or
non-existence of real numbers? Mr. Gabriel is a charlatan.

Eram semper recta

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Apr 14, 2021, 6:44:45 AM4/14/21
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On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 04:41:10 UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:
> on 4/14/2021, arx bodius supposed :
> > Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always
> > simple and logical. With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my
> > calculus test. To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician
> > and a great teacher of mathematics
> >
> > Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's
> > work in just a few hours and see for himself.
> Sure, but if they understand calculus they will realize he is wrong.

It is because they understand that they do well, you moron!

Here is a mainstream professor who realises there is a problem which he has no clue how to fix:

https://faculty.etsu.edu/knisleyj/calculus/Crisis.htm

I corresponded with this idiot many years ago but he was too stupid and arrogant to study my great work. Remind you of yourself?

I do know better. :)

>
> Were the answers you got wrong related to the existence or
> non-existence of real numbers? Mr. Gabriel is a charlatan.

The New Calculus is proof that there is no requirement of ill-formed concepts such as "real number" because I was once again the FIRST human to prove the mean value theorem constructively.

The mainstream statement is unremarkable gibberish.

Mostowski Collapse

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Apr 14, 2021, 6:55:31 AM4/14/21
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ETSU is still in transition: COVID-19 Response: ETSU will begin
transition to Modified Stage 4 Operations on May 15.
https://www.etsu.edu/ehome/

So is ETSU non-binary?

P.S.: Maybe I got some things mixed up here, not sure
whats going on in USA.

Peter

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Apr 14, 2021, 6:56:48 AM4/14/21
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Eram semper recta wrote:
> On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 04:41:10 UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:
>> on 4/14/2021, arx bodius supposed :
>>> Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always
>>> simple and logical. With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my
>>> calculus test. To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician
>>> and a great teacher of mathematics
>>>
>>> Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's
>>> work in just a few hours and see for himself.
>> Sure, but if they understand calculus they will realize he is wrong.
>
> It is because they understand that they do well, you moron!
>
> Here is a mainstream professor who realises there is a problem which he has no clue how to fix:
>
> https://faculty.etsu.edu/knisleyj/calculus/Crisis.htm

I was puzzled by

'Is calculus the first step toward an understanding of the topology of
the real line? Or is calculus the first step in the exploration of
manifolds and the geometry of mechanics? Of course, the answer is "both,"'

Some might think that understanding the topology of the real line is the
first step toward an understanding of calculus.

>
> I corresponded with this idiot many years ago but he was too stupid and arrogant to study my great work. Remind you of yourself?
>
> I do know better. :)
>
>>
>> Were the answers you got wrong related to the existence or
>> non-existence of real numbers? Mr. Gabriel is a charlatan.
>
> The New Calculus is proof that there is no requirement of ill-formed concepts such as "real number" because I was once again the FIRST human to prove the mean value theorem constructively.
>
> The mainstream statement is unremarkable gibberish.
>


--
Just as 'beautiful' points the way for aesthetics and 'good' for ethics,
so do words like 'true' for logic. All sciences have truth as their
goal; but logic is also concerned with it in a quite different way:
logic has much the same relation to truth as physics has to weight or
heat. Frege in 'Thoughts' (Der Gedanke)

WM

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Apr 14, 2021, 6:58:02 AM4/14/21
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ross.pro...@gmx.com schrieb am Dienstag, 13. April 2021 um 21:53:49 UTC+2:
> Just to add to what I said, a collection of nice lecture videos on real analysis, including a construction of both the rational numbers and the also a construction of the real numbers using Dedekind cuts can be found here
>
> http://analysisyawp.blogspot.com/

As a non-native speaker, and on principle, I prefer written text. Does the construction yield countably many or uncountably many Dedekind-cuts?

Regards, WM

Eram semper recta

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Apr 14, 2021, 7:01:41 AM4/14/21
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Thank you my young friend!

Mathematics IS simple and anyone can learn it. When concepts are well formed and a simple approach is used, then even the most complicated mathematical problems become easy.

It is a fallacy that only some people are born good at mathematics. Anyone can master mathematics if taught correctly. Unfortunately, education has been hijacked by perverts, homosexuals, pedophiles and ignoramuses who have never understood mathematics. They have an outward appearance of intelligence but inwardly the stupid, evil cowards know that they are fools.

The teaching community is replete with the most unbelievably stupid and unqualified people who have no ethics, no morals and most importantly know nothing of value.

Oscar Wilde, an eccentric homosexual was honest enough to say:

"Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught."

That quote is especially true in the mathematics community of today. Endless garbage that has ZERO use and is taught incorrectly has put off the majority of students who are interested in mathematics. The introduction of that cancerous fool Cantor dealt the final blow to any reason or logic.

Eram semper recta

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Apr 14, 2021, 7:06:25 AM4/14/21
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On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 06:56:48 UTC-4, Peter wrote:
> Eram semper recta wrote:
> > On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 04:41:10 UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:
> >> on 4/14/2021, arx bodius supposed :
> >>> Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always
> >>> simple and logical. With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my
> >>> calculus test. To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician
> >>> and a great teacher of mathematics
> >>>
> >>> Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's
> >>> work in just a few hours and see for himself.
> >> Sure, but if they understand calculus they will realize he is wrong.
> >
> > It is because they understand that they do well, you moron!
> >
> > Here is a mainstream professor who realises there is a problem which he has no clue how to fix:
> >
> > https://faculty.etsu.edu/knisleyj/calculus/Crisis.htm
> I was puzzled by
>
> 'Is calculus the first step toward an understanding of the topology of
> the real line? Or is calculus the first step in the exploration of
> manifolds and the geometry of mechanics? Of course, the answer is "both,"'
>
> Some might think that understanding the topology of the real line is the
> first step toward an understanding of calculus.

Sigh. Do you even know what it means to be a <<number line>>?

Learn here moron!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-mOEooW03iLMHVYcE8xcmRZRnc

The real crisis started with mathematics even before calculus. For example, most math academics have no clue where their entire theory of arithmetic originated:

https://youtu.be/TS9Asz6fZrs

A simpler video:

https://youtu.be/h_RtgDExaIY

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 14, 2021, 7:23:12 AM4/14/21
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I thank Mr Gabriel for his comment, as it actually provides some basis for a serious discussion.

The essay Mr Gabriel links to by Jeff Knisley & Kevin Shirley, is one I am actually fond of myself, as I read it many years ago after I finished my undergraduate degree and I was quite sympathetic to it at the time. The authors did have a go at making their own calculus book but got little beyond the one variable case. What they did was quite good content wise, so its a shame a complete project didn't get carried out.

The good points they make concern pedagogy (i.e. teaching and course structure) and the choice of sub-topics within calculus; the number of possible choices is enormous and students have diverse interests;, but they are not criticizing the correctness of real analysis itself.

It lends no support to your New Calculus. As has been explained several times, your secant method does work in a limited number of simple algebraic cases, but even then has difficulty with some basic requirements for analyzing functions. In the general transcendental case it is not powerful enough. The only reason I can think of for teaching the secant approach you advocate, at all, is to illustrate the limitations of pre-limit methods as motivation as they run out of steam quite quickly.

In the time since the essay was written, books which are more thorough, have more rigor, and a sharper eye towards applications than the early editions of Stewart or Thomas & Finney, have been written. An example is:

Calculus: a complete course 9th Edition, by Adams and Essex.

A solid piece of work which meets some of the objections in the essay. Numerical methods are far more up to date for example, and Taylor series is more thoroughly treated. It also includes elements of real analysis, and treats multivariable differentiation more extensively than Stewart does. It is however quite information heavy, so the problem of structuring the curriculum appropriately so that it was neither too superficial nor too difficult would still exist.

One suggestion for making the curriculum more unified, that was in the air around the early 2000s was to incorporate the history of mathematics into the presentation of the curriculum in order to provide motivation and informally highlight connections. This is a tricky proposal to pull off, but has always struck me as having some merit, but would probably require expanding the time available for calculus in the degree structure. A tough call, given the number of topics undergraduates have to look at to realistically get close enough to research ability at postgrad level.

I would also favor giving geometry some more time at first year undergraduate level. Too often undergraduates just get some exposure to basic vector material with some brief discussion of conic sections thrown in for first year geometry. Some thing more systematic, but still suitably modern, might be beneficial for making calculus easier to absorb. I would suggest the book:

Elementary Geometry, by Roe

Not Euclid's elements because whilst some synthetic geometry would be useful, a rigorous and well motivated presentation of the analytic case would be more useful.

Kind Regards

Peter

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Apr 14, 2021, 7:29:33 AM4/14/21
to
Eram semper recta wrote:
> On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 06:56:48 UTC-4, Peter wrote:
>> Eram semper recta wrote:
>>> On Wednesday, 14 April 2021 at 04:41:10 UTC-4, FromTheRafters wrote:
>>>> on 4/14/2021, arx bodius supposed :
>>>>> Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always
>>>>> simple and logical. With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my
>>>>> calculus test. To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician
>>>>> and a great teacher of mathematics
>>>>>
>>>>> Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's
>>>>> work in just a few hours and see for himself.
>>>> Sure, but if they understand calculus they will realize he is wrong.
>>>
>>> It is because they understand that they do well, you moron!
>>>
>>> Here is a mainstream professor who realises there is a problem which he has no clue how to fix:
>>>
>>> https://faculty.etsu.edu/knisleyj/calculus/Crisis.htm
>> I was puzzled by
>>
>> 'Is calculus the first step toward an understanding of the topology of
>> the real line? Or is calculus the first step in the exploration of
>> manifolds and the geometry of mechanics? Of course, the answer is "both,"'
>>
>> Some might think that understanding the topology of the real line is the
>> first step toward an understanding of calculus.
>
> Sigh. Do you even know what it means to be a <<number line>>?
>
> Learn here moron!
>
> https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-mOEooW03iLMHVYcE8xcmRZRnc

You are as ignorant as you are obnoxious.

>
> The real crisis started with mathematics even before calculus. For example, most math academics have no clue where their entire theory of arithmetic originated:
>
> https://youtu.be/TS9Asz6fZrs
>
> A simpler video:
>
> https://youtu.be/h_RtgDExaIY


Eram semper recta

unread,
Apr 14, 2021, 7:50:18 AM4/14/21
to
To you and your ilk I will be nothing but obnoxious. You are an insignificant nincompoop who like his fellow idiots has an over-inflated estimation of his knowledge and (lack of?) ability.

You do not deserve to be treated with respect, because you are the epitome of IGNORANCE, dishonesty, stupidity, incompetence, arrogance and jealousy.

Tell me troll, did you find anything that you imagined in your bird brain to be wrong in that link? Chuckle.

I do know better, you fucking idiot!!! Morons like you are the bane of my existence.

Quantum Bubbles

unread,
Apr 14, 2021, 8:09:32 AM4/14/21
to
Hi Peter,

Mr Gabriel is indeed quite ignorant, which is a shame, because given his apparent commitment to what he finds interesting, if his energy had been better directed he might actually have gone on to make a modest contribution to some field somewhere. His ego has just never allowed him to cut his losses, and instead insists on doubling down over and over again.

For what can only be assumed to be rather childish reasons Mr Gabriel also has a preoccupation with being fooled by the genetic fallacy. He seems to live under the misapprehension that ancient Greece was some sort of rationalist paradise full of almost infallible wise people, and whose ideas are generally superior to the academic and scientific community of the modern era. Since, by his own account, he is part Greek, he then feels this somehow transmits down the ages to himself.

But let's tell some home truths shall we?

- Which culture's leading philosopher produced scientifically illiterate dogmatic works that helped hold back western intellectual development for centuries in the fields of biology and physics (possibly politics as well)? [Hint: the philosopher was called Aristotle]

- The reverence of which geometry book helped held back the development of mathematics in the West for generations even after the Renaissance had begun? [Hint: Euclid was the author]

- which ancient culture was sometimes credited with discoveries in geometry that were in fact discovered and learned from elsewhere? [Hint: Pythagoras isn't believed to have actually discovered Pythagoras' theorem]

There were some sharp people in ancient Greece, but a lot more more intellectual loons (by today's better informed standards) and even the smart one's had some ridiculous beliefs that could be easily checked at the time; Aristotle's drivel about women comes to mind.
I wonder if Mr Gabriel thinks Chemists and Quantum Physicists are all cranks, because the world is actually made of earth, water, air and fire? I haven't heard him say it, but you never know...

Greece gets the emphasis that it does in the history of ideas, partly because it is only recently that we have begun to pay more attention to the accomplishments in the intellectual history of ancient China, Persia and such places.

Kind Regards

Quantum Bubbles

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Apr 14, 2021, 8:29:50 AM4/14/21
to
I suspect this is not a serious comment (if I am wrong I apologize and direct attention to the final paragraph).

I thank Mr Gabriel's foot for allowing one of its warmers to speak on his behalf. Hint for future reference: the phrase "in just a few hours and see for himself" along with the name which translates rather amusingly from Greek to English, kind of raises suspicions.

In the unlikely event this is a genuine comment from one of Mr Gabriel's former students (I thought Mr Gabriel had been out of work for some time by his own account?), I would say that people that are hopelessly wrong about some parts of a subject, like Mr Gabriel is about calculus, can still teach other parts of it well. Mr Gabriel might be quite good at teaching parts of synthetic geometry for example, and a concrete visual approach that he likes (minus the unnecessary philosophy jargon) in arithmetic might help some non-university students. But in calculus, if you scored 92/100, then you either weren't taking a difficult exam; for example it might have been multiple choice so your working out wasn't being graded, or you didn't apply Mr Gabriel's method sysetmatically, because it is not powerful enough for even basic general calculus.

Kind Regards

FromTheRafters

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Apr 14, 2021, 10:27:10 AM4/14/21
to
Eram semper recta pretended :
You should still be ignoring me. Do I have to embarrass you monthly?

Sergio

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Apr 14, 2021, 10:32:41 AM4/14/21
to
ha! JG posting as "arx bodius".

JG's book is free, because it is worthless.

New Age Prophet

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Apr 14, 2021, 10:40:05 AM4/14/21
to
It's still fun to make a fool of you. Chuckle.

New Age Prophet

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Apr 14, 2021, 10:41:57 AM4/14/21
to
On Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 8:29:50 AM UTC-4, ross.pro...@gmx.com wrote:
> On Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 7:32:48 AM UTC+1, arx bodius wrote:
> > Mr. Gabriel has often helped me with mathematics. His explanations are always simple and logical.
> > With his help I managed to get a score of 92/100 on my calculus test.
> > To me it is clear that Mr. Gabriel is a great mathematician and a great teacher of mathematics
> >
> > Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr. Gabriel's work in just a few hours and see for himself.

> I suspect this is not a serious comment (if I am wrong I apologize and direct attention to the final paragraph).

Oh it's pretty serious you pathetic crank! I have stopped working several years ago but I still am able to help out students who have reached a dead end because of fucking morons like YOU!

Shepherd Castilloux

unread,
Apr 14, 2021, 10:44:18 AM4/14/21
to
Sergio wrote:

>> Anyone who knows high school algebra can study the basics of Mr.
>> Gabriel's work in just a few hours and see for himself.
>>
> ha! JG posting as "arx bodius".JG's book is free, because it is
> worthless.

The Secret Contents of Ever Given – Evergreen Container Ship – Translated
Video By Kaan Sariaydin
https://www.mavigazetem.com.tr/the-secret-contents-of-ever-given-
evergreen-container-ship-translated-video-by-kaan-sariaydin/

https://www.youtube.com/embed/8Z1eFrE66aM

Shall I tell you the True story here? Now … Everyone, really needs to see
this from a different perspective!
(Globalists’) 1st Card, what was it? ‘The Techno Weapon Corona Covid-19!
They were planning to put an end to this matter in March Do you know WHY
the corona cases are going up?
Now, In order to understand what I mean, We have written an article about
this on mavigazetem.com and as we go along we will expose this further
There (in Suez), Nationalist Powers carried out an operation against
Global Powers Jointly Turkey, Israel, Egypt, Qatar carried out an (secret)
operation The Evergreen crisis is an (secret) operation (against
Globalists)
All events are interrelated, Let me explain this …
The Evergreen crisis, that container ship carried Very Important Contents
Those (shipping) containers had the products of a 30 year plan…
… products as a result of 30 years’ worth of investments Let’s analyse
this Step By Step and show you the visuals on the big screen This is Why
Covid-19 Cases are on the Rise!!! (Globalist) were planning to end (the
Corona) game …
Hang On!!! I didn’t get this right! So the Evergreen Containers, the so
called Suez Canal event, the Ship that was stuck there for days.
We were told that the ship broke down due to a technical problem Nooo this
is a lie Why that Ship was stuck there? In that particular way? Is there a
deeper secret behind this? What should our interpretation of this Event
be?
Of course, of course (there is a plan behind this)

Quantum Bubbles

unread,
Aug 28, 2022, 1:17:51 PM8/28/22
to
On Wednesday, April 14, 2021 at 3:41:57 PM UTC+1, New Age Prophet wrote:
[snip]

Sometimes, a comment is worth bumping up for public service purposes, even if only once a year.

JG 115 is still at it after all this time. Dear, oh dear. What happens when the penny drops and he realizes he has made a mistake?

Regards

QB 133

Remain Calm and Keep Loving Real Analysis

Eram semper recta

unread,
May 11, 2023, 2:41:56 PM5/11/23
to
On Tuesday, 13 April 2021 at 06:23:36 UTC-4, Quantum Bubbles wrote:
> Mr Gabriel's "New Calculus" will not give you an advantage in understanding mathematics and will stall your mathematical development if you take it too seriously. As someone with multiple mathematics degrees and a teaching qualification in mathematics, I am genuinely disturbed by the idea that students, perhaps suffering from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and other very common difficulties, might have their precious time and effort wasted by this.
>
> Calculus and analysis can be tricky subjects to learn, and even trickier to master. There is a lot of material to digest; many definitions, many techniques, the calculus books are sometimes 1000 pages long, and the analysis books seem to be packed with a blizzard of inequalities. You might have spent days learning an idea and then weeks later it feels as if you have forgotten it all.
>
> It can look very daunting. This is a perfectly normal feeling and neither signifies that you cannot do it, nor that the mathematics community does not know what it is doing. There are many books on the same subjects, and different students will be better served by different choices of books, or different ways of presenting the same ideas. Teachers cannot always cater for every preference at once; but that does not mean there isn't a good book FOR YOU out there.
>
> It is perfectly normal for it to take years to master these topics, and it is perfectly normal to struggle at various stages. It is normal to struggle at the beginning when a mathematical concept is new. It is normal to struggle when the topics have become more abstract. It is normal to struggle when connections between different ideas need to be explored, because the cognitive load is demanding. It is normal for memories to fade after the pressure of exams has ended, unless you practice to help solidify those memories afterwards.
>
> This is true for most people; it doesn't really matter which university you go to, or how smart you are (even genius's sometimes need feedback from other experts: Leonhard Euler and John Nash did for example).
>
> The solution to this is to find study methods that work FOR YOU (which might not be the same as what works for someone else), and which books work best FOR YOU. I will give what I hope is a helpful list for both at the end of this post, including some genuinely useful YouTube channels. Once you find material and approaches that work for you, you can be surprised at how much more smoothly things go; but it is never truly easy, because maths is abstract and often subtle, and abstraction is always difficult.
>
> And it is perfectly normal for "philosophical" questions about a subject to sometimes occur to students, which they might find difficult to verbalize, and might not feel their book is directly addressing.
>
> Under no circumstances is the right response to this, to seek refuge in silly ancient Greek metaphysics, amateur psychology, and fantasizing that 150 years worth of mathematics experts missed the real value of an ancient Greek geometry book that had been regularly read and understood for centuries; nor that they are clueless about set theory that has been thought about for 150 years. Philosophers and mathematicians of many cultures have been thinking about abstract ideas of number and space for millennia; Mr Gabriel's ideas are neither deep, nor special, nor generally effective.
>
> Qualified mathematicians and teachers, including myself, have read Mr Gabriel's New Calculus and are not impressed by it. It can work in a very small class of situations, just like other pre-limit methods which existed in the 16th century, but beyond that not really. It also struggles with basic and important ideas like points of inflection, which are important in pure mathematics, game theory, the calculus of variations and other areas.
>
> Some examples of this kind of historical development can be found here, in this lovely 25 minute 1980's BBC/Open University video starring mathematics historian Jeremy Gray:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObPg3ki9GOI
>
> Needless to say, Mr Gabriel's approach cannot be used to develop a useful calculus of variations nor indeed many of the standard methods of modern mathematical physics.
>
> Mr Gabriel is also mistaken in believing that he has a special insight into the concept of number. Elementary conceptions of number were common in higher mathematics pre-20th century. Leonhard Euler gave a much smoother and fruitful offering of one in his lovely book:
>
> "Elements of Algebra"
>
> which has been read since the 18th century, and can still be purchased in various abridged forms today. Euler was a genius and clear explainer, but no one (especially not Euler himself) claims he was a genius because of his smooth presentation of a number concept.
>
> POSITIVE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STUDENTS
>
> 1] Concerning philosophy
>
> Most philosophical difficulties with early set theory have been satisfactorily addressed, but the detailed explanations can be very hard and dwelling on them during undergraduate studies is often not advisable because it can take far too long, and is better approached when you have more experience.
>
> There is nothing wrong with having philosophical opinions that differ from the mainstream per se, provided they are not dogmatic and provided they possess clarity. They should be clearly thought out, should not inhibit your ability to do core mathematics (algebra, calculus etc.) and shouldn't descend into silly conspiracy theories about academia.
>
> If, for example, students feel drawn to a more algorithmic and less Cantorian approach to mathematics than is normally presented, then I would suggest they look up Professor Harold M. Edwards, who has championed an algorithmic approach to mathematics for many years. His webpage is here:
>
> https://math.nyu.edu/faculty/edwardsd/
>
> In particular his book on elementary number theory:
>
> Higher Arithmetic: an algorithmic introduction to number theory
>
> might be suitable for such students. I do not share Professor Edwards' philosophical opinions, but at least he is intellectually sober and does genuinely good mathematics within the framework he advocates. So if you dislike or struggle with Cantorianism, then try Edwards instead, don't waste your time with vague ancient Greek metaphysics and ultra-finitist nonsense.
>
>
> 2] On psychology and learning
>
> Psychologists have been studying the learning of mathematics for decades, and some genuinely useful advice for studying more effectively has come out of it. Look up:
>
> - spaced practice and retrieval practice
>
> - Frayer models/diagrams
>
> - the brilliant lecture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlU-zDU6aQ0&t
>
> - the benefits of cardio-vascular exercise for improving study focus (the neurologist John Ratey has presented good stuff on this kind of thing)
>
> - The psychologist Anders Ericsson, who researched the development of expertise.
>
> Don't fall into the trap of thinking that if you stare at a problem for a few minutes and can't do it, that this means you aren't able to be very good at the subject. Many mathematicians need to ponder things at length and return to the same thing in an iterative fashion over a period of time. Even genius's like Nobel prize winning mathematical physicist Roger Penrose do this, and if you want to see what slow, fallible pondering can produce, look up his book:
>
> The Road to Reality
>
> which provides beautiful illustrations of what many of the mathematical ideas you study can be used to do in physics. You won't find a better guide than Penrose on that sort of thing. A brilliant teacher and a true inspiration.
>
> The book: How to Solve it, by G. Polya, is a classic short guide for undergraduates in developing problem solving skills in mathematics. Far more worthy of your time than Mr Gabriel's output.
>
>
> 3] Books on analysis
>
> The best book on analysis FOR YOU, is the one that is easiest to learn from FOR YOU. There is no universally suitable book and no book is perfect. An excellent book for students who lack confidence is:
>
> Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis 2nd ed, by Rod Haggarty.
>
> It goes at a gentle pace, has diagrams, historical asides, and solutions to exercises. Good for self-study. It's only significant drawback is that it doesn't construct the real numbers. But for that, you can look up explanations of Dedekind cuts on the internet.
>
> I found my first and second year courses on real analysis quite difficult at first, but I bought Haggarty's book, threw myself into it and I aced my courses and went on to study the Calculus of Variations at MSc level later on. I didn't disrupt my education by indulging the silly idea that real analysis was built on obvious delusions and lies. That way represents the slow decent into bitterness and madness.
>
> A book which is somewhat more difficult (but not impossibly hard), but which has a beautiful style of exposition and does look at Dedekind cuts, is the classic text:
>
> A Course in Pure Mathematics (centenary edition), by G.H. Hardy
>
> Having both texts so that you can switch between them is a perfectly good strategy. Don't be afraid to have different books on the same subject. Professional mathematicians often do.
>
>
> 4] Genuinely helpful YouTube channels
>
> One of the least toxic places on YouTube, hosted by a university lecturer, lots of short advice videos about studying mathematics, book reviews and much else:
>
> The Math Sorcerer: https://www.youtube.com/user/themathsorcerer
>
> For good lecture series on mathematics and other topics, such as linear algebra, visit MITOpenCourseWare
>
> https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEBb1b_L6zDS3xTUrIALZOw
>
> For some very beautiful visual presentations of mathematical ideas, you would find it hard to do better than 3Blue1Brown:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYO_jab_esuFRV4b17AJtAw
>
> Best of luck with your mathematics studies, and don't allow yourselves to be done a disservice by silly conspiracy theories. Seek assistance from your college or university if you are having difficulty with a particular subject or study in general; it is perfectly normal, and can be dealt with by seeking out good advice from your tutors, library or study support departments. Not by wasting your time on delirious rantings on the internet.
>
> Kindest Regards

This lying anonymous bastard continues to spew out his vomit.

Read for yourself what I have to say and not what some dumb UK cunt spews out here on sci.math:

https://independent.academia.edu/JohnGabriel30

Eram semper recta

unread,
May 11, 2023, 2:44:20 PM5/11/23
to
Begin with my historic geometric theorem of January 2020 which exposes the lie that mainstream calculus was ever rigorous:

https://www.academia.edu/62358358/My_historic_geometric_theorem_of_January_2020

https://www.academia.edu/79881709/Six_simple_reasons_why_the_mainstream_derivative_definition_of_calculus_is_flawed

and much more at the above link: https://independent.academia.edu/JohnGabriel30

Eram semper recta

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Jun 26, 2023, 11:39:27 AM6/26/23
to
Want to learn calculus in just two pages? See below.

https://www.academia.edu/103723139/My_historic_geometric_theorem_for_Dummies

Eram semper recta

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Sep 5, 2023, 7:34:08 PM9/5/23
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So "silly" that I revealed the Holy Gail of Calculus, which not a single jealous bastard of the mainstream even came close to discovering:

https://www.academia.edu/105576431/The_Holy_Grail_of_Calculus

markus...@gmail.com

unread,
Sep 7, 2023, 12:28:55 PM9/7/23
to
You still struggle with calculus?

Eram semper recta

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Sep 7, 2023, 1:42:23 PM9/7/23
to
On Thursday, 7 September 2023 at 12:28:55 UTC-4, markus...
💩💩💩

Jay Dee

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Dec 4, 2023, 5:49:04 PM12/4/23
to
On Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 6:23:36 AM UTC-4, Quantum Bubbles wrote:
> Mr Gabriel's "New Calculus" will not give you an advantage in understanding mathematics and will stall your mathematical development if you take it too seriously. As someone with multiple mathematics degrees and a teaching qualification in mathematics, I am genuinely disturbed by the idea that students, perhaps suffering from anxiety, lack of self-confidence and other very common difficulties, might have their precious time and effort wasted by this.
>
Let's be honest. The New Calculus is actually much better than the old calculus. The 'old calculus' is really bad. That proof of the derivative is a terrible hack with the magical h that can somehow have multiple values at once (not zero yet zero? lol). Grow up guys. Swallow your pride and admit the truth.

Eram semper recta

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Jan 28, 2024, 4:33:10 PMJan 28
to
Hello Shithead and slimy English coward that you are.

Have you noticed how my channel has grown? You dumb, stupid, vile bastard! You will bow the knee to me in time. LMAO.

Don't be fooled students! Calculus is NOT about limits and does not require any limit theory whatsoever.

Neither ignoramus Newton nor Leibniz formulated a rigorous calculus. It was I, John Gabriel, who solved the tangent line and area problem.

Calculus is about smooth functions. And no, differentiation and integration are NOT reverse processes as the dumb bastards (math professors and teachers in Western Unis) teach you.

Differentiation is about slope.
Integration is about the product of level magnitudes (arithmetic means).

https://www.academia.edu/105576431/The_Holy_Grail_of_Calculus

I know better than anyone else on the planet. This is fact, not delusion. Don't believe me moron? STUDY my work, you fucking idiots and get a brain!

Eram semper recta

unread,
Feb 20, 2024, 10:40:04 PMFeb 20
to
Mr. Gabriel is so "silly" that he makes Isaac Newton look like an intellectually challenged adult:

https://www.academia.edu/109334669/Ancient_Greek_trigonometric_formulas_better_than_anything_ever_known

Students: Don't be fooled by the dumbest bastards in mainstream academia - math professors and teachers. They are pathologically jealous of me. Yes, I know ... it must be absolutely awful to be scum like them.
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