How do I pronounce Ladefoged?

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misha

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Dec 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/11/95
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In article <4akb3g$c...@neptunus.pi.net>, m...@pi.net (Miguel Carrasquer
Vidal) wrote:

> how does one pronounce the name Ladefoged? Broad and narrow
transcriptions > accepted.

Ooh, it's so very, very tempting to reply "just as it's spelled!" and then
watch the flames ignite!

Miguel Carrasquer Vidal

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Dec 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/12/95
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I recently acquired Peter Ladefoged's "A Course in Phonetics (3rd.
ed.)", which I can heartily recommend to anyone who is interested in
the subject and hasn't read it yet.

Practically everything one needs to know about phonetics is explained
in the book, except one little detail: how does one pronounce the name


Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.

TIA,


Miguel Carrasquer Vidal ~ ~
Amsterdam _____________ ~ ~
m...@pi.net |_____________|||

========================== Ce .sig n'est pas une .cig


THOMailAddress=Torleif.Holthe@dnpost.md.dep.telemax.noOrganization=Directorate for nature management

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Dec 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/13/95
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In article <4akb3g$c...@neptunus.pi.net>, m...@pi.net (Miguel Carrasquer Vidal) says:
>
>I recently acquired Peter Ladefoged's "A Course in Phonetics (3rd.
>ed.)", which I can heartily recommend to anyone who is interested in
>the subject and hasn't read it yet.
>
>Practically everything one needs to know about phonetics is explained
>in the book, except one little detail: how does one pronounce the name
>Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.
>
>
I have no idea about the nationality of P.L., but the name is certainly
originally Danish. The Danish pron. sounds strange even to other
Scandinavians. You'll have to ask a Dane for it.

Torleif Holthe
Trondheim, Norway

Jens Brix Christiansen

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Dec 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/13/95
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Well, I pronounce it /'l&:@Dfo@D/. But that is because it looks
distinctly Danish. Mr. Ladefoged may, of course, not be Danish
in any way, and may claim that resemblance to a fairly common
Danish surname to be purely coincidental.


Donald Fisk

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Dec 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/13/95
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THOMailAddress=Torleif...@dnpost.md.dep.telemax.noOrganization=Directorate for nature management (y...@somehost.somedomain) wrote:

: In article <4akb3g$c...@neptunus.pi.net>, m...@pi.net (Miguel Carrasquer Vidal) says:
: >
: >I recently acquired Peter Ladefoged's "A Course in Phonetics (3rd.
: >ed.)", which I can heartily recommend to anyone who is interested in
: >the subject and hasn't read it yet.
: >
: >Practically everything one needs to know about phonetics is explained
: >in the book, except one little detail: how does one pronounce the name
: >Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.

I had this problem too, with another book by the same author, also on
phonetics. I asked someone else who was more familiar with articulatory
phonetics than myself (a university English Language lecturer), who said
it was pronounced (in IPA) "'ladE'fogEd" or something similar. At any
rate, pronounce all the vowels and pronounce "g" as a stop consonant.
The primary stress is on the "a", and the secondary on the "o".

: I have no idea about the nationality of P.L., but the name is certainly

: originally Danish. The Danish pron. sounds strange even to other
: Scandinavians. You'll have to ask a Dane for it.

: Torleif Holthe
: Trondheim, Norway

--
Le Hibou (mo bheachd fhe/in:my own opinion) Email: don...@info.bt.co.uk
"[British] lager is an imitation continental beer drunk only by refined
ladies, people with digestive ailments, tourists, and other weaklings."
-- Muenchen Suddeutsche Zeitung, April 1976.

Kvan

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Dec 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/13/95
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m...@pi.net (Miguel Carrasquer Vidal) writes:

>I recently acquired Peter Ladefoged's "A Course in Phonetics (3rd.
>ed.)", which I can heartily recommend to anyone who is interested in
>the subject and hasn't read it yet.

>Practically everything one needs to know about phonetics is explained
>in the book, except one little detail: how does one pronounce the name
>Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.

D being a soft /d/ and E being schwa, it goes something like

['laDEfoED]

Regards,
Kvan.
--
kv...@diku.dk (Casper Kvan Clausen) | I think TWINKLE's a nice word. So's
| VIRIDIAN. I met a lady once who had
| imaginary fish.
http://www.diku.dk/students/kvan/ | Delirium.

David Blair

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Dec 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/13/95
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Peter, where are you when we need a horse's mouth pronouncement?

Forget the Danish, guys. PL, though UCLA ensconced, is British to the bootheels
still. One of the most classical RP speakers you'd ever want to hear.

It's a long time since I heard PL introduce himself. But try /lad@'fog@t/; or /l&-/
for the first syllable; hard to tell whether the final stop is voiced or not, so
/-@d/ is a possibility.

Surely someone from UCLA is on the list, to organise first-hand info for us?
--
David Blair
School of English, Linguistics & Media
MACQUARIE UNIVERSITY
SYDNEY

bodhi

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Dec 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/14/95
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Well, maybe someday I'll be hailing from UCLA, but at least I'm in the
same geographic area. Two of my linguistics professors know Ladefoged
personally, one being a former student of his at UCLA. We use his
_A_Course_in_Phonetics_, 3rd. ed., as the primary text for our
Phonetics and Phonology course at California State University,
Fullerton. Sorry folks, I dunno the ASCII keyboard equivalent of the
IPA, which sure would simplify my explanation, so I'll have to do this
"longhand." Everybody around here pronouces his name using the
low front digraph, as is found in American English "ladder", for the
first vowel, something resembling either a schwa or a "barred i" for
the second vowel, [o] for the 3rd vowel, and the last vowel is
pronounced much like the second. The [d] is voiced, although
unreleased. Primary stress is on the 1st syllable and secondary
stress is on the third.

By the way, according to Ladefoged himself, his dialect is Scottish,
not RP.

Regards,

Michael McBroom
bo...@earthlink.net
CSUF Linguistics

PS: would anybody care to post the complete set of ASCII symbols for
IPA?

Alex Langley

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Dec 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/14/95
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In article <4amgoq$p...@coco.cri.dk> Jens Brix Christiansen <j...@cri.dk> writes:
>Well, I pronounce it /'l&:@Dfo@D/. But that is because it looks
>distinctly Danish. Mr. Ladefoged may, of course, not be Danish
>in any way, and may claim that resemblance to a fairly common
>Danish surname to be purely coincidental.
>
Professor Ladefoged teaches here at UCLA, where I got my linguistics
degree. It is pronounced by the Americans (he is British) as an
American from California would pronounce the word spelled:

lattifoegid

with primary stress on the first syllable, and secondary stress on the
third syllable.


Alex Langley http://www.math.ucla.edu/~alex/ al...@math.ucla.edu
6115A MSB, 520 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1555, (310)825-2897

Anton Sherwood

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Dec 18, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/18/95
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Miguel Carrasquer Vidal <m...@pi.net> says:
: Practically everything one needs to know about phonetics is explained

: in the book, except one little detail: how does one pronounce the name
: Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.

His e-address is oldfogey@ somewhere-or-other; is that broad enough? ;)
--
Anton Sherwood *\\* +1 415 267 0685 *\\* DAS...@netcom.com
I wasn't always anarcho-capitalist, you know. -- Ubi scriptum?

Leo Edwardsson

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Dec 22, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/22/95
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>how does one pronounce the name
> Ladefoged? Broad and narrow transcriptions accepted.

My linguistics lecturers pronounced it like this: Primary stress on the a,
which is pronounced as in "apple". Secondary stress on the o, which is a
dipthong, as in "loan", and the es are schwas.

Lars Henrik Mathiesen

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Dec 23, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/23/95
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le...@postoffice.sandybay.utas.edu.au (Leo Edwardsson) writes:

Ladefoged is a Danish surname (50+ entries in the Copenhagen phone
book). It's pronounced ["l{:D@fo:@D] in the SAMPA broad phonetic
transcription (see http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/danish.htm).

I've always assumed that the Ladefoged of phonetics textbooks is at
least of Danish descent. IIRC, his first name is Peter, which could be
both Danish and English, so he might have been born in the US (or
equivalent non-Danish country). Does anybody here happen to know?

If Mr. Ladefoged was not born in Denmark, he will almost certainly use
a different pronunciation. (If he was born in the US, the one used by
Leo's lecturers is probably a good guess.) Even if he is Danish, he
may have adopted an anglified version of his name for use around
non-Danes---the phonetics of Danish tend to map poorly onto other
languages. Find someone who has heard Ladefoged say his own name...

Lars Mathiesen (U of Copenhagen CS Dep) <tho...@diku.dk> (Humour NOT marked)
[lA:s ma"ti?@s=n] [%k2b=n"hau?n]

Michael McBroom

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Dec 24, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/24/95
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In <4bhdhm$3...@odin.diku.dk>, tho...@diku.dk (Lars Henrik Mathiesen) writes:
>
>
>Ladefoged is a Danish surname (50+ entries in the Copenhagen phone
>book). It's pronounced ["l{:D@fo:@D] in the SAMPA broad phonetic
>transcription (see http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/danish.htm).
>
>I've always assumed that the Ladefoged of phonetics textbooks is at
>least of Danish descent. IIRC, his first name is Peter, which could be
>both Danish and English, so he might have been born in the US (or
>equivalent non-Danish country). Does anybody here happen to know?
>
>If Mr. Ladefoged was not born in Denmark, he will almost certainly use
>a different pronunciation. (If he was born in the US, the one used by
>Leo's lecturers is probably a good guess.) Even if he is Danish, he
>may have adopted an anglified version of his name for use around
>non-Danes---the phonetics of Danish tend to map poorly onto other
>languages. Find someone who has heard Ladefoged say his own name...

Hi Lars,

Dr. Ladefoged is a native of Scotland, and makes no secret of that
fact in his book, _A_Course_In_Phonetics_.

Regards,

Michael McBroom
CSUF Linguistics

Lars Henrik Mathiesen

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Dec 27, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/27/95
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bo...@earthlink.net (Michael McBroom) writes:
>Hi Lars,

>Dr. Ladefoged is a native of Scotland, and makes no secret of that
>fact in his book, _A_Course_In_Phonetics_.

As it happens, I have never read that book. Does he write anything
about the history of his name? (It does not look Scottish.)

(I have been informed, by someone who heard from someone who heard PL
say it himself, that it should be pronounced "LAH-duh-fo-gud" with
hard D's and a hard G. About the same as a previous poster had heard.)

Corey Reid

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Dec 29, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/29/95
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Michael McBroom (bo...@earthlink.net) wrote:

: In <4bhdhm$3...@odin.diku.dk>, tho...@diku.dk (Lars Henrik Mathiesen) writes:
: >
: >
: >Ladefoged is a Danish surname (50+ entries in the Copenhagen phone
: >book). It's pronounced ["l{:D@fo:@D] in the SAMPA broad phonetic
: >transcription (see http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/sampa/danish.htm).
: >
: >I've always assumed that the Ladefoged of phonetics textbooks is at
: >least of Danish descent. IIRC, his first name is Peter, which could be
: >both Danish and English, so he might have been born in the US (or
: >equivalent non-Danish country). Does anybody here happen to know?
: >
: >If Mr. Ladefoged was not born in Denmark, he will almost certainly use
: >a different pronunciation. (If he was born in the US, the one used by
: >Leo's lecturers is probably a good guess.) Even if he is Danish, he
: >may have adopted an anglified version of his name for use around
: >non-Danes---the phonetics of Danish tend to map poorly onto other
: >languages. Find someone who has heard Ladefoged say his own name...

: Hi Lars,

: Dr. Ladefoged is a native of Scotland, and makes no secret of that
: fact in his book, _A_Course_In_Phonetics_.

: Regards,

: Michael McBroom
: CSUF Linguistics

Which makes perfect sense. The Scottish-Scandinavian connection is
strong, not just in names (and I think this is a great example), but in
vocabulary (the large number of Scandic cognates in Scots English). The
fact that Dr. Ladefoged is a Scot with a Danish name is another example
of the historical bond of Scotland and Scandinavia.

--
Reid
pea...@wam.umd.edu

********************************************************
If you're wondering what this is...........well.....
--------------------------------------------------------
GFA/GS d-(++) s:+ a19>20 C+(++) U? P? !L E----@ W++
N+(+++) K? w+ O? M V? PS+@ PE(-) Y? PGP? t++(+++)@
5+ X+ R* tv++(+++) b DI? D? G e>++++ h !r y-->+++
--------------------------------------------------------
..don't ask me what it means, someone gave it to me!
********************************************************

Michael McBroom

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Dec 30, 1995, 3:00:00 AM12/30/95
to
In <4brj4t$c...@odin.diku.dk>, tho...@diku.dk (Lars Henrik Mathiesen) writes:

>>Dr. Ladefoged is a native of Scotland, and makes no secret of that
>>fact in his book, _A_Course_In_Phonetics_.

>As it happens, I have never read that book. Does he write anything


>about the history of his name? (It does not look Scottish.)

Not that I recall, no.

>(I have been informed, by someone who heard from someone who heard PL
>say it himself, that it should be pronounced "LAH-duh-fo-gud" with
>hard D's and a hard G. About the same as a previous poster had heard.)

You're probably correct. Here in Southern California, however, we
tend to pronounce the first sylable with the low-front digraph "ae",
with primary stress on the first and secondary stress on the third
syllables. The "d" is more of a flap, as in American English
"ladder", and the unstressed vowels can be either schwas or barred i's
depending upon one's regional accent.

Arnold Zwicky

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Jan 8, 1996, 3:00:00 AM1/8/96
to
in article <4c29lp$m...@bolivia.it.earthlink.net>,
michael mcbroom <bo...@earthlink.net> wrote:

>In <4brj4t$c...@odin.diku.dk>, tho...@diku.dk (Lars Henrik
>Mathiesen) writes:

>>...(I have been informed, by someone who heard from someone who heard

>>PL say it himself, that it should be pronounced "LAH-duh-fo-gud" with
>>hard D's and a hard G. About the same as a previous poster had heard.)

>You're probably correct. Here in Southern California, however, we
>tend to pronounce the first sylable with the low-front digraph "ae",
>with primary stress on the first and secondary stress on the third
>syllables. The "d" is more of a flap, as in American English
>"ladder", and the unstressed vowels can be either schwas or barred i's
>depending upon one's regional accent.

peter ladefoged has now had business cards printed up with not
only a cross-section of the human vocal tract on it but also
an IPA transcription of [the way he pronounces] his name. definitely
a digraph in the first syllable of his surname. [d] rather than
flap, of course, because this is a british pronunciation. and, for
the same reason, [t] (rather than flap) in Peter, which is also,
of course, r-less.

i mentioned the sci.lang discussion to him at the LSA meetings
in san diego, and it turned out he'd never heard about it.

arnold zwicky (noting that, with characteristic self-deprecating humor,
peter has chosen "oldfogey" as his username)

cena...@gmail.com

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Apr 8, 2015, 8:17:26 PM4/8/15
to
On Monday, December 11, 1995 at 3:00:00 AM UTC-5, misha wrote:
>>
> Ooh, it's so very, very tempting to reply "just as it's spelled!" and then
> watch the flames ignite!

My married name is Ladefoged.

The American pronunciation is LAD-uh-foe-gid. The Danish is LAHTH-uh-foe-[stop]-uhd. It translates into "barn official", or steward, or bailiff.


>

Brian M. Scott

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Apr 8, 2015, 8:53:41 PM4/8/15
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On Wed, 8 Apr 2015 17:17:23 -0700 (PDT),
<cena...@gmail.com> wrote
in<news:53017b0a-3796-4d91...@googlegroups.com>
in sci.lang:
The (now 20-year-old) question was probably about the
pronunciation of the linguist Peter Ladefoged’s surname.
He died in 2006, but the UCLA Linguistics Department still
maintains his web page, which has a sound file of his own
pronunciation of the name.

Brian
--
It was the neap tide, when the baga venture out of their
holes to root for sandtatties. The waves whispered
rhythmically over the packed sand: haggisss, haggisss,
haggisss.

Adam Funk

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Apr 9, 2015, 7:30:04 AM4/9/15
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On 2015-04-09, Brian M. Scott wrote:

> The (now 20-year-old) question was probably about the
> pronunciation of the linguist Peter Ladefoged’s surname.
> He died in 2006, but the UCLA Linguistics Department still
> maintains his web page, which has a sound file of his own
> pronunciation of the name.

That's appropriate.


--
"Mandrake, have you never wondered why I drink only distilled water,
or rain water, and only pure grain alcohol?" [Dr Strangelove]

Mścisław Wojna-Bojewski

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Apr 11, 2015, 4:24:27 PM4/11/15
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On Monday, December 11, 1995 at 10:00:00 AM UTC+2, misha wrote:
> In article <4akb3g$c...@neptunus.pi.net>, m...@pi.net (Miguel Carrasquer
> Vidal) wrote:
>
> > how does one pronounce the name Ladefoged? Broad and narrow
> transcriptions > accepted.
>
> Ooh, it's so very, very tempting to reply "just as it's spelled!" and then
> watch the flames ignite!

La det swinge, la det rock and roll!

jgoodw...@gmail.com

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May 4, 2016, 5:01:31 PM5/4/16
to
I work with a guy with the last name Ladefoged. He's Danish. And his family pronounces it "rabbit".

Ruud Harmsen

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May 5, 2016, 3:20:31 AM5/5/16
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Wed, 4 May 2016 14:01:29 -0700 (PDT): jgoodw...@gmail.com scribeva:
>I work with a guy with the last name Ladefoged. He's Danish. And his family pronounces it "rabbit".

Not really, but close. This page has IPA, in English and Danish:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Ladefoged

We're already over 10 years after Peter's death. Time flies while
you're having fun.
--
Ruud Harmsen, http://rudhar.com

Peter T. Daniels

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May 5, 2016, 7:13:19 AM5/5/16
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This was a lazarization of a question asked 12/11/95.
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