Memorised Pi (or other #'s)

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Andrew Kingdom

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May 30, 1994, 2:28:25 PM5/30/94
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Okay, it's brain relaxing/straining time (depending on your point
of view).

How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
to?
Myself, pi to 34 places.
An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.

Any advances?

-Andrew #%^)

EFEDULA

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May 30, 1994, 6:17:05 PM5/30/94
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In article <2sdb89$r...@ausom.ausom.oz.au>, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au
(Andrew Kingdom) writes:

> How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental
{sp?})
> to?
> Myself, pi to 34 places.
> An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.

Letsee, all I know is
3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751058209749445923078
1640628621... (the last 1 is a zero that's rounded up)
That would be 78 places. I know someone who has it memorized 150+
digits, and somebody else who knows it to 400+ (both high school
students). I believe the world record is 40,000.
Everytime I'm really bored, I just start working on a few more
digits. Generally I like to go until I reach a zero, since they make
good stopping places (next time I'm bored, I'll start working on the
next group of digits which is 089986280 (I had to look that part up))

As for other numbers, I know e is 2.718281828459045..., 16 places,
and the next part is 235360 (again, that part I had to look up).
sqrt(pi) is 1.7724538509055, 14 places, and I don't plan to learn any
more.
Those are the only ones I know to more than 10 places, but I'm
working on learning a few digits of logs and square roots of small
numbers.

E
-----------------------------------------
| Edward Early | Life's a beach and |
| efe...@aol.com | then you drown... |
-----------------------------------------

ge...@macadam.mpce.mq.edu.au

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May 30, 1994, 7:41:10 PM5/30/94
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In article <2sdb89$r...@ausom.ausom.oz.au>, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au (Andrew
Kingdom) wrote:
$>
$> How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental
$> {sp?}) to?

How many places of Liouville's number would you like?

.110001000000000000000001....

GM

Bruce Ikenaga

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May 30, 1994, 10:51:49 PM5/30/94
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In a previous article, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au (Andrew Kingdom) says:

>
>Okay, it's brain relaxing/straining time (depending on your point
>of view).
>
>How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
>to?
>Myself, pi to 34 places.
>An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.

Ummm ... a little over a hundred, I think. It was a
popular thing in high school.

What I would like to know is whether anyone does this
by picturing or visualizing the digits, as opposed to
reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read
somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
like?
--

Bruce Ikenaga
US mail: Dept. of Math, CWRU, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
E-mail : b...@po.CWRU.edu

Sebastian Goette

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May 31, 1994, 9:11:47 AM5/31/94
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Chris Minwah Fang-Yen (cfan...@leland.Stanford.EDU) wrote:
: In article <2sdb89$r...@ausom.ausom.oz.au>,
: Andrew Kingdom <a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au> wrote:
: >
: >Okay, it's brain relaxing/straining time (depending on your point

: >of view).
: >
: >How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
: >to?

: Pi to 45 digits, memorized in sixth grade. I have tried to add
: more digits occasionally but for some reason they don't seem to
: stick.

: Chris

There is a rhyme starting something like:

I know a maths professor.
1 4 1 4 9
He always weeps and sighs,
2 6 5 3 5
whenever polyhedra capsize ...

You get the decimal digits of pi after the decimal point
by counting the letters in the word.
I don't no if its correct, nor how it continues ...
Who does (there might have been something in Sci. American) ??

Sebastian Goette

daniel kalman biss

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May 31, 1994, 1:06:51 PM5/31/94
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In article <2se8o5$e...@usenet.ins.cwru.edu>,

Bruce Ikenaga <b...@po.CWRU.Edu> wrote:
>
>>
>>How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
>>to?
>>Myself, pi to 34 places.
>>An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.
>
> Ummm ... a little over a hundred, I think. It was a
>popular thing in high school.
>
> What I would like to know is whether anyone does this
>by picturing or visualizing the digits, as opposed to
>reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read
>somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
>I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
>like?
>--
>
>Bruce Ikenaga
>US mail: Dept. of Math, CWRU, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
>E-mail : b...@po.CWRU.edu

I learned e to 15 (because of an insane mneumonic device that my high
school teacher showed me) and pi to one hundred because that's how
many I had access to, but I sincerely wonder if it has any worth at
all. It certainly doesn't relax me, and it's hardly something I'm
proud of. Hence, my question is why do so many people find it so
attractive, including those (like myself) who don't particularly enjoy
it?

By the way, I learned pi partially auditory (the first 35), partially
visual (the last 30 or so), and the rest a mish mash of the two.
Needless to say, it's the in-between ones that I know the least well.
Visually just means that I have no auditory association, that is, it
doesn't "sound right," I just see the next five (I memorized them in
groups of five) moving from right to left in front of me.

Tord G.M. Malmgren

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May 31, 1994, 4:44:45 AM5/31/94
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In article <2se8o5$e...@usenet.INS.CWRU.Edu>, b...@po.CWRU.Edu (Bruce Ikenaga) writes:

>>How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
>>to?

> What I would like to know is whether anyone does this


>by picturing or visualizing the digits, as opposed to
>reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read
>somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
>I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
>like?

a guy I knew first year at Univ. of Stockholm knew the first 100, so
I learned 150, then he did 400, so I did 500, then he did a 1000, so
I gave up, but anyways, he remembered them visualy (whereas I did it
by sound,) and he had grouped them on a paper in groups of 5, so it
would make 50 on each line, and then you could ask him "667th decimal"
and he'd find out which line and row, and he'd see that group and tell
you.. he'd do it backwards from the 885th decimal if you wanted him to...


-----------------------+-------------------------------------------------------
Tord G.M. Malmgren | These opinions are my OWN, and NOT of this department!
Stockholm University +-------------------------------------------------------
Department of Physics | InterNet: To...@VanA.PhySto.SE
Box 6730 | BITNet : TordM@SESUF51
113 85 Stockholm | Phone : +46-8-164588
SWEDEN | GIF : bbs.augsburg.edu /files/user_gifs/tord.gif
-----------------------+-------------------------------------------------------

Leon Hsu

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May 31, 1994, 1:10:07 PM5/31/94
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In article <2se8o5$e...@usenet.ins.cwru.edu>,
Bruce Ikenaga <b...@po.CWRU.Edu> wrote:
>
>In a previous article, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au (Andrew Kingdom) says:
>
>>
>>Okay, it's brain relaxing/straining time (depending on your point
>>of view).
>>
>>How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
>>to?
>>Myself, pi to 34 places.
>>An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.
>
> Ummm ... a little over a hundred, I think. It was a
>popular thing in high school.
>
> What I would like to know is whether anyone does this
>by picturing or visualizing the digits, as opposed to
>reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read
>somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
>I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
>like?


My brother got bored when he was in high school and I think he made
it to about 2000 digits. I'm sure he doesn't still know them and
I think at his best there would usually be a mistake or two in the
last thousand digits.

I should ask him sometime how he remembered them.

-leon.
--

Chris Minwah Fang-Yen

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May 31, 1994, 5:01:52 AM5/31/94
to
In article <2sdb89$r...@ausom.ausom.oz.au>,
Andrew Kingdom <a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au> wrote:
>
>Okay, it's brain relaxing/straining time (depending on your point
>of view).
>
>How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
>to?

Pi to 45 digits, memorized in sixth grade. I have tried to add

Willem Jan Hengeveld

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Jun 1, 1994, 11:45:23 PM6/1/94
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b...@po.CWRU.Edu (Bruce Ikenaga) writes:
>
> In a previous article, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au (Andrew Kingdom) says:

> >How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
> >to?
> >Myself, pi to 34 places.
> >An ex-colegue's colegue, pi to 75 places.

> reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read


> somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
> I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
> like?

I remember 3. 141 5926 535 8 979 323 8 46264 .. and an 8 somewhere

this is how I remember it, I remember the palidromes easiest,
and fill in the gaps, when I was still in high school I think I
remembered about 10 more, but I lost those, I guess not palindromic
enough (3383279502884...)

willem

Robb Nebbe

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Jun 3, 1994, 7:50:34 AM6/3/94
to
In article <2se8o5$e...@usenet.INS.CWRU.Edu>, b...@po.CWRU.Edu (Bruce Ikenaga) writes:
:
: In a previous article, a...@bbs.ausom.oz.au (Andrew Kingdom) says:
: >How many places can you remember Pi (or your favorite trancendental {sp?})
: >to?


: Ummm ... a little over a hundred, I think. It was a


: popular thing in high school.
:
: What I would like to know is whether anyone does this
: by picturing or visualizing the digits, as opposed to
: reciting them and remembering the sound. I think I read
: somewhere that more people do it by sound than sight. But
: I'm curious ... if you do it by sight, what does it look
: like?

When I was 14 I had a contest with my brother to see who could memorize
the most digits of Pi (He won with 139). He did it by sound and I did
it by sight.

The interesting thing was that because our list was by groups
of 10 with 5 groups to a line I was able to immediately give, for
example, the 78th digit. My brother had to start with the 50th digit
and go through the series hoping he didn't mess up because he was
counting. Another advantage to having a picture in my head was that I
could recite Pi backwards from the 50th digit. (How's that for
something totally useless :-)


- Robb

AT...@asuacad.bitnet

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Jun 3, 1994, 6:05:35 PM6/3/94
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e = 2.7 andrew jackson squared: 2.718281828
right triangle: 459045
used two 45's: 2
my age :-) 35
how old I'll be next year: 36
My calculus teacher showed me that way back when. I tell it to my calculus
class now and then and they seem to like it. One of them even went to the
library to look up what 1828 had to do with Andrew Jackson.

--Lynn Kurtz

lewis.h.mammel..jr

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Jun 5, 1994, 11:47:14 PM6/5/94
to

Some time ago I undertook to memorise a hundred or so digits of
pi and wrote an interactive "pi trainer" on the computer. I added
a timer and embarked on a campaign of "speed pi typing" - I used
the top line of digits, not the number key pad. I recorded results
in a "pilog", which I still have. Some notable entries:

50 digits in 7 secs Tue Jan 25 16:46:32 1983
100 digits in 17 secs Tue Feb 15 11:53:14 1983
200 digits in 38 secs Sun Mar 27 16:17:22 1983
300 digits in 57 secs Wed Apr 13 13:44:08 1983
400 digits in 102 secs Fri May 11 16:07:48 1984

I started the timer on the initial keystroke ( "3" )
and ended the timer with a <CR>. The count specifies
digits after the decimal point ( which I also typed. )

I can still do 50 under 15 seconds, but that's about it.
Some have remarked on the visual versus aural methods of
memorizing. I found that I retained the digit sequence as
a motor skill, and actually had to go through the motion
of typing to recall them, in some instances.
I used the popular "groups of five" method throughout.

Not insane!

Lew Mammel, Jr.

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