ASLEC Cipher At Work – Demonstration.

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austin obyrne

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Nov 11, 2021, 9:12:47 AM11/11/21
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I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
Please go to https://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.

I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.

This version of my cipher is fully annotated and is intended more
as a simple demonstration. The working version has no such help
of course and slims down a lot as one would expect.

I have used the Ada-95 edition of the Ada computer language in
all of this encryption.

Enjoy.

Austin O’Byrne

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 10:34:10 AM11/11/21
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On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
> Please go tohttps://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>
> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.

Has anyone managed to track this down yet?

--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within

austin obyrne

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Nov 11, 2021, 11:02:20 AM11/11/21
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The worked example is a black background file
- double left click will open it fine - am having
the automatic zoom extended to that file also.

AOB

Ben Bacarisse

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Nov 11, 2021, 11:03:54 AM11/11/21
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Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> writes:

> On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>
> Has anyone managed to track this down yet?

I think he means this:

https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0.pdf

and

https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0_Sample.bmp

--
Ben.

Richard Harnden

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Nov 11, 2021, 11:10:16 AM11/11/21
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On 11/11/2021 15:34, Richard Heathfield wrote:
> On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>>   Please go tohttps://www.aslec.uk  and double left click on any
>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>
>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>
> Has anyone managed to track this down yet?
>

It is,I think,the bmp here:
<https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0_Sample.bmp>

Wow!

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 11:16:39 AM11/11/21
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Well found, sir.

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 11:17:10 AM11/11/21
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He's having a laugh, presumably.

Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 12:21:22 PM11/11/21
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Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
> On 11/11/2021 16:10, Richard Harnden wrote:
>> On 11/11/2021 15:34, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>> On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
>>>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>>>>   Please go tohttps://www.aslec.uk  and double left click on any
>>>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>>>
>>>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>>>> single word ? milestone ? as a working example for your perusal.
>>>
>>> Has anyone managed to track this down yet?
>>>
>>
>> It is,I think,the bmp here:
>> <https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0_Sample.bmp>
>>
>>
>> Wow!
>
> He's having a laugh, presumably.

Sigh, a huge bmp screen capture for what should have been a text file.
:(

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 12:32:53 PM11/11/21
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Ironically, ASLEC would have had a fighting chance at encrypting the
text file but is unable to encrypt the (non-ASCII octets in the) bitmap.

austin obyrne

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Nov 11, 2021, 1:30:30 PM11/11/21
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Somebody please tell him that the bitmap is an encryption.
He's not up to ihis rather advanced cryptography.

AOB

austin obyrne

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:05:12 PM11/11/21
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On Thursday, 11 November 2021 at 14:12:47 UTC, austin obyrne wrote:
About the black file in my website.

This is a scren capture of my computer screen.
It depidts my encryption of the word " milestone ".
It was encrypted from the ASCII character set and
it is meant to seen by readers as the ciphertext that
my ASLEC cipher delivers.

AOB

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:10:04 PM11/11/21
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On 11/11/2021 18:30, austin obyrne wrote:
> On Thursday, 11 November 2021 at 17:32:53 UTC, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>> On 11/11/2021 17:21, Rich wrote:
>>> Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
>>>> On 11/11/2021 16:10, Richard Harnden wrote:
>>>>> On 11/11/2021 15:34, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>>>>> On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
>>>>>>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>>>>>>> Please go tohttps://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
>>>>>>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>>>>>>> single word ? milestone ? as a working example for your perusal.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Has anyone managed to track this down yet?
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> It is,I think,the bmp here:
>>>>> <https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0_Sample.bmp>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Wow!
>>>>
>>>> He's having a laugh, presumably.
>>>
>>> Sigh, a huge bmp screen capture for what should have been a text file.
>>> :(
>> Ironically, ASLEC would have had a fighting chance at encrypting the
>> text file but is unable to encrypt the (non-ASCII octets in the) bitmap.
>> --
> Somebody please tell him that the bitmap is an encryption.

No, it really isn't. It's an image file. And because it contains
non-ASCII characters, ASLEC can't encrypt it.

Here are the first 16 bytes of your bitmap, first in hexadecimal, then
in decimal, then where possible the ASCII symbol:

42 4D 7E A5 50 00 00 00 00 00 36 00 00 00 28 00

66 77 126 165 80 0 0 0 0 0 54 0 0 0 40 0

B M ~ ?? P ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? 6 ?? ?? ?? ( ??

ASLEC can only encrypt six out of those 16 byte values, because the
other ten aren't in ASLEC's range 32-126.

> He's not up to ihis rather advanced cryptography.

Look up `irony'.

Chris M. Thomasson

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:10:38 PM11/11/21
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Can you encrypt/decrypt the actual bitmap file?

Chris M. Thomasson

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:11:46 PM11/11/21
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OT: What is that red dot on your homepage?

Stefan Claas

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:22:24 PM11/11/21
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He said that he used the word 'milestone' that was encrypted in his example.
If his cipher would produce an encrypted bitmap this would be IMHO
a way too large .bmp file, even for a complete and long message or a small
binary file.

The best thing IMHO to get an image from a binary blob is something like
this, which writes .png format and allows to convert back:

https://github.com/jweyrich/imgify

PS. cool for encrypted MMS messages with a dumb phone. :-)

Regards
Stefan

Bruce Stephens

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:28:54 PM11/11/21
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On 11/11/2021 19:05, austin obyrne wrote:
> it is meant to seen by readers as the ciphertext that
> my ASLEC cipher delivers.

And this is what Bob decrypts using your software?

Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:34:56 PM11/11/21
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Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
> On 11/11/2021 17:21, Rich wrote:
>> Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
>>> On 11/11/2021 16:10, Richard Harnden wrote:
>>>> On 11/11/2021 15:34, Richard Heathfield wrote:
>>>>> On 11/11/2021 14:12, austin obyrne wrote:
>>>>>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>>>>>>   Please go tohttps://www.aslec.uk  and double left click on any
>>>>>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>>>>>> single word ? milestone ? as a working example for your perusal.
>>>>>
>>>>> Has anyone managed to track this down yet?
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> It is,I think,the bmp here:
>>>> <https://www.aslec.uk/ewExternalFiles/Batch_Encryption_Program_Mark_0_Sample.bmp>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Wow!
>>>
>>> He's having a laugh, presumably.
>>
>> Sigh, a huge bmp screen capture for what should have been a text file.
>> :(
>
> Ironically, ASLEC would have had a fighting chance at encrypting the
> text file but is unable to encrypt the (non-ASCII octets in the) bitmap.

Also sadly true. He posted a file format that his own code can't
encrypt, even if he wanted to do so.

Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:35:42 PM11/11/21
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The bitmap is a screen capture -- of using a text terminal. It should
have just been a textual capture of the text output to the terminal.

Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:37:31 PM11/11/21
to
austin obyrne <ao40...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Thursday, 11 November 2021 at 14:12:47 UTC, austin obyrne wrote:
>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>> Please go to https://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>
>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>> single word ? milestone ? as a working example for your perusal.
>>
>> This version of my cipher is fully annotated and is intended more
>> as a simple demonstration. The working version has no such help
>> of course and slims down a lot as one would expect.
>>
>> I have used the Ada-95 edition of the Ada computer language in
>> all of this encryption.
>>
>> Enjoy.
>>
>> Austin O?Byrne
>
> About the black file in my website.
>
> This is a scren capture of my computer screen.

Yes, that is it. But it *should* have simply been a textual capture of
the ASCII text output by your code as it encrypted. There was no need
for "screen capture" in this situation.

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:42:30 PM11/11/21
to
No. Bob can't get hold of the software. Alice is wailing on the wind,
sans audience, and Bob will never know whether he should, or should not,
attack at dawn.

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 2:49:15 PM11/11/21
to
On 11/11/2021 19:37, Rich wrote:
> austin obyrne <ao40...@gmail.com> wrote:

<snip>

>>
>> About the black file in my website.
>>
>> This is a scren capture of my computer screen.
>
> Yes, that is it. But it *should* have simply been a textual capture of
> the ASCII text output by your code as it encrypted. There was no need
> for "screen capture" in this situation.

I doubt very much whether AOB understands the concept of redirection. He
has a very loose grasp of the concept of `files'; for example, we can
see from the material quoted above that he seems to think that files
have colours(!).

DaleT

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:20:41 PM11/11/21
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On Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 8:12:47 AM UTC-6, austin obyrne wrote:

>
> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>
>
Please provide the example in text format. It looks like it may be
different from the "worked example" in some areas. Just for the
letters "m" and "i" would probably be sufficient to compare..

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:37:24 PM11/11/21
to
On 11/11/2021 20:20, DaleT wrote:
> On Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 8:12:47 AM UTC-6, austin obyrne wrote:
>
>>
>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>>
>>
> Please provide the example in text format.

I doubt whether he knows how.

> It looks like it may be
> different from the "worked example" in some areas. Just for the
> letters "m" and "i" would probably be sufficient to compare..

Amusingly, I have discovered on my filesystem a bunch of stuff I
downloaded from AOB's site a few years ago; named PlainTextFile_9.dat,
it contains the single word `Milestone', which suggests that AOB has
taken three years or more to get from "create example data" to "publish
verbose log output from program run".

wizzofozz

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:41:09 PM11/11/21
to
Op 11-11-2021 om 15:12 schreef austin obyrne:
> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
> Please go to https://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
> > I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>
> This version of my cipher is fully annotated and is intended more
> as a simple demonstration. The working version has no such help
> of course and slims down a lot as one would expect.
>

We can also slim down the running time. I don't know if you followed the
thread of "vector maths" where MM and I have a short discussion about
your 'y' value. You 'brute force' y in your factoring algorithm in loops
like these:

Y := 0; -- initialising --
FOR I IN 1 .. Increase LOOP --
Y:=Y+1;
WHILE (Item_1*Epsilon_X + Item_2*Y) REM Item_3 /= 0 LOOP
Y:=Y+1;
END LOOP;
END LOOP; -

I checked your last encryption of 'e' with the normal vector
[395,897,898] and found that 'y' is 395. This means you go 395 times
through that loop.

A friend of MM showed MM that it could be done faster with the extended
euclidean algorithm, and I tried to reproduce that. I got it for
normalvectors where Epsilon_x = 1 (gcd(b,g) == 1), but still needed to
generalize it to situations where Epsilon_x > 0.

Now I got this (see the other thread for the full explanation);
if e > 1, then we solve for -(ae-by)/g.
Since e = gcd(b,g), we have -(ae-eb'y)/eg', where b' and g' are b/e and
g/e respectively.
So, we rewrite as
-e(a-b'y)/eg'
and then
e/e * -(a-b'y)/g'
thus
-(a-b'y)/g'

That brings us to the "simple case" where b' and g' are coprime and thus
an inverse exists. This also works for e == 1, because then b'==b and g'==g.

So, we get the same function as in the other thread with a small tweak;

def calcY(N,ex):
return egcd(N[1]/ex,N[2]/ex)[1]*-N[0]%(N[2]/ex)

The only thing I don't like is that I do (e)gcd two times:

python vc2.py '[395,897,898]'
gcd: 897 898
gcd: 898 897
gcd: 897 1
egcd: 897 898
egcd: 1 897
egcd: 0 1
[0, 898, -897] [1, 395, -395]

I don't know exactly what every call to (e)gcd 'costs', but I guess it
beats 395 iterations where modulo is involved. I spotchecked some of
your other numbers, and we get the same results (as far as the factoring
goes).

If you incorporate this in your factoring algorithm, you could call it
"Fast Vector Factoring Algorithm", which sounds cool :-)

Cheers,
Ozz







Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:47:32 PM11/11/21
to
Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
> On 11/11/2021 19:37, Rich wrote:
>> austin obyrne <ao40...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> <snip>
>
>>>
>>> About the black file in my website.
>>>
>>> This is a scren capture of my computer screen.
>>
>> Yes, that is it. But it *should* have simply been a textual capture of
>> the ASCII text output by your code as it encrypted. There was no need
>> for "screen capture" in this situation.
>
> I doubt very much whether AOB understands the concept of redirection. He
> has a very loose grasp of the concept of `files'; for example, we can
> see from the material quoted above that he seems to think that files
> have colours(!).

Yes, I noticed that odd phraseology on his part. And yes, I doubt he
understands that he could have captured all of that terminal output to
a text file. So now we get to "view" bmp image files of screen
captures....

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:47:47 PM11/11/21
to
On 11/11/2021 20:41, wizzofozz wrote:
> Op 11-11-2021 om 15:12 schreef austin obyrne:
>> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
>>   Please go to https://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
>> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>>  > I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>>
>> This version of my cipher is fully annotated and is intended more
>>   as a simple demonstration.  The working version has no such help
>> of course and slims down a lot as one would expect.
>>
>
> We can also slim down the running time.

While performance is certainly one of AOB's (many) problems, he would do
better to tackle the biggest problem first, and by far the biggest
problem is the binding of the key to the code. Until he splits out the
key to a file read in at runtime, his cipher will continue to be
unusable even by the most accommodating and unsecurity-conscious Alices
and Bobs of this world.

Rich

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Nov 11, 2021, 3:53:51 PM11/11/21
to
Richard Heathfield <r...@cpax.org.uk> wrote:
> On 11/11/2021 20:20, DaleT wrote:
>> On Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 8:12:47 AM UTC-6, austin obyrne wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
>>> single word ? milestone ? as a working example for your perusal.
>>>
>>>
>> Please provide the example in text format.
>
> I doubt whether he knows how.
>
>> It looks like it may be
>> different from the "worked example" in some areas. Just for the
>> letters "m" and "i" would probably be sufficient to compare..
>
> Amusingly, I have discovered on my filesystem a bunch of stuff I
> downloaded from AOB's site a few years ago; named PlainTextFile_9.dat,
> it contains the single word `Milestone', which suggests that AOB has
> taken three years or more to get from "create example data" to "publish
> verbose log output from program run".

My squashfs archive of shuttlepads that I held onto also contains a
PlainTextFile_9.dat, in a subdirectory "dat", with a date of March 10,
2015.

The oldest file in the batch are the set
PlainTextFile_[1|100|1000|4000|10000].dat each dated Nov 22, 2008.

So he's been using this same single word file since at least 2015,
assuming the timestamps inside the squashfs are accurate.

wizzofozz

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Nov 11, 2021, 5:13:38 PM11/11/21
to
Op 11-11-2021 om 21:47 schreef Richard Heathfield:
> On 11/11/2021 20:41, wizzofozz wrote:
>>
>> We can also slim down the running time.
>
> While performance is certainly one of AOB's (many) problems, he would do
> better to tackle the biggest problem first, and by far the biggest
> problem is the binding of the key to the code. Until he splits out the
> key to a file read in at runtime, his cipher will continue to be
> unusable even by the most accommodating and unsecurity-conscious Alices
> and Bobs of this world.
>

You're right, but up to now he has ignored that advice while it has been
given to him many times. I figured I'd try something new. And I wanted
to show off my solution ;-)

Ozz

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 12, 2021, 2:27:10 AM11/12/21
to
On 11/11/2021 22:13, wizzofozz wrote:
> Op 11-11-2021 om 21:47 schreef Richard Heathfield:
>> On 11/11/2021 20:41, wizzofozz wrote:
>>>
>>> We can also slim down the running time.
>>
>> While performance is certainly one of AOB's (many) problems, he would
>> do better to tackle the biggest problem first, and by far the biggest
>> problem is the binding of the key to the code. Until he splits out the
>> key to a file read in at runtime, his cipher will continue to be
>> unusable even by the most accommodating and unsecurity-conscious
>> Alices and Bobs of this world.
>>
>
> You're right,

Actually... no, I'm not.

> but up to now he has ignored that advice

THAT is his biggest problem.

austin obyrne

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Nov 12, 2021, 7:02:29 AM11/12/21
to
On Thursday, 11 November 2021 at 14:12:47 UTC, austin obyrne wrote:
> I have uploaded a demonstration of my ASLEC cipher at work.
> Please go to https://www.aslec.uk and double left click on any
> of the leader pages in the Downloads and Appendices sections.
>
> I have also included an example of my cipher encrypting the
> single word ‘ milestone ‘ as a working example for your perusal.
>
> This version of my cipher is fully annotated and is intended more
> as a simple demonstration. The working version has no such help
> of course and slims down a lot as one would expect.
>
> I have used the Ada-95 edition of the Ada computer language in
> all of this encryption.
>
> Enjoy.
>
> Austin O’Byrne

There seems to a misunderstanding about how the
keys that the entities use are deployed. There are
thousands of key in the entities' mutual databases
and the onus is on Alice and Bob to keep their stuff
safe from ordinary theft and from electronic theft.

For a start the ready-use arrays of key material are
volatile and empty out completely when a computer
is shut down.

The arrays are loaded up at run time only. The entities
are assumed to be wise enough to store the key material
on free-standing computers or other when they are not in use.

The arrays of keys are loaded up at runtime only.

The entities are assuned to be wise enoghto take all precautions.

AOB

Richard Heathfield

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Nov 12, 2021, 7:24:42 AM11/12/21
to
On 12/11/2021 12:02, austin obyrne wrote:

<snip>

> There seems to a misunderstanding about how the
> keys that the entities use are deployed. There are
> thousands of key in the entities' mutual databases

A bank will use those up in a New York minute. So will a social media
site. So will an army.

So what happens when they run out?

It matters because:

1) your cipher is trivially decryptable if multiple messages are sent
using the same key;
2) your keys are huge (over 14,000 lines of code per key, each line
being 31 bytes according to your recent post, making 420KB per key.
3) changing a key requires editing and recompiling source code, a skill
most people don't have.

Not even the OTP (which is far more secure than your cipher but is
normally overlooked because of key difficulties) has as many key
problems as ASLEC does.
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