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Splattering solder into eye?

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Peter Hucker

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Oct 25, 2008, 11:57:30 AM10/25/08
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Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in my eye. How bad is it?

--
http://www.petersparrots.com http://www.insanevideoclips.com http://www.petersphotos.com

Confuscious say: "War doesn't determine who's right. War determines who's left."

WW

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Oct 25, 2008, 2:18:23 PM10/25/08
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"Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.ujk7x...@fx62.mshome.net...

Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!


Peter Hucker

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Oct 25, 2008, 2:24:17 PM10/25/08
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 19:18:23 +0100, WW <cc...@bresnan.net> wrote:

> "Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
> news:op.ujk7x...@fx62.mshome.net...
>> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering
>> into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in my
>> eye. How bad is it?
>

> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!

It's quite a small risk, so I've never bothered. I only use a soldering iron perhaps once a month, and have done for 20 years. In all that time not one piece has hit my eye.

If it lands on the skin, there is no mark left, and no lasting pain, so wouldn't I be fair to assume that the eye wouldn't be damaged any more than say a fly whacking into it while cycling?

Loose or missing nuts. Spank the monkey (Y/N)?

Paul E. Schoen

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Oct 25, 2008, 2:57:44 PM10/25/08
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"Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.ujleq...@fx62.mshome.net...

> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 19:18:23 +0100, WW <cc...@bresnan.net> wrote:
>
>> "Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
>> news:op.ujk7x...@fx62.mshome.net...
>>> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering
>>> into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in
>>> my
>>> eye. How bad is it?
>>
>> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!
>
> It's quite a small risk, so I've never bothered. I only use a soldering
> iron perhaps once a month, and have done for 20 years. In all that time
> not one piece has hit my eye.
>
> If it lands on the skin, there is no mark left, and no lasting pain, so
> wouldn't I be fair to assume that the eye wouldn't be damaged any more
> than say a fly whacking into it while cycling?

I had it happen once when I was unsoldering a wire from a terminal, and
when it came loose, a small piece of solder hit my eye. I think I even
heard it sizzle. Luckily, it was a small piece and it hit the white of the
eye, so it did not affect my vision, and eventually it worked its way out.
Since then, I always wear glasses. Of course, now I also wear them so I can
see what I'm doing.

You should also always wear eye protection when cycling. A fly might not
cause damage, but a bumblebee or other large insect could put an eye out.

Paul


Peter Hucker

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Oct 25, 2008, 3:08:04 PM10/25/08
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 19:57:44 +0100, Paul E. Schoen <pst...@smart.net> wrote:

>
> "Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
> news:op.ujleq...@fx62.mshome.net...
>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 19:18:23 +0100, WW <cc...@bresnan.net> wrote:
>>
>>> "Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
>>> news:op.ujk7x...@fx62.mshome.net...
>>>> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering
>>>> into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in
>>>> my
>>>> eye. How bad is it?
>>>
>>> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!
>>
>> It's quite a small risk, so I've never bothered. I only use a soldering
>> iron perhaps once a month, and have done for 20 years. In all that time
>> not one piece has hit my eye.
>>
>> If it lands on the skin, there is no mark left, and no lasting pain, so
>> wouldn't I be fair to assume that the eye wouldn't be damaged any more
>> than say a fly whacking into it while cycling?
>
> I had it happen once when I was unsoldering a wire from a terminal, and
> when it came loose, a small piece of solder hit my eye. I think I even
> heard it sizzle.

Do the eyelids not automatically close?

> Luckily, it was a small piece and it hit the white of the
> eye, so it did not affect my vision, and eventually it worked its way out.

You mean it stayed there for a while? If it hits the skin, it usually knocks straight off.

> Since then, I always wear glasses.

Did it hurt?

> Of course, now I also wear them so I can see what I'm doing.

:-)

> You should also always wear eye protection when cycling. A fly might not
> cause damage, but a bumblebee or other large insect could put an eye out.

I've never heard of any accidents or serious injuries resulting from stuff hitting a cyclist's eyes.

Don't waste money on binoculars, stand closer to the object.

William Sommerwerck

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Oct 25, 2008, 4:58:04 PM10/25/08
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> Do the eyelids not automatically close?

Yes -- right on the piece of solder.


The Phantom

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Oct 25, 2008, 5:40:37 PM10/25/08
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 16:57:30 +0100, "Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote:

>Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in my eye. How bad is it?

A friend, repairing a console TV that was too heavy to move by himself, got
on his back under the TV and was replacing an electrolytic when a drop of
solder fell into his eye. Ouch!

It didn't hit the cornea, but it stuck to the white. In extreme pain he
drive himself to the hospital. It had no lasting effect on his vision, but
I suspect that had it landed on the cornea there would have been serious
damage. Safety glasses are the order of the day in a situation like that!

In ordinary, upright, circumstances I've never had a drop of solder even
hit me in the face. But I learned early that when unsoldering a joint
where wires may be under tension, they may sling solder when the solder
melts. I pay attention to that possibility and restrain the wires.

And, of course, wearing glasses of some kind is the prudent thing to do.

WW

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Oct 25, 2008, 6:20:50 PM10/25/08
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"Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.ujlgr...@fx62.mshome.net...

>
> -I was trying out a new motor cycle on the way home from work and did not
> have my riding gear. Only going to go around the block. A speck of
> something entered my eye. It had to be surgically removed. This was
> painfull until removed. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES.

Anthony Fremont

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Oct 25, 2008, 6:51:03 PM10/25/08
to
Peter Hucker wrote:
> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder
> splattering into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face,
> but never in my eye. How bad is it?

I think you'll find a much larger set of people that have picked up a
soldering iron from the wrong end. Interestingly, you'll find that they
probably never did it again though.


Matt J. McCullar

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Oct 25, 2008, 10:27:03 PM10/25/08
to

>
> I've never heard of any accidents or serious injuries resulting from stuff
hitting a cyclist's eyes.
>

It happens. Some states have laws for motorcyclists requiring them to wear
eye protection while riding. I've worn eyeglasses for many years, so I've
never had anything hit me in the eye while riding a bicycle. But when it
does, it's going to be at the worst possible time.

Once I was leaning over the back of an open television set to squirt some
tuner cleaner into it. Somehow that spray liquid shot back out through
another hole in the mechanical tuner and managed to crawl over my glasses
and hit me right smack in the eye. Yeah, it stung a little, but I did
manage to wash it all out right away.

Solder joints are mysterious creatures. One that looks perfectly normal can
literally explode when touched by a soldering iron. I sure wouldn't want a
piece of hot solder, no matter how small, to hit me in MY eye. Stick a
soldering iron into a head of lettuce if you want to know what it sounds
like.


William Sommerwerck

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Oct 26, 2008, 6:28:55 AM10/26/08
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> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!

It's hard to believe, but I'm actually seeing the English language's
pronunciation and spelling change. For example, Americans are starting to
adopt the British pronunciations of certain words, principally by changing
the stressed syllable.

I also notice that many people have decided that "lose" is spelled "loose".

Though "lose" and "loose" are related words, they have distinct meanings.


WW

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Oct 26, 2008, 8:45:03 AM10/26/08
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"William Sommerwerck" <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:rYSdnQnn1LhB25nU...@comcast.com...

William... I held the O button too long. Should read what I type before
sending.
I wondered who would catch this. WW
>
>


Claude Hopper

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Oct 26, 2008, 9:11:25 AM10/26/08
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Peter Hucker wrote:
> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in my eye. How bad is it?
>
No but I used to get the smoke from frying rosin in my eye when I used
to build short wave radios many years ago. Burns like nothing else.

--
Claude Hopper :)

? ? ¥

Claude Hopper

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Oct 26, 2008, 9:12:38 AM10/26/08
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No but I used to get the smoke from frying rosin in my eye when I used
to build short wave radios many years ago. Burns like nothing else.

Safety glasses don't help for that.

PeterD

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Oct 26, 2008, 9:16:23 AM10/26/08
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But...

Maybe his eye *will* fall out?


(and he may want it to if he gets molten solder in it!)

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 11:58:14 AM10/26/08
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I'm thinking more of minute amounts that splatter when melting fresh solder from the reel. Maybe it's only flux?

A man is a person who will pay two dollars for a one-dollar item he wants.
A woman will pay one dollar for a two-dollar item that she doesn't want.

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 11:59:36 AM10/26/08
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At what speed? I was talking about a bicycle.

--

Bad command or file name! Go stand in the corner.

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 12:00:41 PM10/26/08
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I have done that three times. I let go immediately and the pain did not continue, I just ended up with some hard skin on my fingers for a few days.

The longest word in German is DONAUDAMPFSCHIFFAHRTSELEKTRIZITAETENHAUPTBETRIEBSWERKBAUUNTERBEAMTENGESELLSCHAFT, "the club for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services" (name of a pre-war club in Vienna), according to 1996 Guinness.

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 12:12:25 PM10/26/08
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You could have used a full face gas mask. Try an army surplus store.

/\
__ \/ __
\_\_\/\/_/_/
_\_\/_/_
__/_/\_\__
/_/ /\/\ \_\
/\
\/

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 12:29:55 PM10/26/08
to

No they haven't. They just write the wrong one.

A man is driving down a deserted stretch of highway when he notices a
sign out of the corner of his eye....It reads:
SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS
HOUSE OF PROSTITUTION
10 MILES
He thinks this is a figment of his imagination and drives on without
second thought....
Soon he sees another sign which reads:
SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS
HOUSE OF PROSTITUTION
5 MILES
Suddenly he begins to realize that these signs are for real and drives
past a third sign saying:
SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS
HOUSE OF PROSTITUTION
NEXT RIGHT
His curiosity gets the best of him and he pulls into the drive. On the
far side of the parking lot is a stone building with a small sign next
to the door reading:
SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS
He climbs the steps and rings the bell. The door is answered by a nun in
a long black habit who asks, 'What may we do for you my son?' He
answers, 'I saw your signs along the highway and was interested in
possibly doing business....'
'Very well my son. Please follow me.' He is led through many winding
passages and is soon quite disoriented. The nun stops at a closed door
and tells the man, 'Please knock on this door.'
He does so and another nun in a long habit, holding a tin cup answers
the door... This nun instructs, 'Please place $100 in the cup then go
through the large wooden door at the end of the hallway.'
He puts $100 in the cup, eagerly trots down the hall and slips through
the door pulling it shut behind him.
The door locks, and he finds himself back in the parking lot facing
another sign:
GO IN PEACE.
YOU HAVE JUST BEEN SCREWED BY THE SISTERS OF ST. FRANCIS.

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 12:41:58 PM10/26/08
to
On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote:

>> Do the eyelids not automatically close?
>
> Yes -- right on the piece of solder.

Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you.

(( _______
_______ /\O O\
/O /\ / \ \
/ O /O \ / O \O____O\ ))
((/_____O/ \\ /O /
\O O\ / \ / O /
\O O\ O/ \/_____O/
\O____O\/ )) ))
((

Peter Hucker

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Oct 26, 2008, 12:43:51 PM10/26/08
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On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 02:27:03 -0000, Matt J. McCullar <mccu...@flash.net> wrote:

>
>>
>> I've never heard of any accidents or serious injuries resulting from stuff
> hitting a cyclist's eyes.
>>
>
> It happens. Some states have laws for motorcyclists

MOTORcyclists travel faster.

> requiring them to wear
> eye protection while riding. I've worn eyeglasses for many years, so I've
> never had anything hit me in the eye while riding a bicycle. But when it
> does, it's going to be at the worst possible time.
>
> Once I was leaning over the back of an open television set to squirt some
> tuner cleaner into it. Somehow that spray liquid shot back out through
> another hole in the mechanical tuner and managed to crawl over my glasses
> and hit me right smack in the eye. Yeah, it stung a little, but I did
> manage to wash it all out right away.
>
> Solder joints are mysterious creatures. One that looks perfectly normal can
> literally explode when touched by a soldering iron. I sure wouldn't want a
> piece of hot solder, no matter how small, to hit me in MY eye. Stick a
> soldering iron into a head of lettuce if you want to know what it sounds
> like.

I'm not even going to consider how you might accidentally throw the soldering IRON into your eye!

Why do they rate a movie "R" for "adult language?"
The only people I hear using that language are teenagers.

ehsjr

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Oct 26, 2008, 7:52:14 PM10/26/08
to
Peter Hucker wrote:
> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>
>>>Do the eyelids not automatically close?
>>
>>Yes -- right on the piece of solder.
>
>
> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you.
>

How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity
of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to
it?

And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close
his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional
rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object
can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug
may come from the side etc.

You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions
are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter
or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because
you don't have any data on the speed at which the object
approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even
whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching
object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their
eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.

Ed

Paul E. Schoen

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Oct 26, 2008, 10:31:38 PM10/26/08
to

"ehsjr" <eh...@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote in message
news:Oo7Nk.588$225...@nwrddc02.gnilink.net...

Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here, but eye protection while
operating a vehicle, whether motorized or not, is important for maintaining
control as well as protection from eye injury. The eye rapidly repairs
corneal abrasions, and I have heard that it is the fastest-healing part of
the body. Here is an interesting link:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3225/is_1_70/ai_n6159408

You are probably going to be injured much more seriously by losing control
of your vehicle, rather than the direct result of a foreign object hitting
the eye. It may be unlikely that both eyes would be compromised at the same
time, but it could happen.

If you get steel slivers in your eye, you can use an eye magnet:
http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2007/01/800lb_magnet_tr.html

And, your government grant dollars at work:
http://www.1ad.army.mil/Safety/Vision%20Conservation%20Program/EYE%20PROTECTION.pdf

More on eye safety:
http://www.eyehealthillinois.org/eyesafety/index.html

Paul


Message has been deleted

davew

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Oct 27, 2008, 9:13:30 AM10/27/08
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"Claude Hopper" <boobooil...@roadrunner.com> wrote in message
news:pqmdneNk9vLh8ZnU...@giganews.com...


>>
>> Not bad, you may just loose your eye. WEAR SAFTY GLASSES!
>>
>>
> No but I used to get the smoke from frying rosin in my eye when I used
> to build short wave radios many years ago. Burns like nothing else.
>
> Safety glasses don't help for that.

That's why we insist our students wear safety goggles when soldering..


ian field

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Oct 27, 2008, 1:59:32 PM10/27/08
to

"Meat Plow" <me...@petitmorte.net> wrote in message
news:2a0ao6....@news.alt.net...
> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:31:38 -0400, "Paul E. Schoen"
> <pst...@smart.net>wrote:
>

>>> Peter Hucker wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck
>>>> <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>>Do the eyelids not automatically close?
>>>>>
>>>>>Yes -- right on the piece of solder.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close
>>>> while the solder is flying towards you.
>>>>
>>>
>>> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity
>>> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to
>>> it?
>>>
>>> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close
>>> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional
>>> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object
>>> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug
>>> may come from the side etc.
>>>
>>> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions
>>> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter
>>> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because
>>> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object
>>> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even
>>> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching
>>> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their
>>> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.
>>
>>Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here,
>
> CHA CHING!!!
>
> Peter Hucker, one of Usenet's most prolific trolls.

PHucker spends most of his time on alt.binaries.chatter - his favourite
topic is bragging that he goes about his life without regard for rules or
laws, he seems to have branched out into net-kopping on the sci groups
lately.


Peter Hucker

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Oct 27, 2008, 2:19:06 PM10/27/08
to
On Mon, 27 Oct 2008 06:56:50 -0000, Meat Plow <me...@petitmorte.net> wrote:

> On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 22:31:38 -0400, "Paul E. Schoen"
> <pst...@smart.net>wrote:
>


>>> Peter Hucker wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck
>>>> <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>> Do the eyelids not automatically close?
>>>>>
>>>>> Yes -- right on the piece of solder.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close
>>>> while the solder is flying towards you.
>>>>
>>>
>>> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity
>>> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to
>>> it?
>>>
>>> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close
>>> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional
>>> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object
>>> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug
>>> may come from the side etc.
>>>
>>> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions
>>> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter
>>> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because
>>> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object
>>> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even
>>> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching
>>> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their
>>> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.
>>
>> Methinks we may be dealing with a troll here,
>

> CHA CHING!!!
>
> Peter Hucker, one of Usenet's most prolific trolls.
>

> Nothing wrong with a little trolling under the right circumstances but
> Peter takes it to the extreme.

I asked a simple question. Is asking a question now considered troling?

If the English language made any sense, lackadaisical would have something to do with a shortage of flowers.

Peter Hucker

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Oct 27, 2008, 2:20:27 PM10/27/08
to
On Sun, 26 Oct 2008 23:52:14 -0000, ehsjr <eh...@NOSPAMverizon.net> wrote:

> Peter Hucker wrote:
>> On Sat, 25 Oct 2008 21:58:04 +0100, William Sommerwerck <grizzle...@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>> Do the eyelids not automatically close?
>>>
>>> Yes -- right on the piece of solder.
>>
>>
>> Your reactions aren't up to scratch then. They're supposed to close while the solder is flying towards you.
>>
>
> How do you figure that, without knowing the velocity
> of the solder - or even whether one sees and reacts to
> it?

Experience. I've virtually never had anything hit my eyeball. But have often had things hit my closed eye.

> And, as to the idea you posted that a bicycle rider can close
> his eyelids fast enough - ridiculous. Even an occasional
> rider can easily hit 40 mph or more downhill, the object
> can be launched from a car's tire at high speed, a bug
> may come from the side etc.

Perhaps. But it hasn't happened to me. If a car is overtaking and throwing up stuff, I tend to squint my eyes in advance!

> You have no way of knowing whether his - or your - reactions
> are fast enough for the eyelids to protect from solder splatter
> or airborne objects/bugs/whatever while bicycle riding, because
> you don't have any data on the speed at which the object
> approaches the eye or the distance it must travel or even
> whether the conditions allow the eye to detect the approaching
> object. Sheesh! Even people walking have gotten stuff in their
> eyes, blown by a gust of wind or whatever.

Dust perhaps, but not large enough objects to cause damage.

It seems a farm boy accidentally overturned his wagon load of corn. The farmer who lived nearby heard the noise.
"Hey Willis!!" the farmer yelled. "Forget your troubles. Come in with us. Then I'll help you get the wagon up."
"That's mighty nice of you, " Willis answered, "but I don't think Pa would like me to."
"Aw, come on," the farmer insisted.
"Well okay," the boy finally agreed, and added, "But Pa won't like it."
After a hearty dinner, Willis thanked his host. "I feel a lot better now, but I know Pa is going to be real upset."
"Don't be foolish !" the neighbor said with a smile. "By the way, where is he?"
"Under the wagon."

Peter Hucker

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Oct 27, 2008, 2:21:35 PM10/27/08
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Aly

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Nov 2, 2008, 4:40:32 PM11/2/08
to
"Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.ujk7x...@fx62.mshome.net...
> Has anyone ever actually been unlucky enough to get solder splattering
> into their eye? I've had it hit my leg, hand, and face, but never in my
> eye. How bad is it?
>

Wear glasses. I do.

All of this talk of laser-eye-surgery. Yeah right!! Like I need that.
Doesn't protect your eyes from fast moving projectiles and springs. Mine
have saved me time and time again.


GlenB

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Nov 2, 2008, 10:06:04 PM11/2/08
to

"Claude Hopper" <boobooil...@roadrunner.com> wrote in message
news:pqmdneNk9vLh8ZnU...@giganews.com...
>
> No but I used to get the smoke from frying rosin in my eye when I used
> to build short wave radios many years ago. Burns like nothing else.
>
> Safety glasses don't help for that.
>
> --
> Claude Hopper :)
>
> ? ? ¥

Safety glasses don't help with rosin smoke but smoke/fume absorbers do.
Rosin fumes do more than irritate your eyes too. If you are around rosin
smoke on a regular basis, you really should consider getting one. You can
get a Weller WSA350 desktop filter for under $50. Your eyes and lungs will
thank you. I don't do much soldering on a regular basis, but if I had to
wear eye protection daily I'd probably opt for a face shield. The glasses
impede vision too much for me. Besides, it's tough wearing prescription
glasses under safety glasses.

I've burned myself plenty of times with electronics solder and improperly
placed irons, but the worst incident I can remember has to be related to a
tight crawl space and copper water pipe. I got lucky that day and only
managed to burn my lower eyelid a little. I guess in the grand scheme of
things the possibility of burning the house down because I can't see through
the safety glasses outweighs the possibility of losing sight in an eye.

GlenB
www.all-spec.com


Peter Hucker

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Nov 3, 2008, 12:58:33 PM11/3/08
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On the subject of glasses, do you ever notice a reflection in them? Do your eyes ever get distracted by dirt on the glass? Do you ever get annoyed that you can see the rim when you look to the right or left? I'd go for contact lenses or perhaps laser surgery, then wear safety specs if I felt the need.

I got to thinking about my divorce the other day. (Well, not like
it's ever far from my thoughts.) And I had the thought that
eventually goes through every couple's head at least once in
a relationship: "What did I ever see in you?"

We argued about everything. There just couldn't have been
two people more incompatible.

Just as an example. When we decided we wanted a child,
we discussed videotaping the event. She wanted to videotape
the birth.

*I*, on the other hand, wanted to videotape the conception.

Peter Hucker

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Nov 3, 2008, 1:37:11 PM11/3/08
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There must be some glasses that don't impede vision. Wrap around type? Something skiiers might wear?

A penguin had to take his car for engine repair.
The mechanic told the penguin to leave his car with him for about two hours, to find out whats wrong.
The penguin goes across the street to a grocery store, climbs into a freezer and eats vanilla ice cream.
When the two hours was up the penguin went back to the garage to find out what happened to his car.
When the penguin entered the garage, the mechanic looked at him and said, "Looks like you blew a seal."

Aly

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Nov 3, 2008, 3:26:22 PM11/3/08
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"Peter Hucker" <no...@spam.com> wrote in message
news:op.uj11j...@fx62.mshome.net...

On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 21:40:32 -0000, Aly
<sf333ddf@sfsss'=-3498hfn2nmdf0xdh3222a]].c> wrote:

>On the subject of glasses, do you ever notice a reflection in them? Do
>your eyes ever get distracted by dirt on >the glass? Do you ever get
>annoyed that you can see the rim when you look to the right or left? I'd
>go for >contact lenses or perhaps laser surgery, then wear safety specs if
>I felt the need.

Erm, actually no. I've had glasses all of my life.

Yes, from the sounds of things, I think it's probably best that you don't
wear them.


geoff

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Nov 30, 2008, 10:22:50 PM11/30/08