origin of "third time ice cream"?

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Hanan Cohen

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Sep 22, 2004, 11:36:55 AM9/22/04
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Shalom,

In Israel, when two people coincidently meet the third time during a
short period, one of them might say (in Hebrew) "third time ice
cream".

I have found no good explanation to this. One explanation is that it's
a twist on "third time I will scream" but I have not found this phrase
in Google so I assume people don't commonly use this phrase. Another
possibility is "Third time's the charm" or "third time lucky" but they
both contain the assumption that the first two tries were
unsuccessful.

Does anyone here know of a custom of announcing the third meeting or a
third accurance of an incident? In any language or culture?

Thanks,

Hanan Cohen
***Love and Peace***

Harlan Messinger

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Sep 22, 2004, 11:49:35 AM9/22/04
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"Hanan Cohen" <hanan...@fastmail.fm> wrote in message
news:63c08e6a.04092...@posting.google.com...

> Shalom,
>
> In Israel, when two people coincidently meet the third time during a
> short period, one of them might say (in Hebrew) "third time ice
> cream".

Assuming the possibility that the explanation exists within Hebrew, you
might have thought to tell us what the actual expression is. Is it "paam
shlishit g'lidah" or something like that?

Lukas Pietsch

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Sep 22, 2004, 12:03:28 PM9/22/04
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Hanan Cohen wrote:

The meaning might be much more literal. In German we say, "nächstes Mal
gibst du mir einen aus", i.e. "next time you'll have to buy me a drink".
Meant as a jocular suggestion that such a coincidence must be celebrated -
but, to be sure, at the expenses of the other person.

Lukas

Hanan Cohen

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Sep 23, 2004, 2:37:32 AM9/23/04
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"Harlan Messinger" <h.mes...@comcast.net> wrote in message

> Assuming the possibility that the explanation exists within Hebrew, you
> might have thought to tell us what the actual expression is. Is it "paam
> shlishit g'lidah" or something like that?

Sorry, yes it is "paam shlishit g'lidah".

And I thought more about it and it seems close to what Lukas wrote.
"paam shlishit glidah" is sometimes said at the SECOND time, meaning
that the next/third time this will happen, someone will owe someone
icecreem. It's not clear who should buy whome the icecream.

Since Israeli culture borrows from all the cultures of the people
immigrating to Israel, it might be that the Israeli icecream was once
a German beer.

Hanan

Alexander Magidow

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Sep 24, 2004, 12:53:33 AM9/24/04
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What would you want in a desert? Beer or ice cream?

Prai Jei

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Sep 24, 2004, 2:01:37 PM9/24/04
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Hanan Cohen (or somebody else of the same name) wrote thusly in message
<63c08e6a.04092...@posting.google.com>:

Here in Britain the comment is more likely to be something on the lines of
"We can't go on meeting like this."
--
Paul Townsend
I put it down there, and when I went back to it, there it was GONE!

Interchange the alphabetic elements to reply

Pieter Z.

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Sep 26, 2004, 1:46:08 PM9/26/04
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"Lukas Pietsch" <lukas....@invalid-uni-hamburg.de> wrote in message
news:4151a257$0$13081$9b62...@news.freenet.de

Same in The Netherlands, too. It rarely actually happens though, owing
to the unclearness of who's to buy rounds perhaps.

Cheers,

Pieter


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