fluid of negative mass

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Jacob Navia

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Nov 28, 2021, 3:19:57 PM11/28/21
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[[Mod. note -- Lines rewrapped -- jt]]

arXiv:1712.07962v2 [physics.gen-ph] 26 Oct 2018
ABSTRACT
Dark energy and dark matter constitute 95% of the observable Universe.
Yet the physical nature of these two phenomena remains a mystery.
Einstein suggested a long-forgotten solution: gravitationally
repulsive negative masses, which drive cosmic expansion and cannot
coalesce into light-emitting structures. However, contemporary
cosmological results are derived upon the reasonable assumption
that the Universe only contains positive masses. By reconsidering
this assumption, I have constructed a toy model which suggests that
both dark phenomena can be unified into a single negative mass
fluid. The model is a modified Lambda-CDM cosmology, and indicates
that continuously-created negative masses can resemble the cosmological
constant and can flatten the rotation curves of galaxies. The model
leads to a cyclic universe with a time-variable Hubble parameter,
potentially providing compatibility with the current tension that
is emerging in cosmological measurements. In the first three-dimensional
N-body simulations of negative mass matter in the scientific
literature, this exotic material naturally forms haloes around
galaxies that extend to several galactic radii. These haloes are
not cuspy. The proposed cosmological model is therefore able to
predict the observed distribution of dark matter in galaxies from
first principles. The model makes several testable predictions and
seems to have the potential to be consistent with observational
evidence from distant supernovae, the cosmic microwave background,
and galaxy clusters. These findings may imply that negative masses
are a real and physical aspect of our Universe, or alternatively
may imply the existence of a superseding theory that in some limit
can be modelled by effective negative masses. Both cases lead to the
surprising conclusion that the compelling puzzle of the dark Universe
may have been due to a simple sign error.

Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)

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Nov 29, 2021, 2:20:01 PM11/29/21
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In article <9d1f6a5a-c853-4577...@googlegroups.com>, Jaco=
b Navia <jacob...@gmail.com> writes:
> [[Mod. note -- Lines rewrapped -- jt]]
>=20
> arXiv:1712.07962v2 [physics.gen-ph] 26 Oct 2018
> ABSTRACT
> Dark energy and dark matter constitute 95% of the observable Universe=
.
> Yet the physical nature of these two phenomena remains a mystery.
> Einstein suggested a long-forgotten solution: gravitationally
> repulsive negative masses, which drive cosmic expansion and cannot
> coalesce into light-emitting structures. However, contemporary
> cosmological results are derived upon the reasonable assumption
> that the Universe only contains positive masses. By reconsidering
> this assumption, I have constructed a toy model which suggests that
> both dark phenomena can be unified into a single negative mass
> fluid. The model is a modified Lambda-CDM cosmology, and indicates
> that continuously-created negative masses can resemble the cosmologic=
al
> constant and can flatten the rotation curves of galaxies. The model
> leads to a cyclic universe with a time-variable Hubble parameter,
> potentially providing compatibility with the current tension that
> is emerging in cosmological measurements. In the first three-dimensio=
nal
> N-body simulations of negative mass matter in the scientific
> literature, this exotic material naturally forms haloes around
> galaxies that extend to several galactic radii. These haloes are
> not cuspy. The proposed cosmological model is therefore able to
> predict the observed distribution of dark matter in galaxies from
> first principles. The model makes several testable predictions and
> seems to have the potential to be consistent with observational
> evidence from distant supernovae, the cosmic microwave background,
> and galaxy clusters. These findings may imply that negative masses
> are a real and physical aspect of our Universe, or alternatively
> may imply the existence of a superseding theory that in some limit
> can be modelled by effective negative masses. Both cases lead to the
> surprising conclusion that the compelling puzzle of the dark Universe
> may have been due to a simple sign error.

There was much discussion when that came out a few years ago. Suffice=20
it to say that he has convinced practically no-one and many people have=20
pointed out deficiencies in the idea.

Although arXiv is certainly not always right, in many cases astrophysics=20
papers are in the gen-ph rather than astro-ph category if arXiv thinks=20
that they are not very good. Now arXiv is not always right, and their=20
decisions in such cases are very obscure, but look at what is in gen-ph=20
and compare it to astro-ph and draw your own conclusions.

Phillip Helbig (undress to reply)

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Nov 29, 2021, 2:20:17 PM11/29/21
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There is a good summary here:

http://backreaction.blogspot.com/2018/12/no-negative-masses-have-not.html

(As usual, the comments can be hit and miss.)
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