CNN says that helium is flammable

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Dänk 42Ø

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Oct 29, 2015, 2:31:38 AM10/29/15
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CNN has been milking the blimp story all day. So now I'm watching
"The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer", timestamped 17:11 EDT, and
Wolf asks correspondent Brian Todd about the fear surrounding the
helium in the balloon.

Wolf says, "It just went up into the sky and there was fear it could
have exploded. There's helium inside, right?" Brian responds,
"That's right. There was certainly a concern, uh, for a period of
hours here, Wolf, just to show you some of the other images of the
JLEN. A NORAD official we spoke to says helium, of course, has a
flammable quality to it, but he says the JLEN is pressurized inside
it. He says that pressure dissipates -- as that pressure
dissipates -- the flammability decreases. He says he does not
believe there were any explosions, any punctures -- or serious
punctures at least -- no explosions associated with the grounding
of this.

So when did helium become flammable? In fact, it is one of the
most inert elements, a member of the "noble" gas category of
chemical elements. Does CNN only hire "journalists" who flunked
basic junior high skool science class? Who is this NORAD official
who allegedly told CNN that helium is flammable, and why is he
is he in charge of military systems that can launch a nukular
attack?

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/28/politics/loose-blimp-norad-east-coast/index.html

Matt

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Oct 29, 2015, 6:30:59 PM10/29/15
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=?UTF-8?B?RMOkbmsgNDLDmA==?= <middlef...@ifyoudontgiveafuck.org>
wrote in news:HbOdnT8sxbrUIKzL...@earthlink.com:
Apparently, you've never heard of Heliox, used for a variety of things,
most notably scuba diving.

Yes, so-called "inert" gases can be made to mix with things. Perhaps you
should get past your religious school upbringing and learn science.
While He itself is not flammable, when mixed with oxygen it can
accelerate combustion in other materials.

I suppose Xenon can't be combined with anything either. Or Neon.

Matt

Thomas Heger

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Oct 30, 2015, 2:34:52 AM10/30/15
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Am 29.10.2015 23:28, schrieb Matt:
> So when did helium become flammable? In fact, it is one of the
>> most inert elements, a member of the "noble" gas category of
>> chemical elements. Does CNN only hire "journalists" who flunked
>> basic junior high skool science class? Who is this NORAD official
>> who allegedly told CNN that helium is flammable, and why is he
>> is he in charge of military systems that can launch a nukular
>> attack?

Actually 'they' just try to figure out, whether or not the 'sheeple' are
sufficiently sedated.

Otherwise 'they' would spray a little more 'stuff' or alter the
tv-programm to the deep-sleep-mode.

Since you question such elementary knowledge as exploding helium, you
are NOT sedated enough.

THAT WILL CHANGE SOON!
(stay at home and await further orders)


TH

Matt

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Oct 30, 2015, 7:19:43 AM10/30/15
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Thomas Heger <ttt...@web.de> wrote in news:d9ghc9Fqah8U1
@mid.individual.net:
<gulp> Yes sir! Awaiting reprogramming sir!

Matt

Dänk 42Ø

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Oct 30, 2015, 4:34:52 PM10/30/15
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On 10/29/2015 10:28 PM, Matt wrote:
> =?UTF-8?B?RMOkbmsgNDLDmA==?= <middlef...@ifyoudontgiveafuck.org>
> wrote in news:HbOdnT8sxbrUIKzL...@earthlink.com:
>> So when did helium become flammable? In fact, it is one of the
>> most inert elements, a member of the "noble" gas category of
>> chemical elements. Does CNN only hire "journalists" who flunked
>> basic junior high skool science class? Who is this NORAD official
>> who allegedly told CNN that helium is flammable, and why is he
>> is he in charge of military systems that can launch a nukular
>> attack?
>
> Apparently, you've never heard of Heliox, used for a variety of things,
> most notably scuba diving.

Heliox is a mixture of helium and oxygen, not a molecule.


> Yes, so-called "inert" gases can be made to mix with things. Perhaps you
> should get past your religious school upbringing and learn science.
> While He itself is not flammable, when mixed with oxygen it can
> accelerate combustion in other materials.
>
> I suppose Xenon can't be combined with anything either. Or Neon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium

"Helium has a valence of zero and is chemically unreactive under all
normal conditions. It is an electrical insulator unless ionized...
Helium can form unstable compounds, known as excimers, with tungsten,
iodine, fluorine, sulfur and phosphorus when it is subjected to a
glow discharge, to electron bombardment, or else is a plasma for
another reason."


https://www.google.com/patents/US6935433

Helium gas total flood fire suppression system
US 6935433 B2

Abstract

The invention provides systems and methods adaptable to all gaseous
agents including Helium to suppress fire in at least one enclosed space.


Matt

unread,
Oct 31, 2015, 8:17:06 AM10/31/15
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=?UTF-8?B?RMOkbmsgNDLDmA==?= <middlef...@ifyoudontgiveafuck.org>
wrote in news:iqqdnWzuWsL3Sa7L...@earthlink.com:

> On 10/29/2015 10:28 PM, Matt wrote:
>> =?UTF-8?B?RMOkbmsgNDLDmA==?= <middlef...@ifyoudontgiveafuck.org>
>> wrote in news:HbOdnT8sxbrUIKzL...@earthlink.com:
>>> So when did helium become flammable? In fact, it is one of the
>>> most inert elements, a member of the "noble" gas category of
>>> chemical elements. Does CNN only hire "journalists" who flunked
>>> basic junior high skool science class? Who is this NORAD official
>>> who allegedly told CNN that helium is flammable, and why is he
>>> is he in charge of military systems that can launch a nukular
>>> attack?
>>
>> Apparently, you've never heard of Heliox, used for a variety of
things,
>> most notably scuba diving.
>
> Heliox is a mixture of helium and oxygen, not a molecule.

Um, ok. Not that the stuff in "helium" balloons is pure helium either.

>
>
>> Yes, so-called "inert" gases can be made to mix with things. Perhaps
you
>> should get past your religious school upbringing and learn science.
>> While He itself is not flammable, when mixed with oxygen it can
>> accelerate combustion in other materials.
>>
>> I suppose Xenon can't be combined with anything either. Or Neon.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium
>
> "Helium has a valence of zero and is chemically unreactive under all
> normal conditions. It is an electrical insulator unless ionized...
> Helium can form unstable compounds, known as excimers, with tungsten,
> iodine, fluorine, sulfur and phosphorus when it is subjected to a
> glow discharge, to electron bombardment, or else is a plasma for
> another reason."
>

Please note the "normal" conditions. Also note that helium, while not
itself flammable, can act as a conduit to flame.

By the way, nobody makes Helium fire suppression anymore, for a very
good reason.

Matt

Dänk 42Ø

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Oct 31, 2015, 2:41:20 PM10/31/15
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Because the price of helium has gone up dramatically in the last few
years, partly because of increased demand and partly because
congressional Republicans voted to vent the national helium
stockpile to save money during the 1990s budget cuts.

Anyway, it is unlikely there would have been a "glow discharge" around
the blimp, and unlikely there would have been any fluorine, sulfur, etc.
around. This was pure sensationalist crap from CNN, which has become
as reliable a source of information as those ancient aliens and bigfoot
shows on the History Channel.



Matt

unread,
Oct 31, 2015, 5:20:44 PM10/31/15
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=?UTF-8?B?RMOkbmsgNDLDmA==?= <middlef...@ifyoudontgiveafuck.org>
wrote in news:A96dnevmI-HNlqjL...@earthlink.com:
There are quite a few other reasons. Helium isn't the greatest stuff to
have around.

>
> Anyway, it is unlikely there would have been a "glow discharge" around
> the blimp, and unlikely there would have been any fluorine, sulfur,
etc.
> around. This was pure sensationalist crap from CNN, which has become
> as reliable a source of information as those ancient aliens and
bigfoot
> shows on the History Channel.

Unlikely? Sure. But possible? Yes. Which was the whole point. Grade
school science isn't a good way to make decisions. Sorta like the whole
"blue eyes are dominant" thing, those that believe things that are not
entirely true scare me.

Matt
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