Critical Care: First Responder Wellness, SAMHSA DTAC May 2024 Bulletin

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SAMHSA DTAC DBH

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May 10, 2024, 9:04:21 AMMay 10
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Greetings members,

Below we are sharing the content from the most recent SAMHSA DTAC Bulletin, focused on First Responder Wellness.

To subscribe directly to the Bulletin and other SAMHSA DTAC publications, click here

Please respond to this thread to share any other resources, ask questions, or share your thoughts on this topic.  

 

Critical Care: First Responder Wellness

Due to the nature of their work, first responders have a higher risk of substance misuse, some types of mental illness, and suicide. This risk can be offset if first responders are knowledgeable about stress management, signs of stress, and when it is necessary to seek help. Although evidence-based mental health and substance use disorder (behavioral health) treatments are available, first responders often do not seek help because of complex reasons including (but not limited to) lack of time, stigma, lack of knowledge, and negative experiences with mental health professionals. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, with climate change threatening personal and community health, and with the usual range of disasters continuing at their usual pace, it has never been more important or more needed to help first responders help themselves.

Resources and tools are available below to help support first responder behavioral health and resilience. Websites, online courses, and many other kinds of resources have been included.

Due to the nature of their work, first responders have a higher risk of substance misuse, some types of mental illness, and suicide. This risk can be offset if first responders are knowledgeable about stress management, signs of stress, and when it is necessary to seek help. Although evidence-based mental health and substance use disorder (behavioral health) treatments are available, first responders often do not seek help because of complex reasons including (but not limited to) lack of time, stigma, lack of knowledge, and negative experiences with mental health professionals. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, with climate change threatening personal and community health, and with the usual range of disasters continuing at their usual pace, it has never been more important or more needed to help first responders help themselves.

Resources and tools are available below to help support first responder behavioral health and resilience. Websites, online courses, and many other kinds of resources have been included.

 


First Responders and Disaster Responders Resource Portal

Survey ImageDeveloped by the SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center (DTAC), this website explores the higher risk of mental illness and substance use disorders that first responders and disaster responders face. It provides tips for deployment, stress management for responders, online trainings, SAMHSA DTAC publications for first responders, and many other resources.

The Effects of Trauma on First Responders

Survey ImageDeveloped by SAMHSA DTAC, this issue of The Dialogue focuses on first responder mental health and trauma through several articles written by first responders. Contributors include a firefighter, an emergency physician, and a critical care paramedic. Topics include self-care tips, posttraumatic stress disorder, how to handle survivor reactions, and the role of behavioral health in disaster response.

First Responders: Behavioral Health Concerns, Emergency Response, and Trauma

Survey ImageThis edition of the SAMHSA DTAC Supplemental Research Bulletin provides detailed background information on first responders and behavioral health concerns unique to this group, risk factors, and interventions to help protect the behavioral health of first responders.

A Guide to Managing Stress for Disaster Responders and First Responders

Survey ImageThis SAMHSA DTAC guide has tips and information on how to manage stress for disaster and first responders. The guide provides information on the stress cycle, managing personal crises/risk of suicide, and self-care for responders. The guide also offers resources including a crisis lifeline, a website on coping with traumatic events from the National Institute of Mental Health, and many more.


If you have any questions or if you would like additional information, please reach out to the SAMHSA DTAC team at 1-800-308-3515 or via e-mail at dt...@iqsolutions.com.

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