help - 1N34 diode substitute?

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dino

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Jan 4, 2002, 6:17:47 PM1/4/02
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Hi guys, I'm trying to find a substitute for this diode : 1N34
I was unable to find it at digikey, jameco or radio shack

This is the data I found on it:

Name: 1N34
Type: signal
Material: germanium
PIV: 60 volts
Max current Forward(reverse) IO (ir) : 8.5 mA (15.0 uA)
Max drop Vf: 1.0 volts

I would appreciate help with finding a substitute. It's for NOPPP (no parts
pic programmer).

-dino


Lizard Blizzard

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Jan 4, 2002, 8:55:52 PM1/4/02
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Radio Shack Germanium diode package of 10 or 15 is the exact
substitute. The package usually has 1N270s in it. Also you can order
online the 1N34A from Radio Snack for 36 cents each. The part # is
900-6232.

Adam Yudelman

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Jan 4, 2002, 9:45:34 PM1/4/02
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The NOPPP will work with a normal 1N914, 1N4148 etc. (unless you have a
laptop or an otherwise crappy parallel port).
But I think radioshack does sell the 1N32 or something similar, any
germanium diode will be very similar.

Adam

dino wrote in message ...

Gary Lecomte

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Jan 5, 2002, 10:13:07 AM1/5/02
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In most applications a 1N916 or a 1N4148 silicon diode will work even better!
******************************************************************

"dino" <din...@swbell.net> wrote in message news:<vKqZ7.2267$Z_3.115...@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>...

Jim Adney

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Jan 5, 2002, 7:11:15 PM1/5/02
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"dino" <din...@swbell.net> wrote:

>Hi guys, I'm trying to find a substitute for this diode : 1N34
>I was unable to find it at digikey, jameco or radio shack
>
>This is the data I found on it:
>
>Name: 1N34
>Type: signal
>Material: germanium
>PIV: 60 volts
>Max current Forward(reverse) IO (ir) : 8.5 mA (15.0 uA)
>Max drop Vf: 1.0 volts

It's a pretty standard item, although old. Last time I checked Radio
Shack had them as 1N34AS. Almost any good germanium diode will replace
it as long as the PIV is sufficient for the application.

-
-----------------------------------------------
Jim Adney jad...@vwtype3.org
Madison,Wisconsin USA
-----------------------------------------------

Bob Wilson

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Jan 5, 2002, 11:06:41 PM1/5/02
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In article <vKqZ7.2267$Z_3.115...@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
din...@swbell.net says...


If you really NEED a germanium diode, a 1N60 is a possibly more available
replacement.

Bob.

Terran Melconian

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Jan 8, 2002, 3:09:28 AM1/8/02
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In article <vKqZ7.2267$Z_3.115...@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>,
dino <din...@swbell.net> wrote:
>Name: 1N34

If you want the genuine germanium part, these guys still have them:

http://www.americanmicrosemi.com/

Unless you really need it, though (which you almost certainly don't;
the only time you really do is for something like a passive radio
receiver), I concur with the other suggestions that you just use a
silicon diode instead.

Bill Walker

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Mar 12, 2002, 7:34:03 AM3/12/02
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I have jillions of them. E-mail me direct and I'll arange to send you a few.


Gary Lecomte <ou...@telus.net> wrote in message
news:9d4cbfcf.02010...@posting.google.com...

Watson A.Name

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Mar 12, 2002, 8:07:21 AM3/12/02
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Bill Walker wrote:
>
> I have jillions of them. E-mail me direct and I'll arange to send you a few.

Of which kind??


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budss...@gmail.com

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Mar 10, 2015, 10:16:28 PM3/10/15
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the 1n914 i put in my mfj tuner seem to work well as a replacement for the 1n34 all the thing is doing is senceing the signal, I just use what ever I have.

eika...@gmail.com

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Jul 27, 2020, 6:07:33 PM7/27/20
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Do a search on eBay for 1N34A or 1N34 should find what you're looking for but the substitutes will work also, 1N914 & 1N4148 as already mentioned. 73 de KE3FL/Phil

Rich

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Jul 27, 2020, 6:35:21 PM7/27/20
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Do you really think that after 18 years that the poster is still
waiting for an answer?

You replied to a post from "January 4, 2002".

Brian Gregory

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Aug 29, 2021, 10:07:35 PM8/29/21
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On 23/04/2021 05:06, gree...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Jul 2020 22:35:17 -0000 (UTC), Rich <ri...@example.invalid> sprachen:
>
>> Do you really think that after 18 years that the poster is still
>> waiting for an answer?
>
> He'll be really grateful if he has been.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> if love is a drug, then, ideally, it's a healing, healthful drug... it's
> kind of like prozac is supposed to work (without the sexual side
> effects and long-term damage to the brain and psyche)
>

Suggesting silicon diodes as substitutes for a germanium signal diode is
pretty daft too.

--
Brian Gregory (in England).

Michael Terrell

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Aug 31, 2021, 11:01:29 PM8/31/21
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On Sunday, August 29, 2021 at 10:07:35 PM UTC-4, Brian Gregory wrote:
>
> Suggesting silicon diodes as substitutes for a germanium signal diode is
> pretty daft too.

Hot carrier or Zero bias diodes work well, and have better specs but they aren't cheap. They are made for microwave mixers and detectors

Phil Hobbs

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Sep 3, 2021, 5:36:16 PM9/3/21
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With a bit of bodging, something like a BAT15-03 (<$1 in onesies, 21
cents in reels) ought to work at least as well as a 1N34A, assuming that
a 4V rating is enough, which it ought to be for an RF detector. (1N34As
work up to something ridiculous like 60V).

Cheers

Phil Hobbs

Michael Terrell

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Sep 4, 2021, 12:15:19 AM9/4/21
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I suppose the 1N271 is obsolete, as well? Microdyne had switched to them from earlier pat numbers in the late 1990s.

There are Ebay listings for 1N34 diodes. I had a pound of them, from Poly-Paks, but an animal dug a hole under the wall into my shed, and used them to make a nest. Needless to say, the several thousand diodes had their leads rusted away. I still have some that were salvaged from some '70s era computer PC boards. They were daughter boards with individual flip flops, and they had silver mica capacitors. I can't imagine the price of something like that, back then.

Another trick is to DC bias a diode to give it closer to a zero volt forward drop. This was done in some radios in the early days to improve sensitivity. I had to scratch my head the first time I saw that trick, with a 6H6 dual diode vaccum tube.
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