Is Sage suitable for writing analysis proofs?

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Meem

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May 5, 2019, 9:23:22 AM5/5/19
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Hi,

(Not sure if this is the correct forum for this question).

When I don't have access to paper and/or a large work surface (for example on a coach seat in an airplane): I try to compose my proofs using LaTeX.

So I copy the previous line -- cross out terms -- perform additional manipulations and continue till I hit a wall or finish the proof.

I'm half decent at LaTeX, but the syntax is so verbose that it becomes tiring. 

I am thinking of using a more compact representation with some possible algebraic support from the underlying system.

I've been (briefly) checking out Sage and am delighted that I can convert stuff to LaTeX.

So I guess my question has the following parts:

1. Is Sage suitable for writing proofs? 

2. Does it have any facilities to keep the arguments/steps in a proof format -- kind of like in LaTeX there is a proof typesetting option?

3. What tutorials should I look at for this type of work -- the stuff I wish to tackle first is mostly simple proofs from say an introductory course in analysis -- mostly delta/epsilon stuff.

Thanks!

David Joyner

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May 5, 2019, 10:31:39 AM5/5/19
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On Sun, May 5, 2019 at 9:23 AM Meem <memmak...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

(Not sure if this is the correct forum for this question).

When I don't have access to paper and/or a large work surface (for example on a coach seat in an airplane): I try to compose my proofs using LaTeX.

So I copy the previous line -- cross out terms -- perform additional manipulations and continue till I hit a wall or finish the proof.

I'm half decent at LaTeX, but the syntax is so verbose that it becomes tiring. 

I am thinking of using a more compact representation with some possible algebraic support from the underlying system.

I've been (briefly) checking out Sage and am delighted that I can convert stuff to LaTeX.

So I guess my question has the following parts:

1. Is Sage suitable for writing proofs? 

2. Does it have any facilities to keep the arguments/steps in a proof format -- kind of like in LaTeX there is a proof typesetting option?


Are you using sagetex? There's a manual here:

 
3. What tutorials should I look at for this type of work -- the stuff I wish to tackle first is mostly simple proofs from say an introductory course in analysis -- mostly delta/epsilon stuff.

Thanks!

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kcrisman

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May 6, 2019, 9:41:36 AM5/6/19
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On Sunday, May 5, 2019 at 10:31:39 AM UTC-4, David Joyner wrote:


On Sun, May 5, 2019 at 9:23 AM Meem <memmak...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

(Not sure if this is the correct forum for this question).

When I don't have access to paper and/or a large work surface (for example on a coach seat in an airplane): I try to compose my proofs using LaTeX.

So I copy the previous line -- cross out terms -- perform additional manipulations and continue till I hit a wall or finish the proof.

I'm half decent at LaTeX, but the syntax is so verbose that it becomes tiring. 

I am thinking of using a more compact representation with some possible algebraic support from the underlying system.

I've been (briefly) checking out Sage and am delighted that I can convert stuff to LaTeX.

So I guess my question has the following parts:

1. Is Sage suitable for writing proofs? 

2. Does it have any facilities to keep the arguments/steps in a proof format -- kind of like in LaTeX there is a proof typesetting option?



Another open-source option you may find more congenial to your needs is Lurch - http://lurchmath.org 

Meem

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May 7, 2019, 8:42:30 PM5/7/19
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I am aware of it -- let me look at in greater detail.

Thanks!


On Sunday, May 5, 2019 at 10:31:39 AM UTC-4, David Joyner wrote:
On Sun, May 5, 2019 at 9:23 AM Meem <memmak...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

(Not sure if this is the correct forum for this question).

When I don't have access to paper and/or a large work surface (for example on a coach seat in an airplane): I try to compose my proofs using LaTeX.

So I copy the previous line -- cross out terms -- perform additional manipulations and continue till I hit a wall or finish the proof.

I'm half decent at LaTeX, but the syntax is so verbose that it becomes tiring. 

I am thinking of using a more compact representation with some possible algebraic support from the underlying system.

I've been (briefly) checking out Sage and am delighted that I can convert stuff to LaTeX.

So I guess my question has the following parts:

1. Is Sage suitable for writing proofs? 

2. Does it have any facilities to keep the arguments/steps in a proof format -- kind of like in LaTeX there is a proof typesetting option?


Are you using sagetex? There's a manual here:

 
3. What tutorials should I look at for this type of work -- the stuff I wish to tackle first is mostly simple proofs from say an introductory course in analysis -- mostly delta/epsilon stuff.

Thanks!

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You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "sage-edu" group.
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Meem

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May 7, 2019, 8:42:47 PM5/7/19
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Thanks -- looks interesting

Oras P.

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May 14, 2019, 5:52:14 PM5/14/19
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You might be interested in LyX as well. It's designed for typesetting, but simplifies a lot of math expressions in LaTeX.

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