WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

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Micky

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May 1, 2017, 12:07:51 PM5/1/17
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WD-40 to clean electric contacts?

I'm on vacation and renting a room, and my landlady has a combination
CD/Radio/Cassette?, very compact, portable, works well except fo the
little on/off/CD slide switch.

The switch doesn't easily make contact, even when pushed to and past
the On position. So it's hard to get the radio on, and it turns off
by itself in about 30 minutes. Moving the switch back and forth 10
times to clean it hasn't worked yet.

Normally what I would do is spray contact cleaner or tuner cleaner in
the switch from above, where the plastic slider that goes over the
switch is, And normally that doesn't accomplish much.

Even taking such things apart and spraying the switch from underneath
has taken longer to work than for rheostats, for example, and here I
don't want to take it apart. She's only my landlady.

I don't know where in this non-English-speaking country to buy
contact cleaner and she might balk at the extra money, but she does
have something in an aerosol can that looks mighty like WD-40.

I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them. Should I try it.

BTW, I want to use the radio, so that's one big reason I want it
fixed. When it stopped playing while she was there, she said, "Oh,
yeah, maybe that's why I bought another one" (She speaks English.)

Sjouke Burry

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May 1, 2017, 12:39:07 PM5/1/17
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Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
care of the wd40 residue(maybe).
I don't think it will make things worse.

Retired

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May 1, 2017, 1:00:54 PM5/1/17
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According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
"• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them


pf...@aol.com

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May 1, 2017, 1:40:38 PM5/1/17
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A few things on WD-40.

Its name means Water Displacement - 40th try.
It is, essentially, stoddard solvent, that is highly refined kerosene and a very small amount of very light mineral oil.
It is 100% volatile over time. Which is directly related to temperature.
Most gunks and goos are soluble in WD-40. But, what is not rinsed away will be evenly distributed when the solvent evaporates. So beware!
It is a rather gentle solvent, and does not attack most plastics or finishes. *MOST*, not all!

WD-40 is NOT a contact cleaner. What it does along those lines is by rinsing.
WD-40 is not a lubricant. It will (temporarily) reconstitute some lubricants under some conditions.

Good luck with it, you could do worse.

Foxs Mercantile

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May 1, 2017, 3:08:24 PM5/1/17
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On 5/1/2017 12:00 PM, Retired wrote:
> According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
> https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
> "• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them

And most of the 2000 ideas are marketing hype.

--
Jeff-1.0
wa6fwi
http://www.foxsmercantile.com

---
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tabb...@gmail.com

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May 1, 2017, 4:04:02 PM5/1/17
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Stoddard solvent is aka white spirit. I'd try 100 times rather than 10.


NT

Wade Garrett

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May 1, 2017, 4:24:33 PM5/1/17
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On 5/1/17 3:08 PM, Foxs Mercantile wrote:
> On 5/1/2017 12:00 PM, Retired wrote:
>> According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
>> https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
>> "• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them
>
> And most of the 2000 ideas are marketing hype.
>

You're a regular party-pooper!

--
If people, who cross our border illegally are not Illegal— then what are
they?
- @chuckwoolery

burfordTjustice

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May 1, 2017, 4:25:31 PM5/1/17
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Report back the results after you man up and try it.

olds...@tubes.com

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May 1, 2017, 4:56:36 PM5/1/17
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On Mon, 01 May 2017 19:07:44 +0300, Micky <mis...@bigfoot.com> wrote:

> I don't know where in this non-English-speaking country to buy
>contact cleaner and she might balk at the extra money, but she does
>have something in an aerosol can that looks mighty like WD-40.

Get it on Ebay and have it shipped to you.

Ian Jackson

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May 1, 2017, 5:48:49 PM5/1/17
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In message <b139cdd6-bb7e-4c10...@googlegroups.com>,
"pf...@aol.com" <pf...@aol.com> writes
The makers of WD40 might disagree with you.
>
>Good luck with it, you could do worse.

Indeed. WE40 may be the perfect cure for every problem - but it IS a
good general-purpose cleaner/lubricant/anti-corrosion fluid. I've never
had any problems with it.
--
ian

et...@whidbey.com

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May 1, 2017, 5:51:19 PM5/1/17
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On Mon, 1 May 2017 10:40:36 -0700 (PDT), "pf...@aol.com" <pf...@aol.com>
wrote:
WD-40 does not completely evaporate over time unless the temperature
is higher than that which is compatible with human life. It leaves a
kind of hard residue, almost like a very hard wax. A very thin
coating. Which, unless baked on, will be easily dissloved when next
doused with WD-40. I have had direct experience with this coating. It
can be used to repaior an oil-rubbed bronze finish.
Eric

pf...@aol.com

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May 1, 2017, 6:50:16 PM5/1/17
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On Monday, May 1, 2017 at 5:51:19 PM UTC-4, et...@whidbey.com wrote:
> WD-40 does not completely evaporate over time unless the temperature
> is higher than that which is compatible with human life.

No, it does completely evaporate. That 'leftover' is the previous skunge dissolved and spread over everything.

To prove this out:

Take a standard paper towel, clean and dry.
Saturate it in WD-40.
Leave it on a clean surface in a location in your domicile exposed to normal temperature variations.
Check it in 4-20 days depending on ambient temperatures.

Don't take my word for it.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

John Robertson

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May 1, 2017, 6:51:29 PM5/1/17
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On 2017/05/01 1:24 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:
> On 5/1/17 3:08 PM, Foxs Mercantile wrote:
>> On 5/1/2017 12:00 PM, Retired wrote:
>>> According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
>>> https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
>>> "• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them
>>
>> And most of the 2000 ideas are marketing hype.
>>
>
> You're a regular party-pooper!
>

Having cleaned the residue (glue like substance) of WD-40 from many an
electrical unit I would say that it's only practical use is for
preventing rust on tools.

Everything else is hype.

There are FAR better solvents out there than WD-40...and cheaper!

John :-#(#

--
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the USENET newsgroup)
John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
(604)872-5757 or Fax 872-2010 (Pinballs, Jukes, Video Games)
www.flippers.com
"Old pinballers never die, they just flip out."

John Robertson

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May 1, 2017, 7:11:30 PM5/1/17
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I have a bit of trouble with your test, Peter. If it left no residue
then WD-40 couldn't prevent rust on tools (which was all it was only
designed to do).

Instead of your paper towel, pour some WD-40 on a sheet of glass and let
it sit and evaporate for a while and see what remains.

There MUST be some sort of residue.

My shop's experience is WD-40 plus oil = glue/goo.

John :-#)#

Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 8:09:24 PM5/1/17
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Micky wrote:
>
>
> I have this vague recollection that WD-40 is good to clean electric
> contacts?? Either that or it's bad for them.
>
>

** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.

Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.


.... Phil

Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 8:10:42 PM5/1/17
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Sjouke Burry wrote:
>
> >
> Trying it, will certainly not make things worse.
> And cleaning/flooding the switch a day or two later with
> something volatile,(alcohol,turpentine or such) will take
> care of the wd40 residue(maybe).
>


** No need to do that, the reside is just light mineral oil.


.... Phil

Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 8:16:52 PM5/1/17
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pf...@aol.com wrote:

> A few things on WD-40.
>

** So a few lies from this norotious WD-40 hater.


> It is, essentially, stoddard solvent, that is highly refined
> kerosene and a very small amount of very light mineral oil.


** WD-40 contains no kerosene and the oil content is 10-15 %.

> It is 100% volatile over time. Which is directly related to temperature.


** At room temp, that could means years.


>
> WD-40 is NOT a contact cleaner. What it does along those lines is by rinsing.
>

** So the same action as other contact cleaners.


> WD-40 is not a lubricant.


** Of course it is.




..... Phil

Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 8:18:04 PM5/1/17
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tabb...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
> Stoddard solvent is aka white spirit.
>


** Which is refined petrol, aka lighter fluid.




..... Phil




Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 8:23:03 PM5/1/17
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et...@whidbey.com wrote:
>
>
> WD-40 does not completely evaporate over time unless the temperature
> is higher than that which is compatible with human life. It leaves a
> kind of hard residue, almost like a very hard wax. A very thin
> coating. Which, unless baked on, will be easily dissloved when next
> doused with WD-40. I have had direct experience with this coating.
>

** Ever burn some oil in a fry pan ?

If you put WD-40 on parts that get hot, a similar residue forms.

It cleans off easily or dissolves in fresh WD-40 so is not a problem.

I see it on the pins of certain noval tubes from time to time.



.... Phil

olds...@tubes.com

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May 1, 2017, 8:34:43 PM5/1/17
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I've never had any problems with it either, but there are tw othings ti
does not do well. 1. Loosen rusted bolts. (I use PB Blaster for that,
it's a much better product). 2. Be used as a permanent lubricant. For
example, if the tailgate on my pickup is sticking, I will use WD 40 to
loosen that linkage, but once the linkage is loose, I apply an oil or
grease to that linkage for a permanent lube. I dont think the WD 40
totally evaporates, but there is little lube left. Thus I apply the oil
or whatever as a permanent lube for that linkage.

I have never used WD 40 for electronic switch contacts or
potentiometers. I always used contact cleaner. But I have used WD 40 on
auto connectors such as trailer light plugs, with corrosion on them. It
helps clean them, but I always clean them as best as possible too.

Overall, its top promotion seems to be to loosen rusted bolts, and I
find it near worthless for that purpose. But it does have some other
uses which are valuable. It's also works rather well to clean off
oxidation on old dull paint (on cars and other metal objects).

There are other generic replacements for WD 40 that are cheaper and work
just as well. I usually buy them.

rickman

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May 1, 2017, 9:08:50 PM5/1/17
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Very bad idea. Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job
and won't cause any harm to electronics. A friend used WD40 on some
very expensive chemical instrumentation as "preventive maintenance" and
the volatile solvents in it melted the shafts to the collars on the pots
freezing them. So he had a service call the next day where he had to
replace the pots he sprayed.

--

Rick C

rickman

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May 1, 2017, 9:15:18 PM5/1/17
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Until you use it on one where the plastic bits dissolve and melt together.

--

Rick C

Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 9:26:23 PM5/1/17
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Prickman is a Liar wrote:

>
>
> > I don't think it will make things worse.
>
> Very bad idea.
>

** Lie number 1.


> Contact cleaner is specifically formulated for the job


** Lie number two.

Most so called "contact cleaners" are hopeless at fixing noisy switches and pots. The solvents use are too weak and evaporate so fast they do not do anything. Plus there is no residual oil to protect metal surfaces from corrosion.



> A friend used WD40 on some
> very expensive chemical instrumentation ...
>


** Why is it always a "friend" who has weird experience with WD40 and never the person posting ??

Cos the story is a complete fabrication.



... Phil




Phil Allison

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May 1, 2017, 9:31:55 PM5/1/17
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Prickman is a Liar wrote:

>
>Phil Allison wrote:
>
> > ** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.
> >
> > Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.
>
>
> Until you use it on one where the plastic bits dissolve and melt together.
>
>

** Massive LIE !!

WD40 does not harm plastics used to make electronic or electrical components.

That is the oldest and STUPIDEST crock of shit trotted out by WD40 haters.

The Prickman is a parroting MORON.



.... Phil






Clifford Heath

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May 2, 2017, 2:48:10 AM5/2/17
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I've been meaning to thank you for telling us that some months back.

In my Yamaha A-520 stereo amp, I've been putting up for several
years now with a noisy/intermittent balance pot for several years.
Only one channel working most of the time, and when you finally
get both to work, one was significantly louder than the other.
It looks like a big job to disassemble it enough to replace.

A quick squirt of WD-40 and it seems as good as new.
I wouldn't have done it on anyone else's recommendation.

Clifford Heath.

Ian Jackson

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May 2, 2017, 3:40:00 AM5/2/17
to
In message <v6udnTMQQbl1JprE...@giganews.com>, John
Robertson <sp...@flippers.com> writes
>On 2017/05/01 1:24 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:
>> On 5/1/17 3:08 PM, Foxs Mercantile wrote:
>>> On 5/1/2017 12:00 PM, Retired wrote:
>>>> According to WD-40's "List of 2000+ Uses" at
>>>> https://wd40.com/files/pdf/wd_40_2000_uses_updated_jan_2017.pdf
>>>> "• Cleans gunk from electrical contacts" is one of them
>>>
>>> And most of the 2000 ideas are marketing hype.
>>>
>>
>> You're a regular party-pooper!
>>
>
>Having cleaned the residue (glue like substance) of WD-40 from many an
>electrical unit I would say that it's only practical use is for
>preventing rust on tools.
>
>Everything else is hype.
>
>There are FAR better solvents out there than WD-40...and cheaper!
>
Cheaper than the old can you've had in the tool-shed for the last 20
years, but which has been your saviour on the odd occasion when you've
suddenly needed a general-purpose lubricant / switch cleaner / rusty nut
freer / corrosion inhibitor ?
>

--
Ian

Ian Jackson

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May 2, 2017, 3:45:54 AM5/2/17
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In message <oe8m0u$n9s$2...@dont-email.me>, rickman <gnu...@gmail.com>
writes
While I'm sure that there have been occasions when a squirt of WD40 has
dissolved everything in sight, I've been using it for decades, and I've
never found it has ever caused any such damage.
--
Ian

Phil Allison

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May 2, 2017, 4:11:26 AM5/2/17
to
Clifford Heath wrote:
> Phil Allison wrote:
>
> > ** WD40 is excellent at making bad contacts good again.
> > Switches, connectors and pots are all examples.
> >
>
> I've been meaning to thank you for telling us that some months back.
>
> In my Yamaha A-520 stereo amp, I've been putting up for several
> years now with a noisy/intermittent balance pot for several years.
> Only one channel working most of the time, and when you finally
> get both to work, one was significantly louder than the other.
> It looks like a big job to disassemble it enough to replace.
>
> A quick squirt of WD-40 and it seems as good as new.
> I wouldn't have done it on anyone else's recommendation.
>


** Thanks or the vote of confidence.

Often, the effect of using a little WD40 is so quick and complete it seems almost magical.


.... Phil

gregz

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May 2, 2017, 4:25:21 AM5/2/17
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It does not displace water unless it's the blast. It floats on water. PB
Blaster displaces water.

Greg

pf...@aol.com

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May 2, 2017, 7:16:46 AM5/2/17
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WD-40 is not designed to remove or protect against rust either. It is meant to *DISPLACE* dampness in the process of cleaning and protecting tools *with something else*.

Try the test.

WD-40 is neither voodoo, black magic nor a secret potion. It is a very simple compound designed for a few very basic purposes.

https://wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf

pf...@aol.com

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May 2, 2017, 7:19:44 AM5/2/17
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The MSDS for WD-40 is posted previously. Look up the numbers.

Jeff Layman

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May 2, 2017, 7:43:21 AM5/2/17
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On 02/05/17 12:16, pf...@aol.com wrote:
> WD-40 is not designed to remove or protect against rust either.

From the link you quoted:
"Product Use: Lubricant, Penetrant, Drives Out
Moisture, Removes and Protects Surfaces
From Corrosion"

Why do you believe that "Removes and Protects Surfaces From Corrosion"
does not include removing or protecting against rust? From the Wikipedia
article on "Rust":
"Rusting is the common term for corrosion of iron and its alloys".

. It is
> meant to *DISPLACE* dampness in the process of cleaning and
> protecting tools *with something else*.
>
> Try the test.

I have, many times. It just works.

> WD-40 is neither voodoo, black magic nor a secret potion. It is a
> very simple compound designed for a few very basic purposes.

It is not a compound. A compound is a single entity . It is a mixture of
compounds (including "non-hazardous ingredients", which appear to be, or
include, sodium bisulfite). The actual amounts are given as ranges.

> https://wd40.com/files/pdf/msds-wd482671453.pdf
>
> Peter Wieck Melrose Park, PA

--

Jeff

Adrian Caspersz

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May 2, 2017, 8:06:14 AM5/2/17
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On 02/05/17 12:16, pf...@aol.com wrote:
It washes out the proper & better lubricants.

We have a sliding door that does get a bit stiff, so a while ago a
regular spray of WD40 sorted it - until it got stuck again. Then another
respray.

Now I've I fixed the respray issue more or less permanently with light
machine oil. Actually another known household brand name, 3-in-1.

When it later needs a clean, I'll use WD40 - then back with the oil.

Because of the advertising, the non-technical "my tv is broke, must be
the switch" tend to overuse the product on anything things that are not
suited, I'm sure some here will have seen examples of overendevous
application on deck mechanics and electronics.

--
Adrian C

ohg...@gmail.com

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May 2, 2017, 9:38:58 AM5/2/17
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As much as I hate to agree with Phil, I believe he's right.

I've learned about unintended solvent welding of plastics with all kinds of spray elixirs, and I've also learned to test each one on soft plastics so I have an idea of what kind of consequences (if any) to expect upon usage.

WD40 has never shown any tendency to soften or otherwise affect plastics that I'm aware of. Is there a strange plastic formula that WD might affect that I've never encountered? Possibly, but I've never seen it, at least not at the level that plastic controls might be constructed of.

Maybe the "friend's" controls weren't solvent welded at all, but bound by the original hardened lubricant that was dissolved and rehardened later after being flushed into the shaft.

rbowman

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May 2, 2017, 10:01:36 AM5/2/17
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On 05/02/2017 01:45 AM, Ian Jackson wrote:
> While I'm sure that there have been occasions when a squirt of WD40 has
> dissolved everything in sight, I've been using it for decades, and I've
> never found it has ever caused any such damage.
> -

Not WD-40 but I found out that using Lock-Ease on a bicycle chain lock
with plastic internal parts is a poor idea :) Even worse is having the
chain wrapped around the bike and an immobile object at the time.


rickman

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May 2, 2017, 11:04:02 AM5/2/17
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This was laboratory equipment that had never seen any harsh treatment.
Anything is possible I suppose, so maybe the controls weren't melted by
the WD-40. But the fact remains that regardless of the exact details
surrounding the problem, it was caused by the indiscriminate use of
WD-40 where it does nothing to help.

So caution is advised when using WD-40 on electronics regardless of the
details of how it mucks up the works.

--

Rick C

et...@whidbey.com

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May 2, 2017, 11:52:03 AM5/2/17
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On Mon, 1 May 2017 15:50:09 -0700 (PDT), "pf...@aol.com" <pf...@aol.com>
wrote:
Peter, I discovered this residue after cleaning a machine well with
solvent and then spraying wirth WD-40. There was left behind a hard
coating on all the previously cleaned metal surfaces. I have since
learned to use this to advantage when repairing an oil rubbed bronze
finish that has been damamged by machining operations. After texturing
and oxidizing the bright bronze machined surface I heat, then spray,
then heat and then spray again with WD-40. This ends up being almost
exactly a US-10 oil rubbed bronze finish and wears identically.
Eric

Jeff Layman

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May 2, 2017, 11:54:46 AM5/2/17