GPS Stash Hunt... Stash #1 is there!

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Dave

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May 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/3/00
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Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
the coordinates:

N 45 17.460
W122 24.800

Lots of goodies for the finders. Look for a black plastic bucket
buried most of the way in the ground. Take some stuff, leave
some stuff! Record it all in the log book. Have Fun!

Stash contians: Delorme Topo USA software, videos, books, food,
money, and a slingshot!

* Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!


George E. Lass

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May 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/3/00
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According to mapblast that would be on the west side of Fellows
Road.....

George

John Miller

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May 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/3/00
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Right there by the corner, eh!

Dave <news2you...@hotmail.com.invalid> wrote in message
news:02b45318...@usw-ex0102-084.remarq.com...

Dseibold

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May 4, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/4/00
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food??? ack i hope its mre's


Dan the Man--If life is so short-how come my feet are so big?
x-no-archive: yes

Terrance Zechman

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May 4, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/4/00
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Here's the directions from my place. I'll be leaving right away!

Road Leg Time Dist Dir Near Exit
Start - 131 Grant Ave, 19605
Grant Ave 0.1 0:00 0 E
SR 61 (Centre Ave) 14 0:00 0 N
I-78 (US 22) 29 0:20 14 W I-78 Exit 9AB Mile 29
I-81 37 0:45 43 SW I-81 Exit (89) Mile 89
US 11 (Harrisburg Pike) 1.4 1:21 80 W I-81 Exit 17 Mile 52
I-76 (Pennsylvania Tpke) 250 1:22 81 W I-76 Exit 16 Mile 226 Toll.
I-80 (Ohio Tpke) 354 5:06 331 W Exit 218
I-90 (East-West Toll Rd) 12 10:18 686 W Exit 16/21
SR 912 (Cline Ave) 7.2 10:32 697 NW I-90 Exit 10 Mile 10
I-90 (East-West Toll Rd) 111 10:39 704 NW I-90 Exit 3 Mile Marker 3
I-39 (I-90) 79 12:24 815 N State Border
I-90 (I-94|Scenic) 23 13:35 894 NW I-90 Exit 108AB Mile 108
US 12 (SR 16) 6.2 13:55 917 NW I-90 Exit 85 Mile 85
S Wisconsin St 0.3 14:01 923 NE
Local Road 0.2 14:02 923 E
CR HH 0.3 14:02 924 N
I-90 (I-94) 34 14:02 924 NW I-90 Exit 79 Mile Marker 79
I-94 157 14:31 958 NW I-90 Exit 45A Mile 45
I-694 22 16:46 1114 NW I-694 Exit 58AB Mile 58
I-94 (US 52) 826 17:09 1137 W I-694 Exit 35C Mile 35
I-90 (US 87|US 212) 612 29:17 1963 W I-90 Exit 456B Mile 456 Westbound.
N Paha Packard Rd 6.7 38:35 2574 S I-90 Exit 215 Mile 215
US 395 65 38:47 2581 SW
I-182 (US 12|US 395) 2.6 39:54 2646 W Exit 14
US 395 8.1 39:57 2648 SW Exit 12
I-82 (US 395|Bofer Canyon Rd) 31 40:06 2656 SW I-82 Exit 113 Mile 113
I-84 (US 30|Old Oregon Trail Hwy) 164 40:33 2687 W I-84 Exit 179 Mile 179
NE 238th Dr 0.2 42:59 2851 S I-84 Exit 16A Mile 16 Westbound.
NE Halsey St 0.8 42:59 2851 W
Fairview Ave 0.1 43:01 2852 S
NE Fairview Ave (NE 223rd Ave) 1.1 43:01 2852 S
SE 223rd Ave 0.8 43:04 2853 S
N Main Ave 0.8 43:06 2854 S
US 26 (E Powell Blvd) 0.1 43:08 2855 E
SE Roberts Ave 0.8 43:08 2855 S
SE Regner Rd 2.1 43:10 2856 SW
SE 222nd Dr (Renger Rd) 3.1 43:16 2858 S
SR 212 (SE Highway 212) 0.6 43:21 2861 E
SE 232nd Dr (Deep Creek Rd) 1.9 43:22 2861 S
SE Royer Rd 0.1 43:25 2863 S
SR 224 (SE Highway 224) 0.9 43:25 2863 SE
SE Barton Park Rd 0.2 43:26 2864 S
SE Bakers Ferry Rd (Harding Mill Rd) 0.6 43:26 2864 W
S Bakers Ferry Rd (Harding Mill Rd) 0.6 43:27 2865 SW
S Harding Rd 2.4 43:28 2865 S
S Fischers Mill Rd 0.9 43:32 2868 SW
S Ridge Rd (Funk Rd) 2.7 43:34 2868 S
S Redland Rd (Market Road Twenty) 1.7 43:38 2871 E
S Fellows Rd 0.6 43:41 2873 S
Finish - Finish1 43:42 2873


Terry


Dale DePriest

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May 4, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/4/00
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Please reduce to 30 points, otherwise it won't fit in a route :-)

Dale

--
For GPS data see: Joe -- http://joe.mehaffey.com
Peter -- http://www.vancouver-webpages.com/peter/
Karen -- http://www.gpsy.com/gpsinfo/
Dale -- http://users.cwnet.com/dalede

Message has been deleted

picar...@gmail.com

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Mar 24, 2015, 9:41:05 AM3/24/15
to

You made history
Thanks!

ruif...@gmail.com

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Mar 24, 2015, 6:33:51 PM3/24/15
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quarta-feira, 3 de Maio de 2000 às 08:00:00 UTC+1, Dave escreveu:Esta é a minha mensagem, estou muito longe. Não dá para fazer trocas.
> Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
> the coordinates:
>
> N 45 17.460
> W122 24.800
>
> Lots of goodies for the finders. Look for a black plastic bucket
> buried most of the way in the ground. Take some stuff, leave
> some stuff! Record it all in the log book. Have Fun!
>
> Stash contians: Delorme Topo USA software, videos, books, food,
> money, and a slingshot!
>
> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!



quarta-feira, 3 de Maio de 2000 às 08:00:00 UTC+1, Dave escreveu:
> Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
> the coordinates:
>
> N 45 17.460
> W122 24.800
>
> Lots of goodies for the finders. Look for a black plastic bucket
> buried most of the way in the ground. Take some stuff, leave
> some stuff! Record it all in the log book. Have Fun!
>
> Stash contians: Delorme Topo USA software, videos, books, food,
> money, and a slingshot!
>
> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!



quarta-feira, 3 de Maio de 2000 às 08:00:00 UTC+1, Dave escreveu:
> Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
> the coordinates:
>
> N 45 17.460
> W122 24.800
>
> Lots of goodies for the finders. Look for a black plastic bucket
> buried most of the way in the ground. Take some stuff, leave
> some stuff! Record it all in the log book. Have Fun!
>
> Stash contians: Delorme Topo USA software, videos, books, food,
> money, and a slingshot!
>
> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!



quarta-feira, 3 de Maio de 2000 às 08:00:00 UTC+1, Dave escreveu:
> Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
> the coordinates:
>
> N 45 17.460
> W122 24.800
>
Message has been deleted

Alan Browne

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Oct 1, 2017, 9:13:05 AM10/1/17
to
On 2017-10-01 08:44, jaxxo...@googlemail.com wrote:

Stupid ass activity that.

Try this instead and exercise your brain:
https://orienteeringusa.org/content/city-trees-orienteering-club

jaxxo...@googlemail.com

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Apr 14, 2018, 5:33:26 AM4/14/18
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Where?

sistere...@gmail.com

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Jun 23, 2018, 5:33:33 AM6/23/18
to
On Wednesday, May 3, 2000 at 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, Dave wrote:
> Well, I did it, created the first stash hunt stash and here are
> the coordinates:
>
> N 45 17.460
> W122 24.800
>
> Lots of goodies for the finders. Look for a black plastic bucket
> buried most of the way in the ground. Take some stuff, leave
> some stuff! Record it all in the log book. Have Fun!
>
> Stash contians: Delorme Topo USA software, videos, books, food,
> money, and a slingshot!
>
> * Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
> The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!


Thank you sir for your foresight and creating a hobby loved by many.

polkadot...@gmail.com

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Sep 1, 2018, 9:39:31 PM9/1/18
to
You have no idea how grateful I am for this email.

pa...@reid-family.org

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Jan 14, 2020, 12:00:34 PM1/14/20
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THANK YOU

Reinhard Zwirner

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Jan 14, 2020, 7:13:54 PM1/14/20
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pa...@reid-family.org schrieb:
Wow! I do hope the original poster will read this answer nearly 20
years after writing his post ...

J. J. Lodder

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Jan 15, 2020, 7:15:19 AM1/15/20
to
Don't worry, the stash will no doubt be still there...

Jan

Hans-Georg Michna

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Jan 17, 2020, 1:05:34 PM1/17/20
to
Remarkable! I seem to remember that in those days the word
geocache was barely known.

In June 2000 I put one of the earliest geocaches on the equator,
right where it crosses the 36° east meridian. Nowadays it is
called a virtual geocache or, in this special case, a
confluence. It is most likely the first geocache that was put on
the equator at:

N 0° 0.000', E 036° 0.000'

On https://www.geocaching.com/ it bears the name "Rift Valley"
and the code GC53.

https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC53

Hans-Georg

Alan Browne

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Jan 17, 2020, 5:01:53 PM1/17/20
to
Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.

Recreation: map and compass.

Fuck Geo-caching.

do...@10.usenet.us.com

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Jan 18, 2020, 12:40:19 AM1/18/20
to
Alan Browne <bitb...@blackhole.com> wrote:
> Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.
> Recreation: map and compass.

While in Mongolia, I told my driver that I wanted to visit a confluence.

He had no maps, but he did call it a "map cross".
Later, while driving on a plateau, he said we were getting close, as he looked at the mountains on all sides of us.

Navigation by mountain ridges. No compass, no maps. No roads.

--
Clarence A Dold - Santa Rosa, CA, USA GPS: 38.47,-122.65

Hans-Georg Michna

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Jan 18, 2020, 7:04:21 AM1/18/20
to
On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 17:01:43 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:

>Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.
>
>Recreation: map and compass.
>
>Fuck Geo-caching.

Hmm, perhaps the aeroplane ruins your natural jumping skills.

Bicycles, motorbikes, and, even worse, cars ruin your running
skills.

Books, not to mention computers, and particularly things like
Wikipedia ruin your memory skills.

Do forks and knives or chop sticks ruin your eating skills?

Looking back to stone age, even the first weapons ever invented,
like stones, clubs, hand-axes, spears, bows and arrows ruined
our forebears' hand-fighting skills. (Nowadays some people even
have guns.)

Glasses ruin your seeing skills. (Oops, that may actually be
true sometimes. :-)

Please add more examples, everyone! It's fun.

Hans

J. J. Lodder

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Jan 18, 2020, 7:31:03 AM1/18/20
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Yeah. Great German humour,

Jan

Alan Browne

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Jan 18, 2020, 10:05:18 AM1/18/20
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On 2020-01-18 00:40, do...@10.usenet.us.com wrote:
> Alan Browne <bitb...@blackhole.com> wrote:
>> Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.
>> Recreation: map and compass.
>
> While in Mongolia, I told my driver that I wanted to visit a confluence.
>
> He had no maps, but he did call it a "map cross".
> Later, while driving on a plateau, he said we were getting close, as he looked at the mountains on all sides of us.
>
> Navigation by mountain ridges. No compass, no maps. No roads.

That's local information. Which is great.

But I worry about people's basic orientation, map reading and navigation
skills.

I'd be a lot more impressed if people found caches w/o GPS. I suppose
such a "sport" could be invented. Perhaps call it:

-Orienteering or
-Rogaine

And people would participate all over the world, and ...

Ah, I'm dreaming!

Alan Browne

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Jan 18, 2020, 10:06:39 AM1/18/20
to
On 2020-01-18 07:04, Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
> On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 17:01:43 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:
>
>> Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.
>>
>> Recreation: map and compass.
>>
>> Fuck Geo-caching.
>
> Hmm, perhaps the aeroplane ruins your natural jumping skills.

You're an idiot on most NG's, and staying true to form.

As a matter of fact I don't jump out of perfectly functioning airplanes
and I'm quite skilled at navigating them with compass, map and watch.
For that matter I used to teach those skills.

Alan Browne

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Jan 18, 2020, 10:07:22 AM1/18/20
to
On 2020-01-18 07:31, J. J. Lodder wrote:

>
> Yeah. Great German humour,

For very low values of "Great" and zero value of "humour".

Hans-Georg Michna

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Jan 19, 2020, 7:36:54 AM1/19/20
to
I admit, for me it's easy to say these things. I have crossed
the entire continent of Africa twice in the pilot's seat of my
Cessna 172 before the GPS was even invented. So I know what I'm
talking about and I necessarily had to master map and compass
navigation.

But I also admit that I prefer the new Cessna 172 SP with the
Garmin G1000 avionics that I fly these days. I hold pilot
workshops for it.

It is interesting to think about what pilots should be able to
do nowadays. Of course they have to have the capability to
navigate by map and compass, but what I keep seeing is that
pilots have too little knowledge about the new systems to
utilize them fully. The question is, what gives them more
safety, learning more about classic map, compass, and radio
navigation or learning more about the glass cockpits they use?
They cannot always do both. Looking at accident statistics,
there are indications that certain types of accidents are more
typical of glass cockpits, and quite possibly caused by a
misalignment between the new technology and the pilot's ability
to put the new GPS-based devices to full and proper use.

It is, of course, easy to say that the pilot should always fall
back on map and compass in any difficult situation, but that
doesn't cut it. Pilots can get into poor visibility or into
areas lacking landmarks and radio nav-aids, where their classic
navigation skills don't help them much. I still remember looking
out for fires to get an idea about the wind to aid
dead-reckoning. But such situations are where GPS technology is
far superior and can greatly lighten the workload of the pilot
and increase safety.

It is always easy to say that pilots should know both means of
navigation perfectly, but in practice this will never be the
case. Private pilots will not be able to expend the time and
effort to know all the old and the new methods to perfection.
Therefore it is quite possible that the optimum is to know just
sufficient classic navigation to get by and put more effort into
mastering the glass cockpit, if this means fewer accidents and
more successful flights. The truth is rarely black and white.

I have been in situations where the GPS made VFR flights
possible that I could not have done without GPS. A simple
example is deteriorating visibility, where you have sufficient
view of the ground to keep flying, but insufficient information
to determine precisely where you are. In such situations the
classic navigations skills will certainly keep you alive and
allow you to safely return to your point of departure, but they
will not allow you to land at a much more convenient small
airfield nearby, because without GPS you simply cannot find it.
I have been in exactly this situation, and the GPS saved me
countless hours of unnecessary flying. (The small airfield was
Mweiga, Kenya.)

In short, I am sure that just insisting on perfect mastery of
the old methods and discounting the new ones is not optimal.

Hans

Alan Browne

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Jan 19, 2020, 12:17:16 PM1/19/20
to
On 2020-01-19 07:36, Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
> On Sat, 18 Jan 2020 10:06:33 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:
>
>> On 2020-01-18 07:04, Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
>>> On Fri, 17 Jan 2020 17:01:43 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:
>>>
>>>> Shit on that. Ruins navigation skills.
>>>>
>>>> Recreation: map and compass.
>>>>
>>>> Fuck Geo-caching.
>>>
>>> Hmm, perhaps the aeroplane ruins your natural jumping skills.
>>
>> You're an idiot on most NG's, and staying true to form.
>>
>> As a matter of fact I don't jump out of perfectly functioning airplanes
>> and I'm quite skilled at navigating them with compass, map and watch.
>> For that matter I used to teach those skills.
>
> I admit, for me it's easy to say these things. I have crossed
> the entire continent of Africa twice in the pilot's seat of my
<s>
> In short, I am sure that just insisting on perfect mastery of
> the old methods and discounting the new ones is not optimal.

In short, you completely missed the point and posted a self-interest
piece in its place.

To think that geo-caching is of any value to anyone is an absolute
farce. Well I suppose it gets lazy minded people off their butts
looking for a bucket in the woods. There's that.

Hans-Georg Michna

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Jan 20, 2020, 11:17:59 AM1/20/20
to
On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 12:17:10 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:
>...
>To think that geo-caching is of any value to anyone is an absolute
>farce. Well I suppose it gets lazy minded people off their butts
>looking for a bucket in the woods. There's that.

Geo-caching is a game. Why should geocaching have less value
than any other game?

Hans

Terje Mathisen

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Jan 20, 2020, 11:38:14 AM1/20/20
to
Because it is systematic littering?

I.e. pretty much all geocaches are physical, which means that somebody
have hidden a box, typically plastic, at the site.

Terje

--
- <Terje.Mathisen at tmsw.no>
"almost all programming can be viewed as an exercise in caching"

Alan Browne

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Jan 20, 2020, 1:52:10 PM1/20/20
to
No challenge to the brain box.

I'd grant it's slightly better than Pokemon live (whatever the fuck it's
called) where people capture virtual thises-and-that's out there in the
wild. (Drove the Canadian military bonkers for a while as people
climbed fences at secure bases ...)

Alan Browne

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Jan 20, 2020, 1:53:44 PM1/20/20
to
On 2020-01-20 11:38, Terje Mathisen wrote:
> Hans-Georg Michna wrote:
>> On Sun, 19 Jan 2020 12:17:10 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:
>>> ...
>>> To think that geo-caching is of any value to anyone is an absolute
>>> farce.  Well I suppose it gets lazy minded people off their butts
>>> looking for a bucket in the woods.  There's that.
>>
>> Geo-caching is a game. Why should geocaching have less value
>> than any other game?
>
> Because it is systematic littering?
>
> I.e. pretty much all geocaches are physical, which means that somebody
> have hidden a box, typically plastic, at the site.

Good point.

jacob...@gmail.com

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Jan 21, 2020, 12:16:11 AM1/21/20
to
Ok boomer

Hans-Georg Michna

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Jan 22, 2020, 12:16:15 PM1/22/20
to
On Mon, 20 Jan 2020 17:38:12 +0100, Terje Mathisen wrote:

>Hans-Georg Michna wrote:

>> Geo-caching is a game. Why should geocaching have less value
>> than any other game?

>Because it is systematic littering?
>
>I.e. pretty much all geocaches are physical, which means that somebody
>have hidden a box, typically plastic, at the site.

Well, that is formally true, but you have to admit that the
littering does not disturb, because the caches are invisible to
the general public.

And they are usually well-maintained. If a geocache is disused,
the owner will remove it. If not, sooner or later probably a
non-geocaching kid will find the cache and take it home. "Look,
ma, what I found!"

I think to call geocaching littering is a bit far-fetched
anyway. Geocaches represent such an extremely tiny fraction of
all garbage on our planet that it is a bit preposterous to count
them at all. We are living in a landfill economy.

On the plus side, they are a good thing for example for
families, because they introduce kids and adults to nature and
to technology at the same time. Some geocaches even have an
explicit educational purpose.

There are very many things that should be criticized long before
geocaching.

Hans-Georg

Alan Browne

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Jan 24, 2020, 9:41:50 AM1/24/20
to
I've been fighting trash, pollution, waste, plastic, emissions all my
life and I still am. So take that tired retort and shove it where it
belongs.

Rexma

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Sep 11, 2020, 6:10:24 PM9/11/20
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Wow, this post is history. Wowzers

Alan Browne

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Sep 12, 2020, 11:07:03 AM9/12/20
to
On 2020-09-11 18:10, Rexma wrote:
> Wow, this post is history. Wowzers
>

Go Orienteering. Better for both mind and body.

Terje Mathisen

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Sep 13, 2020, 9:31:03 AM9/13/20
to
Indeed.

Orienteering was the only sport that never had to close down completely
this spring, in fact we had a huge growth in recreational orienteers
("Tur-orientering") this spring/summer.

Individual orienteering is of course the "most socially distanced" sport
ever, it even says so in the rule book, i.e. you cannot follow anyone
else within sight distance. :-)

Alan Browne

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Sep 13, 2020, 12:19:37 PM9/13/20
to
On 2020-09-13 09:30, Terje Mathisen wrote:
> Alan Browne wrote:
>> On 2020-09-11 18:10, Rexma wrote:
>>> Wow, this post is history. Wowzers
>>>
>>
>> Go Orienteering.  Better for both mind and body.
>
> Indeed.
>
> Orienteering was the only sport that never had to close down completely
> this spring, in fact we had a huge growth in recreational orienteers
> ("Tur-orientering") this spring/summer.

It's open here but I haven't gone. Too many restrictions (need to
reserve for a particular 30 minute slot), no electronic tags at
checkpoints (no idea why), so it's honor system and/or record your track.

>
> Individual orienteering is of course the "most socially distanced" sport
> ever, it even says so in the rule book, i.e. you cannot follow anyone
> else within sight distance. :-)

Hard to avoid following someone on a trail who is slower than you are -
you'll be following for some portion of time ...

--
"...there are many humorous things in this world; among them the white
man's notion that he is less savage than the other savages."
-Samuel Clemens

Terje Mathisen

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Sep 15, 2020, 4:24:46 AM9/15/20
to
Alan Browne wrote:
> On 2020-09-13 09:30, Terje Mathisen wrote:
>> Alan Browne wrote:
>>> On 2020-09-11 18:10, Rexma wrote:
>>>> Wow, this post is history. Wowzers
>>>>
>>>
>>> Go Orienteering.  Better for both mind and body.
>>
>> Indeed.
>>
>> Orienteering was the only sport that never had to close down
>> completely this spring, in fact we had a huge growth in recreational
>> orienteers ("Tur-orientering") this spring/summer.
>
> It's open here but I haven't gone.  Too many restrictions (need to
> reserve for a particular 30 minute slot), no electronic tags at
> checkpoints (no idea why), so it's honor system and/or record your track.

The first race I organized back in April used no punching, just flags
(which you should pass very close to without touching), and then the
results were based on either personally reported times ("honor system"),
or for most of the participants, by uploading their track log to
LiveLox: https://www.livelox.com/Events/Show/47104/OBIK-P1

People were allowed to start at any time within a 2-week period, so very
rarely more than one or two runners in the forest at the same time.
>
>>
>> Individual orienteering is of course the "most socially distanced"
>> sport ever, it even says so in the rule book, i.e. you cannot follow
>> anyone else within sight distance. :-)
>
> Hard to avoid following someone on a trail who is slower than you are -
> you'll be following for some portion of time ...
>
Passing people is of course OK. :-)

In Norwegian terrain you would spend very little time running on paths
anyway, and different courses would share zero to very few legs.

Alan Browne

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Sep 19, 2020, 1:14:45 PM9/19/20
to
On 2020-09-15 04:24, Terje Mathisen wrote:
> Alan Browne wrote:
>> On 2020-09-13 09:30, Terje Mathisen wrote:
>>> Alan Browne wrote:
>>>> On 2020-09-11 18:10, Rexma wrote:
>>>>> Wow, this post is history. Wowzers
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Go Orienteering.  Better for both mind and body.
>>>
>>> Indeed.
>>>
>>> Orienteering was the only sport that never had to close down
>>> completely this spring, in fact we had a huge growth in recreational
>>> orienteers ("Tur-orientering") this spring/summer.
>>
>> It's open here but I haven't gone.  Too many restrictions (need to
>> reserve for a particular 30 minute slot), no electronic tags at
>> checkpoints (no idea why), so it's honor system and/or record your track.
>
> The first race I organized back in April used no punching, just flags
> (which you should pass very close to without touching), and then the
> results were based on either personally reported times ("honor system"),
> or for most of the participants, by uploading their track log to
> LiveLox: https://www.livelox.com/Events/Show/47104/OBIK-P1
>
> People were allowed to start at any time within a 2-week period, so very
> rarely more than one or two runners in the forest at the same time.

I don't see why using an electronic tag is an issue. Very little
contact and it is very brief. Not like you smell it afterwards.

>>
>>>
>>> Individual orienteering is of course the "most socially distanced"
>>> sport ever, it even says so in the rule book, i.e. you cannot follow
>>> anyone else within sight distance. :-)
>>
>> Hard to avoid following someone on a trail who is slower than you are
>> - you'll be following for some portion of time ...
>>
> Passing people is of course OK. :-)
>
> In Norwegian terrain you would spend very little time running on paths
> anyway, and different courses would share zero to very few legs.

On some courses here you are rarely out of the woods so the undergrowth
determines route choice. Most courses seem about 70-90% woods though
some are closer to 50/50.

The organizers, of course, put as many checkpoints in the woods as
possible (except beginner level). So you have to quickly decide on
bushwhack or trail or the right mix.

Often you can't see a CP until within 10 - 20 metres.
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