Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds?

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Primum Sapienti

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Jun 20, 2021, 11:07:00 PM6/20/21
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ALL of them.
Message has been deleted

littor...@gmail.com

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Jun 21, 2021, 5:41:30 AM6/21/21
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"Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds?"

Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.


Human ancestors were probably never fully aquatic, although our early-Pleistocene ancestors might often have slept floating on the water surface.

Hominoid, hominid & Homo evolution leaves no doubt:
0) early primates: arboreal
1) Mio-Pliocene hominoids & hominids: aquarboreal
2) early-Pleistocene archaic Homo: littoral
3) late-Pleistocene H.sapiens: predom.BP.wading
4) H.sapiens today: BP.walking

Google
"aquarboreal"
"coastal dispersal Pleistocene Homo PPT"



DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Jun 21, 2021, 8:21:02 AM6/21/21
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On Monday, June 21, 2021 at 5:41:30 AM UTC-4, littor...@gmail.com wrote:
> "Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds?"
>
> Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
> probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.
>
>
> Human ancestors were probably never fully aquatic, although our early-Pleistocene ancestors might often have slept floating on the water surface.

Unlike all primates, anthropoids, hominoids, humans. Mermaids!! Biology???? Pseudoscience!!!!

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Jun 21, 2021, 8:41:05 AM6/21/21
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mandag den 21. juni 2021 kl. 05.07.00 UTC+2 skrev Primum Sapienti:
> ALL of them.

'Cause they don't descend from brachiating apes from long gone Eurasian jungles around the Tethys Sea and the Mediterranean.
The dexterous simian forelimbs that have adapted to grab food, carry young and generally interact with the surroundings originally evolved from grabbing branches in the canopies, and as a somewhat odd exaptation the interacting forelimbs turn all simian species vertically bipedal when wading through shallow water.
So it's an ape/monkey-adapting-to-wade-for-seafood that has turned us into a obligate biped.

littor...@gmail.com

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Jun 21, 2021, 3:36:34 PM6/21/21
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Some idiot asked:

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Jun 21, 2021, 5:44:37 PM6/21/21
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That's a good point, fully aquatic mammals are basically nonpedal. But I sort of understand the gist of the man's question, however divisive: Why in the hell are we the only semiaquatic mammal with a vertical bipedal locomotion both in and out of the water?
And I've tried to relay the likely reason why above: Because we're a tropical ape that adapted to a semiaquatic life.

littor...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2021, 6:04:46 AM6/22/21
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Op maandag 21 juni 2021 om 23:44:37 UTC+2 schreef C. H. Engelbrecht:


> > Some idiot asked: "Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds?"
> > Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
> > probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.

> That's a good point, fully aquatic mammals are basically nonpedal. But I sort of understand the gist of the man's question, however divisive: Why in the hell are we the only semiaquatic mammal with a vertical bipedal locomotion both in and out of the water?

Good question. Probably because Miocene hominoids were already vertical (Morotopithecus etc.): not for walking bipedally on land, but for climbing vertically + keeping the head above the water in the swamp/mangrove/flooded forests where they lived. Google "aquarboreal".

> And I've tried to relay the likely reason why above: Because we're a tropical ape that adapted to a semiaquatic life.

Yes. The sequence was probably:
-Mio-Pliocene hominoids: aquarboreal = orthograde
-early-Pleistocene archaic Homo: shallow-diving,
-late-Pleistocene H.sapiens: orthograde wading->walking.

Gibbons & humans are still vertical.
Gorilla & Pan knuckle-walking evolved in parallel from orthograde ancestors.

Google
"ape human evolution made easy PPT verhaegen"

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Jun 22, 2021, 6:34:42 AM6/22/21
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There is no indication that gibbon ancestors spent more than a miniscule amount of time in water. Gibbon & human lack of laryngeal air sacs plausibly show a lack of upright flotation.

littor...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2021, 9:07:47 AM6/22/21
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Op dinsdag 22 juni 2021 om 12:34:42 UTC+2 schreef DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves:


> > > > Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
> > > > probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.

> > > That's a good point, fully aquatic mammals are basically nonpedal. But I sort of understand the gist of the man's question, however divisive: Why in the hell are we the only semiaquatic mammal with a vertical bipedal locomotion both in and out of the water?

> > Good question. Probably because Miocene hominoids were already vertical (Morotopithecus etc.): not for walking bipedally on land, but for climbing vertically + keeping the head above the water in the swamp/mangrove/flooded forests where they lived. Google "aquarboreal".

> > > And I've tried to relay the likely reason why above: Because we're a tropical ape that adapted to a semiaquatic life.
> > Yes. The sequence was probably:
> > -Mio-Pliocene hominoids: aquarboreal = orthograde
> > -early-Pleistocene archaic Homo: shallow-diving,
> > -late-Pleistocene H.sapiens: orthograde wading->walking.
> > Gibbons & humans are still vertical.
> > Gorilla & Pan knuckle-walking evolved in parallel from orthograde ancestors.
> > Google
> > "ape human evolution made easy PPT verhaegen"

> There is no indication that gibbon ancestors spent more than a miniscule amount of time in water.

There are several indications that gibbon ancestors were aquarboreal.
Inform, my little boy, before trying to say something.
Google "aquarboreal".

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Jun 23, 2021, 5:57:16 PM6/23/21
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On Tuesday, June 22, 2021 at 9:07:47 AM UTC-4, littor...@gmail.com wrote:
> Op dinsdag 22 juni 2021 om 12:34:42 UTC+2 schreef DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves:
> > > > > Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
> > > > > probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.
>
> > > > That's a good point, fully aquatic mammals are basically nonpedal. But I sort of understand the gist of the man's question, however divisive: Why in the hell are we the only semiaquatic mammal with a vertical bipedal locomotion both in and out of the water?
>
> > > Good question. Probably because Miocene hominoids were already vertical (Morotopithecus etc.): not for walking bipedally on land, but for climbing vertically + keeping the head above the water in the swamp/mangrove/flooded forests where they lived. Google "aquarboreal".
>
> > > > And I've tried to relay the likely reason why above: Because we're a tropical ape that adapted to a semiaquatic life.
> > > Yes. The sequence was probably:
> > > -Mio-Pliocene hominoids: aquarboreal = orthograde
> > > -early-Pleistocene archaic Homo: shallow-diving,
> > > -late-Pleistocene H.sapiens: orthograde wading->walking.
> > > Gibbons & humans are still vertical.
> > > Gorilla & Pan knuckle-walking evolved in parallel from orthograde ancestors.
> > > Google
> > > "ape human evolution made easy PPT verhaegen"
>
> > There is no indication that gibbon ancestors spent more than a miniscule amount of time in water.
> There are several indications that gibbon ancestors were aquarboreal.

Claims are not evidence. Their subcutaneous fat & thick fur are arboreal adaptations of exposed sleeper.

littor...@gmail.com

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Jun 23, 2021, 6:23:18 PM6/23/21
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Op woensdag 23 juni 2021 om 23:57:16 UTC+2 schreef DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves:


> > > > > > Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,
> > > > > > probably the same idiots who think their ancestors ran antelopes to exhaustion on the Afr.savannas.

> > > > > That's a good point, fully aquatic mammals are basically nonpedal. But I sort of understand the gist of the man's question, however divisive: Why in the hell are we the only semiaquatic mammal with a vertical bipedal locomotion both in and out of the water?

> > > > Good question. Probably because Miocene hominoids were already vertical (Morotopithecus etc.): not for walking bipedally on land, but for climbing vertically + keeping the head above the water in the swamp/mangrove/flooded forests where they lived. Google "aquarboreal".

> > > > > And I've tried to relay the likely reason why above: Because we're a tropical ape that adapted to a semiaquatic life.

> > > > Yes. The sequence was probably:
> > > > -Mio-Pliocene hominoids: aquarboreal = orthograde
> > > > -early-Pleistocene archaic Homo: shallow-diving,
> > > > -late-Pleistocene H.sapiens: orthograde wading->walking.
> > > > Gibbons & humans are still vertical.
> > > > Gorilla & Pan knuckle-walking evolved in parallel from orthograde ancestors.
> > > > Google "ape human evolution made easy PPT verhaegen"

> > > There is no indication that gibbon ancestors spent more than a miniscule amount of time in water.

> > There are several indications that gibbon ancestors were aquarboreal.

> Claims are not evidence.

Primum Sapienti

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Jul 5, 2021, 11:01:27 PM7/5/21
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C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
> mandag den 21. juni 2021 kl. 05.07.00 UTC+2 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>> ALL of them.
>
> No, not all of them. The ones who don't have access to DHA through their diet still don't evolve large brains. Sirenians are the classic case, because they're all herbivores, and only an aquatic fauna diet contains DHA. You need to eat them fish, or in our case likely shellfish, to evolve that big brain we're so bleeding proud of.
>

I mentioned quadrupedality, not DHA.

Primum Sapienti

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Jul 5, 2021, 11:03:12 PM7/5/21
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littor...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> "Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds?"
>
> Only complete idiots believe Cetacea & Sirenia are quadrupedal,

Vestigial.



Primum Sapienti

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Oct 23, 2021, 12:56:10 AM10/23/21
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ALL of them.

Pandora

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Oct 23, 2021, 10:33:04 AM10/23/21
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On Fri, 22 Oct 2021 22:56:13 -0600, Primum Sapienti
<inva...@invalid.invalid> wrote:

>ALL of them.

They're all tetrapods, but not all quadrupeds.
Extant sirenians en cetaceans don't have hindlegs.
But in the Eocene they did:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/11676587_The_earliest_known_fully_quadrupedal_sirenian

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/11781254_Origin_of_Whales_from_Early_Artiodactyls_Hands_and_Feet_of_Eocene_Protocetidae_from_Pakistan

Notice the elongated foot in the protocetid.

littor...@gmail.com

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Oct 23, 2021, 3:34:27 PM10/23/21
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Op zaterdag 23 oktober 2021 om 16:33:04 UTC+2 schreef Pandora:


> >ALL of them.

> They're all tetrapods, but not all quadrupeds.

Yes, the poor man doesn't even know the difference between quadruped & tetrapod (etymologically the same).
Yes, plantigrady is never seen in typical cursorial tetrapods.
Only complete imbeciles believe their ancestors ran after antelopes.

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 1, 2021, 12:58:36 AM11/1/21
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Found those snorkel noses yet?

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 1, 2021, 1:20:26 AM11/1/21
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mandag den 1. november 2021 kl. 05.58.36 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
> Found those snorkel noses yet?

Why don't you go play in downtown Moscow with no mask or hand sanitizer in sight.

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 1, 2021, 1:32:30 AM11/1/21
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Why don't you take a stab at answering the question in the subject line?

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 1, 2021, 2:02:24 AM11/1/21
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Didn't work so far. You just want your daily dopamine fix.

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Nov 2, 2021, 5:49:18 AM11/2/21
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Quadrupedal aquatics, except penguins which don't wade but do endurance march.

Peter Nyikos

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Nov 4, 2021, 4:23:24 PM11/4/21
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When you wrote "aquatic," were you referring exclusively to fresh-water mammals,
as opposed to "marine = salt water animals"?

Otherwise, your question has been answered, and it now has a similar status to
"why are humans the only fully bipedal mammals"?

In case there are those who do not know: sifakas are fully bipedal primates,
and have forelimbs at least as short in proportion to their hindlimbs as those of us humans.


Peter Nyikos
Professor, Dept. of Mathematics -- standard disclaimer--
University of South Carolina
http://people.math.sc.edu/nyikos

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Nov 4, 2021, 4:45:39 PM11/4/21
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Sifakas are not aquatic, they are upright bipedal arboreal leaping lemurs with long tails.

Peter Nyikos

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Nov 4, 2021, 5:08:08 PM11/4/21
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I never suggested they were aquatic. I was making an analogy that brings us a tad closer to humans,
phylogeny-wise.


But they aren't exclusively leaping, as a remarkable picture on page 26 of
_Primates_, vol 1 of Illustrated Library of Nature, Time-Life Books, 1984 shows.

It is a photo of a sifaka vigorously striding along the ground like a human, swinging its
arms like a human might. The caption reads as follows, caps and all:

"IN MID-STRIDE a sifaka shows why it is bipedal on the ground: Its legs are long and its arms are short. It would be even more awkward for it to walk on all fours than it would be for a man."


Peter Nyikos

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Nov 4, 2021, 5:15:19 PM11/4/21
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Grasshoppers sometimes stride. Humans can walk on their hands and run quadrupedally.

The habitual behaviour is rather significant.
--
DD ~ David ~ Da'ud ~ Diode ~ ∆^¥°∆

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 4, 2021, 5:29:54 PM11/4/21
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torsdag den 4. november 2021 kl. 22.15.19 UTC+1 skrev DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves:
> Grasshoppers sometimes stride. Humans can walk on their hands and run quadrupedally.

Sure. About as much as dogs can walk bipedally.

littor...@gmail.com

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Nov 6, 2021, 6:42:11 AM11/6/21
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Op donderdag 4 november 2021 om 22:29:54 UTC+1 schreef C. H. Engelbrecht:
> torsdag den 4. november 2021 kl. 22.15.19 UTC+1 skrev DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves:

> > Grasshoppers sometimes stride. Humans can walk on their hands and run quadrupedally.

> Sure. About as much as dogs can walk bipedally.

Yes.
Some will never learn, Chris...

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 7, 2021, 9:00:12 PM11/7/21
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C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
> mandag den 1. november 2021 kl. 06.32.30 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>> C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
>>> mandag den 1. november 2021 kl. 05.58.36 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>>>> Found those snorkel noses yet?
>>>
>>> Why don't you go play in downtown Moscow with no mask or hand sanitizer in sight.
>>>
>> Why don't you take a stab at answering the question in the subject line?
>
> Didn't work so far. You just want your daily dopamine fix.

None of the AA crowd can answer the question in the subject line...

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 7, 2021, 9:01:39 PM11/7/21
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Peter Nyikos wrote:
> On Monday, November 1, 2021 at 1:32:30 AM UTC-4, Primum Sapienti wrote:
>> C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
>>> mandag den 1. november 2021 kl. 05.58.36 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>>>> Found those snorkel noses yet?
>>>
>>> Why don't you go play in downtown Moscow with no mask or hand sanitizer in sight.
>>>
>> Why don't you take a stab at answering the question in the subject line?
>
> When you wrote "aquatic," were you referring exclusively to fresh-water mammals,
> as opposed to "marine = salt water animals"?

Ask mv.

> Otherwise, your question has been answered, and it now has a similar status to
> "why are humans the only fully bipedal mammals"?

Actually, none of the aa crowd have attempted to answer.

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 7, 2021, 9:07:54 PM11/7/21
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So you can't answer the question...

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 7, 2021, 9:33:52 PM11/7/21
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Primum Sapienti

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Nov 7, 2021, 10:34:47 PM11/7/21
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Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds AND shortlimbed? Can't aa answer? No?

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 7, 2021, 10:44:06 PM11/7/21
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mandag den 8. november 2021 kl. 04.34.47 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
> Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds AND shortlimbed? Can't aa answer? No?

You keep ignoring the answer. I got better things to do than repeat myself to some fucking dopamine junkie.

https://st3.depositphotos.com/13194036/18767/i/1600/depositphotos_187673770-stock-photo-young-addicted-junkie-doing-heroin.jpg

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 15, 2021, 1:37:42 AM11/15/21
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You keep not being able to answer:
Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds AND shortlimbed?

Can't aa explain this?

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 15, 2021, 1:55:58 AM11/15/21
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Sure. Post no. 4 of this thread already did.

And now you're gonna wait a bit and then ask again. 'Cause that's really funny and then you get the pussy somehow.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonic_Males

littor...@gmail.com

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Nov 15, 2021, 10:35:47 AM11/15/21
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Op maandag 15 november 2021 om 07:55:58 UTC+1 schreef C. H. Engelbrecht

> Sure. Post no. 4 of this thread already did.
> And now you're gonna wait a bit and then ask again. 'Cause that's really funny and then you get the pussy somehow.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonic_Males

Don't waste your time with such retarded people, Chris,
they don't inform: they don't even know what "aquarboreal" means.

I Envy JTEM

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Nov 15, 2021, 6:00:09 PM11/15/21
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Primum Sapienti wrote:
> ALL of them.

Duck, duck, goose... duck, duck, goose... duck, duck, goose...



-- --

https://jtem.tumblr.com/post/667888698881458176/the-right-wing-isnt-very-warm-cozy-with-gay

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Nov 15, 2021, 7:09:39 PM11/15/21
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-
Duck-billed platypus? Quadruped. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platypus
Water mongoose? Quadruped. https://www.sanbi.org/animal-of-the-week/water-mongoose/
(hint: MAMMALS aren't avians and vice versa.)

I Envy JTEM

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Nov 16, 2021, 12:53:34 AM11/16/21
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DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves wrote:

> Duck-billed platypus? Quadruped. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platypus

Apply the same "Argument" to terrestrial animals. How many bipedal savanna species
are there?

Or should we just stick to herbivores?



-- --

https://jtem.tumblr.com/post/667963075733897216

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

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Nov 16, 2021, 6:23:08 AM11/16/21
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See topic.

I Envy JTEM

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Nov 16, 2021, 8:42:38 PM11/16/21
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DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves wrote:

> See topic.

I did. The subject line is what is referred to as a "Leading Question." It's
not seeking information it's preaching. The fact is that there are exactly
as many bipedal mammals in the African savanna nonsense as there
are in Aquatic Ape.

How many bipedal mammals in Aquatic Ape? EXACTLY THE SAME
NUMBER as in African savanna idiocy.





-- --

https://jtem.tumblr.com/post/668039603260997632

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 29, 2021, 1:29:11 AM11/29/21
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C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
> mandag den 15. november 2021 kl. 07.37.42 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>> C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
>>> mandag den 8. november 2021 kl. 04.34.47 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
>>>> Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds AND shortlimbed? Can't aa answer? No?
>>>
>>> You keep ignoring the answer. I got better things to do than repeat myself to some fucking dopamine junkie.
>>>
>>> https://st3.depositphotos.com/13194036/18767/i/1600/depositphotos_187673770-stock-photo-young-addicted-junkie-doing-heroin.jpg
>>>
>> You keep not being able to answer:
>> Why are aquatic mammals all quadrupeds AND shortlimbed?
>> Can't aa explain this?
>
> Sure. Post no. 4 of this thread already did.

4th? what are you babbling about? You're making up stuff again.

> And now you're gonna wait a bit and then ask again. 'Cause that's really funny and then you get the pussy somehow.

And now you're going to dodge again. Still waiting for that explaination...

> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonic_Males
>

Primum Sapienti

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Nov 29, 2021, 1:30:02 AM11/29/21
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Related to snorkel noses?

C. H. Engelbrecht

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Nov 29, 2021, 5:05:41 AM11/29/21
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mandag den 29. november 2021 kl. 07.30.02 UTC+1 skrev Primum Sapienti:
> Related to snorkel noses?

You're not working out of St. Petersburg, are ya?

littor...@gmail.com

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Nov 29, 2021, 6:08:30 AM11/29/21
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Op maandag 29 november 2021 om 07:30:02 UTC+1 schreef Primum Sapienti:

> Related to snorkel noses?

OI, BIG NOSE !
New Scientist 2782 p 69 Lastword 16.10.10

Why do humans evolve external noses that don’t seem to serve any useful purpose – our smelling sensors are inside the head. Our nose is vulnerable to damage, and the majority of primates and other mammals manage with relatively flat faces. Traditional explanations are that the nose protects against dry air, hot air, cold air, dusty air, whatever air, but most savannah mammals have no external noses, and polar animals such as arctic foxes or hares tend to evolve shorter extremities including flatter noses (Allen’s Rule), not larger as the Neanderthal protruding nose.

The answer isn’t so difficult if we simply consider humans like other mammals.

An external nose is seen in elephant seals, hooded seals, tapirs, elephants, swine and, among primates, in the mangrove-dwelling proboscis monkeys. Various, often mutually compatible functions, have been proposed, such as sexual display (in male hooded and elephant seals or proboscis monkeys), manipulation of food (in elephants, tapirs and swine), a snorkel (elephants, proboscis monkeys) and as a nose-closing aid during diving (in most of these animals). These mammals spend a lot of time at the margins of land and water. Possible functions of an external nose in creatures evolving into aquatic ones are obvious and match those listed above in many cases. They can initially act as a nose closure, a snorkel, to keep water out, to dig in wet soil for food, and so on. Afterwards, these external noses can also become co-opted for other functions, such as sexual display (visual as well as auditory) in hooded and elephant seals and proboscis monkeys.

But what does this have to do with human evolution?

The earliest known Homo fossils outside Africa – such as those at Mojokerto in Java and Dmanisi in Georgia – are about 1.8 million years old. The easiest way for them to have spread to other continents, and to islands such as Java, is along the coasts, and from there inland along rivers. During the glacial periods of the Pleistocene – the ice age cycles that ran from about 1.8 million to 12,000 years ago – most coasts were about 100 metres below the present-day sea level, so we don’t know whether or when Homo populations lived there. But coasts and riversides are full of shellfish and other foods that are easily collected and digested by smart, handy and tool-using “apes”, and are rich in potential brain-boosting nutrients such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

If Pleistocene Homo spread along the coasts, beachcombing, wading and diving for seafoods as Polynesian islanders still do, this could explain why Homo erectus evolved larger brains (aided by DHA) and larger noses (because of their part-time diving). This littoral intermezzo could help to explain not only why we like to have our holidays at tropical beaches, eating shrimps and coconuts, but also why we became fat and furless bipeds with long legs, flat feet, large brains and big noses.

Primum Sapienti

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Dec 13, 2021, 1:08:37 AM12/13/21
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See subject line...

Primum Sapienti

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Dec 13, 2021, 1:12:57 AM12/13/21
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littor...@gmail.com wrote:
> Op maandag 29 november 2021 om 07:30:02 UTC+1 schreef Primum Sapienti:
>
>> Related to snorkel noses?
>

OI! BIG PENIS!



https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/2/eaaq0250.full
Nasalization by Nasalis larvatus: Larger noses audiovisually advertise
conspecifics in proboscis monkeys
Science Advances 21 Feb 2018:

Abstract
Male proboscis monkeys have uniquely enlarged noses that are prominent
adornments, which may have evolved through their sexually competitive
harem group social system. Nevertheless, the ecological roles of the
signals encoded by enlarged noses remain unclear. We found significant
correlations among nose, body, and testis sizes and a clear link between
nose size and number of harem females. Therefore, there is evidence
supporting both male-male competition and female choice as causal factors
in the evolution of enlarged male noses. We also observed that nasal
enlargement systematically modifies the resonance properties of male
vocalizations, which probably encode male quality. Our results indicate
that the audiovisual contributions of enlarged male noses serve as
advertisements to females in their mate selection. This is the first
primate research to evaluate the evolutionary processes involved in
linking morphology, acoustics, and socioecology with unique masculine
characteristics.


https://www.menshealth.com/uk/sex/a36339905/bigger-penis-large-noses/
Men With Larger Noses Have Bigger Penises, According to New Study
Your beak may be giving away more than you think

BY MEN'S HEALTH 05/05/2021
Published in the medical journal Basic and Clinical Andrology, the
researchers of
the study found that men with larger noses had a ‘stretched penile length’
of at
least 5.3 inches, while men with smaller noses had a penis length of 4.1
inches
erect.

The team of researchers drew this conclusion by looking at the dead corpses of
126 men within three days of death and measured different parts of their body.
After taking into account varying factors such height, weight and measurements
of the penis (there were no links between feet size and appendage size, before
you ask), the authors of the study then worked out the "stretched penile
length"
(SPL) of each cadaver. This was measured by, and sorry to be so graphic,
by pulling
the penis up as far as it would go. Hopefully they used gloves.


https://bacandrology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12610-021-00121-z
Nose size indicates maximum penile length

Abstract
Background
In a previous report, we investigated whether the size of male genitalia
similarly
exposed to serum testosterone during aging could change with age and found
that penile length almost stopped increasing during adolescence and decreased
in older males. In this report, to determine what factors other than age
are related
to penile length, we performed a multivariate analysis of the
relationships between
stretched penile length (SPL) and other measurements of genital organs,
nose size,
height and body weight in 126 adults in their 30s–50s.


Primum Sapienti

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Dec 13, 2021, 1:13:48 AM12/13/21
to
littor...@gmail.com wrote:
> Op maandag 29 november 2021 om 07:30:02 UTC+1 schreef Primum Sapienti:
>
>> Related to snorkel noses?
>
OI, BIG PENIS !

C. H. Engelbrecht

unread,
Dec 13, 2021, 1:22:35 AM12/13/21
to
Bored, huh?

Primum Sapienti

unread,
Dec 22, 2021, 3:02:08 PM12/22/21
to
C. H. Engelbrecht wrote:
> Bored, huh?
>
Dodging,huh?

DD'eDeN aka note/nickname/alas_my_loves

unread,
Dec 22, 2021, 5:36:16 PM12/22/21
to
cuz gallileo.
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