VCR plays color tapes in B&W only?

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wire

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Apr 15, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/15/00
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I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color
tapes in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things
that would cause this?

Thanks
Peter
--
!!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!
! http://members.home.net/wireb/ !
!!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!

Peter Shabino Graduated Electrical Engineering
wi...@home.com Michigan Technological University
2015 41st ST. NW apt. F13 Now at
Rochester, MN 55901 IBM card test division

Michael Parker

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Apr 15, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/15/00
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umm yeah, they don't get uhh "dirty" in the sense of little grains of sand
all over the place.. Varying chemical crap builds up in/on the heads (the
little tiny 1/4" x 1/16" specks in the drunk) and interferes that way.

It needs to be cleaned with rubbing alcohol and the applicator of your
choice. "They" say not to use Q-tips, but I usually use Q-tips. "They" say
not to use yer finger, but in a pinch, I've used my finger.

I forget the name of the special little sticks you're supposed to use, but
Radio Shack has them.

wire wrote in message <38F7D6CC...@home.com>...


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wire

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Apr 15, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/15/00
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already cleaned the vcr with alcohol and "shammies on a stick"
still no color the picture has no noise in it just no color.

later
Peter

Tom MacIntyre

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Apr 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/16/00
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2000 02:28:58 GMT, wire <wi...@home.com> wrote:

>I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color
>tapes in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
>cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
>cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
>plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things
>that would cause this?
>
>Thanks
>Peter
>--
> !!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!
> ! http://members.home.net/wireb/ !
> !!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!
>
>Peter Shabino Graduated Electrical Engineering
>wi...@home.com Michigan Technological University
>2015 41st ST. NW apt. F13 Now at
>Rochester, MN 55901 IBM card test division

Somebody sneaked in and reversed the heads? :-))

Seriously, there may be a problem with the crystal or a related
component. Have you recorded and played the tape back on another
machine to see if the recording is in colour? I know little about
VCR's, but those are some ideas that come to mind. You should post
back with the model and make, and it may tweak someone's memory. You
may need a schematic and oscilloscope to sort out a problem like this.

Tom

wire

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Apr 16, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/16/00
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Tom MacIntyre wrote:
>
> On Sat, 15 Apr 2000 02:28:58 GMT, wire <wi...@home.com> wrote:
>
> >I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color
> >tapes in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
> >cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
> >cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
> >plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things
> >that would cause this?
>

> Somebody sneaked in and reversed the heads? :-))
>
> Seriously, there may be a problem with the crystal or a related
> component. Have you recorded and played the tape back on another
> machine to see if the recording is in colour? I know little about
> VCR's, but those are some ideas that come to mind. You should post
> back with the model and make, and it may tweak someone's memory. You
> may need a schematic and oscilloscope to sort out a problem like this.
>
> Tom

Magnavox
MODEL CCR095AT04

This is a combo TV VCR unit
The tv works fine off the tuner (in color).

I have my scopemeter charged up waiting for some hints at repair.
I will stop by target on my way to work and pick up a blank tape
and try recording on this vcr and playing on a second one.....

wire

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Apr 17, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/17/00
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Recorded a tape in the vcr. It played back on that vcr in
black and white. It also played back in black and white on
another vcr (known good). Any ideas?

Thanks
Peter

Tom MacIntyre

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Apr 17, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/17/00
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2000 01:42:25 GMT, wire <wi...@home.com> wrote:

>Recorded a tape in the vcr. It played back on that vcr in
>black and white. It also played back in black and white on
>another vcr (known good). Any ideas?
>
>Thanks
>Peter

It's losing color before the head. If you have colour on any channel
you select with the VCR's tuner, this narrows things down a fair
amount. You'll still probably need a schematic for this.

Tom

My-self

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Apr 19, 2000, 3:00:00 AM4/19/00
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How old is this unit.Does it have switch mode power supply in cage?Caps over
heat and dry out from poor ventalation. Check the ALL capacitors in the power
supply and the dc out puts of the power supply for ac ripple. The chroma
portion of the video signal is so small ac ripple could be walking on it.
I fixed a older Panasonic Hifi that had this exact problem not long ago.It
puzzled me a little at first but then I clued in when I checked the video
signal. I replaced all caps and clean the unit. Perfect picture record/play
Done.

Don

In article <38F7D6CC...@home.com>, wi...@home.com says...


>
>I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color
>tapes in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
>cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
>cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
>plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things
>that would cause this?
>

Andrew Schwerin

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Jun 1, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/1/00
to
My vcr (Panasonic Omnivision PV-4225S (mfg. 1992)) just started exhibiting a
similar problem (which led me to this newsgroup).

It records only in black and white. It just started doing it a couple days
ago - at first, it'd vary back and forth - color then b/w, then back again.
Now its just b/w.

It plays back in color if the tape came from somewhere else. Its tapes play
in b/w on another vcr. So the problem is only in the recording, not in the
playback.

I read y'all's FAQ and cleaned the heads and everything else (no Q-tips!
actually folded up some paper towel into a square - no lint, and soft).
Didn't fix it.

I found some stuff referring to the ps caps as a possible color problem.
Took off the cover and there's what looks like burn marks above the ps but
can't see much on the circuit board.

On your FAQ it says that a cap should go to infinity when subjected to an
ohmmeter. I tried 2 330uF caps, on one nothing happened (tried rev.
polarity), and the other it went up fast at first then slowly approached to
about 84 on the 200K ohm scale.

If anybody could advise as to whether I'm on the right track, if I should
try my hand at some soldering or whatever, I'd appreciate it.

Andrew

CLSNOWYOWL

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Jun 3, 2000, 3:00:00 AM6/3/00
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Have you tried cleaning the heads manually? Do you get a color signal through
the TV tuner? I would check these things out first and then go deeper from
there.

crazy chicken

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Sep 25, 2020, 10:02:18 PM9/25/20
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I am having the exact same problem. What is broken, the VCR or VHS that is making it B&W. Is everything B&W because my VHS tapes are too old and have eroded? I have tapes since 1990, so do they still work 30 years later? Is there no solution to this problem? I am trying to get my tapes to digital, and I need to solve this problem.
Thanks for reading!
- A Chicken

Dave Platt

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Sep 26, 2020, 12:57:57 AM9/26/20
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In article <0e80f69b-170d-4252...@googlegroups.com>,
https://www.broadcaststore.com/pdf/model/793700/TT198%20-%204802.pdf
has some useful information about how VHS color recording works,
although the details of the testing procedure it suggests won't help
you all that much.

With tapes in good condition, and a VCR in good condition and
alignment, color playback should work OK. It's unlikely that several
different tapes would have degraded in the same way, so the fault is
more probably with the VCR.

VHS can lose color because of dirty or bad playback heads in the drum,
or because of a fault in the color-conversion circuits (VHS stores the
color information in a different frequency band than is used by NTSC
video). A failed 3.68 MHz color-reference oscillator would be one
such possible fault, and I'm sure there are plenty of others.

Sure, there's a solution: try a different VCR, preferably one which is
in known-good condition.

Your existing VCR might be repairable; it might need something as
simple as a good professional cleaning (and I don't mean a "cleaning
tape", I mean a by-hand cleaning by a technician who knows how to do
it properly and who won't damage the heads) or it might need circuitry
repairs. Old VHS players are common enough that simply buying a
(used) replacement is likely to be cheaper than a repair.

Another possibility - if you have hooked your VCR up to a TV/monitor
using an S-video cable, try a different cable. S-Video sends the
luminance (brightness) signal on one wire, and the chroma (color)
signal on another wire. A broken wire or pin could cut off the chroma
and leave you seeing black-and-white. See if the problem is still
there if you use a composite-video cable (RCA plug/jack, usually
yellow) rather than S-Video.

If you're trying to video-capture onto a PC, you might have a problem
with your video-capture card.



Guy Patterson

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Sep 26, 2020, 1:14:46 PM9/26/20
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A specific model number would be helpful. I may still have service records somewhere on VCRs. But no, the age of the tape has nothing to do with a loss of chroma in playback assuming the signal to noise ratio is still respectable (viewable image without severe noise). The chroma sub carrier won't degrade any faster than any other part of the composite waveform will.

Old VCRs suffer the same issues as modern garbage does: lazy electrolytic caps as they age. If you only need this to run long enough to do a digital transfer, try taking the cover off the VCR and heating the innards for about 10 minutes with a hair dryer (don't use a real heat gun). With a good hot soak, a weak electro cap can increase it's value and lower it's ESR enough to allow the color to work as it should. If it responds to heat, make all your transfers while it stays hot.

crazy chicken

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Sep 27, 2020, 8:27:14 PM9/27/20
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Thank you so much! I will tell you if any of this works! If it does, anyone else that comes into the google group will see your message and leave!

bruce bowser

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Dec 17, 2020, 2:42:48 PM12/17/20
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On Sunday, September 27, 2020 at 8:27:14 PM UTC-4, crazy chicken wrote:
> Thank you so much! I will tell you if any of this works! If it does, anyone else that comes into the google group will see your message and leave!

"an analog-to-digital converter box transfers the VHS signal from a VCR. The converter box creates an MPEG file of the VHS tape (to a hard/flash drive).

-- https://itstillworks.com/how-to-copy-vhs-to-flash-drives-10186.html

bruce bowser

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Dec 17, 2020, 2:46:28 PM12/17/20
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I didn't know that you could copy the VCR or VHS tape onto the DVD (then transfer to a hard/flash drive).

Glenn Gundlach

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Dec 19, 2020, 4:15:02 PM12/19/20
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Copy to DVD/files works much better with time base corrected video so that the maths line up for the subcarrier (color) and luminance. Once the TBC
has done its job, making files and DVDs is trivial. I used to do this regularly. There aren't a lot of TBCd VCR models. JVC called it 'digipure' and it
works very well. I use a JVC HR-S9911U. Note SOME video capture cards might have the TBC function on the card so you can use any VCR.


Charles Lucas

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Jul 10, 2022, 4:35:57 PMJul 10
to
On Saturday, April 15, 2000 at 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, wire wrote:
> I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color
> tapes in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
> cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
> cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
> plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things
> that would cause this?
> Thanks
> Peter
> --
> !!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!
> ! http://members.home.net/wireb/ !
> !!!!!!!!!!!Go Build a Robot!!!!!!!!!!!
> Peter Shabino Graduated Electrical Engineering
> wi...@home.com Michigan Technological University
> 2015 41st ST. NW apt. F13 Now at
> Rochester, MN 55901 IBM card test division
Check the luminance/chrominance [luma/chroma] circuitry that controls the picture output
in black and white and color. I would check the 3.58 MHz crystal oscillator also on the video
output as well. This things help with the color processing. Usually, it is an IC or integrated
circuit (could even be a flatpack) that controls this or some discreet component like a transistor,
resistor, or cap. that activates the IC).

Another idiot on google groups

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Jul 10, 2022, 9:30:31 PMJul 10
to
Charles Lucas <charles...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Saturday, April 15, 2000 at 2:00:00 AM UTC-5, wire wrote:
>> I am working on my aunts vcr and it just started to play color tapes
>> in black and white. I assumed it was just dirty and needed
>> cleaning. Took it apart and for the most part it is very clean.
>> cleaned up what little dirt there was and reassembled it. Still
>> plays tapes in black and white. What are some common things that
>> would cause this?
>> Thanks
>> Peter

> Check the luminance/chrominance [luma/chroma] circuitry that controls
> the picture output in black and white and color. I would check the
> 3.58 MHz crystal oscillator also on the video output as well. This
> things help with the color processing. Usually, it is an IC or
> integrated circuit (could even be a flatpack) that controls this or
> some discreet component like a transistor, resistor, or cap. that
> activates the IC).

Do you really think that after over 22 years, the poster of the article
to which you just replied is still waiting around for your answer?

The article to which you repled was posted April 15, 2000.

Charles Lucas

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Jul 11, 2022, 8:08:02 PMJul 11
to
I saw the date (I can read) and I am truly sorry if my outrageously late reply deeply offends you somehow. I never expected either of us to wait and I am sure the original poster never expect me nor my specific answer to be available at any time. I posted a reply this late for archival purposes, as VCR's are outmoded now, for the most part. Besides, everyone else has had 22 years to provide some sort of answer (however simple or complex to solve the problem). Some of us when we service peoples' tech. needs are extremely busy and do not get around to writing on a forum like this. At any rate, archiving the answer is good for posterity, should anyone at any future time utilize the technology or the information and find it useful. You can perceive me as an "idiot" for the outdated response. The fact is I wanted to respond to this and thought I would offer my two cents worth (whether you value the actual input or not). The point is even though the original poster didn't wait for me or answer, somehow you did respond with a reply.

Have a great day. God Bless.

Charles Lucas

ohg...@gmail.com

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Jul 16, 2022, 12:49:16 PMJul 16
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You didn't provide any specific help at all, unless you want to consider 'check the color circuitry' and 'it could be an IC, transistor, crystal, resistor, or capacitor' as helpful.

Charles Lucas

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Jul 16, 2022, 7:15:21 PMJul 16
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Need a model number to do that. everything is specific to the model. Also,check any and all of those things- if not sure. A good
service manual for the model would help to track down the critical components that activate the circuit. There are also many different
integrated circuits and circuits out there and different ways to actuate them (a resistor,a diode, a transistor, or cap, etc...), so it depends on
the design of the circuit. If I have a model number, I can tell you what pins to check to verify correct operation. I have been a tech. for 32
years and not all circuits are designed the same. The initial information is generalized as a guide. If you want something more specific, please provide a model number or an FCC ID number. God Bless you.

amdx

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Aug 5, 2022, 3:59:50 PMAug 5
to
With a problem like that, my first shot would be to sparingly,
start hitting single parts in that area with cold spray, and see if the
color came back.
If not, then start troubleshooting. That even had success during the 1980s!

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

Charles Lucas

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Aug 6, 2022, 2:46:35 PMAug 6
to

> > The article to which you repled was posted April 15, 2000.
> >
> With a problem like that, my first shot would be to sparingly,
> start hitting single parts in that area with cold spray, and see if the
> color came back.
> If not, then start troubleshooting. That even had success during the 1980s!
>

Another technique is to heat the IC up with a hot hair dryer to see if you can get
it to act up that way. This worked during the 1980's also. Overheating microprocessors
beyond their temperature coefficients can be dodgy... They can be tricky.

Stephen Wolstenholme

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Aug 7, 2022, 8:17:07 AMAug 7
to
On Sat, 6 Aug 2022 11:46:32 -0700 (PDT), Charles Lucas
<charles...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>> > The article to which you repled was posted April 15, 2000.
>> >
>> With a problem like that, my first shot would be to sparingly,
>> start hitting single parts in that area with cold spray, and see if the
>> color came back.
>> If not, then start troubleshooting. That even had success during the 1980s!
>>
>
>Another technique is to heat the IC up with a hot hair dryer to see if you can get
>it to act up that way. This worked during the 1980's also. Overheating microprocessors
>beyond their temperature coefficients can be dodgy... They can be tricky.
>

I used a soldering iron without any solder to heat individual
components, hair dryers tended to heat everything up at once. That was
a long time before the 1980's

Steve
--
Neural Network Software for Windows http://www.npsnn.com

Jeff Liebermann

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Aug 7, 2022, 11:28:25 AMAug 7
to
Hair dryers, large heat guns, paint strippers, butane torches, and
flame throwers are too large for heating individual components.
Smaller is better (mini or micro heat gun):
<https://www.aliexpress.com/item/3256802432742384.html>
<https://www.google.com/search?q=mini+heat+gun&tbm=isch>
Personally, I have several temperature controlled SMD desoldering
stations and adapters with very small diameter stainless tips. It
took a while to optimize the air flow and temperature settings, but
works well enough for localized heating.

I've also thought about building a small IR heater consisting of a hot
nichrome wire and a polished aluminum reflector to concentrate the
heat. Because there's no flame or blowing air, it should be able to
heat individual components without also heating up everything in the
vicinity. Yet another project.


--
Jeff Liebermann je...@cruzio.com
PO Box 272 http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Ben Lomond CA 95005-0272
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558

Chuck

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Aug 7, 2022, 11:44:36 AMAug 7
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The problem can be open filter capacitors in the power supply.
Excessive hash on the B+ busses can kill the color circuitry.

Charles Lucas

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Aug 7, 2022, 4:55:29 PMAug 7
to
Both of these are some of the most interesting responses I have heard.
Really great replies. Thanks for the insight. I was making the suggestion
I made because we found the general vicinity of the problem, then measured
voltages to hone down the specific line where the culprit was.

> The problem can be open filter capacitors in the power supply.
> Excessive hash on the B+ busses can kill the color circuitry.

excellent suggestions and replies. Thank you.
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