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slang words in Trainspotting

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christ...@infonie.fr

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Jan 29, 2002, 7:35:33 AM1/29/02
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Hello,
A friend of mine needs help to know the meaning of some words in
Trainspotting

"Is that aw yir sae fuckin moosey-faced aboot?" the problem is that
she does not understand "moosey-faced".

"fuck, off, ya plukey-faced wee hing oot."
The translator hat translated it into French by "va sucer les
éléphants chez Spontex" , my friend thinks that "vire, petit pédé
boutonneux" will be better, do you think it is a good translation?

"well, whe niver sais nowt tae me, ah whinge, biscuit-ersed"
The man who has said it, has just realized something.
What does "biscuit-ersed" mean?

Thank you if you can help her.
christelle.

Anna MCM

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Jan 29, 2002, 7:39:51 AM1/29/02
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christ...@infonie.fr wrote:
>
> "Is that aw yir sae fuckin moosey-faced aboot?" the problem is that
> she does not understand "moosey-faced".
>
Might it mean "your face is like the face of a moose"?

Bye,

Anna Maria

Nick Worley

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Jan 29, 2002, 7:46:25 AM1/29/02
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I found a Trainspotting glossary at
http://www.totse.com/en/media/televisionary_film_vidiots/transpot.html
according to which "plukey-faced" means "soft" & "biscuit-ersed" means
"self-pitying" (I've never heard either term before. The terms are either
extremely regional and not spread out of that region or they were made up
for the book & are not used in real life).
- "fuck, off, ya plukey-faced wee hing oot" = "fuck off, you soft little
?hing oot?" (not sure what "hing oot" means. "hang-out" maybe? i.e. someone
who's always hanging out with his mates?)
- "well, whe niver sais nowt tae me, ah whinge, biscuit-ersed" = "well, ?he?
never says nothing to me, ah? whinge, self-pitying" (which doesn't make much
sense to me) (to whinge = to complain/moan; never says nothing to me = never
says anything to me)

> "Is that aw yir sae fuckin moosey-faced aboot?" the problem is that
> she does not understand "moosey-faced".

"Is that aw yir sae fuckin moosey-faced aboot?" = "Is that all you're so
fucking moosey-faced about?"
I've not heard this before and I'd guess it's an expression the character in
the book thought up on the spot, rather than it being a set expression (I
could be wrong, though, I mean it could be a Scottish expression).
I'd guess it means that the person is sulking or looks miserable (or
something like that anyway) and as a result the person doesn't look very
attractive.
If you describe someone as looking like a moose it means the person is ugly
(in the opinion of the speaker).
If I'm on the right lines, then "moosey-faced" means "stropy" or "miserable"
or similar & it sounds comical.

At the following website
http://www.laserrot.com/dvd/availdvd/us/advd-us-t.html
it says:
Trainspotting
Danny Boyle (dir.), Ewan McGregor, Jonny Lee Miller, Kevin McKidd, Robert
Carlyle, Kelly Macdonald
***Inc. printed insert including author Irvine Welsh's glossary of terms***.
Audio: ENG DD 5.1 (6ch) / Subtitles: SPA
1995, "R", CC: Eng, LB 1.85:1, R:1, SL, 1s, 93m
Miramax, #13851 (AC), $29.99
It seems to me that that glossary of terms would help you, since Irvine
Welsh is the author, so you'll be getting the meanings from the horse's
mouth.

This site might also be useful
http://arts.qmuc.ac.uk/ijost/Volume1_no1/M_Bowman.htm

Regards
Nick


<christ...@infonie.fr> wrote in message
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Nick Worley

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Jan 29, 2002, 7:52:05 AM1/29/02
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You could also try the newsgroup: alt.movies


"Nick Worley" <nickAARDV...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:a365j1$15p2qv$1...@ID-90070.news.dfncis.de...

Voetleuce

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Jan 29, 2002, 9:43:41 AM1/29/02
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"Anna MCM" <A.Ca...@telia.com> wrote in message
news:3C569817...@telia.com...
> christ...@infonie.fr wrote:

A "moose" is a mouse!

Anna MCM

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Jan 29, 2002, 10:32:13 AM1/29/02
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Voetleuce wrote:
>
> > Might it mean "your face is like the face of a moose"?
>
> A "moose" is a mouse!

A moose is a typical animal of the Northern countries.
Please have a look here:

http://www.mooseworld.com/

I even have some of them in the forest near my house!

Bye,

Anna Maria

David Goward

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Jan 29, 2002, 11:12:43 AM1/29/02
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Anna MCM a écrit dans le message...

That may well be, but here it does mean a mouse...

David


Bettina Price

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Jan 29, 2002, 11:10:21 AM1/29/02
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"Anna MCM" <A.Ca...@telia.com> wrote in message
news:3C56C07D...@telia.com...

Yes, but some scottish people pronounce "house" "hoose" and "mouse" "moose"
(wasn't there a silly song about a moose loose aboot the hoose?). Anyhow,
afaik there are no moose in Scotland.

Greetings,

Bettina

Anna MCM

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Jan 29, 2002, 2:18:27 PM1/29/02
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David Goward wrote:
>
> That may well be, but here it does mean a mouse...
>
OK then...

Bye,

Anna Maria

John Woodgate

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Jan 29, 2002, 1:13:05 PM1/29/02
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I read in sci.lang.translation that Bettina Price <bettina+usenet@pappna
se.demon.co.uk> wrote (in <tUz58.52509$Ph2.8...@news2-win.server.ntlw
orld.com>) about 'slang words in Trainspotting', on Tue, 29 Jan 2002:

>Yes, but some scottish people pronounce "house" "hoose" and "mouse" "moose"
>(wasn't there a silly song about a moose loose aboot the hoose?). Anyhow,
>afaik there are no moose in Scotland.

Nane ootside a zoo, onyway!
--
Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only. http://www.jmwa.demon.co.uk
After swimming across the Hellespont, I felt like a Hero.
PLEASE do NOT copy news posts to me by E-MAIL!

Nick Worley

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Jan 29, 2002, 3:52:15 PM1/29/02
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>A "moose" is a mouse!

Is "mouse" pronounced "moose" in Scotland? I'm not sure, although I have
heard "house" pronounced "hoose", so it could be, I didn't consider that
possibility I must admit.
But then what does "mousey-faced" mean, that the person looks scared or
timid?
Regards
Nick


"Voetleuce" <le...@leu.ce> wrote in message
news:3c56b4bb$0$2...@hades.is.co.za...

Voetleuce

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Jan 29, 2002, 3:32:21 PM1/29/02
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"Anna MCM" <A.Ca...@telia.com> wrote in message
news:3C56C07D...@telia.com...

> Voetleuce wrote:

> > > Might it mean "your face is like the face of a moose"?

> > A "moose" is a mouse!

> A moose is a typical animal of the Northern countries.

Yes, but this is Scotland. Edinburgh city-dialect. Moose? I think it
means mouse.

Margaret Marks

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Jan 29, 2002, 4:04:29 PM1/29/02
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A footloose moose?
Margaret
"Voetleuce" <le...@leu.ce> schrieb im Newsbeitrag


Toby OCM

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Jan 29, 2002, 4:29:28 PM1/29/02
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<christ...@infonie.fr> wrote in message
news:3c5694f...@news.infonie.fr...
> "well, whe niver sais nowt tae me, ah whinge, biscuit-ersed"
> The man who has said it, has just realized something.
> What does "biscuit-ersed" mean?

It should be 'biscuit-arsed'. According to the Trainspotting article at
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/review96/ftrainspotting.
htm it means "A derogatory adjective referring to someone who is crumbly,
not hard."


--
Regards,

Toby
--

There are three kinds of people in the world:
those who can count, and those who can't.

John Woodgate

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Jan 29, 2002, 4:49:37 PM1/29/02
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I read in sci.lang.translation that Margaret Marks <ma...@mmarks.de>
wrote (in <a372nt$2p1$06$1...@news.t-online.com>) about 'slang words in

Trainspotting', on Tue, 29 Jan 2002:
>A footloose moose?

...may be preferable to a body-loused mouse?

sophie

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Jan 29, 2002, 6:11:57 PM1/29/02
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Nick Worley <nickAARDV...@btinternet.com> said

>I found a Trainspotting glossary at
>http://www.totse.com/en/media/televisionary_film_vidiots/transpot.html
>according to which "plukey-faced" means "soft" & "biscuit-ersed" means
>"self-pitying" (I've never heard either term before. The terms are either
>extremely regional and not spread out of that region or they were made up
>for the book & are not used in real life).
>- "fuck, off, ya plukey-faced wee hing oot" = "fuck off, you soft little
>?hing oot?" (not sure what "hing oot" means. "hang-out" maybe? i.e. someone
>who's always hanging out with his mates?)

bits of him hanging out of his clothes?
yeurch.

>- "well, whe niver sais nowt tae me, ah whinge, biscuit-ersed"

well, he never said anything to me, I whinged, biscuit-arsed...

--

sophie

Toby OCM

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Jan 30, 2002, 5:01:34 AM1/30/02
to

"sophie" <sophiej...@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Menwd3J9...@blueyonder.co.uk...

> bits of him hanging out of his clothes?
> yeurch.


As in "his arse was hanging out his trousers" - he was very poor, and as a
result his trousers were so worn that there were holes in them.

It's a thought.

mllhen...@gmail.com

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Jun 16, 2019, 8:57:20 AM6/16/19
to
Plukey faced refers to person who's face is covered in plooks. Plooks = acne or spots in general which means it determines the round about age of the person in question.

A wee hing oot is a young girl who let's all the boys have sex with her.... Hanging out of her.

Moosey faces means mousey faced and is what it sounds like if you can imagine

bradc...@gmail.com

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Dec 22, 2019, 6:32:57 AM12/22/19
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Hing oot means a person of loose sexual morals, slut, slapper, etc😁
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