Re: Melting point of silicone cable insulation?

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Roger Hamlett

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May 10, 2005, 11:41:54 AM5/10/05
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"Lars" <see.other.header@x.x> wrote in message
news:9652A666...@204.153.244.156...
>I am in the UK.
>
> What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
> flex which is made of silicone?
>
> Does anyone have a comparable figure for PVC insulation?
The rated cable temperatures for each (slightly below the actual
melting/charing point), for typical versions are:
PVC 105C
Sil 180C
Teflon 260C
Glass 400C

The last is the most variable, with different types of glass insulation,
pushing this up to over 700C. You also get glass loaded silicone,
typically rated to about 200C.
Silicone rubber, doesn't melt, it sort of 'chars'. All of these are
'continuous' ratings.

Best Wishes


Spehro Pefhany

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May 10, 2005, 11:50:45 AM5/10/05
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On Tue, 10 May 2005 16:21:28 +0100, the renowned Lars
<see.other.header@x.x> wrote:

>I am in the UK.
>
>What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
>flex which is made of silicone?

You're premise is wrong. Silicone insulation doesn't melt- it chars.
Operating temperature ratings are typically around 200-250°C, IIRC.

>Does anyone have a comparable figure for PVC insulation?

Ratings typically run from around 80°C to a bit over 100°C. Burning
moderate quantities PVC can be hazardous.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
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Spehro Pefhany

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May 10, 2005, 11:53:11 AM5/10/05
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On Tue, 10 May 2005 11:50:45 -0400, Spehro Pefhany
<spef...@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote:

>On Tue, 10 May 2005 16:21:28 +0100, the renowned Lars
><see.other.header@x.x> wrote:
>
>>I am in the UK.
>>
>>What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
>>flex which is made of silicone?
>
>You're premise is wrong.

^^^^^
As is the above apostrophe ;-)

Palindr☻me

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May 10, 2005, 12:00:37 PM5/10/05
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Spehro Pefhany wrote:

> On Tue, 10 May 2005 11:50:45 -0400, Spehro Pefhany
> <spef...@interlogDOTyou.knowwhat> wrote:
>
>
>>On Tue, 10 May 2005 16:21:28 +0100, the renowned Lars
>><see.other.header@x.x> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I am in the UK.
>>>
>>>What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
>>>flex which is made of silicone?
>>
>>You're premise is wrong.
>
> ^^^^^
> As is the above apostrophe ;-)

Visiting too many premises has that effect on me too...

--
Sue

Actually, visiting just one will do the job, I dissolve in
very small quantities of alchohol- the ideal inexpensive
date....;)


Andrew Gabriel

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May 10, 2005, 12:03:55 PM5/10/05
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In article <9652A666...@204.153.244.156>,

Lars <see.other.header@x.x> writes:
> I am in the UK.
>
> What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
> flex which is made of silicone?

The immersion heater cable you can buy is, I believe, 180C max
operating temperature, but it's rubber (and I don't think silicone).
I'm not sure these have a 'melting' point, as the rubber is
thermosetting insulation, which will probably jusy go hard, and
eventually char or burn.

> Does anyone have a comparable figure for PVC insulation?

There are different types of PVC. The Twin and earth normally
used for wiring is derated to zero current at 70C ambiant, or
designed to operate at 70C at max current (whichever way you
want to look at it). IIRC, this allows for fault currents to
raise the temperature another 90C to 160C (in the time it takes
the protective device to trip), which is regarded as the max
momentary conductor temperature allowed before the cable sustains
instant permanent damage. So I presume it's above 160C but cable
is not designed to operate that hot other than in occasional
fault conditions.

Temperature affects the life in years of wiring too. At 70C,
you can expect PVC wiring to last around 23 years, whereas at
40C the life is (calculated) at 1,498 years. See:
http://www.iee.org/Publish/WireRegs/Commentary-UpdateApr04.pdf

--
Andrew Gabriel

Hal Murray

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May 11, 2005, 3:22:00 AM5/11/05
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>What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on mains
>flex which is made of silicone?

Two stories from ages ago... (60s)

My father was OEM sales manager for Pass and Seymour. They used to make
things like big ceramic sockets for street lights. Some of his customers
wanted high temperature pig tail wires on those sockets. For silicon rubber,
the limit was not the insulation. The copper wire (fine strands) inside
corroded too fast at temperatures which were fine for the insulation.

I spent a summer/co-op at GE's Engineering Standards Lab. They
used to test parts coming in from vendors. Standard procedure was
to give a sample part and the spec to a technician. Technician would
read the specs and do all the the tests. My boss told me the story of
a spec that (essintially) called for silicon rubber on flexible
waveguide. Spec said roughly: bake at x C for 1 hour. No problems
sould be visble on the furface of the insulation. x was big.

The technician turned on the oven, cut a couple of lengths of heavy
wire off the spool, bent them into hooks and suspended the sample
(2 ft long?) from the screw holes in the end bells to the rack in
the oven. Then he set the timer for an hour and went to lunch.
A short time later there was smoke all over the place. The solder
holding the end bells on had melted. (I said x was big.)
The silicon rubber had fallen on to the way-hot floor.
Other than a bit of scorching where it had hit the floor, the
insulation was fine.

--
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Lars

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May 14, 2005, 9:03:54 AM5/14/05
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> "Lars" <see.other.header@x.x> wrote in message
>>
>>I am in the UK.
>>
>> What is the temperature of the melting point of insulation on
>> mains flex which is made of silicone?
>>
>> Does anyone have a comparable figure for PVC insulation?


On Tue 10 May 2005 16:41:54, Roger Hamlett wrote:
>
> The rated cable temperatures for each (slightly below the actual
> melting/charing point), for typical versions are:
> PVC 105C
> Sil 180C
> Teflon 260C
> Glass 400C
>


Does anyone know how much temperature the mains leads with a woven
cotton outer can withstand?

Is a woven cotton outer better or worse than silicone insulation?

Andrew Gabriel

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May 14, 2005, 10:20:36 AM5/14/05
to
In article <96568F13A...@66.250.146.159>,

Lars <see.other.header@x.x> writes:
>
> Does anyone know how much temperature the mains leads with a woven
> cotton outer can withstand?
>
> Is a woven cotton outer better or worse than silicone insulation?

The cable is silicone. Nowadays, the woven cotten is just retained
to stop it snagging on the cloths you are ironing, so the cable
easily slides over the cloths and the edge of the iorning board.

--
Andrew Gabriel

Palindr☻me

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May 14, 2005, 10:30:51 AM5/14/05
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Oh, is that what it is for? Thanks, I had wondered.

My thought had been that it was there to fray and generally
become a mess quite quickly - so the owner had to go out and
buy a new iron...

--

Sue

Message has been deleted

Andrew Gabriel

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May 14, 2005, 5:16:11 PM5/14/05
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In article <9656C7B8B...@204.153.244.156>,
Lars <see.other.header@x.x> writes:
> On Sat 14 May 2005 15:20:36, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
> <news:42860934$0$38039$5a6a...@news.aaisp.net.uk>

>> The cable is silicone. Nowadays, the woven cotten is just
>> retained to stop it snagging on the cloths you are ironing, so
>> the cable easily slides over the cloths and the edge of the
>> iorning board.
>
> I thought a side benefit of the cotton covering was that it did not
> kink so easily. Mind you, when it does kink then it really does
> kink.
>
> However I figured from a "side comment" which I read in an electrical
> catalogue that the cotton probably had good heat-resistent properties
> too. I just don't know how the heat-resistent property might be
> quanitified.

If you go back to days of old rubber insulation, cotten was
used on any appliance which got hot, such as toasters, heaters,
etc to help protect the old rubber which would burn. I think
it's only still used on irons nowadays as the solicone
insulation doesn't require any additional heat protection,
but has a rather high friction coefficient with fabrics.

--
Andrew Gabriel

Andrew Gabriel

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May 14, 2005, 5:17:45 PM5/14/05
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In article <118c2ss...@corp.supernews.com>,
=?UTF-8?B?UGFsaW5kcuKYu21l?= <sb38...@hotmail.com.invalid> writes:

> Andrew Gabriel wrote:
>> The cable is silicone. Nowadays, the woven cotten is just retained
>> to stop it snagging on the cloths you are ironing, so the cable
>> easily slides over the cloths and the edge of the iorning board.
>
> Oh, is that what it is for? Thanks, I had wondered.
>
> My thought had been that it was there to fray and generally
> become a mess quite quickly - so the owner had to go out and
> buy a new iron...

With me, it's normally some part inside the iron which fails
before the cord. Actually, I have a couple of cords I cut off
irons when the rust was being chucked out.

--
Andrew Gabriel

Allen Shieh

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Sep 15, 2022, 11:09:29 PMSep 15
to
Following articles can help you have a better understand of Medical grade TPU cable and Silicone cable

The performance of TPE and TPU are quite similar and cannot be distinguished by the naked eye, but they can be distinguished by some simple methods.
https://www.conectmed.com/how-to-distinguish-tpe-and-tpu-4-easy-methods

Cable used in Medical devices interconnection or medical accessories can be silicone cable, TPE cable or TPU cable. Of course PVC cable can also be used, but usually for disposable purpose.in some countries, in order to save healthcare expense or environment, some medical items must be reusable, so TPU and TPE become two main medical extrusion or overmolding materials.
https://www.conectmed.com/how-to-choose-cable-for-injection-overmoulding-tpe-cable-vs-tpu-cable


Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is the most durable materials commonly used in medical cable extrusion, as medical cables usually need the cable to be extreme flexible and excellent resistance to different sterilization and any possible situation during its application. Due to its remarkable properties of mechanical, abrasion and chemical resistance, which makes it suitable for harsh environment. Besides, TPU cable sheath limits the increase of bacteria and microbes, suitable particularly for interconnection of medical apparatus and instruments.
https://www.conectmed.com/medical-grade-tpu-cable-tpu-jacket-cable-complies-with-biocompatibility-iso-10993-10



Silicone heating wire is usually composed of metal conductors, carbon fibers, fiberglass, and an insulation layer

When you need tools and equipment to be kept at a steady, reliable, accurate temperature? In addition to fast heating speeds, even temperatures, and precise, efficient heat, silicone insulated heater wire is also resistant to outside weather conditions. There are many ways to apply silicone heater wire to a wide range of equipment, for medical use: development tubes, bodybuilding fabrics, electric medicine pads, waistbands, and blood analyzer heaters.

You should choose silicone-insulated wires when you need a steady temperature in an area that naturally produces high, unsteady temperatures. The silicone insulation prevents connections from melting and keeps them flexible. You can customize these wires depending on the size, shape, color, and specifications that suit your specific industry.

https://www.conectmed.com/custom-silicone-heating-wire-silicone-insulated-heater-wire

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